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Encyclopedia > Konzentrationslager

The German word Konzentrationslager (abbreviated KZ) is a literal translation of the English term, concentration camp. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A concentration camp is a large detention center created for political opponents, aliens, specific ethnic or religious groups, civilians of a critical war-zone, or other groups of people, often during a war. ...


Like in English, a Konzentrationslager is per definition to distinguish from refugee camps, from detention camps for POWs, and from camps for convicted criminals, although in Nazi Germany some camps called Konzentrationslager actually served these purposes — all of them connected with severe human rights abuses. A refugee camp is a camp built up by governments or NGOs (such as the ICRC) to receive refugees. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... A human rights abuse is abuse of people in a way that violates any fundamental human rights. ...


In German language, the term Konzentrationslager often includes the extermination camps founded as early as 1933 for the purpose of genocide with industrial efficiency, in which as many as ten million people, most of them Jews, lost their lives in the following ten years. Majdanek - crematorium Extermination camp (German Vernichtungslager) was the term applied to a group of death camps set up by Nazi Germany during World War II for the express purpose of killing the Jews of Europe, although members of some other groups whom the Nazis wished to exterminate, such as Roma... 1933 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Look up Genocide in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Most generally, Genocide is the deliberate destruction of a social identity. ...


See further: concentration camp. A concentration camp is a large detention center created for political opponents, aliens, specific ethnic or religious groups, civilians of a critical war-zone, or other groups of people, often during a war. ...


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Konzentrationslager - definition of Konzentrationslager in Encyclopedia (131 words)
The German word Konzentrationslager (abbreviated KZ) is a literal translation of the English term, concentration camp.
Like in English, a Konzentrationslager is per definition to distinguish from refugee camps, from detention camps for POWs, and from camps for convicted criminals, although in Nazi Germany some camps called Konzentrationslagern actually served these purposes — all of them connected with severe human rights abuses.
In German language, the term Konzentrationslager often includes the extermination camps founded in 1941–1942 for the purpose of genocide with industrial efficiency, in which at least three million people, most of them Jews, lost their lifes in the following three years.
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