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Encyclopedia > Korea
Korea
Flag
Capital Seoul, Pyongyang
37°32′N 126°59′E / 37.533, 126.983
Largest conurbation (population) Seoul
Official languages Korean
Area
 -  Total 220,186 km² (84th if ranked)
85,020 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) 2.8
Population
 -  2007 estimate 72,326,462 (18th if ranked)
 -  Density 328.48/km² 
850.7/sq mi
Currency Won (₩) (N/S)
Time zone KST (UTC+9)
Entrance to Gyeongbokgung
Joseon dynasty royal throne

Korea (Korean: 한국 or 조선, see below) is a geographic area, civilization, and a former state situated on the Korean Peninsula in East Asia. Korea is currently divided into North Korea and South Korea. Korea is often used to refer to South Korea due to its greater significance and influence in the world. Korea often refers to: Korea, a civilization in East Asia (specifically Northeast Asia) now politically divided into North Korea and South Korea Korean Peninsula, a region in East Asia (specifically Northeast Asia) Republic of Korea (ROK), a state governing South Korea, often simply called Korea Peoples Democratic Republic of... Image File history File links Unification_flag_of_Korea. ... Please see: North Korea: Flag of North Korea South Korea: Flag of South Korea Unification Flag This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This map shows the location of the Korean peninsula. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Short name Statistics Location map Map of location of Seoul. ... Not to be confused with PyeongChang. ... Demographics of Korea may refer to: Demographics of South Korea Demographics of North Korea Koreans - The Korean people, an East Asian ethnic group living in the Korean Peninsula. ... Short name Statistics Location map Map of location of Seoul. ... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ... Map of countries by population for the year 2007 This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This page provides the etymology and history of the currency prior to 1945. ... â‚© is a currency sign that is used for the following currencies: North Korean won South Korean won Woolong, a fictional currency in Cowboy Bebop Category: ... 5000 KPW issued in 2002 The won is the currency of North Korea. ... ISO 4217 Code KRW User(s) Republic of Korea Inflation 2. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The Korea Standard Time (KST) is the standard timezone in North and South Korea and is 9 hours ahead of UTC (UTC+9): ie. ... UTC redirects here. ... Image File history File links Korean_royal_palace_entrance. ... Image File history File links Korean_royal_palace_entrance. ... Gyeongbokgung (Gyeongbok Palace) is a palace located in northern Seoul, South Korea. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2016x1512, 1314 KB) The throne in Gyeongbokgung in Seoul. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2016x1512, 1314 KB) The throne in Gyeongbokgung in Seoul. ... Joseon redirects here. ... Jamo redirects here. ... This article is about the Korean Peninsula. ... This article is about the geographical region. ...


Although the borders of historical Korean dynasties fluctuated, the peninsula today is defined as coterminous with the political borders of the two Koreas combined. Thus, the peninsula borders China to the northwest and Russia to the northeast, with Japan situated to the southeast across the Korea Strait. For other uses, see Border (disambiguation). ... The Military Demarcation Line is the border between North and South Korea. ... The Korea Strait is a sea passage between South Korea and Japan, connecting the East China Sea and the Sea of Japan (East Sea) in the northwest Pacific Ocean. ...


The history of Korea began with the legendary founding of Gojoseon in 2333 BCE by Dangun. Limited linguistic evidence suggests probable Altaic origins of these people, whose northern Mongolian steppe culture absorbed migration and trade with the peoples of Manchuria and China. The adoption of the Chinese writing system ("hanja" in Korean) in the 2nd century BC, and Buddhism in the 4th century AD, had profound effects on the Three Kingdoms of Korea. Koreans later passed on a modified version of these cultural advances to Japan.[1][2][3][4] Gojoseon was an ancient Korean kingdom. ... Dangun is the mythical founder of Korea. ... Altaic is a proposed language family that includes 66 languages [1] spoken by about 348 million people, mostly in and around Central Asia and northeast Asia. ... The Mongolian-Manchurian grassland, also known as the Mongolian-Manchurian steppe, is a temperate grassland of Mongolia and northern China. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Chinese written language consists of a writing system stretching back nearly 4000 years. ... Korean writing systems Hangul Hanja Hyangchal Gugyeol Idu Mixed script Korean romanization Revised Romanization of Korean McCune-Reischauer Yale Romanization Hanja is the Korean name for Chinese characters. ... The Three Kingdoms Period of Korea (hangul: 삼국시대) featured the three rival kingdoms of Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla, which dominated the Korean peninsula and parts of Manchuria for much of the 1st millennium CE. Historians claim that the Three Kingdoms period ran from the 1st century BCE (specifically 57 BC) until...


Since the Goryeo Dynasty, Korea was ruled by a single government and maintained political and cultural independence until the nineteenth century, despite the Mongol invasions of the Goryeo Dynasty in the 13th century and Japanese invasions of the Joseon Dynasty in the 16th century. In 1377, Korea produced the Jikji, the world's oldest movable metal print document.[5] In the 15th century, the turtle ships, possibly the world's first ironclad warships, were deployed, and King Sejong the Great promulgated the Korean alphabet han-geul to increase literacy among his people who could not read nor write hanja (Chinese characters). The Goryeo kingdom ruled Korea from the fall of Silla in 935 until the founding of Joseon in 1392. ... The Mongol invasions of Korea consisted of a series of campaigns by the Mongol Empire against Korea, then known as Koryo, from 1231 to 1259. ... Taegeuk is a traditional symbol of Korea Capital Gaegyeong Language(s) Korean Religion Buddhism Government Monarchy Wang  - 918 - 946 Taejo  - 949 - 975 Gwangjong  - 1259 - 1274 Wonjong  - 1351 - 1374 Gongmin Historical era 918 - 1392  - Later Three Kingdoms rise 892  - Coronation of Taejo June 15, 918  - Korea-Khitan Wars 993 - 1019  - Mongolian... Combatants Joseon Dynasty Korea, Ming Dynasty China Japan under Toyotomi Hideyoshi Commanders Korea: Yi Sun-sin, Gwon Yul, Won Gyun, Kim Myung Won, Yi Il, Sin Lip, Gwak Jae-u, Kim Shi-min China: Li Rusong , Li Rubai, Ma Gui , Qian Shi-zhen, Ren Ziqiang, Yang Yuan, Zhang Shijue, Chen... Joseon redirects here. ... Jikji is the abbreviated title of a Buddhist document, whose full title can be translated Baegun Hwasangs Anthology of the Great Priests Teachings on Identification of the Buddha’s Spirit by the Practice of Seon. ... The turtle ship (also known as Geobukseon or Kobukson by its Korean name) was a large warship belonging to the Panokseon class in Korea that was used under the Joseon Dynasty between the 15th century and 18th century. ... Ironclad (and broadside ironclad) redirects here. ... Birth name Sejong the Great (May 6, 1397 – May 18, 1450, r. ... Jamo redirects here. ... Korean writing systems Hangul Hanja Hyangchal Gugyeol Idu Mixed script Korean romanization Revised Romanization of Korean McCune-Reischauer Yale Romanization Hanja is the Korean name for Chinese characters. ...


During the latter part of the Joseon Dynasty, Korea's isolationist policy earned it the Western nickname the "Hermit Kingdom". By the late 19th century, the country became the object of the colonial designs of Japan and Europe. In 1910, Korea was forcibly annexed by Japan and remained occupied until the end of World War II in August 1945. Hermit kingdom is a term applied to any country or society which walls itself off (metaphorically or physically) from the rest of the world. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Flag of the Japanese Empire Anthem Kimi ga Yoa Korea under Japanese Occupation Capital Keijo Language(s) Korean, Japanese Religion Shintoisma Government Constitutional monarchy Emperor of Japan  - 1910–1912 Emperor Meiji  - 1912–1925 Emperor Taisho  - 1925–1945 Emperor Showa Governor-General of Korea  - 1910–1916 Masatake Terauchi  - 1916–1919 Yoshimichi... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


In 1945, the Soviet Union and the United States agreed on the surrender and disarming of Japanese troops in Korea; the Soviet Union accepting the surrender of Japan north of the 38th parallel and the United States taking the surrender south of it. This led to division of Korea by the two great powers, exacerbated by their inability to agree on the terms of Korean independence. The two Cold War rivals then established governments sympathetic to their own ideologies, leading to Korea's current division into two political entities: North Korea and South Korea. The Japanese representatives, Mamoru Shigemitsu and Yoshijiro Umezu, on board USS Missouri during the surrender ceremonies on 2 September 1945. ... The 38th parallel north is a line of latitude that cuts across Asia, the Mediterranean and the United States. ... The Korean peninsula, first divided along the 38th parallel, later along the demarcation line The division of Korea into North Korea and South Korea stems from the 1945 Allied victory in World War II, ending Japans 35-year occupation of Korea. ... One of the hallmarks of contemporary great power status is permanent membership on the United Nations Security Council. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Names of Korea

Main article: Names of Korea
See also: Korean romanization

The name "Korea" derives from the Goryeo period of Korean history, which in turn referred to the ancient kingdom of Goguryeo. Merchants of the Middle East called it Cauli (from the Chinese pronunciation), which then came to be spelled Corea and Korea. Korea is now commonly used in English contexts by both North and South Korea. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Korean romanization means using letters of the Latin alphabet to write Korean language, which in Korea is written using Hangul, and sometimes Hanja. ... Taegeuk is a traditional symbol of Korea Capital Gaegyeong Language(s) Korean Religion Buddhism Government Monarchy Wang  - 918 - 946 Taejo  - 949 - 975 Gwangjong  - 1259 - 1274 Wonjong  - 1351 - 1374 Gongmin Historical era 918 - 1392  - Later Three Kingdoms rise 892  - Coronation of Taejo June 15, 918  - Korea-Khitan Wars 993 - 1019  - Mongolian... This article is about the history of Korea. ... Chinese name Russian name Goguryeo or Koguryo was an ancient kingdom located in southern Manchuria, southern Russian Maritime province, and the northern and central parts of the Korean peninsula. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ...


In the Korean language, Korea as a whole is referred to as Han-guk (abbreviation of Dae Han Min Guk) (Hangul: 한국(대한민국); Hanja: ; Revised Romanization: Hanguk; McCune-Reischauer: Han'guk) by South Korea, and Chosŏn (Chosŏn'gŭl: 조선; Hancha: ; McCune-Reischauer: Chosǒn; Revised Romanization: Joseon) by North Korea. "The Land of the Morning Calm" is an English language nickname loosely derived from the hanja characters for Joseon, the name derived from the Joseon Dynasty and the earlier Gojoseon. (Choson and Joseon are two Romanizations of the same name.) This article is mainly about the spoken Korean language. ... Jamo redirects here. ... Korean writing systems Hangul Hanja Hyangchal Gugyeol Idu Mixed script Korean romanization Revised Romanization of Korean McCune-Reischauer Yale Romanization Hanja is the Korean name for Chinese characters. ... The Revised Romanization of Korean is the official Korean language romanization system in South Korea. ... McCune-Reischauer romanization is one of the two most widely used Korean language romanization systems, along with the Revised Romanization of Korean, which replaced (a modified) McCune-Reischauer as the official romanization system in South Korea in 2000. ... Jamo redirects here. ... Korean writing systems Hangul Hanja Hyangchal Gugyeol Idu Mixed script Korean romanization Revised Romanization of Korean McCune-Reischauer Yale Romanization Hanja is the Korean name for Chinese characters. ... McCune-Reischauer romanization is one of the two most widely used Korean language romanization systems, along with the Revised Romanization of Korean, which replaced (a modified) McCune-Reischauer as the official romanization system in South Korea in 2000. ... The Revised Romanization of Korean is the official Korean language romanization system in South Korea. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Korean writing systems Hangul Hanja Hyangchal Gugyeol Idu Mixed script Korean romanization Revised Romanization of Korean McCune-Reischauer Yale Romanization Hanja is the Korean name for Chinese characters. ... Joseon or Chosun (Korean: ì¡°ì„ ; Hanja: 朝鮮; Revised: Joseon; McCune-Reischauer: Chosŏn; Chinese: CháoxiÇŽn; Japanese: Chōsen) is a name for Korea, as used in the following cases: As part of the name of several ancient kingdoms (including Gojoseon, Gija Joseon, and Wiman Joseon); During most of the Joseon... Joseon redirects here. ... Gojoseon was an ancient Korean kingdom. ...


History

Main article: History of Korea
See also: Prehistoric Korea, History of North Korea, and History of South Korea
History of Korea

Prehistory
 Jeulmun period
 Mumun period
Gojoseon 2333-108 BC
 Jin state
Proto-Three Kingdoms: 108-57 BC
 Buyeo, Okjeo, Dongye
 Samhan: Ma, Byeon, Jin
Three Kingdoms: 57 BC - 668 AD
 Goguryeo 37 BC - 668 AD
  Sui wars
 Baekje 18 BC - 660 AD
 Silla 57 BC - 935 AD
 Gaya 42-562
North-South States: 698-935
 Unified Silla 668-935
 Balhae 698-926
Later Three Kingdoms 892-935
Goryeo 918-1392
 Khitan wars
 Mongol invasions
Joseon 1392-1897
 Japanese invasions 1592-1598
 Manchu invasions
Korean Empire 1897–1910
Japanese rule 1910–1945
 Provisional Gov't 1919-1948
Division of Korea 1945–1948
North, South Korea 1948–present
 Korean War 1950–1953 This article is about the history of Korea, up to the division of Korea in the 1940s. ... This article is about the prehistory of the Korean Peninsula, from circa 500,000 BCE through 300 BCE. See History of Korea, History of North Korea and History of South Korea for more contemporary accounts of the Korean past. ... For the history of Korea before its division, see History of Korea. ... The History of South Korea traces the development of South Korea from the division of the Korean Peninsula in 1945 to the present day. ... Image File history File links Korea_unified_vertical. ... This article is about the history of Korea, up to the division of Korea in the 1940s. ... This article is about the prehistory of the Korean Peninsula, from circa 500,000 BCE through 300 BCE. See History of Korea, History of North Korea and History of South Korea for more contemporary accounts of the Korean past. ... The Jeulmun pottery period is an archaeological era in Korean prehistory that dates to approximately 8000-1500 B.C. (Bale 2001; Choe and Bale 2002; Crawford and Lee 2003; Lee 2001, 2006). ... The Mumun Pottery Period (Hanja: 無文土器時代, Hangeul: 무문토기시대 Mumun togi sidae) is an archaeological era in Korean prehistory that dates to approximately 1500-300 B.C. (Ahn 2000; Bale 2001; Crawford and Lee 2003). ... Gojoseon was an ancient Korean kingdom. ... Proto-Three Kingdoms of Korea (원삼국시대, 原三國時代) refers to the period after the fall of Gojoseon and before the maturation of Goguryeo, Baekje, and Silla into full-fledged kingdoms. ... Chinese name Buyeo, Puyo, or Fuyu was an ancient kingdom located in todays North Korea and southern Manchuria, from around the 2nd century BC to 494. ... Okjeo was a small tribal state which arose in the northern Korean peninsula from perhaps 2nd century BC to 5th century AD. Dong-okjeo (East Okjeo) occupied roughly the area of the Hamgyŏng provinces of North Korea, and Buk-okjeo (North Okjeo) occupied the Duman River region. ... Dongye was a state which occupied portions of the northeastern Korean peninsula from roughly 150 BCE to around 400 CE. It bordered Goguryeo and Okjeo to the north, Jinhan to the south, and Chinas Lelang Commandery to the west. ... During the Samhan period, the three confederacies of Mahan, Jinhan, and Byeonhan dominated the southern portion of the Korean peninsula. ... Mahan was a loose confederacy of chiefdoms that existed from around the 1st century BC to the 3rd century CE in the southern Korean peninsula in the Chungcheong Province. ... Byeonhan, also known as Byeonjin (변진, 弁辰), was a loose confederacy of chiefdoms that existed from around the beginning of the Common Era to the 4th century CE in the southern Korean peninsula, in the south and west of the Nakdong River valley. ... Jinhan was a loose confederacy of chiefdoms that existed from around the 1st century BC to the 4th century CE in the southern Korean peninsula, to the east of the Nakdong River valley, Gyeongsang Province. ... The Three Kingdoms Period of Korea (hangul: 삼국시대) featured the three rival kingdoms of Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla, which dominated the Korean peninsula and parts of Manchuria for much of the 1st millennium CE. Historians claim that the Three Kingdoms period ran from the 1st century BCE (specifically 57 BC) until... Chinese name Russian name Goguryeo or Koguryo was an ancient kingdom located in southern Manchuria, southern Russian Maritime province, and the northern and central parts of the Korean peninsula. ... Combatants Goguryeo (Korea) Sui Dynasty (China) Commanders King Yeongyang Eulji Mundeok Gang I sik Go Geon Mu Sui Yangdi Yuwen Shu Yu Zhongwen Lai Huer Zhou Luohou Strength approximately 200,000 1,138,000 foot soldiers and total of more than 3,000,000 in invasion of 612 The... Baekje (October 18 BCE–August 660 BCE), originally Sipje, was a kingdom in the southwest of the Korean Peninsula. ... For other uses, see Silla (disambiguation). ... Gaya was a confederacy of chiefdoms in the Nakdong River valley of southern Korea, growing out of the Byeonhan confederacy of the Samhan period. ... North South States Period(남북국시대, 南北國時代) refers to the period from the 7th century to the 10th century when Unified Silla and Balhae coexited at the south and the north[1], [2]. Hitherto, this period had been called the period of Unified Silla. ... Unified Silla (668CE–935CE) is the name often applied to the kingdom of Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, after 668, when it conquered Baekje to unify the southern portion of the Korean peninsula. ... Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Alternate meaning: Bohai Sea Balhae (698 - 926) (Bohai in Chinese) was an ancient multiethnic kingdom established after the fall of Goguryeo. ... The Later Three Kingdoms of Korea (892-936) consisted of Silla, Hubaekje (later Baekje), and Taebong (also known as Hugoguryeo, or Later Goguryeo). ... Taegeuk is a traditional symbol of Korea Capital Gaegyeong Language(s) Korean Religion Buddhism Government Monarchy Wang  - 918 - 946 Taejo  - 949 - 975 Gwangjong  - 1259 - 1274 Wonjong  - 1351 - 1374 Gongmin Historical era 918 - 1392  - Later Three Kingdoms rise 892  - Coronation of Taejo June 15, 918  - Korea-Khitan Wars 993 - 1019  - Mongolian... The Goryeo-Khitan Wars were a series of 10th- and 11th-century conflicts between the kingdom of Goryeo and Khitan forces near what is now the border between China and North Korea. ... The Mongol invasions of Korea consisted of a series of campaigns by the Mongol Empire against Korea, then known as Koryo, from 1231 to 1259. ... Joseon redirects here. ... Combatants Korea under the Joseon Dynasty, China under the Ming Dynasty, Jianzhou Jurchens Japan under Toyotomi Hideyoshi Commanders Korea King Seonjo Crown Prince Gwanghae Yi Sun-sin†, Gwon Yul, Yu Seong-ryong, Yi Eok-gi†, Won Gyun†, Kim Myeong-won, Yi Il, Sin Rip†, Gwak Jae-u, Kim Si-min... The First Manchu invasion of Korea occurred in 1627, when Hong Taiji led the Manchu army against Koreas Joseon dynasty. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Flag of the Japanese Empire Anthem Kimi ga Yoa Korea under Japanese Occupation Capital Keijo Language(s) Korean, Japanese Religion Shintoisma Government Constitutional monarchy Emperor of Japan  - 1910–1912 Emperor Meiji  - 1912–1925 Emperor Taisho  - 1925–1945 Emperor Showa Governor-General of Korea  - 1910–1916 Masatake Terauchi  - 1916–1919 Yoshimichi... The Provisional Government of the Republic of Korea was a government in exile based in Shanghai, China and later in Chongqing, during the Japanese occupation of Korea. ... The Korean peninsula, first divided along the 38th parallel, later along the demarcation line The division of Korea into North Korea and South Korea stems from the 1945 Allied victory in World War II, ending Japans 35-year occupation of Korea. ... For the history of Korea before its division, see History of Korea. ... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung...

Korea Portal
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Korean dynasties are listed in the order of their ruling era. ... This is a timeline of Korean history. ... Korea has a long military history going back several thousand years, with an extensive series of wars that involved invasions, civil discord, counter-piracy actions against medieval Japan, the first use of armoured battleships in seabattles, and the devastation of rebellions against the Joseon era Japanese invasions, the forced peace... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Like most other regions in the world, science and technology in Korea has experienced periods of intense growth as well as long periods of stagnation. ...

Prehistory and Gojoseon

Main articles: Prehistoric Korea and Gojoseon

The earliest known Korean pottery dates to around 10000 BCE, and the Neolithic period begins around 6000 BCE. Gojoseon's founding legend describes Dangun, a descendent of heaven, as establishing the kingdom in 2333 BCE.[6] Archaeological and contemporary written records indicate it developed from a federation of walled cities into a centralized kingdom sometime between the 7th and 4th centuries BCE. This article is about the prehistory of the Korean Peninsula, from circa 500,000 BCE through 300 BCE. See History of Korea, History of North Korea and History of South Korea for more contemporary accounts of the Korean past. ... Gojoseon was an ancient Korean kingdom. ... (Redirected from 10000 BCE) The Paleolithic or Palaeolithic – lit. ... An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... Gojoseon was an ancient Korean kingdom. ... Dangun is the mythical founder of Korea. ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ...

Goguryeo roof tile

The original capital may have been at the Manchuria-Korea border, but was later moved to what is today Pyongyang, North Korea. In 108 BCE, the Chinese Han Dynasty defeated Wiman Joseon and installed four commanderies in the area of Liaoning and the northern Korean peninsula. Subsequent Chinese immigrations from Yan and Qi brought elements of Chinese culture to the peninsula. By 75 BCE, three of those commanderies had fallen, but the Lelang Commandery remained under successive Chinese control until 313. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 436 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Korea Korean art... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 436 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Korea Korean art... Chinese name Russian name Goguryeo or Koguryo was an ancient kingdom located in southern Manchuria, southern Russian Maritime province, and the northern and central parts of the Korean peninsula. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Not to be confused with PyeongChang. ... Han Dynasty in 87 BC Capital Changan (206 BC–9 AD) Luoyang (25 AD–220 AD) Language(s) Chinese Religion Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Chinese folk religion Government Monarchy History  - Establishment 206 BC  - Battle of Gaixia; Han rule of China begins 202 BC  - Interruption of Han rule 9 - 24  - Abdication... Wiman Joseon (194 BC - 108 BC) was the continuation of Go-Joseon, founded by Wiman. ... State of Yan (small seal script, 220 BC) Yan (pinyin: yan1, simplified Chinese/traditional Chinese: 燕) was a state during the Western Zhou, Spring and Autumn and Warring States Periods in China. ... State of Qi (small seal script, 220 BC) See Qi (disambiguation) for other meanings of Qi. Qi (齊; pinyin: qi2) was a relatively powerful state during the Spring and Autumn Period and Period of the Warring States. ... Lelang (樂浪郡 le4 lang4 jun4) was one of the Chinese commanderies which was kept in the Korean Peninsula over 400 years until Goguryeo conquers it in 313 A.D. History In 108 B.C. Emperor Wu of the Han Dynasty conquered the area under Youqu (右渠), a grandson of Wei...


Three Kingdoms

Image:Thumb

The Three Kingdoms of Korea (Goguryeo, Silla, and Baekje) dominated the peninsula and parts of Manchuria during the early Common Era. They competed with each other both economically and militarily. The Three Kingdoms Period of Korea (hangul: 삼국시대) featured the three rival kingdoms of Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla, which dominated the Korean peninsula and parts of Manchuria for much of the 1st millennium CE. Historians claim that the Three Kingdoms period ran from the 1st century BCE (specifically 57 BC) until... The Three Kingdoms Period of Korea (hangul: 삼국시대) featured the three rival kingdoms of Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla, which dominated the Korean peninsula and parts of Manchuria for much of the 1st millennium CE. Historians claim that the Three Kingdoms period ran from the 1st century BCE (specifically 57 BC) until... Chinese name Russian name Goguryeo or Koguryo was an ancient kingdom located in southern Manchuria, southern Russian Maritime province, and the northern and central parts of the Korean peninsula. ... For other uses, see Silla (disambiguation). ... Baekje (October 18 BCE–August 660 BCE), originally Sipje, was a kingdom in the southwest of the Korean Peninsula. ... BCE redirects here. ...


Goguryeo united Buyeo, Okjeo, Dongye and other states in the former Gojoseon territory, in addition to destroying the last Chinese commandery.[7] Goguryeo was the most dominant power, Goguryeo reached its tenth in the fifth century, when reign of the King Gwanggaeto and his son, King Jangsu expanded territory into almost all of Manchuria and part of inner Mongolia, and took the Seoul region from Baekje. Gwanggaeto and Jangsu subdued Baekje and Silla during their times. After the 7th Century, Goguryeo was constantly at war with the Sui and Tang dynasties of China. Chinese name Russian name Goguryeo or Koguryo was an ancient kingdom located in southern Manchuria, southern Russian Maritime province, and the northern and central parts of the Korean peninsula. ... Chinese name Buyeo, Puyo, or Fuyu was an ancient kingdom located in todays North Korea and southern Manchuria, from around the 2nd century BC to 494. ... Okjeo was a small tribal state which arose in the northern Korean peninsula from perhaps 2nd century BC to 5th century AD. Dong-okjeo (East Okjeo) occupied roughly the area of the Hamgyŏng provinces of North Korea, and Buk-okjeo (North Okjeo) occupied the Duman River region. ... Dongye was a state which occupied portions of the northeastern Korean peninsula from roughly 150 BCE to around 400 CE. It bordered Goguryeo and Okjeo to the north, Jinhan to the south, and Chinas Lelang Commandery to the west. ... King Gwanggaeto the Great of Goguryeo (374-413, r. ... King Jangsu of Goguryeo (Personal names: Koryŏn 巨連 Jùlián, Kŏryŏn 高璉 Gāolián, 394~491), a king of Goguryeo (Chinese, Gaogouli) who ruled from 413 to 491. ... Short name Statistics Location map Map of location of Seoul. ... The Sui Dynasty of China amongst the Asian, African, and European spheres of the world, 600 AD. The Sui Dynasty (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; 581-618 AD[1]) followed the Southern and Northern Dynasties and preceded the Tang Dynasty in China. ... For the band, see Tang Dynasty (band). ...


Founded around today's Seoul, the southwestern kingdom Baekje expanded far beyond Pyongyang during the peak of its powers in the 4th century. It had absorbed all of the Mahan states and subjugated most of the western Korean peninsula (including the modern provinces of Gyeonggi, Chungcheong, and Jeolla, as well as part of Hwanghae and Gangwon) to a centralized government. Baekje acquired Chinese culture and technology through contacts with the Southern Dynasties during the expansion of its territory. Short name Statistics Location map Map of location of Seoul. ... Baekje (October 18 BCE–August 660 BCE), originally Sipje, was a kingdom in the southwest of the Korean Peninsula. ... Not to be confused with PyeongChang. ... Gyeonggi is the most populous province in South Korea. ... Chungcheong (Chungcheong-do) was one of the eight provinces of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty. ... Jeolla (Jeolla-do) was one of the eight provinces of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty. ... Hwanghae (Hwanghae-do) was one of the Eight Provinces of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty, and one of the thirteen provinces of Korea during the Japanese Colonial Period. ... Gangwon (Gangwon-do) is a province of South Korea, with its capital at Chuncheon. ... The Southern dynasties 南朝 (nanchao in pinyin: nán cháo) include Liu Song, Southern Qi, Liang Dynasty and Chen Dynasty whose capital were largely all at Jiankang (although the Southern Qi capital was briefly at Jiangling (江陵, in modern Jingzhou, Hubei) during the reign of Emperor He of Southern Qi, and...

Silla crown

Although later records claim that Silla, in the southeast, was the oldest of the three kingdoms, it is now believed to have been the last kingdom to develop. By the 2nd century, Silla existed as a large state, occupying and influencing nearby city states. Silla began to gain power when it annexed the Gaya confederacy in 562 AD. The Gaya confederacy was located between Baekje and Silla. The three kingdoms of Korea often warred with each other and Silla often faced pressure from Baekje and Goguryeo but at various times Silla also allied with Baekje and Goguryeo in order to gain dominance over the peninsula. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 448 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (569 × 761 pixel, file size: 79 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Korea Silla Crown... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 448 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (569 × 761 pixel, file size: 79 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Korea Silla Crown... For other uses, see Silla (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Silla (disambiguation). ... Gaya was a confederacy of chiefdoms in the Nakdong River valley of southern Korea, growing out of the Byeonhan confederacy of the Samhan period. ...


In 660, King Muyeol of Silla ordered his armies to attack Baekje. General Kim Yu-shin, aided by Tang forces, conquered Baekje. In 661, Silla and Tang moved on Goguryeo but were repelled. King Munmu, son of Muyeol and nephew of General Kim launched another campaign in 667 and Goguryeo fell in the following year. King Taejong Muyeol 602 – 661 born Kim Chun Chu, was the 29th monarch of the southern Korean kingdom of Silla and ruled from 654 to 661. ... Baekje (October 18 BCE–August 660 BCE), originally Sipje, was a kingdom in the southwest of the Korean Peninsula. ... Kim Yu-shin (595-673) was a general in 7th-century Silla. ... For the band, see Tang Dynasty (band). ... Chinese name Russian name Goguryeo or Koguryo was an ancient kingdom located in southern Manchuria, southern Russian Maritime province, and the northern and central parts of the Korean peninsula. ... Munmu (reigned 661–681)was the thirtieth king of the Korean kingdom of Silla. ...


Unified Silla and Balhae

Main articles: Unified Silla and Balhae

In the 5th, 6th, and 7th centuries, Silla's power gradually extended across the Korean Peninsula. Silla first annexed the adjacent Gaya confederacy. By the 660s, Silla formed an alliance with the Tang Dynasty of China to conquer Baekje and later Goguryeo. After repelling Chinese forces, Silla partially unified the Peninsula, beginning a period often called Unified Silla. Unified Silla (668CE–935CE) is the name often applied to the kingdom of Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, after 668, when it conquered Baekje to unify the southern portion of the Korean peninsula. ... Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Alternate meaning: Bohai Sea Balhae (698 - 926) (Bohai in Chinese) was an ancient multiethnic kingdom established after the fall of Goguryeo. ... Gaya was a confederacy of chiefdoms in the Nakdong River valley of southern Korea, growing out of the Byeonhan confederacy of the Samhan period. ... Unified Silla (668CE–935CE) is the name often applied to the kingdom of Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, after 668, when it conquered Baekje to unify the southern portion of the Korean peninsula. ...


In the north, former Goguryeo General Dae Joyeong led a group of Goguryeo refugees to the Jilin area in Manchuria and founded Balhae (698 AD - 926 AD) as the successor to Goguryeo. At its height, Balhae's territory extended from northern Manchuria down to the northern provinces of modern-day Korea. Balhae was destroyed by the Khitans in 926. Dae Joyeong, also known as Emperor Go, established the empire of Barhae, reigning from 699 to 719. ... For the city, see Jilin City. ... Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Alternate meaning: Bohai Sea Balhae (698 - 926) (Bohai in Chinese) was an ancient multiethnic kingdom established after the fall of Goguryeo. ... The Khitan (or Khitai, Chinese: ; pinyin: Qìdān) were an ethnic group which dominated much of Manchuria in the 11th century and has been classified by Chinese historians as one of the Eastern proto-Mongolic ethnic groups Donghu (東胡族 dōng hú zú). They established the Liao Dynasty in 907...


Unified Silla fell apart in the late 9th century, giving way to the tumultuous Later Three Kingdoms period (892-935). Goryeo unified the Later Three Kingdoms and absorbed Balhae refugees. The Later Three Kingdoms of Korea (892-936) consisted of Silla, Hubaekje (later Baekje), and Taebong (also known as Hugoguryeo, or Later Goguryeo). ... Taegeuk is a traditional symbol of Korea Capital Gaegyeong Language(s) Korean Religion Buddhism Government Monarchy Wang  - 918 - 946 Taejo  - 949 - 975 Gwangjong  - 1259 - 1274 Wonjong  - 1351 - 1374 Gongmin Historical era 918 - 1392  - Later Three Kingdoms rise 892  - Coronation of Taejo June 15, 918  - Korea-Khitan Wars 993 - 1019  - Mongolian...

Cheongja unhak sanggam mun maebyeong, the 68th national treasure of South Korea.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Buddha statue at Seokguram Grotto, the 24th Korean national treasure. ...

Goryeo

Main article: Goryeo

The country Goryeo was founded in 918 and replaced Silla as the ruling dynasty of Korea. ("Goryeo" is a short form of "Goguryeo" and the source of the English name "Korea.") The dynasty lasted until 1392. During this period laws were codified, and a civil service system was introduced. Buddhism flourished, and spread throughout the peninsula. The development of celadon industry flourished in 12th and 13th century. The publication of Tripitaka Koreana onto 80,000 wooden blocks and the invention of the world's first metal printing press in 13th century attest to Goryeo's cultural achievements. Their dynasty was threatened by Mongol invasion from the 1230s into the 1270s, but the dynastic line continued to survive until 1392 since they negotiated a treaty with the Mongols that kept its sovereign power. In 1350s, King Gongmin was free at last to reform a Goryeo government. Gongmin had various problems that needed to be dealt with, which included the removal of pro-Mongol aristocrats and military officials, the question of land holding, and quelling the growing animosity between the Buddhists and Confucian scholars. Taegeuk is a traditional symbol of Korea Capital Gaegyeong Language(s) Korean Religion Buddhism Government Monarchy Wang  - 918 - 946 Taejo  - 949 - 975 Gwangjong  - 1259 - 1274 Wonjong  - 1351 - 1374 Gongmin Historical era 918 - 1392  - Later Three Kingdoms rise 892  - Coronation of Taejo June 15, 918  - Korea-Khitan Wars 993 - 1019  - Mongolian... Taegeuk is a traditional symbol of Korea Capital Gaegyeong Language(s) Korean Religion Buddhism Government Monarchy Wang  - 918 - 946 Taejo  - 949 - 975 Gwangjong  - 1259 - 1274 Wonjong  - 1351 - 1374 Gongmin Historical era 918 - 1392  - Later Three Kingdoms rise 892  - Coronation of Taejo June 15, 918  - Korea-Khitan Wars 993 - 1019  - Mongolian... Buddhism is a variety of teachings, sometimes described as a religion[1] or way of life that attempts to identify the causes of human suffering and offer various ways that are claimed to end, or ease suffering. ... Alternate meaning: Celadon (color) Celadon funerary jar from the Three Kingdoms period Celadon is a type of pottery having a pale green glaze. ... The Tripitaka Koreana (lit. ... The printing press is a mechanical device for printing many copies of a text on rectangular sheets of paper. ... Honorary guard of Mongolia. ... Gongmin ruled Goryeo (Korea) from 1351 until 1374. ...


Joseon dynasty

Main article: Joseon Dynasty
Hunmin jeong-eum, After called hangul.

In 1392, the general Yi Seong-gye established the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910) with a largely bloodless coup. The Joseon Dynasty is believed to have been the longest-lived actively ruling dynasty in East Asia. He named it the Joseon Dynasty in honor of the previous Joseon before (Gojoseon is the first Joseon. "Go", meaning "later", was added to distinguish between the two). King Taejo moved the capital to Hanseong (formerly Hanyang; modern-day Seoul) and built the Gyeongbokgung palace. In 1394 he adopted Confucianism as the country's official religion, resulting in much loss of power and wealth by the Buddhists. The prevailing philosophy was Neo-Confucianism, which was developed by Zhu Xi. Joseon experienced advances in science and culture. King Sejong the Great (1418-1450) promulgated hangul, the Korean alphabet. The period saw various other cultural and technological advances as well as the dominance of neo-Confucianism over the entire peninsula. Between 1592 and 1598, Japan invaded Korea. Toyotomi Hideyoshi led the forces and tried to invade the Asian continent through Korea, but was eventually repelled before even getting through Korea. This war also saw the rise of the career of Admiral Yi Sun-shin and his "turtle ship" or gobukseon. In the 1620s and 1630s Joseon suffered invasions by the Manchu who eventually also conquered the Chinese Ming Dynasty. After that, the Joseon dynasty swore allegiance to the Qing Court. During the Joseon dynasty, Koreans brought Roman Catholicism (and other forms of Christianity in Korea followed shortly thereafter) into Korea, at first in secret. Joseon redirects here. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Hunmin Jeongeum (Hangul: 훈민 정음; Hanja: 訓民正音; The Correct/Proper Sounds for the Education of the People) denotes two things in Korean: The original official name for Hangul, the native Korean phonetic alphabet; and Hunmin Jeongeum, the document in which Hangeul is first described. ... Taejo of Joseon (1335-1408; r. ... Joseon redirects here. ... Joseon redirects here. ... Seoul is the capital of South Korea and was, until 1945, the capital of all of Korea. ... Hanyang is also a former name of Seoul, South Korea. ... Short name Statistics Location map Map of location of Seoul. ... Gyeongbokgung (Gyeongbok Palace) is a palace located in northern Seoul, South Korea. ... A Confucian temple in Wuwei, Peoples Republic of China. ... Neo-Confucianism (traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: )/(traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a form of Confucianism that was primarily developed during the Sung Dynasty, but which can be traced back to Han Yu and Li Ao in the Tang Dynasty. ... Zhu Xi or Chu Hsi (born October 18, 1130, Yuxi, Fujian province, China – died April 23, 1200, China) was a Song Dynasty (960-1279) Confucian scholar who became the leading figure of the School of Principle and the most influential rationalist Neo-Confucian in China. ... Birth name Sejong the Great (May 6, 1397 – May 18, 1450, r. ... Jamo redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Hideyoshi redirects here. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Yi Sun-sin (April 18, 1545 — December 16, 1598), was a famous Korean naval leader. ... The turtle ship (also known as Geobukseon or Kobukson by its Korean name) was a large warship belonging to the Panokseon class in Korea that was used under the Joseon Dynasty between the 15th century and 18th century. ... During the 17th century, there were two Manchu invasions of Korea: First Manchu expedition to Korea, in 1627 Second Manchu expedition to Korea, in 1637 Category: ... For other uses, see Ming. ... The Samjeondo Monument (South Korean Historic site no. ... The Qing Dynasty (Manchu: daicing gurun; Chinese: 清朝; pinyin: qīng cháo; Wade-Giles: ching chao), sometimes known as the Manchu Dynasty, was founded by the Manchu clan Aisin Gioro, in what is today northeast China expanded into China proper and the surrounding territories of Inner Asia, establishing the... It has been suggested that Christianization of Korea be merged into this article or section. ...


Japanese occupation

Go Fishing, Georges Ferdinand Bigot, Tobae, February 1887. It shows Korea as a fish which China, Russia, and Japan are all trying to catch.

Beginning in the 1870s, Japan began to force Korea to move out of China's sphere of influence into its own. Japan forced Korea to engage in foreign trade through the Treaty of Ganghwa in 1876. In 1895, Empress Myeongseong of Korea was assassinated by the Japanese under Miura Gorō's directive (Kim et al. 1976).[8] In Manchuria on 1909, An Jung-geun assassinated the former Resident-General of Korea, Itō Hirobumi for his role in trying to force Korea into occupation. In 1910, an already militarily occupied Korea was a forced party to the Japan-Korea Annexation Treaty. This is a controversial treaty since the treaty was never ratified by the Korean Emperor and the required Korean Imperial seal was absent.[9] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (1400 × 929 pixel, file size: 199 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (1400 × 929 pixel, file size: 199 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Georges Ferdinand Bigot (1860-1927), French cartoonist, illustrator and artist, who was trained at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris by Jean-Léon Gérôme and Carolus-Duran. ... Flag of the Japanese Empire Anthem Kimi ga Yoa Korea under Japanese Occupation Capital Keijo Language(s) Korean, Japanese Religion Shintoisma Government Constitutional monarchy Emperor of Japan  - 1910–1912 Emperor Meiji  - 1912–1925 Emperor Taisho  - 1925–1945 Emperor Showa Governor-General of Korea  - 1910–1916 Masatake Terauchi  - 1916–1919 Yoshimichi... The Treaty of Ganghwa, also called Korea-Japanese Treaty of Amity, signed in 1876, was written by Kuroda Kiyotaka, Governor of Hokkaidō, and designed to open up Korea to Japanese trade. ... Her Imperial Majesty Empress Myeongseong of Korea (October 19, 1851 – October 8, 1895), more commonly known as Queen Min (明成皇后), was the last empress of Korea. ... Miura Gorō ) (1846-1926), born in Yamaguchi, Japan to a samurai of the Hagi clan, was the Japanese foreign minister to Korea. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An Jung-geun as a Korean Soldier Ahn Jung-geun or An Jung-geun (September 2, 1879 - March 26, 1910) (Christian name: Thomas) was the Korean independence activist who is best known for assassination of the Japanese military governor of Korea, Ito Hirobumi, during Japanese colonial occupation of Korea. ... During the period between 1910 and 1948 there were various Governors of Korea. ... Itō Hirobumi , 16 October 1841–26 October 1909, also called Hirofumi/Hakubun and Shunsuke in his youth) was a Japanese statesman, Resident-General of Korea, four times Prime Minister of Japan (the 1st, 5th, 7th and 10th) and genrō. Itō was assassinated by An Jung-geun, a Korean anti-Japanese... The Treaty of Annexation of Korea by Japan, also called in Korea 경술국치(庚戌國恥), meaning Humiliation of the Nation in the Year of the Dog, was signed on August 22, 1910 by the representatives of the Korean and Japanese Imperial Governments. ...


Even before formal Japanese colonial rule, the Korean Independence Movement was already in existence. Korean resistance to the brutal[10][11][12] Japanese occupation was manifested in the nonviolent March 1st Movement of 1919, where 7,000 demonstrators were killed by Japanese police and military.[13] The Korean liberation movement also spread to neighboring Manchuria and Siberia. The nature of the search for Korean independence under the repressive Japanese occupation period (1890-1945) has a particularly complicated and diverse history. ... The March First Movement, or the Samil Movement, was one of the earliest displays of Korean nationalism during the Japanese rule. ... The nature of the search for Korean independence under the repressive Japanese occupation period (1890-1945) has a particularly complicated and diverse history. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about Siberia as a whole. ...


Over five million Koreans were conscripted for labor beginning in 1939,[14] and tens of thousands of men were forced into Japan's military.[15] Approximately 200,000 girls and women,[16] mostly from Korea and China, were forced into sexual slavery for the Japanese military.[17] In 1993, Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yohei Kono acknowledged the terrible injustices faced by these euphemistically named "comfort women".[18][19] Alternate Japanese name Chinese name Korean name Comfort women ) or military comfort women ) is a euphemism for the thousands of women who were forced into sexual slavery for Japanese military brothels during World War II.[1] There is still some disagreement about exactly how many women were victimized. ...


During Japanese Colonial rule, the Korean language was suppressed in an effort to eradicate Korean nationalism. Koreans were forced to take Japanese surnames, known as Sōshi-kaimei.[20] Traditional Korean culture suffered heavy losses, as numerous Korean cultural artifacts were destroyed[21] or taken to Japan.[22] To this day, valuable Korean artifacts can often be found in Japanese museums or among private collections.[23] One investigation by the South Korean government identified 75,311 cultural assets that were taken from Korea, 34,369 of which are in Japan, and 17,803 of which are in the United States.[24] Literal meaning: Create a surname (shi) and change (your) given name). ... The traditional culture of Korea is shared by South Korea and North Korea, but there are regional differences. ...


Korean War

Main article: Korean War
The earliest surviving depiction of the flag was printed in a U.S. Navy book Flags of Maritime Nations in July 1882.

With the defeat of Japan in 1945, the United Nations developed plans for a trusteeship administration, the Soviet Union administering the peninsula north of the 38th parallel and the United States administering the south. The politics of the Cold War resulted in the 1948 establishment of two separate governments, North Korea and South Korea. Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... Image File history File links Taegukgi. ... Image File history File links Taegukgi. ... UN redirects here. ... The 38th parallel north is a line of latitude that cuts across Asia, the Mediterranean and the United States. ... The United States Army Military Government in Korea, also known as USAMGIK, was the official ruling body of the southern half of the Korean Peninsula from September 8, 1945 to August 15, 1948. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


In June of 1950 North Korea invaded the South, using Russian tanks and weaponry. During the Korean War (1950-1953), millions of civilians died and the three years of fighting throughout the nation effectively destroyed most cities. Around 171,000 POWs were captured and held by the Americans and South Koreans on Geojedo (an island in the south)[25] The war ended in a ceasefire agreement at approximately the Military Demarcation Line (Korea). Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... Geojedo or Geoje Island (also often spelled Koje Island) is the principal island of Geoje City, on the southern coast of Gyeongsangnam-do province, South Korea. ... The Military Demarcation Line is the border between North and South Korea. ...


Geography

Main article: Korean Peninsula
See also: Geography of North Korea, Geography of South Korea, and Provinces of Korea
Daedongyeojido, a map of Korea
A view of Seoraksan.

Korea is located on the Korean Peninsula in North-East Asia. To the northwest, the Amnok River (Yalu River) separates Korea from China and to the northeast, the Duman River (Tumen River) separates Korea from China and Russia. The Yellow Sea is to the west, the East China Sea is to the south, and the Sea of Japan (East Sea) is to the east of Korea.[26] Notable islands include Jeju-do, Ulleung-do, and Liancourt Rocks (Dokdo in Korean). This article is about the Korean Peninsula. ... Map of North Korea North Korea is located in eastern Asia, on the northern half of the Korean Peninsula. ... Map of South Korea South Korea is located in Eastern Asia, on the southern half of the Korean Peninsula jutting out from the far east of the Asian land mass. ... This article describes the historical evolution of Koreas provinces (Do ; Hangul: 도; Hanja: 道). For detailed information on current administrative divisions, please see Administrative divisions of North Korea and Administrative divisions of South Korea. ... Download high resolution version (700x1165, 339 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Gando Categories: Author died more than 100 years ago public domain images | NowCommons ... Download high resolution version (700x1165, 339 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Gando Categories: Author died more than 100 years ago public domain images | NowCommons ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 658 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Korea Mt. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 658 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Korea Mt. ... Seorak-san is the highest mountain in the Taebaek mountain range in the Gangwon province in eastern South Korea. ... This article is about the Korean Peninsula. ... East Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... The Amnok River, or the Yalu River, is a river on the border between China and North Korea. ... Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Manchu name Manchu: (Tumen ula) Mongolian name Mongolian: Russian name Russian: The Tumen or Dumen River is a 521 km-long river that serves as part of the boundary between China, North Korea, and Russia, rising in the Changbai/Jangbaek Mountains and flowing into the Sea... ... For other uses, see East Sea (Chinese mythology). ... The Sea of Japan is a marginal sea of the western Pacific Ocean, bordered by Japan, Korea and Russia. ... Jeju is the smallest province of South Korea, situated on its largest island. ... Ulleung-do is a Korean island in the Sea of Japan (East Sea). ... Dokdo redirects here. ...


The southern and western parts of the peninsula have well-developed plains, while the eastern and northern parts are mountainous. The highest mountain in Korea is Baekdusan (2744 m), through which runs the border with China. The southern extension of Baekdusan is a highland called Gaema Heights. This highland was mainly raised during the Cenozoic orogeny and partly covered by volcanic matter. To the south of Gaema Gowon, successive high mountains are located along the eastern coast of the peninsula. This mountain range is named Baekdudaegan. Some significant mountains include Sobaeksan (2,184 m), Baeksan (1,724 m), Geumgangsan (1,638 m), Seoraksan (1,708 m), Taebaeksan (1,567 m), and Jirisan (1,915 m). There are several lower, secondary mountain series whose direction is almost perpendicular to that of Baekdudaegan. They are developed along the tectonic line of Mesozoic orogeny and their directions are basically northwest. Baitou Mountain, or Paektu Mountain, is a mountain on the border between China and North Korea. ... Mammals are the dominant creatures of Cenozoic. ... The Baekdudaegan is a mountain range which runs most of the length of the Korean Peninsula, from Baekdusan in the north to Jirisan in the south. ... The Sobaek Mountains are a mountain range cutting across the southern Korean peninsula. ... KÅ­mgangsan (Diamond Mountain) is the second-tallest mountain in North Korea, with a height of 1638 metres. ... Seorak-san is the highest mountain in the Taebaek mountain range in the Gangwon province in eastern South Korea. ... The Taebaek Mountains are a mountain range in both North and South Korea. ... Jiri-san is a mountain in the south of South Korea. ...


Unlike most older mountains on the mainland, many important islands in Korea were formed by volcanic activity in the Cenozoic orogeny. Jeju-do, situated off the southern coast, is a large volcanic island whose main mountain Hallasan (1950 m) is the highest in South Korea. Ulleung-do is a volcanic island in the Sea of Japan, whose composition is more felsic than Jeju-do. The volcanic islands tend to be younger, the more westward. Short name Statistics Location map Map of South Korea highlighting Jeju-do. ... Hallasan (한라산) is a dormant volcano on Jeju Island of South Korea. ... Ulleung-do is a Korean island in the Sea of Japan (East Sea). ...


Because the mountainous region is mostly on the eastern part of the peninsula, the main rivers tend to flow westwards. Two exceptions are the southward-flowing Nakdonggang and Seomjingang. Important rivers running westward include the Amnok River (Yalu), the Cheong-cheongang, the Daedonggang, the Han River, the Geumgang, and the Yeongsangang. These rivers have vast flood plains and provide an ideal environment for wet-rice cultivation. Map of Korea, showing some major rivers. ... The Nakdong River (Rakdong in North Korean) is the longest river in South Korea, and passes through major cities such as Daegu and Busan. ... The Seomjin River is a river in South Korea. ... The Yalu (Amnok) River is a river on the border between China and North Korea. ... The Taedong River is a large river in North Korea. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Kumgang or Geumgang may refer to: Kumgang County, a county in Kangwon province, North Korea Kumgang mountain, a mountain in Kangwon province, North Korea The Geum River, in western South Korea. ... The Yeongsan River is a river in south-western South Korea. ...


The southern and southwestern coastlines of Korea form a well-developed ria coastline, known as Dadohae-jin in Korean. Its convoluted coastline provides mild seas, and the resulting calm environment allows for safe navigation, fishing, and seaweed farming. In addition to the complex coastline, the western coast of the Korean Peninsula has an extremely high tidal amplitude (at Incheon, around the middle of the western coast. It can get as high as 9 m). Vast tidal flats have been developing on the south and west coastlines. Georges River, in the southern suburbs of Sydney (Australia) is a ria, or drowned river valley. ... Inchon redirects here. ...


Demographics

The combined population of the Koreas is about 73 million (North Korea: 23 million, South Korea: 50 million). Korea is chiefly populated by a highly homogeneous ethnic group, the Koreans, who speak the Korean language. The number of foreigners living in Korea has also steadily increased since the late 20th century, particularly in South Korea, where more than 1 million foreigners currently reside. A minority population of ethnic Chinese (roughly 440,000 as of August 2007[27]) live in South Korea and small communities of ethnic Chinese and Japanese are also found in North Korea.[28] // noun: Korean(s) adjective: Korean Population: 48,846,823 (July 2006 est. ... The demographics of North Korea are difficult to assess due to the limited amount of data available from the country. ... An ethnic group is a group of people who identify with one another, or are so identified by others, on the basis of a boundary that distinguishes them from other groups. ... This article is mainly about the spoken Korean language. ... Ethnic Chinese in Korea have existed as a recognizable community for at least 120 years. ...


Language

Main articles: Korean language and Hangul

Korean is the official language of both North and South Korea, and of Yanbian Autonomous Prefecture in Manchuria area of China. Worldwide, there are around 100 million or more speakers of the Korean Language. South Korea has around 50 million speakers while North Korea around 27 million. Other large groups of Korean speakers are found in the United States (around 2.5 million speakers), China (around 2 million speakers), the former Soviet Union (around 500,000), Japan (around 900,000), Canada (100,000), Philippines (70,000) and Australia (150,000). It is estimated that there are around 700,000 people scattered across the world who are able to speak Korean because of job requirements (for example, salespersons or businessmen with Korean contacts), marriages to Koreans or out of pure interest in the language.[citation needed] This article is mainly about the spoken Korean language. ... Jamo redirects here. ...


The genealogical classification of Korean is debated. Some linguists place it in the Altaic language family; others consider it to be a language isolate. Korean is agglutinative in its morphology and SOV in its syntax. Like Japanese and Vietnamese, Korean has borrowed much vocabulary from the genetically unrelated Chinese or created vocabulary on Chinese models. Altaic is a proposed language family that includes 66 languages [1] spoken by about 348 million people, mostly in and around Central Asia and northeast Asia. ... A language isolate, in the absolute sense, is a natural language with no demonstrable genealogical (or genetic) relationship with other living languages; that is, one that has not been demonstrated to descend from an ancestor common to any other language. ... It has been suggested that Agglutination be merged into this article or section. ... In linguistic typology, Subject Object Verb (SOV) is the type of languages in which the subject, object, and verb of a sentence appear (usually) in that order. ... For other uses, see Syntax (disambiguation). ...


Modern Korean is written almost exclusively in the hangul script, which was invented in the 15th century. While hangul may appear logographic, it is actually a phonemic alphabet organized into syllabic blocks. Each block consists of at least two of the 24 hangul letters (jamo): at least one each of the 14 consonants and 10 vowels. Historically, the alphabet had several additional letters (see obsolete jamo). For a phonological description of the letters, see Korean phonology. Hanja (Chinese characters) and Roman characters are sometimes included within hangul texts, particularly in South Korea. Jamo redirects here. ... A Chinese logogram A logogram, or logograph, is a single written character which represents a word or a morpheme (a meaningful unit of language). ... In spoken language, a phoneme is a basic, theoretical unit of sound that can distinguish words (i. ... For the computer operating system, see Syllable (operating system). ... Jamo redirects here. ... In articulatory phonetics, a consonant is a sound in spoken language that is characterized by a closure or stricture of the vocal tract sufficient to cause audible turbulence. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Jamo redirects here. ... This article is mainly about the spoken Korean language. ... Korean writing systems Hangul Hanja Hyangchal Gugyeol Idu Mixed script Korean romanization Revised Romanization of Korean McCune-Reischauer Yale Romanization Hanja is the Korean name for Chinese characters. ... Romaja literally means Roman letters in Korean, and refers to the Roman alphabet. ...


Culture and arts

Main article: Culture of Korea
See also: Korean art, Korean pottery, Korean martial arts, and Korean dance
Korean Buddhist architecture

In ancient Chinese texts, Korea is referred to as "Rivers and Mountains Embroidered on Silk" (금수강산, ) and "Eastern Nation of Decorum" (동방예의지국, ).[29] During the 7th and 8th centuries, the silk road connected Korea to Arabia. In 845, Arab traders wrote, "Beyond China is a land where gold abounds and which is named Silla. The Muslims who have gone there have been charmed by the country and tend to settle there and abandon all idea of leaving.[30]" This article is about the traditional culture of Korea. ... Landscape of Geumgangsan in Korea. ... Korean pottery appeared later than south Chinese pottery, and required a reasonably stable village culture before domestic Korean potters wheels and kilns could be produced. ... Practitioners from a Korean martial arts school in Calgary do a demonstration Korean martial arts (Hangul: 무술 or 무예, Hanja: 武術 or 武藝) are the martial arts that are native to, or were adapted and modified by, Korea. ... Muhee, dancers are performing Gain jeon mokdan (가인전목단), one of the royal court dance Korean dance is a type of dance, historically derived in Korea. ... Gyongpodae in Gangneung, South Korea. ... Gyongpodae in Gangneung, South Korea. ... For other uses, see Silk Road (disambiguation). ... The Arabian Peninsula The Arabian Peninsula is a mainly desert peninsula in Southwest Asia at the junction of Africa and Asia and an important part of the greater Middle East. ... For other uses, see Silla (disambiguation). ...


Korean festivities often showcase vibrant colors, which have been attributed to Mongolian influences: bright red, yellow, and green often mark traditional Korean motifs.[31] These bright colors are sometimes seen in the traditional dress known as hanbok. Hanbok (한복) (South Korea) or chosŏn-ot (조선옷) (North Korea) is the traditional Korean dress. ...


One peculiarity of Korean culture is its age reckoning system. Individuals are regarded as one year old when they are born, and their age increments on New Year's Day rather than on the anniversary of their birthday. Thus, one born on December the 31st would be aged two on the day after they were born. Accordingly, a Korean person's stated age will be one or two years more than their age expressed in the Western tradition. East Asian age reckoning is a concept that originated in China and is used in East Asian countries. ... Joseon dynasty court architecture Lotus Lantern Festival The traditional culture of Korea is historically shared by North Korea and South Korea [1], although the current political separation of the two states has resulted in divergence in the modern Korean cultures. ...


Literature

Main article: Korean literature

Korean literature written before the end of the Joseon Dynasty is called "Classical" or "Traditional." Literature, written in Chinese characters (hanja), was established at the same time as the Chinese script arrived on the peninsula. Korean scholars were writing poetry in the classical Chinese style as early as the 2nd century BCE, reflecting Korean thoughts and experiences of that time. Classical Korean literature has its roots in traditional folk beliefs and folk tales of the peninsula, strongly influenced by Confucianism, Buddhism and Taoism. Korean literature is the body of literature produced in Korea. ... Joseon redirects here. ... Korean writing systems Hangul Hanja Hyangchal Gugyeol Idu Mixed script Korean romanization Revised Romanization of Korean McCune-Reischauer Yale Romanization Hanja is the Korean name for Chinese characters. ... A Confucian temple in Wuwei, Peoples Republic of China. ... Buddhism is a variety of teachings, sometimes described as a religion[1] or way of life that attempts to identify the causes of human suffering and offer various ways that are claimed to end, or ease suffering. ... Taoism (or Daoism) refers to a variety of related Chinese philosophical and religious traditions and concepts. ...


Modern literature is often linked with the development of hangul, which helped spread literacy from the aristocracy to the common people and women. Hangul, however, only reached a dominant position in Korean literature in the second half of the 19th century, resulting in a major growth in Korean literature. Sinsoseol, for instance, are novels written in hangul. Jamo redirects here. ...


The Korean War led to the development of literature centered around the wounds and chaos of war. Much of the post-war literature in South Korea deals with the daily lives of ordinary people, and their struggles with national pain. The collapse of the traditional Korean value system is another common theme of the time. Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ...


Religion

Amitabha and Eight Great Bodhisattvas, Goryeo scroll from the 1300s

Confucian tradition has dominated Korean thought, along with contributions by Buddhism, Taoism, and Korean Shamanism. Since the middle of the 20th century, however, Christianity has competed with Buddhism in South Korea, while religious practice has been suppressed in North Korea. Image File history File links Goryeo_Buddhist_painting. ... Image File history File links Goryeo_Buddhist_painting. ... Korean Confucianism is the form of Confucianism developed in Korea. ... The grounds of Koreas Buryeongsa Temple. ... It has been suggested that Christianization of Korea be merged into this article or section. ... Confucianism (儒家 Pinyin: rújiā The School of the Scholars), sometimes translated as the School of Literati, is an East Asian ethical, religious and philosophical system originally developed from the teachings of Confucius. ... Buddhism is a variety of teachings, sometimes described as a religion[1] or way of life that attempts to identify the causes of human suffering and offer various ways that are claimed to end, or ease suffering. ... Taoism (or Daoism) refers to a variety of related Chinese philosophical and religious traditions and concepts. ... There are a number of shamanistic practices that are developed in Korea, where the role of a shaman is most frequently taken by women. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ...


According to 2003 statistics compiled by the South Korean government, about 46% of citizens profess to follow no particular religion. Christians account for 27.3% of the population (of which half are Catholics and half are various denominations of Protestantism) and Buddhists 25.3%. It has been suggested that Christianization of Korea be merged into this article or section. ... The grounds of Koreas Buryeongsa Temple. ...


Koreans valued scholarship and rewarded education and study of Chinese classic texts; Yangban boys were highly educated in hanja. In Silla, the bone rank system defined a person's social status, and a similar system persisted through the end of the Joseon Dynasty. In addition, the gwageo civil service examination provided paths of upward mobility. Chinese classic texts or Chinese canonical texts are the classical literature in Chinese culture that are considered to be the best or the most valuable. ... The Yangban were a well educated scholarly class of male Confucian scholars who were part of the ruling elite within Korea prior to 1945 and the republics period of Korean history. ... Korean writing systems Hangul Hanja Hyangchal Gugyeol Idu Mixed script Korean romanization Revised Romanization of Korean McCune-Reischauer Yale Romanization Hanja is the Korean name for Chinese characters. ... For other uses, see Silla (disambiguation). ... Relationship of Bone-Rank Gradations in Silla to Office Rank and Post [1] The bone rank system was the system of aristocratic rank used in the ancient Korean kingdom of Silla. ... Joseon redirects here. ... The gwageo (or kwago) were the national civil service examinations under the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties of Korea. ...


Cuisine

Main article: Korean cuisine

Korean cuisine is probably best known for kimchi(한글: 김치), which uses a distinctive fermentation process of preserving vegetables, most commonly cabbage. Pepper (chilli) paste(한글: 고추장 - pronounced go-choo-jang) is also commonly used, often as pepper (chilli) powder, earning the cuisine a reputation for being spicy. Hanjeongsik Korean cuisine is based on the traditional foods and preparation techniques of Korea. ... Kimchi, also spelled gimchi or kimchee, is a traditional Korean fermented dish made of some select vegetables with varied seasonings, most commonly referring to the spicy baechu variety. ... Jamo redirects here. ... For other uses, see Fermentation. ... Jamo redirects here. ...


Bulgogi(한글: 불고기) (roasted marinated meat, usually beef), galbi (ribs), and samgyeopsal (pork belly) are popular meat entrees. Meals are usually accompanied by a soup or stew, such as galbitang (stewed ribs) and doenjang jjigae(한글: 된장찌개) (fermentated bean paste stew). The center of the table is filled with a shared collection of sidedishes called banchan. Bulgogi with Banchan Bulgogi is one of Koreas most popular beef dishes. ... Jamo redirects here. ... Galbi or kalbi is a Korean dish made from beef short ribs, though it can also be made with pork ribs. ... Samgyeopsal is a popular Korean dish. ... Doenjang is a traditional Korean fermented soybean paste. ... Jjigae (pronounced jih- geh)is a Korean dish similar to a Western stew. ... Jamo redirects here. ... Banchan, sometimes spelled panchan, refers to small side-dish plates in Korean cuisine. ...


Other popular dishes include bibimbap(한글: 비빔밥)which literally means "mixed rice" (rice mixed with meat, vegetables, and pepper paste) and naengmyeon(한글: 냉면) (cold noodles with soup). Bibimbap (비빔밥) is a popular Korean dish. ... Jamo redirects here. ... Naengmyeon (냉면, Naeng-myeon, Naengmyun, Naeng-myun), literally cold noodles, is a Korean dish. ... Jamo redirects here. ...

See also: Korean tea ceremony and Korean royal court cuisine

A typical setting for a Korean tea ceremony disregarding a contemporary tiled rather than paper covered floor The Korean tea ceremony is a unique form of tea ceremony practiced in Korea for more than a thousand years. ... Korean royal court cuisine or Surasang is the cuisine traditionally consumed at the court of the Joseon Dynasty, which ruled Korea from 1392 to 1910. ...

Video Games

South Korea is widely known as a global hub for professional video game players. Online games such as Starcraft and World of Warcraft are immensely popular. Top players in Korea are known to gain almost celebrity status, and are regarded as professional athletes by their fans. It is believed that the popular internet term "zerg rush keke", and "pwn" originated in Korean gaming circles.


Education

The modern Korean school system consists of 6 years in elementary school, 3 years in middle school, and 3 years in high school. Students are supposed to go to elementary and middle school, and do not have to pay for it.(The teachers are paid from taxes) Most public middle school and high school students have to wear uniforms, and are not supposed to grow their hair more than a particular length. The Programme for International Student Assessment, coordinated by the OECD, currently ranks South Korea's science education as the 11th best in the world, being significantly higher than the OECD average.[32] Although South Korean students often rank high on international comparative tests, the education system is sometimes criticized for its emphasis on passive learning and memorization. The Korean education system is much more strict and structured than most western societies and Korean students rarely have free time to spend enjoying themselves as they are under a lot of pressure to perform and gain entrance to university.[citation needed] Education in the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (DPRK) is strictly controlled by the government. ... The Education in South Korea is seen as the most important key to success and competition is consequently very heated and fierce. ... The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) is a triennial world-wide test of 15-year-old schoolchildrens scholastic performance, the implementation of which is coordinated by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). ... The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international organization of those developed countries that accept the principles of representative democracy and a free market economy. ...


Science and technology

Cheomseongdae, one of the world's oldest surviving astronomical observatories

One of the best known artifacts of Korea's history of science and technology is Cheomseongdae(첨성대, ), a 9.4-meter high observatory built in 634. It is considered to be one of the world's oldest surviving astronomical observatories. Like most other regions in the world, science and technology in Korea has experienced periods of intense growth as well as long periods of stagnation. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Cheomseongdae. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Cheomseongdae. ... Cheomseongdae is a stone tower that seems to have been built in the middle 7th century in Gyeongju by Silla. ... Cheomseongdae is a stone tower that seems to have been built in the middle 7th century in Gyeongju by Silla. ...


The world's first metal mechanical movable type printing was developed in Korea in 1232 by Choe Yun-ui during the Goryeo Dynasty, modeled after widespread Chinese clay (Bi Sheng in 1041), several hundred years before Johann Gutenberg developed his metal letterset type (Cumings 1997: 65). Though the block printing was used much earlier, metal movable type printing press marked a significant development in printing allowing the same tools to be used for more diverse printings. The Jikji is the world's earliest remaining movable metal printed book, printed in Korea in 1377. The world's earliest known surviving example of woodblock printing is the Mugujeonggwang Great Dharani Sutra.[33] It is believed to have been printed in Korea in 750-751 AD which, if correct, would make it older than the Diamond Sutra. Goryeo silk was highly regarded by China, and Korean pottery made with blue-green celadon was of the highest quality in the world and sought after by even Arabian merchants. Goryeo had a bustling economy with a capital that was frequented by merchants from all over the known world. Choe Yun-ui (Hangul: 최윤의) was a Korean scientist during the Goryeo dynasty; he is credited with introducing metal movable type made from bronze and cast in moulds, sometime in the early decades of the 13th century[1]. This followed on experiments in China on movable type using clay (Bi Sheng... The Goryeo kingdom ruled Korea from the fall of Silla in 935 until the founding of Joseon in 1392. ... Pì Shēng (Wade-Giles selling) (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ; died 1052) was the inventor of the first know movable type printing system. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... The printing press is a mechanical device for printing many copies of a text on rectangular sheets of paper. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Woodblock printing. ... Jikji is the abbreviated title of a Buddhist document, whose full title can be translated Baegun Hwasangs Anthology of the Great Priests Teachings on Identification of the Buddha’s Spirit by the Practice of Seon. ... Seokgatap (Sakyamuni Pagoda) is a stone pagoda in South Korea designated as the 21st National Treasure on December 12, 1962. ... The Chinese Diamond Sutra, the oldest known dated printed book in the world, printed in the 9th year of Xiantong Era of the Tang Dynasty, i. ... Unfired green ware pottery on a traditional drying rack at Conner Prairie living history museum. ... Alternate meaning: Celadon (color) Celadon funerary jar from the Three Kingdoms period Celadon is a type of pottery having a pale green glaze. ...


During the Joseon period the earliest ironclad warships, the Geobukseon (Turtle Ship) were invented,[34] as well as other weapons such as the Bigyeokjincheolloe (비격진천뢰, ) and the hwacha. Joseon redirects here. ... Ironclad (and broadside ironclad) redirects here. ... The Turtle Ship, which is also known as Kobukson or Geobukseon (거북선), is a galley that was invented in the 15th century. ... The turtle ship (also known as Geobukseon or Kobukson by its Korean name) was a large warship belonging to the Panokseon class in Korea that was used under the Joseon Dynasty between the 15th century and 18th century. ... Hwacha or Hwacha [1] was an anti-personnel saltpeter weapon used in Korea, inspired by Chinese fire arrows. ...


The Korean alphabet hangul was also invented during this time by Sejong the Great. Jamo redirects here. ...


See also

Korea Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... Korean dynasties are listed in the order of their fall. ... This is a list of famous Koreans or famous people of Korean descent. ... A Korean personal name consists of a family name followed by a given name. ... There are 50 designated national treasures of North Korea. ... The national treasures of South Korea are a numbered set of artifacts, sites, and buildings which are recognized by South Korea as having exceptional cultural value. ... Inter-Korean Summits are meetings between the leaders of North Korea and South Korea. ...

Notes

  1. ^ "Yayoi Period History Summary," BookRags.com; Jared Diamond, "Japanese Roots," Discover 19:6 (June 1998); Thayer Watkins, "The Genetic Origins of the Japanese"; "Shinto - History to 1900," Encyclopædia Britannica; "The Yayoi period (c. 250 BC–c. AD 250)," Encyclopædia Britannica.
  2. ^ "Korean Buddhism Basis of Japanese Buddhism," Seoul Times, June 18, 2006; "Buddhist Art of Korea & Japan," Asia Society Museum; "Kanji," JapanGuide.com; "Pottery," MSN Encarta; "History of Japan," JapanVisitor.com.
  3. ^ (1993) in Delmer M. Brown (ed.): The Cambridge History of Japan. Cambridge University Press, 140-149. ; George Sansom, A History of Japan to 1334, Stanford University Press, 1958. p. 47. ISBN 0-8047-0523-2
  4. ^ From Paekche to Origin of Yamato
  5. ^ World's oldest printed Doc
  6. ^ Go-Choson
  7. ^ Koguryo
  8. ^ Murder of Empress Myeongseong
  9. ^ "서울대이태진교수의동경대생들에게들려준한국사 : 메이지일본의한국침략사", Yi Tae-jin (2005) ISBN 89-7626-999-3
  10. ^ 4. Korea, 1910-1945. 2001. The Encyclopedia of World History
  11. ^ Korea - MSN Encarta
  12. ^ Asia Times Online :: Japan News and Japanese Business and Economy
  13. ^ March 1st Movement
  14. ^ Statistics Of Japanese Genocide And Mass Murder
  15. ^ 山脇 啓造 Yamawaki, Keizo. 近代日本と外国人労働者―1890年代後半と1920年代前半における中国人・朝鮮人労働者問題 Modern Japan and Foreign Laborers: Chinese and Korean Laborers in the late 1890s and early 1920s, 明石書店 Akashi-shoten, 1994, et al. ISBN 9784750305684
  16. ^ Yoshimi Yoshiaki, Comfort Women. Sexual Slavery in the Japanese Military During World War II. Translated by Suzanne O'Brien. Columbia University Press, 2001, ISBN 0-231-12032-X, originally published by 岩波書店, 1995. ISBN 978-4004303848
  17. ^ CNN.com - Japanese comfort women ruling overturned - March 29, 2001
  18. ^ Comfort-Women.org
  19. ^ MOFA: Statement by the Chief Cabinet Secretary Yohei Kono on the result of the study on the issue of "comfort women"
  20. ^ HAN: "Koreans in Japan: Past and Present"
  21. ^ Gyeongbok Palace | Seoul City | South Korea
  22. ^ Newsweek.com. Who rightfully owns Korean artifacts looted by Japan?
  23. ^ Newsweek.com. Who rightfully owns Korean artifacts looted by Japan?
  24. ^ http://news.naver.com/news/read.php?mode=LSD&office_id=001&article_id=0001429084
  25. ^ (Cumings 1997: 298)
  26. ^ Korean Map, The People's Korea, 1998.
  27. ^ Foreign Expatriates in Korea Top One Million. Chosun Ilbo (2007-08-27). Retrieved on 2008-01-08.
  28. ^ CIA - The World Factbook - Korea, North
  29. ^ 대한민국의 국호. Naver Encyclopedia. Retrieved on 2007-08-14.
  30. ^ The kingdom of Silla and the treasures of Nara (ancient Korea kingdom; Buddhist temple in Nara, Japan)
  31. ^ http://www.pacificasiamuseum.org/calendar/kcostumes.htm
  32. ^ http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/42/8/39700724.pdf
  33. ^ Cultural Heritage, the source for Koreans' Strength and Dream
  34. ^ First Ironclad Warships

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Cumings, Bruce. Korea's Place in the Sun, Norton, 1997. ISBN 0-393-31681-5
  • Kim, et al. Women of Korea: A History from Ancient Times to 1945, Ewha Womans University Press, 1976. ISBN 89-7300-116-7.
  • Asian Info website
  • Park's Associates
  • [1]
  • [2]
  • http://www.diamond-dilemma.com/kor/doc/TariqHussain_KoreaHerald_5Mar2007.pdf

Further reading

  • Chun, Tuk Chu. "Korea in the Pacific Community." Social Education 52 (March 1988), 182. EJ 368 177.
  • Cumings, Bruce. The Two Koreas. New York: Foreign Policy Association, 1984.
  • Focus On Asian Studies. Special Issue: "Korea: A Teacher's Guide." No. 1, Fall 1986.
  • Gi-Wook Shin/Michael Robinson (Ed.). Colonial modernity in Korea, Cambridge, Mass. [u.a.] : Harvard University, Asia Center; Distributed by Harvard Univ. Press 1999, ISBN 0-674-14255-1
  • Joe, W.J. & Choe, H.A. Traditional Korea: A Cultural History, Seoul: Hollym, 1997.
  • Joungwon, A.K. Divided Korea: The Politics of Development, Harvard University Press, 1975.
  • Lee Ki-baik. A New History Of Korea. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1984.
  • Lee Sang-sup. "The Arts and Literature of Korea." The Social Studies 79 (July-August 1988): 153-60. EJ 376 894.
  • Tae-Jin, Y. "The Illegality of the Forced Treaties Leading to Japan's Annexation of the Great Han Empire," In the Korean National Commission for UNESCO, Vol. 36, No. 4, 1996.
  • Dennis Hart, From Tradition to Consumption: Construction of a Capitalist Culture in South Korea. Seoul:Jimoondang Pub. 2003.

Bruce Cumings is an historian, and professor at the University of Chicago, specializing in modern Korean history and contemporary international relations in East Asia. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
North Korea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4358 words)
In the aftermath of the Japanese occupation of Korea which ended with World War II in 1945, Korea was left occupied by the Soviet Union north of the 38th Parallel and by the United States south of the 38th parallel.
North Korea is on the northern portion of the Korean Peninsula.
To its west are the Yellow Sea and Korea Bay, and to the east is the Sea of Japan (East Sea of Korea).
Korea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3313 words)
The peninsula is currently divided into North Korea and South Korea, and borders China to the northwest and Russia to the northeast, with Japan situated to the southeast across the Korea Strait.
After the unification of the Three Kingdoms of Korea by Silla in 676, Korea was ruled by a single government and maintained political and cultural independence, despite the Mongol invasions of the Goryeo Dynasty in the 13th century and Japanese invasions of the Joseon Dynasty in the 16th century.
Korea's classical literature came into being in the context of local beliefs, and the in the wake of Taoism, Confucianism and Buddhism, with a dominance of the latter.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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