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Encyclopedia > Kraków
Kraków
(Flag) (Coat of Arms)
Motto: none
Voivodship Lesser Poland
Municipal government Rada miasta Kraków
Mayor Jacek Majchrowski
Area 326,8 km²
Population
 - city
 - urban
 - density

757,500 (2004 est.)
1,200,000
2317.93/km²
Founded
City rights
8th century
1257
Latitude
Longitude
50°04' N
19°57' E
Area code +48 12
Car plates KR
Twin towns Bordeaux, Bratislava, Curitiba, Cuzco, Edinburgh, Fes, Florence, Frankfurt, Gothenburg, Innsbruck, Kyiv, La Serena, Leipzig, Leuven, Lviv, Milan, Nuremberg, Orléans, Pecs, Rochester, Seville, Solothurn, Vilnius, Zagreb
Municipal Website (http://www.krakow.pl)

Cracow or Krakow (Polish: Kraków, pronounced: Image:Ltspkr.png ['krakuf], in full Royal Capital City of Kraków; Polish: Królewskie Stołeczne Miasto Kraków, see also Cities alternative names; in Hungarian Krakkó) is one of the oldest and largest cities of Poland, with a population of 760,000 (as of 2004) - agglomeration 1.2 million. This historic city is situated on the Vistula (Wisła) River at the foot of Wawel Hill in the southerly region of Little Poland (Małopolska). It is the capital of the Lesser Poland Voivodship (województwo małopolskie) (since 1999); previously it was the capital of Kraków Voivodship (since the 14th century). Flag of Kraków, Poland. ... Superior PNG version of the Kraków arms. ... Coat of Arms of Kraków Coat of Arms of Kraków Flag of Kraków See also: Flag of Kraków Polish heraldry Kraków Categories: Poland-related stubs | Kraków | Polish coats of arms ... A motto is a phrase or collection of words intended to describe the motivation or intention of a sociological grouping or organization. ... Kraków on a map of Poland. ... A Voivodship ( Romanian: Voievodat, Polish: Województwo, Serbian: Vojvodstvo or Vojvodina) was a feudal state in medieval Romania, Hungary, Poland, Russia and Serbia (see Vojvodina), ruled by a Voivod. ... The Lesser Poland Voivodship or Little Poland Voivodship (in Polish województwo małopolskie) is an administrative region or voivodship in the south of Poland that contains core areas of the historical and geographical region of Lesser Poland (Malopolska). ... This article explains the meaning of area as a physical quantity. ... Population density can be used as a measurement of any tangible item. ... (7th century — 8th century — 9th century — other centuries) Events The Iberian peninsula is taken by Arab and Berber Muslims, thus ending the Visigothic rule, and starting almost 8 centuries of Muslim presence there. ... Events La Sorbonne, the famous university in Paris, is founded Eutin in Schleswig-Holstein is given its city rights Henry III of England orders the production of a coinage of pure gold location of city Cracow Births Sancho IV king of Castile and León Deaths Pho Khun Si Indrathit... A telephone numbering plan is a system that allows subscribers to make and receive telephone calls across long distances. ... This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ... City motto: Lilia sola regunt lunam undas castra leonem. ... Bratislava is the capital of Slovakia and the countrys largest city, with a population of some 430,000. ... Curitiba is a city in Brazil, the capital of the state of Paraná. In 2001 it had a population of some 1,600,000 people. ... The Church of La Compañía on the Plaza de Armas in Cuzco Cuzco is a city in southeastern Peru in the Huatanay Valley (Sacred Valley), of the Andes mountain range. ... Edinburghs location in Scotland Edinburgh viewed from Arthurs Seat. ... This article is about the city Fes in Morocco. ... Location within Italy Giglio di Firenze - symbol of the city Florence (Italian, Firenze) is a city in the center of Tuscany, in central Italy at 43°46′ N 11°15′ E. The city on the Arno River has a population of around 400,000, plus a suburban population in excess... Frankfurt am Main [ˈfraŋkfʊrt] is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth largest city in Germany. ... Gothenburg (Swedish: Göteborg  listen ) is a city and a municipality on the western coast of Sweden, in the County of Västra Götaland. ... Innsbruck City Center Innsbruck (population 120,000) is a city in western Austria, and the capital of the Tyrol province. ... Kiev (Київ, Kyiv, in Ukrainian; Киев, Kiev, in Russian) is the capital and largest city of Ukraine, located in the north central part of the country on the Dnieper river. ... La Serena (the serene one) is the second oldest city in Chile. ... Map of Germany showing Leipzig Leipzig [ˈlaiptsɪç] (Polish; Sorbian/Lusatian: Lipsk) is the largest city in the federal state (Bundesland) of Saxony in Germany. ... Leuven in 2004 Leuven (Louvain in French, Löwen in German) is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Flemish Brabant, of which it is the capital. ... Motto: Semper fidelis Oblast Lviv Oblast Municipal government City council (Львівська міська рада) Mayor City chairman Lyubomyr Bunyak Area 171,01 km² Population  - city  - urban  - density 808,900 ? 4786/km² Founded City rights 13th century 1353 Latitude Longitude 49°51′ N 24°01′ E Area code +0322 Car plates  ? Twin... Location within Italy Piazza della Scala Milan (Italian: Milano; Milanese dialect: Milán) is the main city in northern Italy, and is located in the plains of Lombardy, the most populated and developed of Italian regions. ... Nuremberg coat of arms Location of Nuremberg Nuremberg (German: Nürnberg) is a city in the German state of Bavaria, in the administrative region of Middle Franconia. ... This article is about Orléans, France; for other meanings see Orleans (disambiguation). ... Pécs Main Square Pécs (Croatian Pečuh, German Fünfkirchen, Slovak Päťkostolie, Turkish Peçuy) is one of the five largest cities of Hungary, located in the south-west of the country. ... In English literary history, the name Rochester refers to John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester. ... The Giralda Tower Seville (Spanish: Sevilla) is the artistic, cultural, and financial capital of southern Spain, crossed by the river Guadalquivir. ... The city of Solothurn is the capital of the Canton of Solothurn in Switzerland. ... Vilnius Old Town Vilnius (sometimes also Vilna in English, Belarusian Вільня, Polish Wilno, Russian Вильнюс, German Wilna, see also Cities alternative names) is the capital and largest city of Lithuania with population in excess of 540 thousand (in 2003). ... Zagreb (pronounced ZA-greb) is the capital city of Croatia. ... The purpose of this page is to lay out our policies for handling sounds, and give people some useful information for handling sound files. ... Most cities in Europe have different names in different languages. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Vistula river basin Vistula ( Polish Wisła, German Weichsel) is the longest river in Poland. ... The Wawel Hill in Kraków Wawel (Polish Wzgórze wawelskie or for short Wawel) is the name of a lime hillock situated on the left bank of the Vistula in Kraków, Poland at an altitude of 228 metres above sea level. ... Lesser Poland voivodship since 1999 Little Poland or Lesser Poland (Polish Małopolska, Latin: Polonia Minor) is one of the historical regions of Poland. ... The Lesser Poland Voivodship or Little Poland Voivodship (in Polish województwo małopolskie) is an administrative region or voivodship in the south of Poland that contains core areas of the historical and geographical region of Lesser Poland (Malopolska). ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday of the Common Era, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Kraków Voivodship - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... (13th century - 14th century - 15th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 14th century was that century which lasted from 1301 to 1400. ...


Kraków has traditionally been one of the leading scientific, cultural and artistic centres of the country. It was once the national capital and is considered by many to still be the heart of Poland, due to its history of more than a thousand years. Kraków is also a major centre of local and international tourism, with more than two million visitors annually.

Contents

Modern landmarks

The old city of Kraków has a rich architecture, mostly Renaissance with some examples of Baroque and Gothic. Kraków's palaces, churches and mansions display a richness of color, architectural details, stained glass, paintings, sculptures, and furnishings. By Region: Italian Renaissance Northern Renaissance -French Renaissance -German Renaissance -English Renaissance Tempietto, San Pietro in Montorio, Rome, 1502 designed by Donato Bramante. ... Baroque architecture, starting in the early 17th century in Italy, took the humanist Roman vocabulary of Renaissance architecture and used it in a new rhetorical, theatrical, sculptural fashion, expressing the triumph of absolutist church and state. ... Gothic architecture characterizes any of the styles of European architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, in use throughout Europe during the high and late medieval period, from the 12th century onwards. ... Strictly speaking, stained glass is glass that has been painted with silver stain and then fired. ... The Mona Lisa is perhaps the best-known artistic painting in the Western world. ... Ancient Greeks depiction of ideal form of the body is expressed through sculpture such as this one. ...

St. Wenceslaus and St. Stanislaus's Cathedral on Wawel Hill

Among the most notable of the city's hundreds of historic buildings are: the Royal Castle and Cathedral on Wawel Hill, where King John III Sobieski is buried; the medieval Old Town with its beautiful square; Market Square (200 meters on a side); dozens of old churches and museums; the 14th century buildings of the Jagiellonian University; as well as Kazimierz, the historical centre of Kraków's Jewish religious and social life. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Wenceslas (or Wenceslaus; Czech: Václav; German: Wenzel), styled Wenceslas I, Duke of Bohemia (b. ... Stanisław Szczepanowski (Stanislaus of Szczepanów; b. ... The Wawel Hill in Kraków Wawel (Polish Wzgórze wawelskie or for short Wawel) is the name of a lime hillock situated on the left bank of the Vistula in Kraków, Poland at an altitude of 228 metres above sea level. ... Reign From May 21, 1674, until June 17, 1696 Elected On May 21, 1674 in Wola, today suburb of Warsaw, Poland Coronation On February 2, 1676 in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland Nobel Family Sobieski Coat of Arms Janina Parents Jakub Sobieski Zofia Teofillia Daniłowicz Consorts Marie Casimire Louise Children... The metre (American spelling: meter), symbol: m, is the basic unit of distance (or of length, in the parlance of the physical sciences) in the International System of Units. ... (13th century - 14th century - 15th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 14th century was that century which lasted from 1301 to 1400. ... Jagiellonian University (Polish: Uniwersytet Jagielloński) is a university in Krakow, Poland. ... Kazimierz (Latin: Casimiria; Yiddish Kuzmir) is a historical district of Kraków (Poland), best known for being home to a Jewish community from the 14th century until the Second World War. ...


The Gothic St Mary's Church stands by the market place. It was built in the 14th century, and its famous wooden altar was carbed by Veit Stoss. Every hour, a trumpet call called the hejnał is sounded from the church's main tower. St. ... Wit Stwosz painted by Jan Matejko Veit Stoss or in Polish Wit Stwosz (ca. ... Bugler playing the Hejnał Hejnał mariacki ( listen) is a traditional Polish melody, closely tied to the history and traditions of the city of Kraków. ...


Kraków hosts many annual artistic events, including some of international significance, such as the festival of Short Feature Films, Biennial of Graphics, and the Jewish Culture Festival. There are several active theaters, including: The Jewish Culture Festival in Kraków (Polish: Festiwal Kultury Żydowskiej w Krakowie, Yiddish: יירשער קולטור – פעסטיוואל אין קראָקע) is an annual cultural event organized since 1988 in the once Jewish district of Kazimierz (part of Kraków) by the Jewish Culture Festival Society headed by Janusz Makuch. ...

  • The Old Theatre (Kraków) (Stary Teatr)
  • the Slowacki Theatre
  • Kraków Opera
  • Kraków Operetta

An ugly landmark is the incomplete high-rise Szkieletor. Szkieletor is the inofficial name of a 91 metre high highrise building at Krakow, Poland. ...


Nearby points of interest include the salt mine in Wieliczka, the Tatra mountains, the historic city of Czestochowa, the former concentration camp at Auschwitz, and Ojcowski National Park. A salt mine is an operation involved in the extraction of salt. ... Motto: none Voivodship Lesser Poland Municipal government Rada Miejska w Wieliczce Mayor Józef Duda Area 13,4 km² Population  - city  - urban  - density 18 190 - 1357/km² Founded City rights - - Latitude Longitude 49°59 N 20°03 E Area code +48 12 Car plates KWI Twin towns - Municipal Website Wieliczka is... Tatras Tatra or Tatras (in Polish and Slovak Tatry, which is a plural proper noun) is a mountain range on the border of Poland and Slovakia, the highest part of the Carpathian Mountains. ... Częstochowa (pronounce: [ʧε̃stɔ:xɔva]) is a city in south Poland on the Warta River with 248,894 inhabitants (2004). ... Auschwitz, in English, commonly refers to the Auschwitz concentration camp complex built near the town of Oświęcim, by Nazi Germany during World War II. Rarely, it may refer to the Polish town of Oświęcim (called by the Germans Auschwitz) itself. ...

St. Mary's Church

Kraków contains 28 museums and art galleries, such as the National Museum (Kraków) and Czartoryski Museum (Muzeum Czartoryskich). File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Czartoryski Museum was founded in 1796 by Princess Izabela Czartoryska to preserve the Polish heritage in keeping with the Princess motto: The Past to the Future. The first objects in the so-called Temple of Memory were trophies commemorating the victory against the Turks at the siege of Vienna...


Kraków is a major centre of education. Today there are 18 university-level institutions with about 10,000 faculty and 110,000 students.


Notable modern artists from or living in Kraków include:

Ewa Demarczyk (born January 16, 1941 in Kraków, Poland) is considered one of Polands most original and creative singing talents. ... Tadeusz Kantor (b April 6, 1915 in Wielopole Skrzyńskie - December 8, 1990 in Kraków, Poland) was an Polish painter, scene designer and theatre director. ... Nigel Kennedy (born December 28, 1956), now often known simply as Kennedy, is an English violinist and violist. ... Sławomir Mrożek (born 1930 in Borzecin) - Polish dramatist and writer. ... Krzysztof Penderecki (born November 23, 1933) is a Polish composer of classical music. ... Zbigniew Preisner (born May 20, 1955) is Polands leading film score composer, best known for his work for the director Krzysztof Kieślowski. ... . A 1996 post stamp with Wisława Szymborska Wisława Szymborska (born July 2, 1923) is a Polish poet, essayist and translator of French literature, laureate of Nobel Prize in Literature in 1996. ... Adam Marczynski (1908 - 1985) was a Polish painter. ...

Historical districts

The oldest parts of Kraków, united in late 18th century are: (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ...

  • Old Town (Stare Miasto) - the area once contained within the city walls, now encircled by a park known as Planty
  • Wawel - a limestone hill south of the Old Town, the site of the Royal Castle and the cathedral
  • Stradom and Kazimierz - south of Wawel; the latter was once divided into Christian and Jewish quarters
  • Kleparz - north of the Old Town

Areas added in the 19th and 20th centuries include: The Wawel Hill in Kraków Wawel (Polish Wzgórze wawelskie or for short Wawel) is the name of a lime hillock situated on the left bank of the Vistula in Kraków, Poland at an altitude of 228 metres above sea level. ... Kazimierz (Latin: Casimiria; Yiddish Kuzmir) is a historical district of Kraków (Poland), best known for being home to a Jewish community from the 14th century until the Second World War. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the...

Nowa Huta (literally New Steel Mill) - is the easternmost district of Kraków. ... The Peoples Republic of Poland (Polish: Polska Rzeczpospolita Ludowa, PRL) was the official name of Poland from 1952 to 1989, during its period of rule by the Communist party, officially called the Polish United Workers Party (Polska Zjednoczona Partia Robotnicza, or PZPR). ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...

Administrative districts

  1. Stare Miasto
  2. Grzegórzki
  3. Prądnik Czerwony
  4. Prądnik Biały
  5. Łobzów
  6. Bronowice
  7. Bieńczyce
  8. Zwierzyniec
  9. Dębniki
  10. Łagiewniki
  11. Swoszowice
  12. Wola Duchacka
  13. Prokocim-Bieżanów
  14. Podgórze
  15. Czyżyny
  16. Mistrzejowice
  17. Grębałów
  18. Nowa Huta

Download high resolution version (522x800, 72 KB)(With permission, Author: Marek i Ewa Wojciechowscy, http://www. ... Download high resolution version (522x800, 72 KB)(With permission, Author: Marek i Ewa Wojciechowscy, http://www. ... Adam Mickiewicz (December 24, 1798 – November 26, 1855) was one of the most well-known Polish poets and writers, considered as the greatest Polish poet, besides Zygmunt Krasiński and Juliusz Słowacki. ... Zwierzyniec nad Wieprzem, Poland. ... Nowa Huta (literally New Steel Mill) - is the easternmost district of Kraków. ...

History

Medieval

Enlarge
Plan of Cracow

The earliest known settlement on the present site of Kraków was established on Wawel hill, and dates back to the 4th century. Legend attributes the town's establishment to the mythical ruler Krak, who built it above a cave occupied by a ravenous dragon. Plan of Cracow ~1500, schedelsche weltchronik, Hartmann Schedel, public domain ? This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Plan of Cracow ~1500, schedelsche weltchronik, Hartmann Schedel, public domain ? This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... (3rd century - 4th century - 5th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... Look up Dragon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Typically depicted as a large and powerful reptile or serpent with magical or spiritual qualities, the dragon is one of few, if not the only mythological creature to be known around the globe. ...


Before the Polish state existed, Kraków was the capital of the tribe of the Vistulians, probably linked to the larger polity of Greater Moravia. Kraków's first appearance in historical records dates back to the 8th century, and notes that the prince of the Vistulians was baptized. (7th century — 8th century — 9th century — other centuries) Events The Iberian peninsula is taken by Arab and Berber Muslims, thus ending the Visigothic rule, and starting almost 8 centuries of Muslim presence there. ... Baptism is a water purification ritual practiced in certain religions such as Christianity, Mandaeanism, Sikhism, and some historic sects of Judaism. ...


After Greater Moravia was destroyed by the Hungarians, Kraków became part of the kingdom of Bohemia. By the end of the 10th century, the city was a major center of trade. Around this time, it was incorporated into the holdings of the Piast dynasty of Poland. Several brick buildings were also constructed, including a castle, Romanesque churches, a cathedral, a basilica, and the St. Felix and Adaukt Church. Bohemia Historical map of Bohemia Bohemia is also a place in the State of New York in the United States of America: see Bohemia, New York. ... ( 9th century - 10th century - 11th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... The Piast dynasty is a line of Kings and dukes that ruled Poland from its beginnings as an independent state up to 1370. ... Romanesque St. ...


In 1038, Kraków became the seat of the Polish government. Two hundred years later, it was almost entirely destroyed in the Tatar invasions. Events Births Deaths Aethelnoth, Archbishop of Canterbury Alhazen, Arabian mathematician August 15 - Hungary Categories: 1038 ... Tatar invasions of Europe from the east took place over the course of three centuries, from the middle ages to early modern period. ...

St. Andrew's Church

In 1257, the city was rebuilt, in a form which has remained practically unaltered, and received city rights under Magdeburg Law. 1311 saw a rebellion agaist Wladislaus I of Poland. Rebellion was organised by Albert and consisted mostly of German-speaking citizens in Kraków. The rebellion cost Poland the city of Gdańsk, which was taken by the Teutonic Orders, but German-speakers lost their political ambitions and began to Polonize. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Saint Andrew (Greek: Andreas, manly), the Christian Apostle, brother of Saint Peter, was born at Bethsaida on the Lake of Galilee. ... Events La Sorbonne, the famous university in Paris, is founded Eutin in Schleswig-Holstein is given its city rights Henry III of England orders the production of a coinage of pure gold location of city Cracow Births Sancho IV king of Castile and León Deaths Pho Khun Si Indrathit... The Magdeburg Rights (or Magdeburg law) were the laws of the Imperial Free City of Magdeburg during many centuries of the Holy Roman Empire, and possibly the most important set of Germanic medieval city laws. ... Events Bolingbroke Castle passes to the House of Lancaster. ... Categories: Poland-related stubs | Polish monarchs | Dukes of Pomerania | Dukes of Greater Poland | Dukes of Poznan | Dukes of Gniezno | Dukes of Kalisz ... The title given to this article lacks diacritics because of certain technical limitations. ... Teutonic Knights Castle in Malbork (Marienburg) The Teutonic Order (German: Deutscher Orden, Latin: Ordo domus Sanctæ Mariæ Theutonicorum) was a crusading order of knights under Roman Catholic religious vows which was formed at the end of the 12th century in Palestine to give medical aid to pilgrims to the holy... Polonization (in Polish: polonizacja) is the assumption, voluntary or involuntary, complete or partial, of the Polish language or another real or supposed Polish attribute. ...


Kraków rose to new prominence in 1364, when Casimir III of Poland founded the University of Kraków, the second in central Europe after the University of Prague. There had been a cathedral school under the auspices of the city's bishop since 1150. The city continued to grow under the Lithuanian Jagiello dynasty (1386-1572), which maintained close connections to the imperial house of Habsburg of the Holy Roman Empire. As the capital of a powerful state, it became a flourishing center of science and the arts. Many works of Renaissance art and architecture were created here during that time. Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1359 1360 1361 1362 1363 - 1364 - 1365 1366 1367 1368 1369 See also: 1364 state leaders Events Foundation of the Jagiellonian University in Krakow (Cracow) The Breton War of Succession... Casimir the Great Casimir III or the Great (Kazimierz Wielki), (1310-1370), King of Poland, son of king Władyslaw I Łokietek (Wladyslaw the Elbow High), 1305-1333 and Jadwiga of Gniezno and Great Poland. ... Jagiellonian University (Polish: Uniwersytet Jagielloński) is a university in Krakow, Poland. ... Historical lands and provinces in Central Europe Central Europe is the region of Europe between Eastern Europe and Western Europe. ... The Charles University of Prague (also simply University of Prague; Czech: Univerzita Karlova; Latin: Universitas Carolina) is the oldest and most prestigious Czech university and among the oldest universities in Europe, being founded in 1340s (for the exact year, see below). ... Events Åhus, Sweden gains city privileges City of Airdrie, Scotland founded King Sverker I of Sweden is deposed and succeeded by Eric IX of Sweden. ... The Jagiellons were a royal dynasty which reigned in some Central European countries between the 14th and 16th century. ... Events Battle of Sempach: Swiss safeguard independence from Hapsburg rule End of reign of Poland by Capet-Anjou family. ... Events January 16 - The Duke of Norfolk is tried for treason for his part in the Ridolfi plot to restore Catholicism in England. ... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ... This page is about the Germanic empire. ...


In 1475 delegates of the elector George the Rich of Bavaria came to Kraków to negotiate the marriage of Hedwig, the daughter of King Casimir IV Jagiello to George the Rich. Hedwig traveled for two months to Landshut in Bavaria, where an elaborate marriage celebration, the Landshut Wedding (Landshuter Hochzeit) took place. Events August 29 - Treaty of Picquigny ends a brief war between France and England. ... With an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ... Reign From 1446 until June 7, 1492 Coronation On June 25, 1447 in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland Royal House Jagiellon Parents Władyslaw II Jagiełło Zofia Holszańska Consorts Elżbieta Rakuszanka Children with Elżbieta Rakuszanka Władysław II Jagiellończyk Jadwiga Jagiellonka Kazimierz Swięty Jan I Olbracht Aleksander Jagiellończyk Zofia Elżbieta Zygmunt I... The Jagiellons were a royal dynasty which reigned in some Central European countries between the 14th and 16th century. ... There is also a Landshut in the Canton of Bern in Switzerland, see Landshut, Switzerland Landshut is a city in Bavaria, Germany, the capital of the Niederbayern region. ...


Renaissance

In 1488 the imperial Poet Laureate and humanist Conrad Celtes founded the Sodalitas Litterarum Vistulana, a learned society based on the Roman Acadiemies. In 1489 Veit Stoss of Nuremberg finished his work on the Great Altar of the Church of St. Mary. He later also wrought a marble sarcophagus for Casimir IV. Numerous other artists, mainly from Nuremberg, worked in Kraków. By 1500, Haller had established a printing press in the city. Download high resolution version (563x996, 264 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (563x996, 264 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A monument is a structure built for commemorative or symbolic reasons rather than for any overtly functional use. ... Nicolaus Copernicus (in Latin; Polish Mikołaj Kopernik, German Nikolaus Kopernikus - February 19, 1473 – May 24, 1543) was a Polish astronomer, mathematician and economist who developed a heliocentric (Sun-centered) theory of the solar system in a form detailed enough to make it scientifically useful. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Events February 3 - Bartolomeu Dias of Portugal lands in Mossel Bay after rounding the Cape of Good Hope, at the tip of Africa becoming the first known European to travel this far south. ... A Poet Laureate is a poet officially appointed by a government and often expected to compose poems for state occasions and other government events. ... Humanism is a general term for many different lines of thought which focus on common solutions to common human issues. ... Conrad Celtes (1459-1508) was a German Humanist scholar. ... Events March 14 - The Queen of Cyprus, Catherine Cornaro, sells her kingdom to Venice. ... Wit Stwosz painted by Jan Matejko Veit Stoss or in Polish Wit Stwosz (ca. ... Nuremberg coat of arms Location of Nuremberg Nuremberg (German: Nürnberg) is a city in the German state of Bavaria, in the administrative region of Middle Franconia. ... Reign From 1446 until June 7, 1492 Coronation On June 25, 1447 in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland Royal House Jagiellon Parents Władyslaw II Jagiełło Zofia Holszańska Consorts Elżbieta Rakuszanka Children with Elżbieta Rakuszanka Władysław II Jagiellończyk Jadwiga Jagiellonka Kazimierz Swięty Jan I Olbracht Aleksander Jagiellończyk Zofia Elżbieta Zygmunt I... Nuremberg coat of arms Location of Nuremberg Nuremberg (German: Nürnberg) is a city in the German state of Bavaria, in the administrative region of Middle Franconia. ... Events Europes population was ~60 million. ... The printing press is a mechanical device for printing many copies of a text on rectangular sheets of paper. ...


In 1520, Johan Behem made the largest churchbell in Poland, named the Sigismund Bell after king Sigismund I. At the same time Hans Dürer, younger brother of Albrecht Dürer, was Sigismund's court painter. Hans von Kulmbach made the altar for the Johannis Church. Events January 18 - King Christian II of Denmark and Norway defeats the Swedes at Lake Asunde. ... Categories: Poland-related stubs | Kraków ... Reign From December 8, 1506 until April 1, 1548 Coronation On January 24, 1507 in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland Royal House Jagiellon Parents Kazimierz IV Jagiellończyk Elżbieta Rakuszanka Consorts Katarzyna Telniczanka Barbara Zapolya Bona Sforza Children with Katarzyna Telniczanka Jan Regina Katarzyna with Barbara Zapolya Jadwiga Anna with Bona... Hans Dürer was born and died in Nuremberg. ... Self-Portrait, 1493, Oil on Canvas Albrecht Dürer (May 21, 1471 - April 6, 1528) was a German painter, wood carver, engraver, and mathematician. ... Artist Hans von Kulmbach (originally Hans Suess of Kulmbach, Franconia) was born about 1480 and died in 1528 in Nuremberg. ...


Decline

In 1572, the king Sigismund II died childless, and the throne passed to Sigismund III of the Swedish House of Vasa. Kraków's importance began to decline, accelerated by the pillaging of the city during the Swedish invasion, and an outbreak of plague that left 20,000 of the city's residents dead. Sigismund III moved his capital to Warsaw in 1596. Events January 16 - The Duke of Norfolk is tried for treason for his part in the Ridolfi plot to restore Catholicism in England. ... Reign From April 1, 1548 until July 6, 1572 Coronation On September 15, 1697 in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland Royal House Jagiellon Parents Zygmunt I Stary Bona Sforza Consorts Elżbieta Habsburzanka Barbara Radziwiłł Katarzyna Austriaczka Barbara Giżycka Children with Barbara Giżycka Barbara Date of Birth August 1, 1520 Place... Reign in Poland From September 18, 1587 until April 19, 1632 Reign in Sweden From November 17, 1592 until July 24, 1599 Elected in Poland On September 18, 1587 in Wola, today suburb of Warsaw, Poland Coronation in Poland On December 27, 1587 in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland Coronation... The Vasa Coat of Arms The House of Vasa was the Royal House of Sweden (1523-1654) and of Poland (1587-1668). ... Warsaw (Polish: Warszawa, see also other names, in full The Capital City of Warsaw, Polish: Miasto Stołeczne Warszawa) is the capital of Poland and its largest city. ... Events February 5 - 26 catholics crucified in Nagasaki, Japan. ...


After the partition of Poland

In the late 18th century, the weakened Polish state was absorbed by its more politically vigorous neighbors, Russia, Austria, and Prussia. Kraków became part of the Austrian province of Galicia. Tadeusz Kościuszko initiated a revolt, the Kościuszko insurrection, in Kraków's market in 1794. The Prussian army put down the revolt, and looted Polish royal treasure kept in the city. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Kingdom of Prussia existed from 1701 until 1918, and from 1871 was the leading kingdom of the German Empire, comprising in its last form almost two-thirds of the area of the Empire. ... The Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, or simply Galicia, was the largest and northernmost province of Austria from 1772 until 1918, with Lemberg (Lwów, Lviv) as its capital city. ... Tadeusz Kościuszko. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


When Napoleon Bonaparte of the French Empire captured what had once been Poland, he established the Duchy of Warsaw (1809) as an independent but subordinate state. The Congress of Vienna (1815) restored the partition of Poland, but gave Kraków its independence, as the Free City of Kraków. The city again became the focus of a struggle for national sovereignty in 1846, during the Kraków Uprising. The uprising failed to spread outside the city to other Polish-inhabited lands, and was put down, resulting in Kraków's annexation by Austria. Bonaparte as general Napoleon Bonaparte ( 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution and was the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur des Français... The First French Empire, commonly known as the French Empire, the Napoleonic Empire or simply as The Empire, covers the period of the domination of France and much of continental Europe by Napoleon I of France. ... Location Official languages Polish Established church Roman Catholic Capital Warsaw Largest City Warsaw Head of state Duke of Warsaw Area about 158,000 km² Population about 3 million Existed 1807 - 1814 The Duchy of Warsaw (Polish: Księstwo Warszawskie, Latin: Ducatus Varsoviae, French: Duche de Varsovie) was a Polish state established... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Congress of Vienna was a conference between ambassadors from the major powers in Europe that was chaired by the Austrian statesman Klemens Wenzel von Metternich and held in Vienna, Austria, from October 1, 1814, to June 9, 1815. ... 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Free City of Kraków (Polish: Wolne Miasto Kraków), also known as Republic of Kraków (Rzeczpospolita Krakowska), was a city-state created by the Congress of Vienna in 1815 and controlled by its three neighbors, Russia, Prussia and Austria until 1846. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Kraków Uprising of February 1846 was an attempt to incite an all-Polish fight for home-rule but was in fact limited only to the Free City of Kraków. ...


After the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, Austria granted autonomy to Galicia, making Polish a language of government and establishing a provincial diet. As this form of Austrian rule was more benevolent than that exercised by Russia and Prussia, Kraków became a Polish national symbol and a center of culture and art. Famous painters, poets and writers of this period include Jan Matejko, Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz, Jan Kasprowicz, Juliusz Kossak, Wojciech Kossak Stanisław Wyspiański, and Stanisław Przybyszewski. The latter two were leaders of Polish modernism. The Austro-Prussian War (also called the Seven Weeks War or the German Civil War) was a war fought between Austria and Prussia in 1866 that resulted in Prussian dominance in Germany. ... 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ... The Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, or simply Galicia, was the largest and northernmost province of Austria from 1772 until 1918, with Lemberg (Lwów, Lviv) as its capital city. ... The coat of arms of the Kingdom of Prussia, 1701-1918 The word Prussia (German: Preußen or Preussen, Polish: Prusy, Lithuanian: Prūsai, Latin: Borussia) has had various (often contradictory) meanings: The land of the Baltic Prussians (in what is now parts of southern Lithuania, the Kaliningrad exclave of Russia and... Categories: Stub | Polish painters | 1838 births | 1893 deaths ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Wojciech Kossak, self-portrait. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Stanisław Przybyszewski 1868-1927, Polish novelist, dramatist, and poet of the decadent naturalistic school. ...


20th century

During the First World War, Kraków Legions led by Jozef Pilsudski set out to fight for the liberation of Poland, in alliance with Austrian and German troops. The Austrians and Germans lost the war, but the terms of the Treaty of Versailles (1919) established the first sovereign Polish state in over a century. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Term of Office from November 14, 1918 until December 9, 1922 Profession Statesman and military commander Political Party none, see Sanacja for details First Lady Maria Piłsudska Date of Birth December 5, 1867 Place of Birth Zułów, in todays Lithuania Date of Death May 12, 1935 Place of Death... Woodrow Wilson with the American Peace Commissioners The Treaty of Versailles of 1919 is the peace treaty created as a result of six months of negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919, which put an official end to World War I between the Allies and Central Powers. ... 1919 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Poland was partitioned again in 1939, at the outset of the Second World War, and Nazi German forces entered Kraków in September of that year. It became the capital of the General Government, a colonial authority under the leadership of Hans Frank. The occupation took a heavy toll, particularly on the city's cultural heritage. On one occasion, over 150 professors and other academics of the Jagiellonian University were summoned to a meeting, arrested and dispatched to the concentration camp at Sachsenhausen (see also Sonderaktion Krakau). Many relics and monuments of national culture were destroyed or looted. Major concentration camps near Kraków included Plaszow and Auschwitz. 1939 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... The General Government (in full General government for the occupied Polish areas, in German Generalgouvernement für die besetzten polnischen Gebiete) was the name given by Germany to the governing authority in Poland after its occupation by the Wehrmacht in September and October 1939. ... Hans Frank (right) hosts Heinrich Himmler during a visit to Kraków in 1940. ... Jagiellonian University (Polish: Uniwersytet Jagielloński) is a university in Krakow, Poland. ... A concentration camp is a large detention center created for political opponents, aliens, specific ethnic or religious groups, civilians of a critical war-zone, or other groups of people, often during a war. ... Sachsenhausen may refer to a quarter of Oranienburg in Germany, see Sachsenhausen (Oranienburg), and a detention facility here a quarter of Frankfurt am Main in Germany, see Sachsenhausen (Frankfurt am Main) a municipality of Weimarer Land, see Sachsenhausen (Thüringen) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other... Rector of the Jagiellonian University, Tadeusz Lehr-Spławiński Sonderaktion Krakau - is the codename for a German action against scientists from the University of Kraków and other Kraków universities at the beginning of World War II. It was carried out as a part of the plan to exterminate the Polish intellectual... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Auschwitz, in English, commonly refers to the Auschwitz concentration camp complex built near the town of Oświęcim, by Nazi Germany during World War II. Rarely, it may refer to the Polish town of Oświęcim (called by the Germans Auschwitz) itself. ...


Thanks to a manoeuvre by advancing Soviet forces, Kraków escaped complete destruction during and some historic buildings and works of art were saved. After the conclusion of the war, however, the government of the People's Republic of Poland ordered the construction of the country's largest steel mill in the suburb of Nowa Huta. This is regarded as an attempt to diminish the influence of Kraków's intellectual and artistic circles by attracting the working class. Soviet Russia is sometimes used as a somewhat sloppy synonym to the Soviet Union — although the term Soviet Russia sometimes refers to Bolshevist Russia from the October Revolution in 1917 to 1922 (Although Russian communists officially formed RSFSR in 1918). ... The Peoples Republic of Poland (Polish: Polska Rzeczpospolita Ludowa, PRL) was the official name of Poland from 1952 to 1989, during its period of rule by the Communist party, officially called the Polish United Workers Party (Polska Zjednoczona Partia Robotnicza, or PZPR). ... Steel mills are the industrial plants where pig iron is converted into steel. ... Nowa Huta (literally New Steel Mill) - is the easternmost district of Kraków. ...


Kraków's population has quadrupled since the end of the war, and it is still regarded as the cultural capital of Poland. In 1978, UNESCO placed Kraków on the list of World Heritage Sites. 1978 was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... UNESCO logo The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, commonly known as UNESCO, is a specialized agency of the United Nations system established in 1946. ... Elabana Falls is in Lamington National Park, part of the Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves World Heritage site in Queensland, Australia. ...


Politics

Kraków constituency

Members of Parliament (Sejm) elected from Kraków constituency This article is about the lower chamber of Polish parliament. ...

Barbican in Kraków
  • Kazimierz Chrzanowski , SLD-UP
  • Bronisław Cieślak , SLD-UP
  • Anna Filek , SLD-UP
  • Jerzy Hausner, SLD-UP
  • Bogdan Klich, PO
  • Marek Kotlinowski , LPR
  • Jan Orkisz , SLD-UP
  • Stanisław Papież , LPR
  • Bogdan Pęk , PSL
  • Jan Rokita, PO
  • Tomasz Szczypiński , PO
  • Zbigniew Wassermann , PiS
  • Kazimierz Wójcik , Samoobrona
  • Zbigniew Ziobro , PiS

(With permission, Author: Marek i Ewa Wojciechowscy, http://www. ... (With permission, Author: Marek i Ewa Wojciechowscy, http://www. ... Barbican (from mediæval Latin barbecana) - a fortified outpost or gateway, such as an outer defence to a city or castle and any tower situated over a gate or bridge which was used for defence purposes. ... Bogdan Klich Bogdan Klich (born on 8 May 1960 in Kraków) is a Polish politician and Member of the European Parliament for the MP & SW with the Platforma Obywatelska, part of the European Peoples Party and sits on the European Parliaments Committee on Foreign Affairs. ... Bogdan Pęk Bogdan Pęk (born on 8 April 1953 in Kraków) is a Polish politician and Member of the European Parliament for the MP & SW with the Liga Polskich Rodzin, part of the Independence and Democracy and sits on the European Parliaments Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home... Jan Maria Władysław Rokita (born June 18, 1959 in Cracow) is a Polish conservative-liberal politician, a member of Sejm, the lower chamber of the Polish parliament, and chairman of the parliamentery caucus of Platforma Obywatelska (Citizens Platform). ... Citizens Platform (Platforma Obywatelska) is a Polish conservative- liberal political party, modelled after the two main American parties. ... Zbigniew Wasserman (born 17 September 1949, Kraków) is a Polish politician, MP, representing Law and Justice (Prawo i Sprawiedliwość). ...

Education

Main building of the Cracow University of Economics
For a list of universities in Kraków see: Education in Kraków

Kraków is home to several major state universities and several dozen other schools of higher education. It is also home to Jagiellonian University, the first Polish university and one of the oldest and most prominent universities in Central Europe. Apart from the local population, the schools of Kraków provide education for inhabitants of the region of Southern Poland. Download high resolution version (3072x2048, 1167 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (3072x2048, 1167 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This is a list of universities and other institutions of higher education in Kraków. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... Jagiellonian University (Polish: Uniwersytet Jagielloński) is a university in Krakow, Poland. ... Historical lands and provinces in Central Europe Central Europe is the region of Europe between Eastern Europe and Western Europe. ...


Among the most notable schools in Kraków are:

  • Jagiellonian University
  • Cracow University of Economics [1] (http://www.ae.krakow.pl/)
  • AGH University of Science and Technology [2] (http://www.agh.edu.pl/)
  • Akademia Muzyczna w Krakowie [3] (http://www.amuz.krakow.pl/)
  • Akademia Pedagogiczna w Krakowie [4] (http://www.wsp.krakow.pl/)
  • Akademia Rolnicza w Krakowie [5] (http://www.ar.krakow.pl/)
  • Akademia Sztuk Pieknych [6] (http://www.cyf-kr.edu.pl/KRAKOW/AA/)
  • Państwowa Wyższa Szkoła Teatralna w Krakowie [7] (http://www.cyf-kr.edu.pl/KRAKOW/UM/PWST/)
  • Papieska Akademia Teologiczna [8] (http://www.pat.krakow.pl/)
  • Politechnika Krakowska [9] (http://www.pk.edu.pl/)

Jagiellonian University (Polish: Uniwersytet Jagielloński) is a university in Krakow, Poland. ... AGH University of Science and Technology (polish Akademia Górniczo - Hutnicza) is the second largest and one of the best technical universities in Poland. ...

Culture

Main article: Culture of Kraków Kraków is considered by many to be Poland’s capital of culture. ...


Kraków is considered by many to be Poland’s capital of culture. The city boasts one of the best museums in the country and some famous theaters. It counts two Nobel Prize winners in literature among its residents (Wisława Szymborska and Czesław Miłosz). It is also home to one of the world’s oldest and most distinguished universities. Kraków was named a European City of Culture in 2000. . A 1996 post stamp with Wisława Szymborska Wisława Szymborska (born July 2, 1923) is a Polish poet, essayist and translator of French literature, laureate of Nobel Prize in Literature in 1996. ... Czesław Miłosz in September 1999 Czesław Miłosz (pronounced [ʧεsȗav miȗɔʃ]; June 30, 1911–August 14, 2004) was a Polish poet and essayist. ... Jagiellonian University (Polish: Uniwersytet Jagielloński) is a university in Krakow, Poland. ...


Kraków by Night

There is no shortage of places to drink, eat, and stay merry late into the night in Kraków. Notably, the huge central Grand Square in the heart of the historic Old Town district and its environs look like they never sleep. Recently trendy new hangouts are launched also in the nearby Kazimierz quarter almost by the month.


Notable Kraków Restaurants:


Wierzynek restaurant- The oldest Polish restaurant(1364) Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1359 1360 1361 1362 1363 - 1364 - 1365 1366 1367 1368 1369 See also: 1364 state leaders Events Foundation of the Jagiellonian University in Krakow (Cracow) The Breton War of Succession...


Wentzl restaurant


Hawełka restaurant


Kraków Night Clubs:


Kraków boasts a lively club scene. The party goes on week long, but–no doubts about it–the Friday and Saturday nights tend to be the hottest. As elsewhere, on weekends Kraków's young professionals, expats, and students mingle happily in crowds that pack bars, discotheques, and restaurants in vogue at the moment. Loyal patrons happen, but most club-goers wander from place to place. Local clubs are not large, few can seat more than 100.

Wianki 2004

Recorded music is the staple, with live performances two or three nights a week. Some Kraków DJs attained local fame, while club celebrities from other parts of Poland and from abroad spin occasionally in the city. Kraków's myriad live entertainment venues cater to all tastes and generations. Sure thing, those in their twenties to thirty-something are best served since most places offer contemporary club music. On the other hand, jazz seems surprisingly popular. There are also hangouts for the fans of rock, modern pop, ballads, etc. The roots music, inspired by varied traditions of this part of Europe, has a niche of its own. Seniors, too, have their places of choice to enjoy themselves with immortal evergreens. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


Sports


Wisla Krakow, Polish football team This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... Wisła Kraków is a Polish football club based in Krakow, Poland. ... 1927 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1928 was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1949 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... 1950 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1978 was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday of the Common Era, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Polish Cup The Polish Cup in football (official Polish title: Puchar Polski) is an annually held elimination tournament for Polish football clubs and is the second most important national title in Polish football after the 1st league (or Ekstraklasa) title. ... 1926 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Polish Super Cup in football (official Polish title: Superpuchar Polski) is an annually held match between the Polish Champion (Polish 1st league winner) and Polish Cup winner. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cracovia Kraków - the oldest still existing Polish football club, based in Kraków, Poland. ... 1906 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Hutnik Kraków is a Polish football club based in Nowa Huta, Kraków External link Hutnik Kraków Official Website Categories: Sports stubs | Polish football clubs | Kraków ... TS Wisla Can-Pack Kraków is a Polish women basketball team, based in Cracow, playing in Sharp Torell Basket Liga. ... Torell Basket Liga (TBL), previously Sharp Torell Basket Liga (STBL) or Polish Women Basketball League (=Polska Liga Koszykówki Lobiet, PLKK) is the highest level league of women basketball in Poland 2004 Championship Playoffs for 1st place: Stary Browar AZS Poznań (2nd place) - Lotos VBW Clima Gdynia - (Polish Champion 2004) 1...

Sons and daughters of the city

Ludwig Gumplowicz, born March 9, 1838 in Kraków, Poland, died August 19, 1909 in Graz, Austria, was one of the founders of European sociology. ... Sociology is the study of the social lives of humans, groups, and societies, sometimes defined as the study of social interactions. ... 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...

See also:

Wikimedia Commons has more media related to:

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free images, sound and other multimedia files. ... John Paul II International Airport () is an international (intercontinental) airport located near Krakow (in the village of Balice, 11 km west of the city, 35 minutes from the city centre), in the south of Poland. ... History of Poland is filled with the struggle to get, keep, and regain freedom—the main value and priode of Poles. ... Royal coronations in Poland: This is a list of royal coronations in Poland. ... Poland was ruled by dukes (c. ... The diocese of Kraków was created in 1000 and was made the archdiocese of Kraków on October 28, 1925. ... Kraków Department (Polish: Departament krakowski) was a unit of administrative division and local government in Polish Duchy of Warsaw in years 1806-1815. ... Location Official languages Polish Established church Roman Catholic Capital Warsaw Largest City Warsaw Head of state Duke of Warsaw Area about 158,000 km² Population about 3 million Existed 1807 - 1814 The Duchy of Warsaw (Polish: Księstwo Warszawskie, Latin: Ducatus Varsoviae, French: Duche de Varsovie) was a Polish state established...

External links

  • Magical Kraków - city's official website (http://www.krakow.pl/en/)
  • Kraków 2000 - official information on cultural events (http://www.krakow2000.pl/pk2001/en/index.html)
  • Cracow Life (http://www.cracow-life.com)
  • Cracow on Wikitravel (http://wikitravel.org/en/article/Krakow)
  • Cracow Online (http://www.cracowonline.com)
  • Go-Cracow (http://www.go-cracow.com)


 
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