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Encyclopedia > Ksitigarbha
Ksitigarbha statue at Mt. Osore, Japan
Ksitigarbha statue at Mt. Osore, Japan
Names
Simplified Chinese: 地藏菩萨, 地藏王菩萨
Traditional Chinese: 地藏菩薩, 地藏王菩薩
Pinyin: Dìzàng Púsà, Dìzàng Wáng Púsà
Wade-Giles: Ti Tsang, Ti Tsang Wang Pu Sa
Japanese | Kanji: 地藏, 地藏王菩薩
Romaji: Jizo, Jizo-o Bosatsu
Tibetan: Sai Nyingpo
Korean romanization: Jijang-bosal
Vietnamese: Địa Tạng, Địa Tạng Vương Bồ tát

Kṣitigarbha Bodhisattva (地藏菩薩), often known by the Japanese name Jizō (地蔵) or the Chinese name Dizang (地藏 Dìzàng), is a popular Mahayana Buddhist Bodhisattva, usually depicted as a monk. The name Jizō or Dizang may be translated as "Earth Treasury", "Earth Store", "Earth Matrix", or "Earth Womb." Statue of Jizo in Osorezan, Japan -- by Jpatokal File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Statue of Jizo in Osorezan, Japan -- by Jpatokal File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Personal names in Chinese culture follow a number of conventions different from those of personal names in Western cultures. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: 简体字; Traditional Chinese: 簡體字; pinyin: jiǎntǐzì; also called 简化字/簡化字, jiǎnhuàzì) are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... It has been suggested that Pinyin method be merged into this article or section. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... Japanese writing Kanji Kana Hiragana Katakana Hentaigana Manyōgana Uses Furigana Okurigana Rōmaji Kanji (Japanese:  ) are the Chinese characters that are used in the modern Japanese logographic writing system along with hiragana (平仮名), katakana (片仮名), and the Arabic numerals. ... Japanese writing Kanji 漢字 Kana 仮名 Hiragana 平仮名 Katakana 片仮名 Uses Furigana 振り仮名 Okurigana 送り仮名 Romaji ローマ字 The title given to this article lacks diacritics because of certain technical limitations. ... The Tibetan language is spoken primarily by the Tibetan people who live across a wide area of eastern Central Asia bordering South Asia, as well as by large number of Tibetan refugees all over the world. ... The Revised Romanization of Korean (Korean: 국어의 로마자 표기법; 國語의 로마字 表記法) is the official Korean language romanization system in South Korea. ... In Buddhist thought, a bodhisattva (Pali: bodhisatta; Simplified Chinese: , Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: púsà; Japanese: 菩薩 bosatsu; Korean: ë³´ì‚´ bosal ; Tibetan changchub sempa (byang-chub sems-dpa); Vietnamese: Bồ Tát; Thai: พระโพธิสัตว์) is a being who is dedicated to assisting all sentient beings in achieving complete Buddhahood. ... Relief image of the bodhisattva Kuan Yin from Mt. ... Buddhism is a dharmic, non-theistic religion, which is also a philosophy and a system of psychology[]. Buddhism is also known as Buddha Dharma or Dhamma, which means the teachings of the Awakened One in Sanskrit and Pali, the languages of ancient Buddhist texts. ... In Buddhist thought, a bodhisattva (Pali: bodhisatta; Simplified Chinese: , Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: púsà; Japanese: 菩薩 bosatsu; Korean: ë³´ì‚´ bosal ; Tibetan changchub sempa (byang-chub sems-dpa); Vietnamese: Bồ Tát; Thai: พระโพธิสัตว์) is a being who is dedicated to assisting all sentient beings in achieving complete Buddhahood. ...


Kṣitigarbha Bodhisattva is often referred to, because of his vow to not achieve Buddhahood until all hells are vacated, as the Bodhisattva of the Hell beings. His famous vow recited by many Buddhists is "Not until the hells are emptied will I become a Buddha; Not until all beings are saved will I certify to Bodhi." Bodhi (Pali and Sanskrit. ... Bodhi, the Pāli and Sanskrit word for awakening or enlightenment, is an abstract noun formed from the verbal root budh (awake, become aware, notice, know or understand), corresponding to the verbs bujjhati (Pāli) and bodhati or budhyate (Sanskrit). ...


Usually depicted as a monk with a nimbus around his shaved head, he carries a staff to force open the gates of hell and a flaming pearl to light up the darkness.

Contents

Overview

In Japan

In Japan, Kṣitigarbha, known as Jizō, or Ojizō-sama as he is affectionately known, is one of the most loved of all Japanese divinities. His statues are a common sight, especially by roadsides and in graveyards.


In modern (post-WW2) Japan, he is probably best known as the guardian of the souls of mizuko, the souls of stillborn, miscarried or aborted fetuses and infants who die young. In Japanese mythology, it is said that souls of mizuko are unable to cross the mythical Sanzu River on its way to the afterlife because they have not had the chance to accumulate enough good deeds and because they have made the parents suffer. It is believed that Jizō saves these souls from having to pile stones eternally on the bank of the river as penance, by hiding them from demons in his robe, and letting them hear mantras. Miscarriage or spontaneous abortion is the natural or accidental termination of a pregnancy at a stage where the embryo or the fetus is incapable of surviving, generally defined at a gestation of prior to 20 weeks. ... An abortion is the removal or expulsion of an embryo or fetus from the uterus, resulting in or caused by its death. ... A human fetus A fetus (or foetus, or fÅ“tus – see below) is a developing mammal after the embryonic stage and before birth. ... The Sanzu River (三途の川 Sanzu-no-kawa) is the Japanese Buddhist version of the River Styx. ...


Jizō statues are usually accompanied by a little pile of stones and pebbles, put there by people in the hope that it would shorten the time children have to suffer in the underworld. The statues can sometimes be seen wearing tiny children's clothing or bibs, or with toys, put there by grieving parents to help their lost ones and hoping that Jizō would specially protect them. Sometimes the offerings are put there by parents to thank Jizō for saving their children from a serious illness. Jizō's features are also commonly made more babylike in order to resemble the children he protects.


As he is the saviour of souls who have to suffer in the underworld, his statues are common in cemeteries. He is also believed to be the protective deity of travellers, and roadside statues of Jizō are a common sight in Japan. Firefighters are also under the protection of Jizō, as he can go in the midst of hell, and remain calm.


In China

Kṣitigarbha is one of the four principal bodhisattvas in Chinese Buddhism. The others are Samantabhadra, Manjusri, and Avalokitesvara. Shakyamuni Buddha teaching. ... Samantabhadra (also Viśvabhadra, 普賢 Chinese: Pǔxián; Japanese: Fugen) is the Lord of the Truth (理) in Buddhism, who represents the practice and meditation of all Buddhas. ... Statue of Manjusri (Monju) at Senkoji in Onomichi, Japan MañjuÅ›rÄ« (Ch: 文殊 Wenshu or 文殊師利 Wenshushili; Jp: Monju; Tib: Jampelyang), also written Manjushri, is the bodhisattva of keen awareness in Buddhism. ... Avalokitesvara with a 1,000 arms, part of the Dazu Stone Carvings at Mount Baoding, Dazu County, Chongqing, China. ...


At the pre-Tang Dynasty grottos in Dunhuang and Longmen, he is depicted in classical bodhisattva shape. After the Tang Dynasty, he became increasingly depicted as a monk, carrying rosaries and a staff. The Tang Dynasty (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) (18 June 618 – 4 June 907), lasting about three centuries, followed the Sui Dynasty and preceded the Song Dynasty and the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms Period in China. ... Location of Dunhuang Dunhuang (Chinese: 敦煌, also written as 燉煌 till early Qing Dynasty; pinyin: Dūnhuáng; ) is a city in Jiuquan, Gansu province, China. ... Longmen can refer to: Longmen Grottoes: a collection of Buddhist cave art in Luoyang, China. ... The Tang Dynasty (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) (18 June 618 – 4 June 907), lasting about three centuries, followed the Sui Dynasty and preceded the Song Dynasty and the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms Period in China. ... Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary Beads The Rosary (from Latin rosarium, crown of roses), an important and traditional devotion of the Catholic Church consisting of a set of prayer beads and a system of set prayers. ...


His full name in Chinese is Dayuan Dizang Wang Pusa (Traditional Chinese: 大願地藏王菩薩; Simplified Chinese: 大願地藏王菩萨; pinyin: Dàyuàn Dìzàng Wáng Púsà), or the Bodhisattva King Dizang of the Great Vow. This is a reference to his pledge, as recorded in the sutras, to take responsibility for the instruction of all souls in Heaven, Earth, and Hell, in the era between the death of Gautama Buddha and the rise of Maitreya Buddha. Because of this important role, shrines to Kṣitigarbha often occupy a central role in Chinese Buddhist temples of the Chan sect, such as at the famed Shaolin Temple. Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; also Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) refer to one of two standard Chinese character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language, officially simplified by the government of the Peoples Republic of China in an attempt to promote literacy. ... It has been suggested that Pinyin method be merged into this article or section. ... SÅ«tra (sex) (Sanskrit) or Sutta (Pāli) literally means a rope or thread that holds things together, and more metaphorically refers to an aphorism (or line, rule, formula), or a collection of such aphorisms in the form of a manual. ... Heaven is a concept found in many religions or spiritual philosophies, typically described as the Holiest place, accessible according to standards of divinity (goodness, etc. ... Adjectives: Terrestrial, Terran, Telluric, Tellurian, Earthly Atmosphere Surface pressure: 101. ... Medieval illustration of Hell in the Hortus deliciarum manuscript of Herrad of Landsberg (about 1180) A hell, according to many religious beliefs, is an afterlife of suffering where the wicked or unrighteous dead are punished. ... Standing Buddha sculpture, ancient region of Gandhara, northern Pakistan, 1st century CE, Musée Guimet. ... In Buddhism, Maitreya Buddha is the future Buddha. ... Chán is the Chinese name for the school of Mahāyāna Buddhism known in Japanese as Zen. ... The Shaolin temples (少林寺; pinyin: Shàolín Sì, Wade-Giles: Shao-lin Ssŭ) are a group of Chinese Buddhist monasteries famed for their long association with Chán (Japanese Zen) Buddhism and martial arts. ...


Jiuhua Mountain in Anhui is regarded as Kṣitigarbha's seat. It is one of the four great Buddhist mountains of China, and at one time housed more than 300 temples. Today, 95 of these are open to the public. The mountain is a popular destination for pilgrims offering dedications to Kṣitigarbha. Jiuhuashan is one amongst the four holiest mountains of China associated with Buddha. ... Anhui (Chinese: 安徽; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: An-hui; Postal System Pinyin: Ngan-hui, Anhwei or An-hwei) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


In some areas, the admixture of traditional religions has led to Kṣitigarbha being also regarded as a Taoist deity. For example, in Taiwan, followers of Buddhism, Taoism or folk religion can be found venerating Kṣitigarbha, where he is often appealed to for protection against earthquakes. There, and in Hong Kong and among Overseas Chinese communities, his images are usually found in the memorial halls of Buddhist and Taoist temples. For other uses of the words tao and dao, see Dao (disambiguation). ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998. ... Overseas Chinese are Chinese people who live outside China. ...


History

The history of Kṣitigarbha is well described in the Sutra of The Great Vows of Kṣitigarbha Bodhisattva, one of the most popular Mahayana Buddhist sutras. This sutra is said to have been spoken by the Buddha towards the end of his life to the beings of the Trāyastriṃśa Heaven as a mark of gratitude and remembrance for his beloved mother, Māyādevī. It stated that Kṣitigarbha practiced filial piety as a mortal, which eventually led to making great vows to save all sentient beings. The Sutra of The Great Vows of Ksitigarbha Bodhisattva (Chn. ... Relief image of the bodhisattva Guan Yin from Mt. ... The Trāyastriṃśa (Sanskrit; Pāli Tāvatiṃsa) heaven is an important world of the devas in Buddhist cosmology. ... Queen Mayas white elephant dream, and the conception of the Buddha. ... Filial piety is extended into the afterlife. ...


As Sacred Girl

In the Kṣitigarbha Sutra, the Buddha revealed that in the distant past aeons, Kṣitigarbha was a Brahman maiden by the name of Sacred Girl. She was deeply troubled when her mother died, because she had often been slanderous towards the Triple Gem. Brahman (Devanagari: ब्रह्म ) in the Vedantic schools of Hindu philosophy, is the signifying name given to the concept of the unchanging, infinite, immanent and transcendent reality of all things in this universe. ... The Triratna or Three Jewels symbol, on a Buddha footprint. ...


To save her from the great tortures of hell, the young girl sold whatever she had and used the money to buy offerings which she offered daily to the Buddha of her time, known as The Buddha of Flower of Meditation and Enlightenment. She made fervent prayers that her mother be spared of the pains of hell and requested the Buddha for help. Naraka (Sanskrit) or Niraya (Pāli) (Ch: 地獄 Dì Yù, Jp: Jigoku, Tib: ) is the name given to one of the worlds of greatest suffering in Buddhist cosmology. ...


One day at the temple, while she was pleading for help, she heard the voice of the Buddha advising her to go home immediately and there to sit down and recite his name if she wanted to know where her mother was. She did as she was told and while doing so, her consciousness was transported to a Hell Realm where she met a guardian who informed her that through her fervent prayers and pious offerings, her mother had accumulated much merits and therefore, she had already been released from hell and ascended to heaven. She was greatly relieved and should have been extremely happy, but the sights of the great sufferings in Hell that she had witnessed so touched her tender heart that she made a vow to do her very best to relieve beings of their sufferings forever in her future lives of kalpas to come. A kalpa is a Sanskrit word meaning an aeon, or a long period of time in Hindu and Buddhist cosmology. ...


As a Bhikkhu

There is another legend talking about how Kṣitigarbha was supposedly seen in China. A Buddhist Monk in Sri Lanka In Pāli, a bhikkhu (male) or bhikkhuni (female) is a fully ordained Buddhist monk. ...


In the Eastern Han dynasty, during the reign of Emperor Ming, Buddhism started to flourish, reaching its peak in the era of the Tang Dynasty, eventually spreading to Japan and Korea. At the time, monks and scholars arrived from those countries to seek the Dharma in China. One of these pilgrims was a former prince of Korea, which was at the time divided into three countries (Silla, Goguryeo and Baekje). The bhikkhu, whose Korean name was Kim Kiao Kak (Ch: Jin Qiaojue) was a prince from Silla who became a monastic under the name of Earth Store (Dizang). He came to the region of Anhui to Mount Jiuhua. After ascending, he decided to build a hut in a deep mountain area so that he may be able to cultivate. The Han Dynasty (Traditional Chinese characters: 漢朝, Simplified Chinese characters: 汉朝, pinyin Hàncháo 202 BC - AD 220) followed the Qin Dynasty and preceded the Three Kingdoms in China. ... Emperor Ming of Han, ch. ... The Tang Dynasty (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) (18 June 618 – 4 June 907), lasting about three centuries, followed the Sui Dynasty and preceded the Song Dynasty and the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms Period in China. ... Korea (Korean: 한국 or ì¡°ì„ , see below) is a geographic area, civilization, and former state situated on the Korean Peninsula in East Asia. ... Korea (Korean: 한국 or ì¡°ì„ , see below) is a geographic area, civilization, and former state situated on the Korean Peninsula in East Asia. ... The Three Kingdoms of Korea were Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla, which dominated the Korean peninsula and parts of northeastern China for much of the 1st millennium CE. The Three Kingdoms period in Korea is usually considered to run from the 1st century BCE until Sillas triumph over Goguryeo in... Silla (also spelled Shilla, traditional dates 57 BCE - 935 CE) was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. ... Three Kingdoms of Korea, at the end of the 5th century (the northern and western borders of Goguryeo are extended in some maps). ... Baekje (or Paekche) and later Nambuyeo (18 BCE – 660 CE) was a kingdom in the southwest of the Korean Peninsula. ... A Buddhist Monk in Sri Lanka In Pāli, a bhikkhu (male) or bhikkhuni (female) is a fully ordained Buddhist monk. ... Anhui (Chinese: 安徽; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: An-hui; Postal System Pinyin: Ngan-hui, Anhwei or An-hwei) is a province of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Jiuhuashan is one amongst the four holiest mountains of China associated with Buddha. ...


According to records, the bhikkhu was bitten by a poisonous snake, but did not move, thus letting the snake go. A woman happened to pass by and gave the Bhikkhu medicines to cure him of the venom, as well as a spring on her son's behalf. For a few years, the Bhikkhu continued to meditate in his hut, until one day, a scholar named Chu-Ke led a group of friends and family to visit the mountain. Noticing the bhikkhu meditating in the hut, they went and took a look at his condition. They had noticed that the bhikkhu's bowl did not contain any food, and that his hair had grown back.


Feeling pity on the bhikkhu, Scholar Chu decided to build a temple as an offering to the monk. The whole group descended the mountain immediately to discuss plans to build the temple. Mount Jiuhua was also property of a wealthy person named the elder Wen-Ke, who obliged to build a temple on his mountain. Therefore, Wen-Ke and the group ascended the mountain once more and asked the bhikkhu how much land he needed. A woman at over 90 years. ...


The bhikkhu replied that he needed a piece of land that could be covered fully by his kasaya. Bewildered that a piece of sash could not be enough land to build a temple, the Bhikṣu surprised them as he threw the kasaya in the air, and the robe expanded in size, covering the entire mountain! Elder Wen-Ke had then decided to renounce the entire mountain to the Bhikṣu, and became the bhikkhu's protector. Sometime later, Wen-Ke's son also left the home life to start his life as a bhikkhu. Kesa ) (or kasaya in Sanskrit) are robes of buddhist monks. ...


The bhikkhu lived in Mount Jiuhua for seventy five years before passing away at the age of ninety-nine. Three years after his nirvana, his tomb was opened, only to reveal that the body had not decayed. Because the bhikkhu led his wayplace with much difficulty, most people had the intuition to believe that he was indeed the transformation body of Kṣitigarbha. (Devanagari , Pali: Nibbāna निब्बान -- Chinese: 涅槃; Pinyin: nièpán, Japanese: 涅槃, nehan, Korean: ì—´ë°˜, yeol-bhan, Thai: Nibpan นิพพาน ), is a Sanskrit word that literally means extinction (as in a candle flame) and/or extinguishing (i. ...


The well-preserved, dehydrated body may still be viewed today at the monastery he built on Mount Jiuhua. Jiuhuashan is one amongst the four holiest mountains of China associated with Buddha. ...


Iconography

Red-bibbed Jizō statues in Nikko
Red-bibbed Jizō statues in Nikko

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x1153, 654 KB) Statues of Jizo, Ganman-ga-fuchi, Nikko. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x1153, 654 KB) Statues of Jizo, Ganman-ga-fuchi, Nikko. ... This article is about Nikko the city; see Nikko (priest) for the founder of Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism. ...

Traditional iconography

In Buddhist iconography, Kṣitigarbha is typically depicted with a shaven head, dressed in a monk's simple robes (unlike most other bodhisattvas, who are dressed like Indian royalty). In his left hand, Kṣitigarbha holds a wish granting jewel; in his right hand, he holds a monk's staff called in Japanese a shakujo (錫杖) (jingle staff), which is used to alert insects and small animals of his approach, so that he will not accidentally harm them. Such a staff is traditionally carried by high ranking monks of Chinese Buddhist temples. Usually, Kṣitigarbha will sometimes be seen wearing a crown depicting the Five Dhyani Buddhas, worn by Tibetan and Chinese monks in Tantric rituals. Prince Siddhartha Gautama as a bodhisattva, before becoming a Buddha. ... Shakujo A Shakujo (錫杖)is a Japanese Buddhist ringed staff. ... In Vajrayana Buddhism, the Five Dhyani Buddhas (Dhyani Skt. ... Tantra (Sanskrit: weave), tantric yoga or tantrism is any of several esoteric traditions rooted in the religions of India. ...


In Japan, Kṣitigarbha is almost always depicted in a standing position; the posture of the adjacent picture is rather unusual.


Like other Bodhisattvas, Kṣitigarbha usually is seen standing upon a lotus base, symbolizing his release from the karmic wheel of rebirth. Kṣitigarbha's face and head are also idealized, featuring the third eye, elongated ears and the other standard attributes of an enlightened being. Karma (Sanskrit karman) or Kamma (Pāli) means action or doing; whatever one does, says, or thinks is a karma. ... 17th century representation of the third eye connection to the higher worlds by alchemist Robert Fludd. ... Bodhi (Pali and Sanskrit. ...


Misconceptions

It should be made clear that Kṣitigarbha is not the judge of Hell, Yama, which many uninformed Buddhists, Taoists, and those who believe in Chinese folk religion, see Kṣitigarbha as. Tibetan Dharmapala at the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois Yama is the name of the Buddhist god and judge of the dead, who presides over the Buddhist Narakas (Pāli: Nirayas), Hells or Purgatories. Although ultimately based on the god Yama of the Hindu Vedas, the Buddhist Yama has developed... Clothed statues of Matsu / Mazu (Chinese goddess of the Sea) Chinese folk religion comprises the religion practiced in much of China for thousands of years which included ancestor worship and drew heavily upon concepts and beings within Chinese mythology. ...


Kṣitigarbha has also often been mistaken by many uninformed Buddhists to be Xuanzang, the famous Tripitaka master of the Tang Dynasty who made the hazardous journey to the west to seek the Buddhist scriptures, and the basis for the fictional character from the Chinese novel Journey to the West. This is mainly due to the robe and the Five Buddha crown which both are seen to wear. A portrait of Xuanzang Xuanzang (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hsüan-tsang; CantoneseIPA: jyn4tsɔŋ1; CantoneseJyutping: jyun4zong1) (602-644/664) was a famous Chinese Buddhist monk. ... The Tang Dynasty (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) (18 June 618 – 4 June 907), lasting about three centuries, followed the Sui Dynasty and preceded the Song Dynasty and the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms Period in China. ... The four heroes of the story, left to right: Sun Wukong, Xuánzàng, Zhu Wuneng, and Sha Wujing. ...


Popular iconography in Japan

Little Jizō (here: Mizuko Jizô) statues at the cemetery in the Zojoji-temple in Tokyo.
Little Jizō (here: Mizuko Jizô) statues at the cemetery in the Zojoji-temple in Tokyo.

The Narihira Santosen Temple in Katsushika, Tokyo contains the famous "Bound Jizo" of Ōoka Tadasuke fame, dating from the Edo Period. When petitions are requested before the Jizō, the petitioner ties a rope about the statue. When the wish is granted, the petitioner unties the rope. At the new year, the ropes of the ungranted wishes are cut by the temple priest. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1019 KB) Description: Zojoji-Temple in Minato, Tokyo. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1019 KB) Description: Zojoji-Temple in Minato, Tokyo. ... Tokyo Tower rises above the Great Gate of Zojoji Sanroku-zan Zojoji (増上寺: Zōjōji) is a Buddhist temple in the Shiba neighborhood of Minato-ku in Tokyo, Japan. ...   , literally Eastern capital) is the seat of the Japanese government and the Imperial Palace, the home of the Japanese Imperial Family, and the de facto[1] capital of Japan. ... Buddhist temple in Katsushika, Tokyo, near the Yamamoto House and Mizumoto City Park. ... Katsushika (葛飾区; ku) is a special ward located in northeast Tokyo, Japan. ...   , literally Eastern capital) is the seat of the Japanese government and the Imperial Palace, the home of the Japanese Imperial Family, and the de facto[1] capital of Japan. ... Ksitigarbha statue at Mt. ... ÅŒoka Tadasuke ) (1677 - 1752) was a Japanese samurai in the service of the Tokugawa shogunate. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Edo Period. ...


Akasagarbha

Kṣitigarbha has a twin known as Ākāśagarbha (虛空藏 ;Ch. Xūkōngzàng, Jap. Kokuzo), the "Void Store". While theologically equally important, Ākāśagarbha entirely lacks the popular cult of Kṣitigarbha. Akasagarbha Bodhisattva (Chinese: 虛空藏菩薩) is one of the eight great bodhisattvas. ...

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Jizo

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Buddhist Deities: Bodhisattvas of Compassion (1114 words)
In India, Ksitigarbha, although known very early to the Mahayana sects (since the fourth century), does not appear to have enjoyed popular favour, and none of his representations can be found, either there or in South-East Asia.
Ksitigarbha, moved by compassion, is said - like all Bodhisattvas - to have made the wish to renounce the status of Buddha until the advent of Maitreya, in order to help the beings of the destinies of rebirth.
In hell, his mission is to lighten the burdens caused by previous evil actions, to secure from the judges of hell an alleviation of the fate of the condemned, and to console them.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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