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Encyclopedia > Krypton (planet)
Lara, Jor-El, and Superman on Krypton. From the cover of Superman (volume 1) #141, 1960. Art by Curt Swan.
Lara, Jor-El, and Superman on Krypton. From the cover of Superman (volume 1) #141, 1960. Art by Curt Swan.

Krypton is the fictional planet which in comic books from DC Comics is the native world of the superhero Superman. This is a magazine cover. ... This is a magazine cover. ... Lara, Jor-El, and Superman. ... Lara, Jor-El, and Superman. ... Superman, aka the Man of Steel, is a fictional character and superhero who first appeared in Action Comics #1 in 1938, and has for several decades been one of the most popular and well-known comic book icons. ... A planet is generally considered to be a relatively large mass of accreted matter in orbit around a star that is not a star itself. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... The current DC Comics logo, adopted in May 2005. ... Spider-Man, one of the best-known superheroes. ... Superman, aka the Man of Steel, is a fictional character and superhero who first appeared in Action Comics #1 in 1938, and has for several decades been one of the most popular and well-known comic book icons. ...


Named after the chemical element krypton, the planet was created by Superman creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, and was first referred to in Action Comics #1 (June 1938); the planet was given its first full-fledged appearance in Superman (volume 1) #1 (1939). A chemical element, often called simply element, is a chemical substance that cannot be divided or changed into other chemical substances by any ordinary chemical technique. ... General Name, Symbol, Number krypton, Kr, 36 Chemical series noble gases Group, Period, Block 18, 4, p Appearance colorless Atomic mass 83. ... Jerome (Jerry) Siegel (October 17, 1914 - January 28, 1996) was the co-creator of Superman, the first of the great comic book heroes and one of the most recognizable fictional characters from the 20th century. ... Joe Shuster (July 10, 1914 - July 30, 1992) was a Canadian-born artist best known for co-creating Superman with Jerry Siegel. ... Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... Superman, aka the Man of Steel, is a fictional character and superhero who first appeared in Action Comics #1 in 1938, and has for several decades been one of the most popular and well-known comic book icons. ...


Krypton no longer exists in the DC Comics universe, as it exploded as a result of highly unstable geological conditions. The entire civilization and race of Krypton perished in the explosion, except for one survivor: the baby Kal-El, who was placed in an escape rocket by his father Jor-El and sent to the planet Earth. Kal-El grew up to become Superman. In some versions of the myth, a few additional survivors, such as Krypto, Supergirl and the criminal inhabitants of the Phantom Zone, were also survivors of the cataclysm. The DC Universe (DCU) is the fictional shared setting where most of the comic stories published by DC Comics take place. ... Krypto. ... Supergirl is a DC Comics superhero, generally considered the female counterpart to Superman. ... The Phantom Zone is a fictional dimension in the Superman comic books used predominantly before the DC Comics shared universe retcon with Crisis on Infinite Earths in the 1980s. ...

Contents


History

Golden Age Krypton

In its first appearance, Krypton was only depicted at the moment of its destruction, the nature of life on Krypton being unaddressed and frankly irrelevant to Superman's adventures on contemporary Earth; the plain fact of his extraterrestrial origin was considered sufficient enough to explain his superpowered status. Eventually, Krypton was shown to have been an evolved version of Earth, older by eons and possessed of all the beneficial progress that implied (though the downside was the hint that Krypton exploded due mainly to old age). Kryptonians, though otherwise completely human, were superior both intellectually and physically to natives of Earth (further, Krypton had much heavier gravity, making them all stronger as well). They lived under the rulership of a scientific elite, in cities of delicate art-deco towers and wore costumes in the style of Alex Raymond characters. The trappings of Krypton were all rather reminiscent of the final technological utopia depicted in the H.G. Wells film Things to Come. The debut of the Superman comic strip in 1939 also delved into further details about Krypton, including introducing the idea that all Kryptonians possessed a minimal level of heightened physical abilities, including superstrength and superspeed. In the early comics' version of Krypton, Superman's parents were named "Jor-L" and "Lora" (changed to the more familiar "Jor-El" and "Lara" by the end of the 1940s). The Art Deco spire of the Chrysler Building, built 1928-1930, commemorated on a US stamp Art Deco (French: Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes) was an early twentieth century movement in the decorative arts, that also grew in influence to affect architecture, fashion and the visual... Alex Raymond (October 2, 1909- September 6, 1956) was an American comic strip artist, best known for his work on Flash Gordon. ... Utopian, in its most common and general positive meaning, refers to the human efforts to create a better, or perhaps perfect society. ... H. G. Wells at the door of his house at Sandgate Herbert George Wells (September 21, 1866 - August 13, 1946) was an English writer best known for his science fiction novels such as The War of the Worlds and The Time Machine. ... Things to Come is a 1936 science fiction film, produced by Alexander Korda and directed by William Cameron Menzies. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... Lara, Jor-El, and Superman. ... Lara, Jor-El, and Superman. ...


The Golden Age Krypton would be revised into another form almost as soon as it was defined (see Krypton in Transition below), and very few stories were written about it. However, after the introduction of DC's multiverse in the 1960s, this version of Krypton was declared to be the Krypton of the Earth-Two universe (the native dimension of DC's Golden Age characters) and its Superman. This was especially so in the late 1970s run of All-Star Comics, where Power Girl, the Earth-Two version of Supergirl, was introduced. Superman, the catalyst of the Golden Age, from Superman #14, January-February 1942. ... In DC Comics, the Multiverse is a continuity construct in which multiple fictional versions of the universe exist in the same space, separated from each other by their vibrational resonances. ... In DC Comics, the Multiverse was a continuity construct in which multiple fictional versions of the universe existed in the same space, separated from each other by their vibrational resonances. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Power Girl (real name Kara Zor-L, a. ... Supergirl is a DC Comics superhero, generally considered the female counterpart to Superman. ...


In the Golden Age, Superman was unaware initially of his true origins; in Superman (volume 1) #61, Superman discovered the existence of Krypton for the first time and learned of his Kryptonian heritage.


Krypton in transition

Over the course of the 1940s and 1950s, various alterations and additions to the makeup of Krypton were made in the comics. Among them was explaining why the natives of Krypton perished if they had possessed superpowers on their native world (as was the case in the earliest versions of Krypton outlined above). Thus, it was explained by the early 1950s that Kryptonians were powerless on their own planet, and would only gain superpowers within a lower gravity environment (versus Krypton's heavy gravity). In the early 1960s, added to this was the need to be exposed to the rays of a yellow sun (versus Krypton's red sun) to gain superpowers, with the yellow sun aspect soon gaining the much greater emphasis. Other changes to the concept of Krypton and its culture were introduced, many of which were stylistic. It has been suggested that gravitation be merged into this article or section. ... The Sun is the star at the center of our Solar system. ...


Silver Age Krypton

By the late 1950s, Krypton played an increasingly larger role in various Superman stories, with greater amounts of details given to Krypton's makeup.


In the Silver Age version of Krypton, Kryptonians made use of their advanced science to create a world where scientific inventions and research influenced much of daily life. Robots and computers were used for many tasks on Krypton, even for determining what career paths young boys and girls would take as they grew up. Scientific and technological research was highly valued on Krypton, with the ruling body of Krypton named the "Science Council."


Several stories featured characters travelling back in time to visit Krypton before its destruction; the most well known of these is probably the 1960 story "Superman's Return to Krypton," in which Superman is swept back in time to Krypton some years before its destruction. Powerless, he spends some time on the planet, where he meets his future parents-to-be and falls in love with a Kryptonian actress named Lyla Lerrol.


Superman's Kryptonian heritage was a frequent factor in Siver Age Superman comic storylines, as he was fully aware of his origins from an early age. Superman would use this knowledge for such tasks as constructing robots or observing some of Krypton's traditions. A humanoid robot playing a trumpet In practical usage, a robot is a mechanical device which can perform complex tasks either according to direct human control, partial control with human supervision, or autonomously (that is, fully under computer control). ...


The Silver Age Superman was not alone in the survival of Krypton's destruction, being joined by his cousin Supergirl, the Phantom Zone criminals, Beppo the super-monkey, Krypto the superdog, a juvenile delinquent named Dev-Em and the entire population of the city of Kandor. Supergirl is a DC Comics superhero, generally considered the female counterpart to Superman. ... The Phantom Zone is a fictional dimension in the Superman comic books used predominantly before the DC Comics shared universe retcon with Crisis on Infinite Earths in the 1980s. ... Josef Mengele Dr. Josef Mengele (March 16, 1911–February 7, 1979) was a Nazi doctor who performed experiments that were condemned as murderously sadistic on prisoners in Auschwitz. ... Krypto. ... Dev-Em is a character who appears in DC Comics. ... Kandor is the name of a fictional Kryptonian city in the Pre-Crisis DC Universe that was shrunken and stolen by the supervillain, Brainiac. ...


The terrain of this Krypton was bright and vivid, featuring such landmarks as the Scarlet Jungle, Gold Volcano and the Jewel Mountains. The Scarlet Jungle in particular contained many strange beasts and plants, such as a species of giant mole that could eat through metal. There were two consecutive capital cities on Krypton: Kandor and Kryptonopolis. The city of Kandor was shrunk by the evil android Brainiac and taken away; Kryptonopolis became the new capital of Krypton. In his first encounter with Brainiac, Superman discovered the city of Kandor preserved in a bottle. He rescued it and took it to Earth with him, vowing to someday discover a way to return the city to normal size. In the early 1980s, Kandor was enlarged, and its inhabitants left Earth to settle on a new planet named Rokyn. Genera Uropsilus Desmana Galemys Talpa Mogera Parascaptor Scaptochirus Scaptonyx Scapanulus Urotrichus Neurotrichus Scalopus Parascalops Scapanus Condylura For other meanings, see Mole (disambiguation). ... Kandor is the name of a fictional Kryptonian city in the Pre-Crisis DC Universe that was shrunken and stolen by the supervillain, Brainiac. ... The android Data, portrayed by Brent Spiner, from the TV series Star Trek: The Next Generation An android is an artificially created robot, an automaton, that resembles a human being usually both in appearance and behavior. ... Brainiac is a fictional supervillain in DC Comics, most often appearing as an opponent of Superman. ...


Krypton had two moons, but one of them was accidentally destroyed by the Kryptonian scientist Jax-Ur when he was experimenting with space travel. The disaster killed millions of inhabitants of the moon, and because of this, Jax-Ur became the first criminal to be banished to the Phantom Zone, which had been discovered by Jor-El. This disaster also prompted the Science Council of Krypton to ban space flight completely, providing another explanation of why Krypton's civilization perished with the planet. Crust composition Oxygen 43% Silicon 21% Aluminium 10% Calcium 9% Iron 9% Magnesium 5% Titanium 2% Nickel 0. ... The Phantom Zone is a fictional dimension in the Superman comic books used predominantly before the DC Comics shared universe retcon with Crisis on Infinite Earths in the 1980s. ...


Krypton exploded due to a build-up of internal pressures in its uranium core. The explosion transformed most of the matter which made up the planet into a radioactive material that became known as kryptonite, which would have various (generally adverse) effects on the few survivors of Krypton in ensuing years. Matter is commonly referred to as the substance of which physical objects are composed. ... Radioactive decay is the set of various processes by which unstable atomic nuclei (nuclides) emit subatomic particles. ... Superman, Phantom Zone criminals, and Jimmy Olsen, in front of a display of kryptonite models. ...


When the planet exploded, one entire city of Krypton survived the cataclysm. This city, named Argo City, drifted through space on an asteroid-sized fragment of Krypton, which had been transformed into kryptonite by the explosion. The super-advanced technology of its Kryptonian inhabitants gave the denizens of Argo City the ability to construct a life-sustaining dome that allowed them to survive for several years, in addition to building a lead shield that protected their city from the kryptonite radiation of their asteroid. However, the protective shield was destroyed in a meteor storm, exposing the inhabitants to the deadly radiation. One sole survivor of Argo City, Kara Zor-El, was sent to Earth by her scientist father to live with her cousin Kal-El, who had become known as Superman. Kara adjusted to her new life on Earth and became known as Supergirl. General Name, Symbol, Number lead, Pb, 82 Chemical series poor metals Group, Period, Block 14, 6, p Appearance bluish white Atomic mass 207. ... Radiation has a variety of different meanings. ... Supergirl is a DC Comics superhero, generally considered the female counterpart to Superman. ...


In 1979, a miniseries entitled The World of Krypton was published, providing a great amount of detail into Krypton's history just before its destruction, along with the life story of Jor-El himself. In the 1980s, writer Alan Moore gave a somewhat darker glimpse into the world of Krypton in his story "For The Man Who Has Everything" (in Superman Annual #11). Alan Moore Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953, in Northampton, England) is a British writer most famous for his work in comics, including the acclaimed graphic novels Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell. ...


The race of Krypton was believed by some to be linked to the alien world of Daxam, a planet whose inhabitants also had powers and abilities similar to Superman's when they were exposed to the radiation of a yellow sun. However, the Daxamites, as they were known, were highly susceptible to lead poisoning, which affected them in a manner similar to kryptonite when they came into contact with lead. One Daxamite, Mon-El, was a member of the Legion of Super-Heroes in the 30th century. While suspected, a direct link between the inhabitants of Daxam and Krypton was never established. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Lead poisoning is a condition, also known as plumbism or painters colic, caused by increased blood serum lead levels. ... Lar Gand, known also variously as Mon-El, Valor, or MOnel, is a fictional character in DC Comics universe who is affiliated with the Legion of Super-Heroes, Superboy, and later Superman. ... The Legion of Super-Heroes is a team of comic book superheroes in the future, featured in DC Comics. ...


After the 1985 miniseries Crisis on Infinite Earths, this version of Krypton was soon replaced by a newer version. Cover to Crisis on Infinite Earths #1. ...


Man of Steel Krypton

Following Crisis on Infinite Earths, which “rebooted” the history of the DC Universe and retroactively eliminated the existence of the Golden and Silver Age versions of Krypton, writer and artist John Byrne was given the task of recreating the entire Superman mythos. This rewrite was started in the 1986 Man of Steel miniseries, which addressed Krypton in both its opening and closing chapters. Krypton itself was the main subject of the late 1980s World of Krypton miniseries (not to be confused with the 1979 miniseries of the same name). This miniseries was written by Byrne and illustrated by Mike Mignola, and filled in much of Krypton's new history. Reboot, in series fiction, means to discard all previous continuity in the series and start anew. ... The DC Universe (DCU) is the fictional shared setting where most of the comic stories published by DC Comics take place. ... John Byrne John Lindley Byrne (born July 6, 1950, Walsall) is a British-born naturalised American author and artist of comic books. ... Man of Steel may refer to: The Man of Steel, a common nickname for Superman Joseph Stalins last name, roughly translated into English This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Mike Mignola is a comic book artist and writer, and he was also a cartoon artist. ...


The new Krypton was approximately the size of Earth and orbited the red sun Rao, located fifty light-years from our solar system. Over 100,000 years ago, Krypton had already developed scientific advancements far beyond those of present-day Earth, and by a few millennia past had conquered disease, learned to retard the aging process and perfected cloning; vast banks of non-sentient clones held multiple copies of each living Kryptonian so that replacement parts were always available in the case of injury. All Kryptonians were effectively immortal and eternally young, and enjoyed an idyllic and sensual existence in an arcadian paradise. However, this society was tipping towards decadence and eventually political strife resulted from the debate as to whether clones should have rights (sparked by the presence of an alien missionary). Eventually this disagreement led to open violent conflict, during which Kryptonian science was turned to warfare and several superweapons were developed and used. Among them were the devices which became known as the Eradicator and the Destroyer. Although the Eradicator's effects (altering the DNA of all Kryptonian lifeforms so that they would instantly die upon leaving the planet) were felt immediately, the Destroyer's effects were possibly more significant: by the time the Kryptonian government conceded defeat and abolished the clone banks, a terrorist faction known as Black Zero had started the Destroyer, a device intended to trigger a massively explosive chain reaction in the planet's core. At the time, it was believed that the device had been stopped before it could achieve this, but eventually it was discovered, centuries later by Jor-El, that the reaction had only been slowed to a nearly imperceptible rate and would eventually destroy the planet as intended. Earth is the third-closest planet to the Sun. ... A light year (or light-year, or lightyear), abbreviated ly, is the distance light travels in one year: about 9. ... Cloning is the process of creating an identical copy of an original. ... This page is about the fictional land of Arcadia - for the real Greek region see Arcadia, or for other uses arcadia (disambiguation) Arcadia was a concept in Greek mythology or a land untouched by human civilisation, free of war and a place of outstanding natural beauty - in this way it... In the DC Comics universe, the Eradicator is a 200,000 year old artifact and weapon. ... Space-filling model of a section of DNA molecule Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a nucleic acid that contains the genetic instructions specifying the biological development of all cellular forms of life (and most viruses). ...


In the meantime, though it had for now survived the war, Krypton was scarred deeply by it. The formerly lush garden world was burned and blasted, left mostly a lifeless desert. In direct contrast to the society that had existed prior to the Clone Wars, a sterile and emotionally dead civilization emerged. The population became isolated from one another, living in widely separated technological citadels and shunning all personal contact. Procreation became a matter of selecting compatible genetic material which would then be placed within an artificial womb called a "birthing matrix". Any attempt to contact other worlds was forbidden, and the planetary government maintained an isolationist stance forbidding space exploration of any kind. It was into this world that the young scientist Jor-El was born. By his adult years, the mysterious “Green Plague” was killing Kryptonians by the hundreds, and upon researching the matter Jor-El discovered that the cause was growing radiation produced by the planet's increasingly unstable core. Due to this process the planet itself was going to explode. Unable to convince his associates to abandon tradition and consider escape, Jor-El took the birthing matrix of his unborn son Kal-El, removed the Eradicator's planetary binding and attached a prototype interstellar propulsion system to the vessel. Just as the planet began to shake apart, he launched the matrix towards Earth, where it would open and give birth to the infant upon landing. Female internal reproductive anatomy The uterus or womb is the major female reproductive organ of most mammals, including humans. ...


A central theme of this version of the Superman mythos was that the character was to remain the last surviving remnant of Krypton. Thus, Silver Age elements such as Supergirl, Krypto and Kandor had never existed in this version (though post-Crisis versions of these elements were eventually reintroduced). The supervillain Doomsday was revealed in the 1990s as being of Kryptonian origin, though he was apparently created hundreds of thousands of years before the rise of Krypton's civilization. In the newer continuity, Superman also only became aware of his alien heritage sometime after his debut as a superhero, when a holographic program encoded into the vessel which brought him to Earth downloaded the information into his brain. Doomsday is the name of a fictional supervillain in the Superman comic book series best known for fighting Superman to the death. ...


In a late 1980s storyline, Superman traveled to the former site of Krypton, to discover that the planet was slowly reforming from the vast sphere of debris remaining. However, it would take millions of years before the planet would be solid again.


In the 1990s comic series Starman, Jack Knight became lost in time and space and landed on Krypton several years before its destruction, and met Jor-El as a young man. The story boldly implies that it was this early meeting with a Terran that led Jor-El to study other worlds, and eventually choose Earth as the target for his son's vessel. Starman VII is Jack Knight, a comic book superhero in the DC Comics universe, and a member of the Justice Society of America. ...


In an early 2000s storyline, an artificial version of the pre-Crisis Krypton was created in the Phantom Zone by Brainiac 13, a descendant of the original Brainiac who had traveled back in time to the present. It was stated to have been based on Jor-El's favorite Kryptonian historical period. The Phantom Zone is a fictional dimension in the Superman comic books used predominantly before the DC Comics shared universe retcon with Crisis on Infinite Earths in the 1980s. ... Brainiac is a fictional supervillain in DC Comics, most often appearing as an opponent of Superman. ...


Birthright Krypton

In the 2004 comic miniseries Superman: Birthright, a new retelling of Superman's origin and early years, Mark Waid depicted a Krypton with elements of various versions of Krypton, but was closer to the pre-Crisis version. It was later implied that the time-bending adventure in Superman (volume 2) #200 had rewritten history so this was now the "official" version, and later stories have held to Birthright as being the official current version of Superman's origin. Mark Waid (born March 21, 1962 in Hueytown, Alabama) is an American comic book writer. ...


Waid also made use of Superman's "S"-shield symbol in his version of Krypton. While in previous versions of the mythos, the "S" simply stood for "Superman," in Birthright, Waid presented the symbol as a Kryptonian symbol of hope.


Other media

Radio

The first non-comics version of Krypton was presented in the debut storyline of the 1940s Superman radio series.


Animation

Krypton was very briefly depicted in the first Fleischer Studios-produced Superman cartoon in the early 1940s as "a planet that burned like a green star in the distant heavens [and where] civilization was far advanced and it brought forth a race of Supermen whose mental and physical powers were developed to the absolute peak of human perfection," implying that all Kryptonians had Superman's abilities even on their own planet. The planet is seen only from a distance. Fleischer Studios, Inc. ... ...


Depictions of Krypton on both The New Adventures of Superman and Super Friends are generally similar to those of the pre-Crisis comic books. Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman was a live-action television series based on the Superman comic books. ... Super Friends is an animated series about a team of superheroes which ran from 1973 to 1985. ...


In Superman: The Animated Series, a pilot episode (later recut as a 3-part episode) depicts Krypton as being basically similar to the pre-Crisis version (it was scientifically advanced, Kal-El appeared to be about two-years-old as in the Silver Age comics, there are depictions of peculiar animals) although with elements of the Man of Steel version (such as the appearance of the characters' wardrobe). Krypton is depected at first as frigid as in the first film, but is later shown to have varrying climates. According to commentary on the DVD collection for the show's first series, some of Krypton was influenced by American artist Jack Kirby. Superman: The Animated Series is the unofficial title given to Warner Bros. ... Man of Steel may refer to: The Man of Steel, a common nickname for Superman Joseph Stalins last name, roughly translated into English This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


This version depicted the android villain Brainiac indirectly destroying Krypton through a massive sin of omission (and even deception), as the caretaking program for the planet. Later episodes have delt with this issue.


Superman: The Movie

With the release of the first feature-length Superman movie in 1978, a vastly less idyllic image of Krypton, compared to the previous comics' versions, was presented. Whereas in the comics, Krypton was colorful and bright, onscreen it was envisioned as a stark white terrain of jagged frozen plateaus, stretching broadly under heavy dark skies. The Kryptonians themselves were portrayed as being coolly cerebral, clad in stark white and treaded halls of jet black under crystalline arches. This version of Krypton was to have a strong influence on John Byrne's 1986 reimagining of the world. However, this Krypton was still presented as having a society "better" than Earth's, unlike the Krypton that Byrne envisioned. For instance, there was no death penalty on Krypton because almost all criminals were rehabilitated (the ones that were not were banished to the Phantom Zone). Superman himself thought very highly of the planet and was proud to have come from there. Also, in this version of the story, both Jor-El and Lara preserve some part of their essence on the ship that brings their child to Earth, so that on Clark Kent's eighteenth birthday, Jor-El appears to him and initiates twelve years of Kryptonian education for the youth. Christopher Reeve as the Man of Steel, Superman Superman, also known as Superman: The Movie, is a 1978 Warner Bros. ... The Phantom Zone is a fictional dimension in the Superman comic books used predominantly before the DC Comics shared universe retcon with Crisis on Infinite Earths in the 1980s. ... Superman, aka the Man of Steel, is a fictional character and superhero who first appeared in Action Comics #1 in 1938, and has for several decades been one of the most popular and well-known comic book icons. ...


Lois & Clark

This version of Krypton was somewhat similar to the version on Superman: The Movie. Highly advanced technology, but this version's Kryptonians are more loving than the Man of Steel version.


Smallville

The 2000s television series Smallville presents a version of Krypton that borrows elements from the 1978 movie version of the planet. Smallville is an American television series that debuted in 2001 on The WB Television Network. ...


See also

The following is a glossary of terms related to the fictional planet Krypton, the birthplace of Superman: All, The - Post-Crisis, The All are a collection of artifacts created by the Clerics people. ... The exploration of other worlds is one of the most enduring themes of science fiction. ...

External links

  • Supermanica: Krypton Supermanica entry on the pre-Crisis Krypton
  • Superman: Fathers Coverage of the version of Krypton shown in Superman (volume 2) #166
  • Excerpt of Superman: Birthright Superman re-imagined for the 21st century!

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