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Encyclopedia > Krazy Kat
Krazy Kat

Detail of a Sunday page in which Ignatz, disguised as a painting,

hurls a brick at Krazy Kat, who interprets it as an expression of love. Image File history File links 1937_1107_kkat_brick_500. ...

Creator(s) George Herriman
Status Ended
Syndicate(s) King Features Syndicate
Genre(s) Humor, Romance
First strip October 13, 1913
Last strip June 25, 1944

Krazy Kat is a comic strip created by George Herriman that appeared in U.S. newspapers between 1913 and 1944. It was first published in William Randolph Hearst's New York Evening Journal. Set in a dreamlike portrayal of Herriman's vacation home of Coconino County, Arizona, Krazy Kat's mixture of surrealism, innocent playfulness, and poetic language have made it a favorite of comics aficionados and art critics for more than eighty years.[1][2][3] George Herriman and some of his fans. ... King Features Syndicate is a syndication company owned by The Hearst Corporation; it distributes about 150 comic strips, newspaper columns, editorial cartoons, puzzles and games to thousands of newspapers around the world. ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... George Herriman and some of his fans. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... William Randolph Hearst (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ... The New York Journal American was a newspaper purchased by William Randolph Hearst in 1895 (at the time called the New York Morning Journal, then the New York Journal). ... Coconino County is located in the north central part of the state of Arizona. ... Yves Tanguy Indefinite Divisibility 1942 Surrealism[1] is a movement stating that the liberation of our mind, and subsequently the liberation of the individual self and society, can be achieved by exercising the imaginative faculties of the unconscious mind to the attainment of a dream-like state different from, or... Poetry (ancient Greek: poieo = create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... An art critic is normally a person who have a speciality in giving reviews mainly of the types of fine art you will find on display. Typically the art critic will go to an art exhibition where works of art are displayed in the traditional way in localities especially made...


The strip focuses on the relationship triangle between its title character, a carefree and innocent cat of indeterminate gender (referred to as both male and female), her antagonist Ignatz Mouse, and the protective police dog, Offica Bull Pupp. Krazy nurses an unrequited love for the mouse, but Ignatz despises her and constantly schemes to throw a brick at her head; for unknown reasons, Krazy takes this as a sign of affection. Offica Pupp, as Coconino County's administrator of law and order, makes it his unwavering mission to interfere with Ignatz's brick-tossing plans and lock the mouse in the county jail. Trinomial name Felis catus Linnaeus, 1758 The cat (or domestic cat, house cat) is a small carnivorous mammal. ... An antagonist is a fictional character or group of characters, or, sometimes an institution of a story who represents the opposition against which the hero(es) or protagonist(s) must contend. ... Unrequited love is love that is not reciprocated, even though reciprocation is usually deeply desired. ... An old brick wall in English bond laid with alternating courses of headers and Brick is an artificial stone made by forming clay into rectangular blocks which are hardened, either by burning in a kiln or sometimes, in warm countries, by sun-drying. ...


Despite the slapstick simplicity of the general premise, it was the detailed characterization, combined with Herriman's visual and verbal creativity, that made Krazy Kat one of the first comics to be widely praised by intellectuals and treated as serious art.[1] Gilbert Seldes, a noted art critic of the time, wrote a lengthy panegyric to the strip in 1924, calling it "the most amusing and fantastic and satisfactory work of art produced in America today."[4] Famed poet E. E. Cummings, as another Herriman admirer, wrote the introduction to the first collection of the strip in book form. In more recent years, many modern cartoonists have cited Krazy Kat as a major influence. Slapstick is a type of comedy involving exaggerated physical violence. ... Gilbert Vivian Seldes (January 3, 1893 – September 29, 1970) was an American writer and cultural critic. ... A Panegyric is a formal public speech delivered in high praise of a person or thing, a generally high studied and undiscriminating eulogy. ... E. E. Cummings Edward Estlin Cummings (October 14, 1894 – September 3, 1962), abbreviated E. E. Cummings, was an American poet, painter, essayist, and playwright. ...

Contents

Overview

An early color Saturday page in which Krazy tries to understand why Door Mouse (a minor character) is carrying around a door. Published January 21, 1922.Click image to enlarge.
An early color Saturday page in which Krazy tries to understand why Door Mouse (a minor character) is carrying around a door. Published January 21, 1922.
Click image to enlarge.

Krazy Kat takes place in a heavily stylized version of Coconino County, Arizona, with Herriman filling the page with landscapes typical of the Painted Desert.[5] These backgrounds tend to change dramatically between panels even while the characters remain stationary. A Southwestern visual style is evident throughout, with clay-shingled rooftops, trees planted in pots with designs imitating Navajo art, and references to Mexican-American culture. The descriptive passages mix whimsical and often alliterative language with a poetic sensibility ("Agathla, centuries aslumber, shivers in its sleep with splenetic splendor, and spreads abroad a seismic spasm with the supreme suavity of a vagabond volcano.").[6] Herriman was fond of experimenting with unconventional page layouts in his Sunday strips, including panels of various shapes and sizes, arranged in whatever fashion he thought would best tell the story. Image File history File links 1922_0121_krazykat_det_650. ... Image File history File links 1922_0121_krazykat_det_650. ... January 21 is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Coconino County is located in the north central part of the state of Arizona. ... Painted Desert, Arizona Painted Desert, Arizona. ... The Navajo (also Navaho) people of the southwestern United States call themselves the Diné (pronounced ), which roughly means the people. They speak the Navajo language, and many are members of the Navajo Nation, an independent government structure which manages the Navajo reservation in the Four Corners area of the United... Alliteration is a stylistic device or literary technique in which successive words (stressed syllables) begin with the same consonant sound or letter. ... El Capitan, also called Agathla by the Navajo people, is a peak in Monument Valley, Arizona, a volcanic cone over 1500 feet (457 meters) high. ...


Though the basic concept of the strip is straightforward, Herriman always found ways to tweak the formula. Sometimes, Ignatz's plans to surreptitiously lob a brick at Krazy's head succeed; other times Offica Pupp outsmarts the wily mouse and imprisons him. The interventions of Coconino County's other anthropomorphic animal residents, and even forces of nature, occasionally change the dynamic in unexpected ways. Other strips have Krazy's simple-minded or gnomic pronouncements irritating the mouse so much that he goes to seek out a brick in the final panel. Even self-referential humor is evident — in one strip, Offica Pupp, having arrested Ignatz, berates the cartoonist for not having finished drawing the jail.[7] Self-referential humor relies on a subject making light of itself in some manner. ...


Public reaction at the time was mixed; many were puzzled by its iconoclastic refusal to conform to comic strip conventions and simple gags. But publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst loved Krazy Kat, and it continued to appear in his papers throughout its run, sometimes only by his direct order.[8] William Randolph Hearst (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ...


Characters

Krazy Kat's three central characters. Left to right: Ignatz Mouse, Offica Pupp, Krazy Kat.
Krazy Kat's three central characters. Left to right: Ignatz Mouse, Offica Pupp, Krazy Kat.

Image File history File links Ignatzoffisapuppkrazy. ... Image File history File links Ignatzoffisapuppkrazy. ...

Krazy Kat

Simple-minded and curious, the strip's title character drifts through life in Coconino County without a care. Krazy's dialogue is a highly stylized argot ("A fowl konspirissy — is it pussible?")[9] phonetically evoking a mixture of English, French, Spanish, Yiddish, and other dialects, often identified as George Herriman's own native New Orleans dialect, Yat.[2] Often singing and dancing to express her eternal joy, Krazy is hopelessly in love with Ignatz and thinks that the mouse's brick-tossing is his way of returning that love. She is also completely unaware of the bitter rivalry between Ignatz and Offica Pupp and mistakes the dog's frequent imprisonment of the mouse for an innocent game of tag ("Ever times I see them two playing games togedda, Ignatz seems to be It").[10] On those occasions when Ignatz is caught before he can launch his brick, Krazy is left pining for her "l'il ainjil" and wonders where her beloved mouse has gone. Argot is primarily slang used by various groups, including but not limited to thieves and other criminals, to prevent outsiders from understanding their conversations. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Yiddish (Yid. ... Nickname: The Crescent City, The Big Easy, The City That Care Forgot, NOLA (acronym for New Orleans, LA) Location in the State of Louisiana and the United States Coordinates: Country United States State Louisiana Parish Orleans Founded 1718  - Mayor Ray Nagin (D) Area    - City  350. ... Yat refers to a unique dialect of English spoken in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...


Krazy's own gender is never made clear and appears to be fluid, varying from strip to strip. Most authors post-Herriman (beginning with E. E. Cummings) have referred to her as female,[11] but Krazy's creator was more ambiguous and even published several strips poking fun at this uncertainty.[12][13] When filmmaker Frank Capra, a fan of the strip, asked Herriman to straightforwardly define the character's sex, the cartoonist admitted that Krazy was "something like a sprite, an elf. They have no sex. So that Kat can't be a he or a she. The Kat's a spirit — a pixie — free to butt into anything."[14] E. E. Cummings Edward Estlin Cummings (October 14, 1894 – September 3, 1962), abbreviated E. E. Cummings, was an American poet, painter, essayist, and playwright. ... This article is about the film director. ...


Ignatz

Ignatz being marched off by Offica Pupp for trying to throw a brick (lower-right) at Krazy Kat. Behind the newspaper, Krazy is reading and describing aloud the very same cartoon that they're all appearing in.
Ignatz being marched off by Offica Pupp for trying to throw a brick (lower-right) at Krazy Kat. Behind the newspaper, Krazy is reading and describing aloud the very same cartoon that they're all appearing in.

Ignatz Mouse is driven to distraction by Krazy's naïveté, and nothing gives him greater joy than to toss a brick at the Kat's head. To shield his plans from the ever-vigilant (and ever-suspecting) Offica Pupp, Ignatz hides his bricks, disguises himself, or enlists the aid of willing Coconino County denizens (without making his intentions clear). Easing Ignatz's task is Krazy Kat's willingness to meet him anywhere at any appointed time, eager to receive a token of affection in the form of a brick to the head. Image File history File links Krazypanel-4-16-1922. ... Image File history File links Krazypanel-4-16-1922. ...


Offica Pupp

"Limb of Law and Arm of Order", Offica Bull Pupp (also called "Offissa" and "Offisa") always tries — and sometimes succeeds — to thwart Ignatz's designs to pelt bricks at Krazy Kat. Offica Pupp and Ignatz often try to get the better of each other even when Krazy is not directly involved, as they both enjoy seeing the other played for a fool.


Minor characters

Beyond these three, Coconino County is populated with an assortment of characters. Kolin Kelly, a dog, is a brickmaker and often Ignatz's source for projectiles, although he distrusts the mouse. Mrs. Kwakk Wakk, a duck in a pillbox hat, is a scold who frequently notices Ignatz in the course of his plotting and then informs Offica Pupp. Joe Stork, "purveyor of progeny to prince & proletarian",[15] often makes unwanted baby deliveries to various characters (in one strip, Ignatz tries to trick him into dropping a brick onto Krazy's head from above). Other characters who make semi-frequent appearances are Bum Bill Bee, a transient insect; Don Kiyote, a dignified and aristocratic Mexican coyote; Mock Duck, a clairvoyant fowl of Chinese descent who resembles a coolie and operates a cleaning establishment; and Krazy's cousins, Krazy Katbird and Krazy Katfish. A pillbox hat is a small womans hat with a flat crown and straight, upright sides. ... Punishing a common scold in the ducking stool. ... Genera See text. ... The proletariat (from Latin proles, offspring) is a term used to identify a lower social class; a member of such a class is proletarian. ... Binomial name Canis latrans Say, 1823 The coyote (Canis latrans, meaning barking dog) also prairie wolf [2]) is a member of the Canidae (dog) family and a close relative of the domestic dog. ... Coolie labourer circa 1900 in Zhenjiang, China. ...


History

Krazy Kat evolved from an earlier comic strip of Herriman's, The Dingbat Family, which started in 1910 and would later be renamed "The Family Upstairs." This comic chronicled the Dingbats' attempts to avoid the mischief of the mysterious unseen family living in the apartment above theirs and to unmask that family. Herriman would complete the cartoons about the Dingbats, and finding himself with time left over in his 8-hour work day, filled the bottom of the strip with slapstick drawings of the upstair family's mouse preying upon the Dingbats' cat.[16]

Ignatz Mouse resolves not to throw any more bricks at Krazy. Temptation follows him at every turn, and ultimately he finds a loophole to indulge his passion. Sunday, January 6, 1918.Click image to enlarge.
Ignatz Mouse resolves not to throw any more bricks at Krazy. Temptation follows him at every turn, and ultimately he finds a loophole to indulge his passion. Sunday, January 6, 1918.
Click image to enlarge.

This "basement strip" grew into something much larger than the original cartoon. It became a daily comic strip with a title (running vertically down the side of the page) on October 28, 1913 and a black and white full-page Sunday cartoon on April 23, 1916. Due to the objections of editors, who didn't think it was suitable for the comics sections, Krazy Kat originally appeared in the Hearst papers' art and drama sections.[17] Hearst himself, however, enjoyed the strip so much that he gave Herriman a lifetime contract and guaranteed the cartoonist complete creative freedom. Download high resolution version (640x736, 138 KB)Krazy Kat cartoon from Sunday, January 6, 1918, by George Herriman. ... Download high resolution version (640x736, 138 KB)Krazy Kat cartoon from Sunday, January 6, 1918, by George Herriman. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 359 days (360 in leap years) remaining. ... Year 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (114th in leap years). ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Despite its low popularity among the general public, Krazy Kat gained a wide following among intellectuals. In 1922, a jazz ballet based on the comic was produced and scored by John Alden Carpenter; though the performance played to sold-out crowds on two nights[18] and was given positive reviews in The New York Times and The New Republic,[19] it failed to boost the strip's popularity as Hearst had hoped. In addition to Seldes and Cummings, contemporary admirers of Krazy Kat included Willem de Kooning, H. L. Mencken, and Jack Kerouac.[3] More recent scholars and authors have seen the strip as reflecting the Dada movement[20] and prefiguring Postmodernism.[2][21] Jazz is a musical art form that originated in New Orleans at around the start of the 20th century. ... Painting of ballet dancers by Edgar Degas, 1872. ... John Alden Carpenter (February 28, 1876 - April 26, 1951) was a U.S. composer. ... The New York Times is a newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... For other uses, see the disambiguation section. ... Willem de Koonings Woman V (1952-53), National Gallery of Australia Willem de Kooning (April 24, 1904 – March 19, 1997) was an abstract expressionist painter, born in Rotterdam, Netherlands. ... H. L. Mencken Henry Louis Mencken (September 12, 1880 – January 29, 1956), better known as H. L. Mencken, was a twentieth-century journalist, satirist, social critic, cynic, and freethinker, known as the Sage of Baltimore and the American Nietzsche. He is often regarded as one of the most influential American... Jack Kerouac (pronounced ) (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, artist, and part of the Beat Generation. ... Cover of the first edition of the publication, Dada. ... Postmodernism is a controversial term partly because it implies that the modern historical period has ended. ...


Beginning in 1935, Krazy Kat's Sunday edition was published in full color. Though the number of newspapers carrying it dwindled in its last decade, Herriman continued to draw Krazy Kat — creating roughly 3,000 cartoons — until his death in 1944. Hearst promptly canceled the strip after the artist died, since he did not want to see a new cartoonist take over (as common practice of the time dictated).[22]


Animated adaptations

A scene from the 1930 Charles Mintz Krazy Kat cartoon, Lambs Will Gambol.
A scene from the 1930 Charles Mintz Krazy Kat cartoon, Lambs Will Gambol.

The comic strip was animated several times. The earliest Krazy Kat shorts were produced by William Randolph Hearst in 1916. They were produced under Hearst-Vitagraph News Pictorial and later the International Film Service (IFS), though Herriman was not involved. In 1920, after a two-year hiatus, the John R. Bray studio began producing a series of Krazy Kat shorts.[23] Image File history File links Mintz-krazy. ... Image File history File links Mintz-krazy. ... Lambs Will Gambol is a 1930 animated short subject produced by Charles B. Mintz, featuring Krazy Kat. ... William Randolph Hearst (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ... International Film Service was an American animation studio created to exploit the popularity of the comic strips controlled by William Randolph Hearst. ... Bray Productions was the dominant animation studio based in the United States in the years before World War I. // History The studio was founded in December of 1914 by J. R. Bray, perhaps the first studio entirely devoted to animation, and series animation at that (he was probably beaten a...


In 1925, animation pioneer Bill Nolan decided to bring Krazy to the screen again. Nolan intended to produce the series under Associated Animators, but when it dissolved, he sought distribution from Margaret J. Winkler. Unlike earlier adaptations, Nolan did not base his shorts on the characters and setting of the Herriman comic strip. Instead, the feline in Nolan's cartoons was an explicitly male cat whose design and personality both reflected Felix the Cat. This is probably due to the fact that Nolan himself was a former employee of the Pat Sullivan studio.[24] Margaret J. Winkler (or M. J. Winkler) was one of the key figures in silent animation history, having a crucial role to play in the histories of Max and Dave Fleischer, Pat Sullivan, Otto Messmer and Walt Disney. ... The famous Felix pace as seen in Oceantics (1930) Felix the Cat is a cartoon character from the silent-film era. ... Patrick Sullivan (1887 – 15 February 1933) was an Australian émigré film producer, best known for producing the first Felix the Cat silent cartoons. ...


Winkler's husband, Charles B. Mintz, slowly began assuming control of the operation. Mintz and his studio began producing the cartoons in sound beginning with 1929's Ratskin. In 1930, he moved the staff to California and ultimately changed the design of Krazy Kat. The new character bore even less resemblance to the one in the newspapers. Mintz's sound Krazy Kat was, like many other early 1930s cartoon characters, imitative of Mickey Mouse, and usually engaged in slapstick comic adventures with his look-alike girlfriend and loyal pet dog.[25] In 1936, animator Isadore Klein, with the blessing of Mintz, set to work creating the short, Lil' Ainjil, the only Mintz work that was intended to reflect Herriman's comic strip. However, Klein was "terribly disappointed" with the resulting cartoon, and the Mickey-derivative Krazy returned.[26] In 1939, Mintz became indebted to his distributor, Columbia Pictures, and subsequently sold his studio to them.[27] Under the name Screen Gems, the studio produced only one more Krazy Kat cartoon, The Mouse Exterminator in 1940.[28] Charles B. Mintz (1896 - January 4, 1940) was an American film producer and distributor, who took control over Margaret J. Winklers Winkler Pictures after marrying her in 1924. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Mickey Mouse is an Academy Award-winning comic animal cartoon character who has become an icon for The Walt Disney Company. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Screen Gems is an American subsidiary company of Sony Pictures Entertainments Columbia TriStar Motion Picture Group that has served several different purposes for its parent companies over the decades since its incorporation. ...


Gene Deitch's Rembrandt Films in Prague, Czechoslovakia (now the Czech Republic) produced Krazy Kat cartoons from 1962 to 1964, helping to introduce Herriman's cat to the baby boom generation. The Deitch shorts were made for television and have a closer connection to the comic strip; the backgrounds are drawn in a similar style, and Ignatz and Offica Pupp are both present. However, this incarnation of Krazy was made explicitly female. Jerky animation and poorly-synchronized voices are common in these Krazy Kat shorts. Jay Livingston and Ray Evans did the music for most of the episodes.[23] Gene Deitch (born August 8, 1924 in Chicago, Illinois, USA) is an American Academy-Award winning illustrator, animator and film director, based out of Prague. ... Nickname: City of a Hundred Spires Motto: Praga Caput Rei publicae Location within the Czech Republic Coordinates: Country Czech Republic Region Capital City of Prague Founded 9th century  - Mayor Pavel Bém Area    - City 496 km²  (191. ... A U.S. postage stamp depicting the increase in birthrate experienced after World War II. As is often the case with a large war, the elation of victory and large numbers of males returning to their country triggered a baby boom after the end of World War II in many... Jay Livingston (March 28, 1915 - October 17, 2001) was a partner in the composing and songwriter duo with Ray Evans, best known for the songs they composed for films. ... Raymond Bernard Evans (February 4, 1915 - February 15, 2007) was an American songwriter. ...


Legacy

In 1999, Krazy Kat was rated #1 in a Comics Journal list of the best American comics of the 20th century; the list included both comic books and comic strips.[29] In 1995, the strip was one of 20 included in the Comic Strip Classics series of commemorative U.S. postage stamps. The Comics Journal is an American magazine of news and criticism pertaining to comic books and strips, renowned for its in-depth interviews, often scathing reviews, and an editorial ethos that views comics as a fine art deserving of broader cultural respect. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... The Comic Strip Classics series of commemorative postage stamps was issued by the US Postal Service in 1995 to honor the centennial of the newspaper comic strip. ... The Common Man featured in a commemorative golden postage stamp released by the Indian Postal Service on the 150th anniversary of the Times of India - 1988 A commemorative stamp is a postage stamp issued to honor or commemorate a place, event or person. ... 48-star flag, 1957 This is a survey of the postage stamps and postal history of the United States. ...


While Chuck Jones' Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner shorts, set in a similar visual pastiche of the American Southwest, are among the most famous cartoons to draw upon Herriman's work,[21] Krazy Kat has continued to inspire artists and cartoonists to the present day. Patrick McDonnell, creator of the current strip Mutts and co-author of Krazy Kat: The Comic Art of George Herriman, cites it as his "foremost influence."[30] Bill Watterson of Calvin and Hobbes fame named Krazy Kat among his three major influences (along with Peanuts and Pogo).[31] Watterson would revive Herriman's practice of employing varied, unpredictable panel layouts in his Sunday strips. Charles M. Schulz[32] and Will Eisner[33] both said that they were drawn towards cartooning partly because of the impact Krazy Kat made on them in their formative years. Charles Martin Chuck Jones (September 21, 1912–February 22, 2002) was an American animator, cartoon artist, screenwriter, producer, and director of animated films, most memorably of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts for the Warner Brothers cartoon studio. ... To Beep or Not to Beep Wile E. Coyote (also known simply as The Coyote) and the Road Runner are cartoon characters from a series of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoons, created by Chuck Jones in 1948 for Warner Brothers. ... Patrick McDonnell Self-Portrait Patrick McDonnell (born March 17, 1956) is the creator of the daily comic strip Mutts. ... Mutts is a daily comic strip started by Patrick McDonnell in 1994, based around the foibles of pets and their owners. ... William B. Bill Watterson II (born July 5, 1958) is the author of the comic strip Calvin and Hobbes and a few poems (which are mostly embedded in his works). ... Listen to this article (3 parts) · (info) Part 1 · Part 2 · Part 3 This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2006-01-29, and may not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Peanuts is a syndicated daily and Sunday comic strip written and illustrated by Charles M. Schulz, which ran from October 2, 1950, to February 13, 2000 — the day after Schulzs death. ... Pogo as drawn by Walt Kelly. ... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922 – February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known worldwide for his Peanuts comic strip. ... William Erwin Eisner (March 6, 1917 – January 3, 2005) was an acclaimed American comics writer, artist and entrepreneur. ...


Jules Feiffer,[34] Philip Guston,[34] and Hunt Emerson[35] have all had Krazy Kat's imprint recognized in their work. Larry Gonick's comic strip Kokopelli & Company is set in "Kokonino County", an homage to Herriman's exotic locale. Chris Ware admires the strip, and his frequent publisher, Fantagraphics, is currently reissuing its entire run. In the 1980s, Sam Hurt's synidicated strip Eyebeam shows a clear Herriman influence, particularly in its continually morphing backgrounds. Among non-cartoonists, Jay Cantor's 1987 novel Krazy Kat uses Herriman's characters to analyze humanity's reaction to nuclear weapons, while Michael Stipe of the rock band R.E.M. has a tattoo of Ignatz and Krazy.[36] Jules Feiffer (1958) Jules Feiffer (born January 26, 1929) is an American syndicated comic-strip cartoonist and author. ... Philip Guston ([Montreal, Canada [July 27]], 1913 - [Woodstock, N.Y.[June 7]], 1980) was one of the most important painters of the New York School, which also numbered many of the Abstract Expressionists, such as Jackson Pollock and Willem De Kooning. ... Hunt Emerson (1952-). Cartoonist. ... Larry Gonick is a cartoonist best known for The Cartoon History of the Universe, a history of the world in comic book form, which he has been publishing in installments since 1977. ... Cover for Attack of the Smart Pies (2005), showing Emma, Urania, Feather and Kokopelli Kokopelli & Company is a comic strip drawn by science historian and cartoonist Larry Gonick, aimed generally at ten- to fifteen-year-olds. ... The cover to the collected edition of Jimmy Corrigan by Chris Ware Franklin Christenson Ware (born December 28, 1967) is an American comic book artist and cartoonist, best-known for a series of comics called the Acme Novelty Library, and a graphic novel, Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth. ... Fantagraphics Books is an American publisher of alternative comics, underground comics, classic comic strip anthologies, magazines, and graphic novels located in the Maple Leaf neighborhood of Seattle, Washington. ... Eyebeam was a daily comic strip written and illustrated by Sam Hurt at the University of Texas at Austin. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 kilometers (11 mi) above the hypocenter. ... John Michael Stipe (born January 4, 1960 in Decatur, Georgia) is the lead singer of the American rock band R.E.M. Stipe has become well-known (and occasionally parodied) for the mumbling style of his early career and for his complex, surreal lyrics, as well as his social and... R.E.M. is an American rock band formed in Athens, Georgia, in early 1980 by drummer Bill Berry, guitarist Peter Buck, bassist Mike Mills, and vocalist Michael Stipe. ... A tattoo is a mark made by inserting pigment into the skin; in technical terms, tattooing is dermal pigmentation. ...


Reprints

For many decades, Herriman's strip was only sporadically available. The very first Krazy Kat collection, published by Henry Holt & Co. in 1946, just two years after Herriman's death, gathered 200 selected strips.[37] In Europe, the cartoons were first reprinted in 1965 by the Italian magazine Linus, and appeared in the pages of the French monthly Charlie Mensuel starting in 1970.[38] In 1969, Grosset & Dunlap produced a single hardcover collection of selected episodes and sequences spanning the entire length of the strip's run. The Netherlands' Real Free Press published five issues of "Krazy Kat Komix" in 1975, containing a few hundred strips apiece; each of the issues' covers was designed by Joost Swarte. However, owing to the difficulty of tracking down high-quality copies of the original newspapers, no plans for a comprehensive collection of Krazy Kat strips surfaced until the 1980s. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, somethimes abbreviated as HRW or referred to as Holt, is an Austin, Texas based publishing company, that specializes in textbooks for use in secondary schools. ... Grosset & Dunlap is a United States book publisher founded in 1898. ... Joost Swarte (born 24 December 1947, Heemstede, the Netherlands) is a Dutch comic artist and graphical designer. ...


All of the Sunday strips from 1916 to 1924 were reprinted by Eclipse Comics in cooperation with Turtle Island Press. The intent was to eventually reprint every Sunday Krazy Kat, but this planned series was aborted when Eclipse ceased business in 1992. Beginning in 2002, Fantagraphics has resumed reprinting Sunday Krazy Kats where Eclipse left off. Fantagraphics has released seven installments to date, designed by Chris Ware. The company plans to continue until all strips through the end in 1944 have been reprinted, and then to start reissuing in the same format the strips previously printed in Eclipse's now out-of-print volumes.[39] Both the Eclipse and Fantagraphics reprints include additional rarities such as older George Herriman cartoons predating Krazy Kat. Kitchen Sink Press, in association with Remco Worldservice Books, reprinted two volumes of color Sunday strips dating from 1935 to 1937; but like Eclipse, they collapsed before they could continue the series.[40] See also Comic strip and Daily strip. ... Eclipse Comics was an American comic book publisher, one of several influential indendent publishers during the 1980s. ... Fantagraphics Books is an American publisher of alternative comics, underground comics, classic comic strip anthologies, magazines, and graphic novels located in the Maple Leaf neighborhood of Seattle, Washington. ... The cover to the collected edition of Jimmy Corrigan by Chris Ware Franklin Christenson Ware (born December 28, 1967) is an American comic book artist and cartoonist, best-known for a series of comics called the Acme Novelty Library, and a graphic novel, Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth. ... Kitchen Sink Press was a comic book publisher in from the late 1960s until the late 1990s when it went out of business. ...


The daily strips for 1921 to 1923 were reprinted by Pacific Comics Club. The 1922 and 1923 books skipped a small number of strips, which have now been reprinted by Comics Revue. Comics Revue has also published all of the daily strips from September 8, 1930 through December 31, 1934. Scattered Sundays and dailies have appeared in several collections, including the Grosset & Dunlap book reprinted by Nostalgia Press, but the most readily available sampling of Sundays and dailies from throughout the strip's run is Krazy Kat: The Comic Art of George Herriman, published by Harry N. Abrams, Inc. in 1986.[40][41] It includes a detailed biography of Herriman and is currently the only in-print book to republish Krazy Kat strips from after 1940. Although it contains over 200 strips, including many color Sundays, it is light on material from 1923 to 1937. See also Comic strip and Sunday strip. ... Comics Revue is a monthly small press comic book published by Manuscript Press. ... Comics Revue is a monthly small press comic book published by Manuscript Press. ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Grosset & Dunlap is a United States book publisher founded in 1898. ... Gnomes 30th Anniversary Edition from Harry N. Abrams, Inc. ...


Eclipse Comics editions

  • Krazy & Ignatz (1916 strips) ISBN 0-913035-49-1
  • The Other Side To the Shore Of Here (1917 strips) ISBN 0-913035-74-2
  • The Limbo of Useless Unconsciousness (1918 strips) ISBN 0-913035-76-9
  • Howling Among the Halls of Night (1919 strips) ISBN 1-56060-019-5 OCLC 22660089
  • Pilgrims on the Road to Nowhere (1920 strips) ISBN 1-56060-023-3
  • Sure As Moons is Cheeses (1921 strips) ISBN 1-56060-034-9
  • A Katnip Kantata in the Key of K (1922 strips) ISBN 1-56060-063-2
  • Inna Yott On the Muddy Geranium (1923 strips) ISBN 1560600667
  • Shed a Soft Mongolian Tear (1924 strips) ISBN 1-56060-102-7
  • Honeysuckil Love is Doubly Swit (1925 strips) ISBN 1-56060-203-1 (unpublished)

OCLC Online Computer Library Center was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC). ...

Kitchen Sink Press editions

  • 1935-36 ISBN 0-924359-06-4
  • 1936-37 ISBN 0-924359-07-2 limited distribution

Fantagraphics Books editions

  • Krazy & Ignatz in "There Is A Heppy Lend Furfur A-Waay": The Komplete Kat Komics 1925–1926 ISBN 1-56097-386-2
  • Krazy & Ignatz in "Love Letters In Ancient Brick": The Komplete Kat Komics 1927–1928 ISBN 1-56097-507-5
  • Krazy & Ignatz in "A Mice, A Brick, A Lovely Night": The Komplete Kat Komics 1929–1930 ISBN 1-56097-529-6
  • Krazy & Ignatz in "A Kat Alilt with Song": The Komplete Kat Komics 1931–1932 ISBN 1-56097-594-6
  • Krazy & Ignatz in "Necromancy by the Blue Bean Bush": The Komplete Kat Komics 1933–1934 ISBN 1-56097-620-9
    • Krazy & Ignatz: The Complete Sunday Strips 1925–1934. Collects the five paperback volumes 1925–1934 in a single hardcover volume. Only 1000 copies printed, and only available by direct order from the publisher. ISBN 1-56097-522-9.
  • Krazy & Ignatz in "A Wild Warmth of Chromatic Gravy": The Komplete Kat Komics 1935–1936 ISBN 1-56097-690-X (first volume in color)
  • Krazy & Ignatz in "Shifting Sands Dusts its Cheeks in Powdered Beauty": The Komplete Kat Komics 1937–1938 ISBN 1-56097-734-5
  • Krazy & Ignatz in "A Brick Stuffed with Moom-bins": The Komplete Kat Komics 1939–1940 ISBN 1-56097-789-2

Harry N. Abrams, Inc. editions

  • Krazy Kat: The Comic Art of George Herriman. Various strips. ISBN 0-8109-9185-3 (softcover) ISBN 0-8109-8152-1 (hardcover)

Notes

  1. ^ a b Kramer.
  2. ^ a b c Shannon.
  3. ^ a b McDonnell/O'Connell/De Havenon 26.
  4. ^ Seldes 231.
  5. ^ Heer 41–45.
  6. ^ A Mice, A Brick, A Lovely Night 71.
  7. ^ Krazy Kat: The Comic Art of George Herriman 97.
  8. ^ Schwartz 8–10.
  9. ^ Pilgrims on the Road to Nowhere, 47.
  10. ^ There is a Heppy Lend, Fur, Fur Awa-a-ay-, 62.
  11. ^ Crocker.
  12. ^ Necromancy By the Blue Bean Bush, 16–17.
  13. ^ A Katnip Kantata in the Key of K, 71.
  14. ^ Schwartz 9.
  15. ^ A Mice, A Brick, A Lovely Night 67, et. al.
  16. ^ McDonnell/O'Connell/De Havenon 52.
  17. ^ McDonnell, O'Connell and De Havenon 58.
  18. ^ Blackbeard 1–3.
  19. ^ McDonnell, O'Connell and De Havenon 66–67.
  20. ^ Inge.
  21. ^ a b Bloom.
  22. ^ Schwartz 9–10.
  23. ^ a b Crafton.
  24. ^ Maltin 205–06.
  25. ^ Maltin 207.
  26. ^ Maltin 210–11.
  27. ^ Maltin 213.
  28. ^ Screen Gems, The Columbia Crow's Nest — Columbia Cartoon History.
  29. ^ "Kreem of the Komics!", Detroit Metrotimes. Retrieved on January 13, 2005.
  30. ^ comic masters. Retrieved on January 13, 2005.
  31. ^ Watterson 17–18.
  32. ^ Charles Schulz, interviewed by Rick Marschall and Gary Groth in Nemo 31, January 1992. Cited at [1] (URL retrieved January 13, 2005).
  33. ^ The Onion AV Club interview with Will Eisner, September 27, 2000. Retrieved on January 13, 2005.
  34. ^ a b Comics in Context #20: This Belongs in a Museum. Retrieved on January 13, 2005.
  35. ^ The artsnet interview: Hunt EMERSON. Retrieved January 13, 2005.
  36. ^ Rec.music.rem FAQ (#A15). Retrieved January 13, 2005.
  37. ^ Tashlin.
  38. ^ Exhibit catalog from the Musée de la bande dessinée in Angoulême, 1997, cited in BDM 2005-2006, by Bera, Denni and Mellot.
  39. ^ There is a Heppy Lend, Fur, Fur Awa-a-ay-, 119.
  40. ^ a b Krazy Kat online bibliography
  41. ^ The Mouse Bibliography

January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Angoulême is a town and commune in southwestern France, préfecture (capital city) of the Charente département. ...

References

  • Blackbeard, Bill. "A Kat of Many Kolors: Jazz pantomime and the funny papers in 1922." (1991). Printed in A Katnip Kantata in the Key of K (q.v.)
  • Bloom, John. "Krazy Kat keeps kracking." United Press International, June 23, 2003.
  • Crafton, Donald (1993). Before Mickey: The Animated Film, 1898–1928. University of Chicago Press. ISBN 0-226-11667-0.
  • Crocker, Elisabeth. "'To He, I Am For Evva True': Krazy Kat's Indeterminate Gender." Postmodern Culture, January 1995. January 12, 2006.
  • Heer, Jeet. "Cartoonists in Navajo Country." Comic Art Magazine, Summer 2006. 40–47.
  • Herriman, George (1990). Pilgrims on the Road to Nowhere. Forestville: Turtle Island, Eclipse Books. ISBN 1-56060-024-1.
  • Herriman, George (1991). A Katnip Kantata in the Key of K. Forestville: Turtle Island/Eclipse Books. ISBN 1-56060-064-0.
  • Herriman, George (2002). Krazy & Ignatz 1925–1926: "There Is A Heppy Land, Fur, Far Awa-a-ay -". Seattle: Fantagraphics Books. ISBN 1-56097-386-2.
  • Herriman, George (2003). Krazy & Ignatz 1929–1930: "A Mice, A Brick, A Lovely Night". Seattle: Fantagraphics Books. ISBN 1-56097-529-6.
  • Herriman, George (2004). Krazy & Ignatz 1933–1934: "Necromancy by the Blue Bean Bush". Seattle: Fantagraphics Books. ISBN 1-56097-620-9.
  • Inge, Thomas (1990). "Krazy Kat as American Dada Art" Comics as Culture, Jackson: University Press of Mississippi. ISBN 0-87805-408-1.
  • Kramer, Hilton. Untitled review of Herriman art exhibition. The New York Times, January 17, 1982.
  • Maltin, Leonard (1987). Of Mice and Magic: A History of American Animated Cartoons. Penguin Books. ISBN 0-452-25993-2.
  • McDonnell, Patrick; O'Connell, Karen; de Havenon, Georgia Riley (1986) Krazy Kat: The Comic Art of George Herriman. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. ISBN 0-8109-2313-0.
  • Schwartz, Ben (2003). "Hearst, Herriman, and the Death of Nonsense." Printed in Krazy & Ignatz 1929–1930: "A Mice, A Brick, A Lovely Night." (q.v.)
  • Seldes, Gilbert. "The Krazy Kat That Walks By Himself." The Seven Lively Arts. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1924. See External Links.
  • Shannon, Edward A. "'That we may mis-unda-stend each udda': The Rhetoric of Krazy Kat." Journal of Popular Culture, Fall 1995, vol. 29, issue 2.
  • Tashlin, Frank. "In Coconino County." The New York Times, November 3, 1946, p. 161.
  • Watterson, Bill (1995). The Calvin and Hobbes Tenth Anniversary Book. Kansas City: Andrews and McMeel. ISBN 0-8362-0438-7

Bill Blackbeard is a writer-editor and the founder-director of the San Francisco Academy of Comic Art, a comprehensive collection of comic strips and cartoon art from American newspapers. ... Joe Bob Briggs is a pseudonym and persona of John Irving Bloom (born January 27, 1953 in Dallas, Texas), a syndicated American film critic, writer and actor. ... Front of UPI Headquarters, Washington, D.C. UPI redirects here. ... Comic Art is a magazine focusing mainly on newspaper strip and comic book art. ... George Herriman and some of his fans. ... Hilton Kramer (1928-) is an U.S conservative cultural critic and commentator. ... The New York Times is a newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... Leonard Maltin (born December 18, 1950 in New York City) is a widely known and respected American film critic. ... Patrick McDonnell Self-Portrait Patrick McDonnell (born March 17, 1956) is the creator of the daily comic strip Mutts. ... Gilbert Vivian Seldes (January 3, 1893 – September 29, 1970) was an American writer and cultural critic. ... Frank Tashlin (February 19, 1913 - May 5, 1972) was an animator, screenwriter, and director. ... The New York Times is a newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... William B. Bill Watterson II (born July 5, 1958) is the author of the comic strip Calvin and Hobbes and a few poems (which are mostly embedded in his works). ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Krazy Kat Keeps Kracking (1226 words)
Krazy Kat has a more poetic soul, tending to spend his days mooning around the sagebrush, musing about the beauty of the universe, until he's knocked unconscious by a hurled brick--and takes it as a sign of Ignatz's love.
Since Krazy Kat is so introspective, the real protagonist is Ignatz the Mouse, always driving the action with his purchasing of bricks, hording of bricks, lying in wait for Krazy Kat, and finding new ways to deliver the missile to the feline cranium.
Is Herriman a Gandhi-like pacifist and Krazy Kat a Christ-like longsuffering martyr?
Krazy Kat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3309 words)
Krazy Kat is a comic strip created by George Herriman that appeared in U.S. newspapers between 1913 and 1944.
Krazy nurses an unrequited love for the mouse, but Ignatz despises her and constantly schemes to throw a brick at her head; for unknown reasons, Krazy takes this as a sign of affection.
Krazy's dialogue is a highly stylized argot ("A fowl konspirissy - is it pussible?") phonetically evoking a mixture of English, French, Spanish, Yiddish, and other dialects.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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