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Encyclopedia > Knoxville, Tennessee
Knoxville, Tennessee

Seal
Nickname: The Marble City, K-Town,
Big Orange Country, 865, Rocky Top, Knoxvegas
Location within the U.S. State of Tennessee.
Location within the U.S. State of Tennessee.
Coordinates: 35°58′22″N 83°56′32″W / 35.97278, -83.94222
Country United States
State Tennessee
County Knox
Settled 1786
Incorporated 1791
Government
 - Type Mayor-council government
 - Mayor Bill Haslam
Area [1]
 - Total 98.09 sq mi (254.0 km²)
 - Land 92.66 sq mi (240.0 km²)
 - Water 5.43 sq mi (14.1 km²)  5.5%
Elevation [1] 936 ft (276 m)
Population (2000)[2]
 - Total 173,890
 - Density 1,876.7/sq mi (724.6/km²)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 865
FIPS code 47-40000[3]
GNIS feature ID 1648562[4]
Website: www.cityofknoxville.org

Founded in 1786, Knoxville is the third-largest city in the state of Tennessee, behind Memphis and Nashville, and is the county seat of Knox County[5]. It is also the principal city of the "Knoxville Metropolitan Area" which is included in the "Knoxville-Sevierville-La Follette Combined Statistical Area". As of the 2000 United States Census, Knoxville had a total population of 173,890 with a metro population of 655,400. There are several places in the United States called Knoxville: Knoxville, Georgia - the county seat of Crawford County, Georgia Knoxville, Illinois Knoxville, Iowa Knoxville, Maryland Knoxville, Pennsylvania Knoxville, Tennessee In addition, there is a place named New Knoxville, Ohio. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 450 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1440 pixel, file size: 1. ... This work is copyrighted. ... // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... Adapted from Wikipedias TN county maps by Seth Ilys. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... List of Tennessee counties: Anderson County Bedford County Benton County Bledsoe County Blount County Bradley County Campbell County Cannon County Carroll County Carter County Cheatham County Chester County Clairborne County Clay County Cocke County Coffee County Crockett County Cumberland County Davidson County Decatur County DeKalb County Dickson County Dyer County... Knox County is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Mayor-Council government is one of two variations of government most commonly used in modern representative municipal governments in the United States. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Bill Haslam (b. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1,000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... Nashville redirects here. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Knox County is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Knoxville Metropolitan Area is the third largest Metropolitan Statistical Area in Tennessee. ... Sevierville (pronounced ) is a city in and the county seatGR6 of Sevier County , Tennessee, United States of America. ... La Follette is a city located in Campbell County, Tennessee. ... The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines micropolitan and metropolitan statistical areas. ...


Of Tennessee's four major cities, Knoxville is second oldest to Nashville, which was founded in 1779. After Tennessee's admission into the Union in 1796, Knoxville was the state's first capital, in which capacity it served until 1819, when the capital was moved to Murfreesboro, prior to Nashville receiving the designation. The city was named in honor of the first Secretary of War, Henry Knox. Nickname: Motto: Location in Rutherford County and the state of Tennessee. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... Henry Knox (July 25, 1750 – October 25, 1806) was an American bookseller from Boston who became the chief artillery officer of the Continental Army and later the nations first Secretary of War. ...


One of Knoxville's nicknames is The Marble City.[6] In the early 20th century, a number of quarries were active in the city, supplying Tennessee pink marble (actually Ordovician limestone of the Holston Formation) to much of the country. Notable buildings such as the National Gallery of Art in Washington are constructed of Knoxville marble. The National Gallery's fountains were turned by Candoro Marble Company, which once ran the largest marble lathes in the United States. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... For other uses, see Marble (disambiguation). ... Artist impression of the Ordovician Sea. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... This 120 mile long seam is where all Tennessee marble comes from. ... The West building of the National Gallery of Art with the East building visible behind and to to the left The National Gallery of Art is an art museum, located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The museum was established in 1937 by the Congress, with funds for... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


Knoxville was once also known as the Underwear Capital of the World.[citation needed] In the 1930s, no fewer than 20 textile and clothing mills operated in Knoxville, and the industry was the city's largest employer. In the 1950s, the mills began to close, causing an overall population loss of 10% by 1960.


Knoxville is also the home of the University of Tennessee's primary campus (UTK). The university's sports teams, called the "Volunteers" or "Vols," are extremely popular in the surrounding area. In recognition of this popularity, the telephone area code for Knox County and eight adjacent counties is 865 (VOL). Knoxville is also the home of the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame, almost entirely thanks to the popularity of Pat Summitt and the University of Tennessee women's basketball team. The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ... A telephone numbering plan is a system that allows subscribers to make and receive telephone calls across long distances. ... Area Code 865 is an area code in Tennessee. ... The Womens Basketball Hall of Fame honors men and women who have contributed to the sport of womens basketball. ... Pat Summitt (born Patricia Sue Head on June 14, 1952 in Clarksville, Tennessee) is the coach of the Tennessee Lady Vols basketball team. ... The Tennessee Lady Volunteers basketball team is one of the most prominent teams in U.S. womens college basketball. ...


As of 2007, the current mayor is Bill Haslam, who defeated Madeline Rogero in 2003. The previous mayor of sixteen years, Victor Ashe, was named United States Ambassador to Poland in June 2004. Ashe was term-limited and could not serve another term. A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Bill Haslam (b. ... Victor Henderson Ashe II (born January 1, 1945) was mayor of Knoxville, Tennessee (1988-2003), and in 2004 became U.S. ambassador to Poland. ... This is a list of ambassadors from the United States. ...

Contents

History

Early history

The first humans to form substantial settlements in what is now Knoxville arrived during the Woodland period (c. 1000 B.C. - 1000 A.D).[7] One of the oldest man-made structures in Knoxville is a burial mound constructed during the early Mississippian period (c. 1000 A.D.). The mound is located on the University of Tennessee campus.[8] Other prehistoric sites include an Early Woodland habitation area at the confluence of the Tennessee River and Knob Creek (near the Knox-Blount county line),[9] and Dallas phase Mississippian villages at Post Oak Island (also along the river near the Knox-Blount line),[10] and at Bussell Island (at the mouth of the Little Tennessee River near Lenoir City).[11] The Woodland period of North American pre-Columbian cultures lasted roughly from 1000 BCE to 1000 CE. The term Woodland was coined in the 1930s and refers to prehistoric sites between the Archaic period and the Mississippian cultures. ... The Mississippian culture was a mound-building Native American culture that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from approximately 800 to 1500 A.D., varying regionally. ... The Little Tennessee River is a tributary of the Tennessee River, approximately 135 miles (217 km) long, in the Appalachian Mountains in the southeastern United States. ...


By the 18th century, the Cherokee had become the dominant tribe in the East Tennessee region, although they were consistently at war with the Creeks and Shawnee.[12][13] The Cherokee people called the Knoxville area kuwanda'talun'yi, which means "Mulberry Place."[14] Most Cherokee habitation in the area was concentrated in the Overhill settlements along the Little Tennessee River, southwest of Knoxville. This page contains special characters. ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... The Little Tennessee River, looking south from the Tellico Blockhouse The term Overhill Cherokee refers to the former Cherokee settlements located in what is now Tennessee in the Southeastern United States. ... The Little Tennessee River is a tributary of the Tennessee River, approximately 135 miles (217 km) long, in the Appalachian Mountains in the southeastern United States. ...


The first Euro-American traders and explorers arrived in the Tennessee Valley in the late 1600s, although there is significant evidence that Hernando De Soto visited the Bussell Island site in 1540.[15] The first major recorded Euro-American presence in the Knoxville area was the Henry Timberlake expedition, which passed through the confluence of the Holston and French Broad into the Tennessee River in December of 1761. Timberlake, who was en route to the Overhill settlements along the Little Tennessee River, recalled being pleasantly surprised by the deep waters of the Tennessee after having struggled down the relatively shallow Holston for several weeks.[16] Hernando de Soto is a: Spanish explorer. ...


Settlement

The home of James White in Downtown Knoxville
The home of James White in Downtown Knoxville

The end of the French and Indian War and confusion brought about by the American Revolution led to a drastic increase in Euro-American settlement west of the Appalachians.[17] By the 1780s, Euro-American settlers were already established in the Holston and French Broad valleys. Since the Cherokee had not ceded this land, however, most of these settlers were in the valley illegally. The U.S. Congress ordered all illegal settlers out of the valley in 1785, but with little success. As settlers continued to trickle into Cherokee lands, tensions between the settlers and the Cherokee rose steadily.[18] Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,040 killed, wounded or captured The French and... This article is about military actions only. ...


In 1786, James White, a Revolutionary War officer, and his friend James Connor built White's Fort near the mouth of First Creek, on land White had purchased three years earlier.[19] In 1790, White's son-in-law, Charles McClung— who had arrived from Pennsylvania the previous year— surveyed White's holdings between First Creek and Second Creek for the establishment of a town. McClung drew up 64 0.5-acre (0.0020 km²) lots, with the waterfront set aside for a town common, two lots were set aside for a church and cemetery, and four lots were set aside for a school (the school— eventually chartered as Blount College— was the basis for the University of Tennessee). That same year, President George Washington appointed North Carolina surveyor William Blount governor of the newly-created Territory South of the River Ohio. James White (August 8, 1747 – August 14, 1821) was an American pioneer and soldier who founded Knoxville, Tennessee. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Whites Fort, also known as James Whites Fort, was an 18th century settlement that became Knoxville, Tennessee. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... Italic text:For the English scholar see William Blount, 4th Baron Mountjoy. ... The Southwest Territory, also known as the Territory South of the River Ohio, was an organized territory of the United States formed on May 26, 1790. ...


One of Blount's first tasks was to meet with the Cherokee and establish territorial boundaries and resolve the issue of illegal settlers.[20] This he accomplished almost immediately with the Treaty of Holston, which was negotiated and signed at White's Fort in 1791. Blount originally wanted to place the territorial capital at the confluence of the Clinch River and Tennessee River (now Kingston), but when the Cherokee refused to cede this land, Blount chose White's Fort, which McClung had surveyed the previous year. Blount named the new capital Knoxville after Revolutionary War general and Secretary of War Henry Knox, who at the time was Blount's immediate superior.[21] The Treaty of Holston was signed William Blount, governor in and over the territory of the United States south of the Ohio River, and superintendent of Indian Affairs for the southern district for the United States and representatives of the Cherokee Nation on July 2, 1791 and proclaimed on February... The Clinch River rises in southwestern Virginia and flows into East Tennessee. ... Kingston is a city located in Roane County, Tennessee. ... Henry Knox (July 25, 1750 – October 25, 1806) was an American bookseller from Boston who became the chief artillery officer of the Continental Army and later the nations first Secretary of War. ...


Problems immediately arose from the Holston Treaty. Blount believed that he had "purchased" much of what is now East Tennessee when the treaty was signed in 1791. However, the terms of the treaty came under dispute, culminating in continued violence on both sides. In 1792, 200 Cherokee lead by John Watts marched on Knoxville, and a second group of Cherokee attacked Covet's Station in 1793. Both attacks were repelled by Knoxville settlers. Knoxville settlers attacked the Cherokee several times as well. When the government invited the Cherokee's chief Hanging Maw for negotiations in 1793, Knoxville settlers attacked the Cherokee against orders, killing the chief's wife. Peace was renegotiated in 1794.[22]


Antebellum Knoxville

The Craighead-Jackson House in Knoxville, built in 1818
The Craighead-Jackson House in Knoxville, built in 1818

Knoxville served as capital of the Territory South of the River Ohio and as capital of Tennessee (admitted as a state in 1796) until 1817,[23] when the capital was moved to Murfreesboro. Early Knoxville has been described as an "alternately quiet and rowdy river town."[24] Early issues of the Knoxville Gazette— the first newspaper published in Tennessee— are filled with accounts of murder, theft, and hostile Cherokee attacks. Abishai Thomas, a friend of William Blount, visited Knoxville in 1794 and wrote that while he was impressed by the town's modern frame buildings, the town had "seven taverns" and no church.[25] Nickname: Motto: Location in Rutherford County and the state of Tennessee. ...


Knoxville initially thrived as a way station for travelers and migrants heading west. Its situation at the confluence of three major rivers in the Tennessee Valley brought flatboat and later steamboat traffic to its waterfront in the first half of the 19th-century, and Knoxville quickly developed into a regional merchandising center. Local agricultural products— especially tobacco, corn, and whiskey— were traded for cotton, which was grown in the Deep South.[26] The population of Knoxville more than doubled in the 1850s with the arrival of the East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad in 1855.[27] A Flatboat is a boat with a flat bottom and has square ends. ... For other uses, see Steamboat (disambiguation). ...


Among the most prominent citizens of Knoxville during the Antebellum years was James White's son, Hugh Lawson White (1773-1840). White first served as a judge and state senator before being nominated by the state legislature to replace Andrew Jackson in the U.S. Senate in 1825. In 1836, White ran unsuccessfully for president, representing the Whig Party.[28] This is about the 19th century Tennessee politician; for the 20th century Mississippi politician, see Hugh L. White. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ...


The U.S. Civil War

The site of Fort Dickerson in South Knoxville
The site of Fort Dickerson in South Knoxville
Main article: Knoxville Campaign

Anti-slavery and anti-secession sentiment ran high in East Tennessee in the years leading up to the U.S. Civil War. William "Parson" Brownlow, the radical publisher of the Knoxville Whig, was one of the region's leading anti-secessionists (although he defended the practice of slavery).[29] Blount County, just south of Knoxville, had developed into a center of abolitionist activity, due in part to its relatively large Quaker faction and the anti-slavery president of Maryville College, Isaac Anderson.[30] The Greater Warner Tabernacle AME Zion Church, Knoxville was reportedly a station on the underground railroad.[31] Business interests, however, guided largely by Knoxville's trade connections with cotton-growing centers to the south, contributed to the development of a strong pro-secession movement within the city. The city's pro-secessionists included among their ranks Dr. J.G.M. Ramsey, a prominent historian whose father had built the Ramsey House in 1797. Thus, while East Tennessee and greater Knox County voted decisively against secession in 1861, the city of Knoxville favored secession by a 2-1 margin.[32] James Longstreet and Ambrose Burnside, principal commanders of the Knoxville Campaign The Knoxville Campaign[1] was a series of American Civil War battles and maneuvers in East Tennessee during the fall of 1863. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the northern states, popularly referred to as the U.S., the Union, the North, or the Yankees; and the seceding southern states, commonly referred to as the Confederate States of America, the CSA, the Confederacy... William Gannaway Brownlow (August 29, 1805 - April 29, 1877) was Governor of Tennessee from 1865 to 1869 and a Senator from Tennessee from 1869 to 1875. ... The Knoxville Whig was a Knoxville, Tennessee paper begun by William G. Brownlow. ... Quaker redirects here. ... Maryville College is a private four-year liberal arts college in Maryville, Tennessee, near Knoxville. ... The Greater Warner Tabernacle AME Zion Church is a historic church presently located at 3800 Martin Luther King Jr Ave in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... H. B. Lindsley, Harriet Tubman, c. ... The Ramsey House is a two-story, stone house in Knoxville, Tennessee. ...


In July of 1861, after Tennessee had joined the Confederacy, General Felix Zollicoffer arrived in Knoxville as commander of the District of East Tennessee. While initially lenient toward the city's Union sympathizers, Zollicoffer instituted martial law in November of that year after Union guerillas destroyed seven of the city's bridges. The command of the district passed briefly to George Crittenden and then to Kirby Smith, the latter of whom launched a failed invasion of Kentucky in August of 1862. In early 1863, General Simon Buckner took command of Confederate forces in Knoxville. Anticipating a Union invasion, Buckner fortified Fort Loudon (in West Knoxville, not to be confused with the colonial fort to the southwest) and began constructing earthworks throughout the city. The approach of Union forces under Ambrose Burnside in the Summer of 1863, however, forced Buckner to evacuate Knoxville before the earthworks were completed.[33] Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Felix Kirk Zollicoffer (May 19, 1812 – January 19, 1862) was a newspaperman, three-term United States Congressman from Tennessee, officer in the United States Army, and a Confederate brigadier general during the American Civil War. ... Animated map of secession, Civil War and re-admission:  States of the Union  Territories of the Union (including occupied territory)  States of the Confederacy  Territories claimed by Confederacy During the American Civil War, the Union was a name used to refer to the twenty-three states of the United States... Portrait of Edmund Kirby Smith during the Civil War Edmund Kirby Smith (1824–1893) was a general in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War, notable for his command of the western Confederacy after the fall of Vicksburg. ... Simon Bolivar Buckner may refer to: Simon Bolivar Buckner, Sr. ... Fort Loudoun was a colonial American fort in present-day Monroe County, Tennessee near the villages of the Overhill Cherokee. ... Ambrose Everett Burnside (May 23, 1824 – September 13, 1881) was an American soldier, railroad executive, inventor, industrialist, and politician from Rhode Island, serving as governor and a U.S. Senator. ...


Burnside arrived in Knoxville in early September of 1863. Like the Confederates, he immediately began fortifying the city. The Union forces rebuilt Fort Loudon and erected 12 other forts and batteries flanked by entrenchments around the city. Burnside moved a pontoon bridge upstream from Loudon, allowing Union forces to cross the river and build a series of forts along the heights of South Knoxville, including Fort Stanley and Fort Dickerson.[34] Loudon is a town located in Loudon County, Tennessee. ...


As Burnside was fortifying Knoxville, the Confederate army defeated Union forces at the Battle of Chickamauga (near the Tennessee-Georgia line) and subsequently laid siege to Chattanooga. On November 3, 1863, the Confederates dispatched General James Longstreet north to attack Burnside at Knoxville. Longstreet initially wanted to attack the city from the south, but lacking the means to carry the necessary pontoon bridges, he was forced to cross the river further downstream at Loudon (November 14) and march against the city's heavily-fortified western section. On November 15, General Joseph Wheeler unsuccessfully attempted to dislodge Union forces in the heights of South Knoxville, and the following day Longstreet failed to cut off retreating Union forces at Campbell's Station (now Farragut). On November 18, General William P. Sanders was mortally wounded while conducting delaying maneuvers west of Knoxville, and Fort Loudon was renamed Fort Sanders in his honor. On November 29, after a two-week siege, the Confederates attacked Fort Sanders, but retreated after a fierce 20-minute engagement. On December 4, after word of the Confederate setback at Chattanooga reached Longstreet, Longstreet abandoned his attempts to take Knoxville and retreated into winter quarters at Russellville. He rejoined the Army of Northern Virginia the following Spring.[35] Belligerents United States (Union) CSA (Confederacy) Commanders William S. Rosecrans George H. Thomas Braxton Bragg James Longstreet Strength Army of the Cumberland (56,965) Army of Tennessee (70,000) Casualties and losses 16,170 (1,657 killed, 9,756 wounded, 4,757 captured/missing) 18,454 (2,312 killed, 14... Chattanooga redirects here. ... James Longstreet (January 8, 1821 – January 2, 1904) was one of the foremost Confederate generals of the American Civil War and the principal subordinate to General Robert E. Lee, who called him his Old War Horse. ... Joseph Wheeler Joseph Wheeler (September 10, 1836 – January 25, 1906) was an American military commander and politician. ... The Battle of Campbells Station was a battle of the American Civil War, occurring on November 16, 1863 in Knox County, Tennessee. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant Braxton Bragg Strength Military Division of the Mississippi (56,359 effectives)[1] Army of Tennessee (44,010)[1] Casualties 5,824 (753 killed, 4,722 wounded, 349 missing)[1] 6,667 (361 killed, 2,160 wounded, 4... Russellville, Tennessee is the sixth oldest settlement in the State of Tennessee. ... The Army of Northern Virginia was the primary military force of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War in the eastern theater. ...


Reconstruction and the Industrial Age

St. John's Cathedral, built in the 1890s
St. John's Cathedral, built in the 1890s

After the war, northern investors such as the brothers Joeseph and David Richards helped Knoxville recover relatively quickly. Joseph and David Richards convinced 104 Welsh immigrant families to migrate from the Welsh Tract in Pennsylvania to work in a rolling mill then co-owned by John H. Jones. These Welsh families settled in an area now known as Mechanicsville.[citation needed] The Richards brothers also co-founded the Knoxville Iron Works beside the L&N Railroad, also employing Welsh workers. Later the site would be used as the grounds for the 1982 World's Fair.[citation needed] St. ... Map showing the population density of Americans who declared Welsh ancestry in the census. ... The Welsh Tract, also called the Welsh Barony, was a portion of Pennsylvania settled largely by Welsh-speaking Quakers. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Mechanicsville is a neighborhood in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... The 1982 Worlds Fair logo. ...


Other companies that sprang up during this period were Knoxville Woolen Mills, Dixie Cement, and Woodruff's Furniture. Between 1880 and 1887, 97 factories were established in Knoxville, most of them specializing in textiles, food products, and iron products.[36] By the 1890s, Knoxville was home to more than 50 wholesaling houses, making it the third largest wholesaling center by volume in the South.[37] The Candoro Marble Works, established in the community of Vestal in 1914, became the nation's foremost producer of pink marble and one of the nation's largest marble importers.[38]


In 1869, Thomas Hughes, a Union-sympathizer and president of East Tennessee University, secured federal wartime restitution funding and state-designated Morrill Act funding to expand the college, which had been occupied by both armies during the war.[39] In 1879, the school changed its name to the University of Tennessee, hoping to secure more funding from the Tennessee state legislature. Charles Dabney, who became president of the university in 1887, overhauled the faculty and established a law school in an attempt to modernize the scope of the university.[40]


The post-war manufacturing boom brought thousands of immigrants to the city. The population of Knoxville grew from around 5,000 in 1860 to 32,637 in 1900. West Knoxville was annexed in 1897, and over 5,000 new homes were built between 1895 and 1904.[41]


In 1901, train robber Kid Curry (whose real name was Harvey Logan), a member of Butch Cassidy's Wild Bunch was captured after shooting two deputies on Knoxville's Central Avenue. He escaped from the Knoxville Jail and rode away on a horse stolen from the sheriff.[citation needed] Harvey Logan, alias Kid Curry. ... Butch Cassidy (13 April 1866 - c. ... Front row left to right: Harry A. Longabaugh, alias the Sundance Kid, Ben Kilpatrick, alias the Tall Texan, Robert Leroy Parker, alias Butch Cassidy; Standing- Will Carver, alias News Carver & Harvey Logan, alias Kid Curry; Fort Worth, Texas, 1901. ...


The Progressive Era and the Great Depression

Kingston Pike, circa 1910.
Kingston Pike, circa 1910.

The growing city of Knoxville hosted the Appalachian Exposition in 1910 and again in 1911, and the National Conservation Exposition in 1913. The latter is sometimes credited with giving rise to the movement to create a national park in the Great Smoky Mountains, some 20 miles (32 km) south of Knoxville.[42] Around this time, a number of affluent Knoxvillians began purchasing summer cottages in Elkmont, and began to pursue the park idea more vigorously. They were led by Knoxville businessman Colonel David C. Chapman, who as head of the Great Smoky Mountains Park Commission was largely responsible for raising the funds for the purchase of the property that became the core of the park. The Great Smoky Mountains National Park opened in 1933.[43] Image File history File links Kingstonpike. ... Image File history File links Kingstonpike. ... This article is about national parks. ... Elkmont was a former community in the Great Smoky Mountains of far eastern Tennessee. ... Cades Cove panorama The Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a United States National Park that straddles the ridgeline of the Great Smoky Mountains, part of the Blue Ridge Mountains which are a division of the larger Appalachian Mountain chain. ...


Knoxville's reliance on a manufacturing economy left it particularly vulnerable to the fallout from the Great Depression. The Tennessee Valley also suffered from consistent flooding, and millions of acres of farmland had been ruined by soil erosion. To control flooding and improve the economy in the Tennessee Valley, the federal government created the Tennessee Valley Authority in 1933. Beginning with Norris Dam, TVA constructed a series of hydroelectric and other power plants throughout the valley over the next few decades, bringing flood control, jobs, and electricity to the region.[44] The Federal Works Project Administration, which also arrived in the 1930s, helped to build McGhee-Tyson Airport and expand Neyland Stadium.[45] TVA's headquarters, which consists of two twin high rises built in the 1970s, were among Knoxville's first modern high-rise buildings. For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Norris Dam is a Tennessee Valley Authority hydorelectric and flood control structure located on the Clinch River in East Tennessee. ... The Works Progress Administration (later Works Projects Administration, abbreviated WPA), was created on May 6, 1935 with the signing of Executive Order 7034. ... Neyland Stadium is a sports stadium in Knoxville, Tennessee. ...


In 1948, the soft drink Mountain Dew was first marketed in Knoxville, originally designed as a mixer for whiskey.[1] Around the same time, John Gunther, author of Inside USA, dubbed Knoxville the "ugliest city" in America. Gunther's description jolted the city into enacting a series of beautification measures that helped improve the appearance of the Downtown area.[46] Mountain Dew is a caffeinated, sweet, citrus-flavored soft drink produced by PepsiCo, Inc. ... Whisky (or whiskey) is an alcoholic beverage distilled from grain, often including malt, which has then been aged in wooden barrels. ...


Modern Knoxville

The Sterchi Lofts building dominates 'The 100 Block' in downtown Knoxville. Formerly Sterchi Brothers Furniture store, the building was vacant for many years prior to its redevelopment as rental apartments.
The Sterchi Lofts building dominates 'The 100 Block' in downtown Knoxville. Formerly Sterchi Brothers Furniture store, the building was vacant for many years prior to its redevelopment as rental apartments.

Knoxville's textile and manufacturing industries largely fell victim to foreign competition in the 1950s and 1960s, and after the establishment of the Interstate Highway system in the 1960s, the railroad— which had been largely responsible for Knoxville's industrial growth— began to decline. The rise of suburban shopping malls in the 1970s drew retail revenues away from Knoxville's Downtown area. While government jobs and economic diversification prevented widespread unemployment in Knoxville, the city sought to recover the massive loss of revenue by attempting to annex neighboring communities in Knox County. These annexation attempts often turned combative, and several attempts to merge the Knoxville and Knox County governments failed.[47] Interstate Highways in the lower 48 states. ...


With annexation attempts stalling, Knoxville initiated several projects aimed at boosting revenue in the Downtown area. The 1982 World's Fair— the most successful of these projects— became one of the most popular world's fairs in U.S. history with 11 million visitors. The fair's energy theme was selected due to Knoxville being the headquarters of the Tennessee Valley Authority and for the city's proximity to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Sunsphere, a 266-foot (81 m) steel truss structure topped with a gold-colored glass sphere, was built for the fair and remains one of the Knoxville's most prominent buildings.[48] The 1982 Worlds Fair logo. ... A combination of federal, state and private funds is providing $300 million for the construction of 13 facilities on ORNLs new main campus. ... The Sunsphere is an 81. ...


Since then, Knoxville's downtown has been developing, with the opening of the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame and the Knoxville Convention Center, redevelopment of Market Square, a new visitors center, Regal Cinemas, and many new and redeveloped condominiums.[citation needed] Regal Entertainment Group is North Americas largest movie theater chain, operating 6,119 screens in 562 locations in 39 states. ... There are two meanings of condominium In international law, a condominium is a territory in which two sovereign powers have equal rights. ...


Forbes Magazine named Knoxville among the Top 10 Metropolitan Hotspots.[49]


Geography

Southeastern view of Knoxville.
Southeastern view of Knoxville.

Knoxville is located at 35°58′22″N, 83°56′32″W (35.972882, -83.942161)[50]. Image File history File links Image was photod by Zereshk. ... Image File history File links Image was photod by Zereshk. ...


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 98.1 square miles (254.1 km²), of which, 92.7 square miles (240.0 km²) of it is land and 5.4 square miles (14.1 km²) of it is water. The total area is 5.5% water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ...


In the southeast part of the city, the French Broad River (flowing from Asheville, North Carolina) joins the Holston River (flowing from Kingsport) to form the Tennessee River. Knoxville is centered around a hilly area along the north bank of the river between its First Creek and Second Creek tributaries. This area now comprises Downtown Knoxville. South Knoxville refers to the industrial and residential areas along the south bank of the river (extending to the Blount County line), and West Knoxville typically refers to the area beyond Sequoyah Hills, much of which is situated along Kingston Pike and the merged I-40 and I-75. The Knox County section of the Tennessee River is technically part of Fort Loudoun Lake, an impoundment of the river created by the completion of Fort Loudoun Dam (near Lenoir City) in 1940. The French Broad River flows from near Rosman in Transylvania County, North Carolina, into Tennessee. ... Downtown Asheville bustles with activity at midday while smog silently obscures the Smoky Mountains to the west. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... The Holston drainage basin, located within the upper Tennessee drainage basin For other uses of Holston, see Holston (disambiguation). ... Kingsport is a city located primarily in Sullivan County, and also partially in Hawkins County, Tennessee, United States. ... A riverboat passing under the Henley Street Bridge on the Tennessee River. ... Fort Loudoun Dam Fort Loudoun Lock and Dam. ... Lenoir City is a city located in Loudon County, Tennessee. ...


The hills and ridges surrounding Knoxville are part of the Appalachian Ridge-and-Valley Province, which consists of a series of elongate and narrow ridges that traverse the upper Tennessee Valley. The most substantial Ridge-and-Valley structures in the Knoxville area are Bays Mountain, which runs along the Knox-Blount county line to the south, and Beaver Ridge, which passes through the northern section of the town. The Great Smoky Mountains— a subrange of the Appalachian Mountains— are located approximately 20 miles (32 km) south of Knoxville. Ridges and valleys near Bristol, Tennessee The Ridge-and-Valley Appalachians, also called the Ridge and Valley Province or the Valley and Ridge Appalachians, are a physiographic province of the larger Appalachian division and are also a belt within the Appalachian Mountains extending from northern New Jersey westward into Pennsylvania... Bays Mountain is a ridge of the Ridge-and-valley Appalachians, located in eastern Tennessee. ... A rainy day in the Great Smoky Mountains, Western North Carolina Appalachian Mountain system The Great Smoky Mountains are a major mountain range in the southern part of the Appalachian Mountains, the second ridge line forming a north-south running mountain chain from the Eastern United States and bordering the... The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ...


Principal highways serving the city Interstate 40 to Asheville, North Carolina, and Nashville and Interstate 75 to Chattanooga and Lexington. Knoxville and the surrounding area is served by McGhee Tyson Airport. Public transportation is provided by KAT. Rail freight is offered by CSX and Norfolk Southern. Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 40 Interstate 40 (abbreviated I-40) is a major west-east interstate highway in the United States. ... Not to be confused with Ashville. ... Nashville redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Chattanooga redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... McGhee Tyson Airport (IATA: TYS, ICAO: KTYS) is an airport located in Alcoa, Tennessee, approximately 12 miles (19 km) south of downtown Knoxville. ... CSX redirects here. ... Norfolk Southern Corporation (AAR reporting mark NS) NYSE: NSC is a US publicly-traded stock corporation based in Norfolk, Virginia. ...


Climate

Knoxville falls in the humid subtropical climate zone (Koppen climate classification Cfa), although it is not quite as hot as areas to the south and west due to the higher elevations. Summers are hot and very humid, with July highs averaging 88°F (31°C) and lows averaging 69°F (20°C). According to former local meteorologist Brittany Tarr, triple digit temperatures in Knoxville are fairly rare, however. Winters are generally cool with snow not an uncommon occurrence, with January averaging a high of 46°F (8°C) and a low of 29°F (-2°C), although low temperaures in the teens and single digits are an annual occurrence. The record high for Knoxville is 105°F (41°C), while the record low is -24°F (-31°C). Annual rainfall averages 48.2 inches (1,225 mm), and average winter snowfall in 9.9 inches (25 cm). The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ... The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ...

Monthly Normal and Record High and Low Temperatures
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Rec High °F 77 83 86 92 94 102 103 102 103 91 84 80
Norm High °F 46.3 51.7 60.3 69 76.3 83.6 86.9 86.4 80.7 69.9 59 49.8
Norm Low °F 28.9 31.8 39.1 46.6 55.6 63.9 68.5 67.3 60.8 47.7 38.9 31.9
Rec Low °F -24 -8 1 22 32 43 49 49 36 25 5 -6
Precip (in) 4.57 4.01 5.17 3.99 4.68 4.04 4.71 2.89 3.04 2.65 3.98 4.49
Source: USTravelWeather.com [2]

Nearby towns and cities

Alcoa is a city in Blount County, Tennessee, United States, south of Knoxville. ... Clinton is a city in Anderson County, Tennessee, United States. ... Corryton, Tennessee is a small community of about 700 people in northeast Knox County, Tennessee, about 15 miles north of Knoxville. ... Concord, Knox County, Tennessee is a village in Knox County in the U.S. state of Tennessee and is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. ... Dandridge is a town located in Jefferson County, Tennessee. ... Farragut is a town in Knox County, Tennessee, United States and is a suburb of nearby Knoxville. ... Halls Crossroads, Tennessee is a suburban community in Knox County, north of the city of Knoxville. ... Halls is a town located in Lauderdale County, Tennessee. ... West Tennessee is one of the three traditional regions in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Harriman is a city located in Roane County, Tennessee. ... Jefferson City is a city located in Jefferson County, Tennessee. ... Luttrell is a town in Union County, Tennessee, United States, with a population of 915 as of the 2000 U.S. census. ... Karns is an unincorporated community in western Knox County, Tennessee. ... Kingston is a city located in Roane County, Tennessee. ... Lenoir City is a city located in Loudon County, Tennessee. ... Loudon is a town located in Loudon County, Tennessee. ... Maryville is a city located in Blount County, Tennessee, 20 miles south of Knoxville. ... Maynardville is a city in and the county seat of Union CountyGR6, Tennessee, United States. ... Morristown is a city in Tennessee, United States. ... Newport is a city in Cocke County, Tennessee, United States. ... Oak Ridge is an incorporated city in Anderson and Roane Counties in East Tennessee, about 25 miles northwest of Knoxville. ... Powell, Tennessee is a small town located in the Emory Road corridor, just north of Knoxville. ... Rutledge is a town located in Grainger County, Tennessee. ... Sevierville (pronounced ) is a city in and the county seatGR6 of Sevier County , Tennessee, United States of America. ... Seymour is a census-designated place located in Tennessee. ... Washburn is an unincorporated community located in rural northern Grainger County, Tennessee, United States. ...

Neighborhoods

Krutch Park in Downtown Knoxville.
Krutch Park in Downtown Knoxville.
  • Arlington
  • Bearden
  • Bluegrass
  • Burlington
  • Cedar Bluff
  • Chilhowee Park
  • Colonial Village
  • Downtown
  • East Knoxville
  • Edgewood
  • Emory Place
  • Fairmont-Emoriland
  • Five Points
  • Forest Hills
  • Fort Sanders, also called "the Fort"
  • Fountain City
  • Fourth & Gill
  • Holston Hills
  • Island Home
  • Karns
  • Mechanicsville
  • Lake Forest
  • Lindbergh Forest
  • Lonsdale
  • Morningside
  • North Hills
  • Norwood/Inskip
  • Oakwood-Lincoln Park
  • Old City, formerly known as the Warehouse district
  • Old North Knoxville
  • Old Sevier
  • Parkridge (Park City)
  • Rocky Hills
  • Sequoyah Hills
  • South Haven
  • Vestal
  • Wedgewood Hills
  • West Hills
  • Westwood
  • Western Heights
  • Westmoreland

Chilhowee Park is a neighborhood located in the east end of Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Fountain City, Tennessee, is a neighborhood in northern Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Mechanicsville is a neighborhood in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sequoyah Hills, Tennessee, is a neighborhood in the city of Knoxville, Tennessee. ...

Major streets

  • Kingston Pike (US 11/US 70;TN 1)
  • Magnolia Avenue (US 11/US 70;TN 1)
  • Merchants Drive
  • Middlebrook Pike (TN 169)
  • Neyland Drive (TN 158)
  • Northshore Drive
  • Parkside Drive / North Peters Road
  • Pellissippi Parkway (I-140 and TN 162)
  • Rutledge Pike (US 11W;TN 1)
  • Seventeenth Street
  • South Central Street
  • South Knoxville Connector
  • Washington Pike (TN 61)
  • Western Avenue, formerly Asylum Street (TN 62)

Alcoa is a city in Blount County, Tennessee, United States, south of Knoxville. ... Tail of the Dragon on U.S. 129 U.S. Highway 129 is a spur of U.S. Highway 29. ... Tennessee State Route 115 is an east to west highway in the U.S. state of Tennessee that is 49 miles (78 km) long. ... Not to be confused with Ashville. ... U.S. Route 11 is a north-south United States highway extending 1,645 miles[1] (2,647 km) across the eastern United States. ... U.S. Route 25 is a north-south US highway in the eastern United States of America that now connects Cincinnati, Ohio, at the Ohio River to Brunswick, Georgia, near the Atlantic Ocean. ... U.S. Route 70 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 2,385 miles (3,838 km) from eastern North Carolina to east-central Arizona. ... State Route 9 is an east to west highway in the U.S. state of Tennessee that is 117 miles (189 km) long. ... U.S. Highway 441 is a spur route of US Highway 41. ... State Route 71 is a north-south state highway in Tennessee. ... U.S. Highway 441 is a spur route of US Highway 41. ... State Route 71 is a north-south state highway in Tennessee. ... Clinton is a city in Anderson County, Tennessee, United States. ... U.S. Route 25 is a north-south US highway in the eastern United States of America that now connects Cincinnati, Ohio, at the Ohio River to Brunswick, Georgia, near the Atlantic Ocean. ... State Route 9 is an east to west highway in the U.S. state of Tennessee that is 117 miles (189 km) long. ... United States Highway 11 is a north-south United States highway. ... United States Highway 70 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 2,385 miles (3,838 km) from eastern North Carolina to east-central Arizona. ... Tennessee State Route 1, known as the Memphis to Bristol Highway, is an east to west highway in Tennessee that is 538 miles (866 km) long. ... Tennessee State Route 131 is a south-to-north highway in the U.S. state of Tennessee that is 67 miles (108 km) long. ... Tennessee State Route 168, also known as Gov. ... U.S. Highway 441 is a spur route of US Highway 41. ... State Route 71 is a north-south state highway in Tennessee. ... James White (August 8, 1747 – August 14, 1821) was an American pioneer and soldier who founded Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Kingston Pike (part of U.S. Route 70) was the primary route from downtown Knoxville, Tennessee, formerly James Whites Fort to the western edge of Knox County before Interstate I-40 was constructed in the 1960s. ... U.S. Route 11 is a north-south United States highway extending 1,645 miles[1] (2,647 km) across the eastern United States. ... U.S. Route 70 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 2,385 miles (3,838 km) from eastern North Carolina to east-central Arizona. ... Tennessee State Route 1, known as the Memphis to Bristol Highway, is an east to west highway in Tennessee that is 538 miles (866 km) long. ... U.S. Route 11 is a north-south United States highway extending 1,645 miles[1] (2,647 km) across the eastern United States. ... U.S. Route 70 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 2,385 miles (3,838 km) from eastern North Carolina to east-central Arizona. ... Tennessee State Route 1, known as the Memphis to Bristol Highway, is an east to west highway in Tennessee that is 538 miles (866 km) long. ... Tennessee State Route 169 is a west to east secondary highway in Knox County in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Robert Reese Neyland (February 17, 1892 - 1962) was an American football coach. ... Tennessee State Route 162, also known as the Pellissippi Parkway, is a south to north primary highway in Tennessee. ... Interstate 140 is a spur route of Interstate 40 near Knoxville, Tennessee. ... U.S. Route 11 is a north-south United States highway extending 1,645 miles[1] (2,647 km) across the eastern United States. ... Tennessee State Route 1, known as the Memphis to Bristol Highway, is an east to west highway in Tennessee that is 538 miles (866 km) long. ... State Route 61 is an east-to-west highway in the U.S. state of Tennessee that is 69 miles (111 km) long. ... Tennessee State Route 62 is an east-to-west highway in the U.S. state of Tennessee that is 83 miles (134 km) long. ...

Demographics

Old Knox County Courthouse in Downtown Knoxville
Old Knox County Courthouse in Downtown Knoxville

As of the census[3] of 2000, there were 177,661 people, 76,650 households, and 40,164 families residing in the city, and the Knoxville Metropolitan Statistical Area had a population of 616,079. The population density was 1,876.7 people per square mile (724.6/km²). There were 84,981 housing units at an average density of 917.1/sq mi (354.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 79.7% White, 16.2% African American, 0.31% Native American, 1.45% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.72% from other races, and 1.57% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.58% of the population. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 76,650 households out of which 22.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 35.3% were married couples living together, 13.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 47.6% were non-families. 38.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.12 and the average family size was 2.84. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 19.7% under the age of 18, 16.8% from 18 to 24, 29.5% from 25 to 44, 19.6% from 45 to 64, and 14.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 90.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.3 males.


The median income for a household in the city is $27,492, and the median income for a family is $37,708. Males had a median income of $29,070 versus $22,593 for females. The per capita income for the city is $18,171. About 14.4% of families and 20.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.1% of those under age 18 and 12.0% of those age 65 or over. Per capita income means how much each individual receives, in monetary terms, of the yearly income generated in their country. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


In 2006, ERI published an analysis that identified Knoxville as the most affordable U.S. city for new college graduates, based on the ratio of typical salary to cost of living.[51] Economic Research Institute, or ERI, is a private company with headquarters in Redmond, Washington. ...


Population and household growth are expected to follow employment growth, causing increased housing demand during the forecast period. Resident employment should continue to grow at a pace equal to that from 2000 to the Current date. As population continues to increase and the labor force grows, the unemployment rate is projected to increase slightly to 3.7 percent. The population growth is estimated to result in 12,900 new households in the HMA by the Forecast date. Demand for new housing for the period from April 1, 2005, to April 1, 2008, is estimated to total 13,100 units — 10,400 sales units and 2,700 rental units. is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


Households

During the 1990s, growth in the number of households averaged 3,575 a year. The number of renter households grew by an average annual increase of 600 during the 1990s compared to an average annual increase of 900 from 2000 to the Current date. From 2000 to the Current date, the total average annual household growth was 3,925. Average annual household growth is expected to continue increasing by 4,300 through the forecast period and total 262,800 as of April 1, 2008. Since 1990, average household size in the HMA has been decreasing steadily. This decrease can be attributed to a growing number of students and retirees and to an overall demographic shift toward smaller families. is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


Economy

Knoxville's economy is largely fueled by the regional location of the main campus of the University of Tennessee, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and other Department of Energy facilities in nearby Oak Ridge, the National Transportation Research Center, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. These make Knoxville the heart of the high-tech Tennessee Valley Corridor, which extends from Blacksburg, Virginia to Huntsville, Alabama.[citation needed] The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ... A combination of federal, state and private funds is providing $300 million for the construction of 13 facilities on ORNLs new main campus. ... The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ... Oak Ridge is an incorporated city in Anderson and Roane Counties in East Tennessee, about 25 miles northwest of Knoxville. ... The National Transportation Research Center is a facility located in Knoxville, Tennessee dedicated to improving transportation systems as regards efficiency, effects on the environment, and safety. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Blacksburgs location within Virgina Virginias location within the United States Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Montgomery Founded 1798 Government  - Mayor Ron Rordam Area  - Town  19. ... Huntsville, Alabama (top center), near the Tennessee border, is north of Birmingham and northeast of Decatur, across the Tennessee River flowing northwest. ...


Because of its central location in the eastern half of the United States and proximity to two major Interstate highways, many warehousing and distribution companies operate in and around Knoxville.[citation needed] The Old City is home to most of Knoxville's historic warehouses and factories.[citation needed] A typical rural stretch of Interstate highway, with two lanes in each direction separated by a large grassy median, and with cross-traffic limited to overpasses and underpasses. ... Inside Green Logistics Co. ... Wikibooks [[wikibooks:|]] has more about this subject: Marketing Distribution (or placement) is one of the four aspects of marketing. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Major companies headquartered in Knoxville

AC Entertainment is a music promotion company based in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... The Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival is a four day annual music festival created and produced by Superfly Productions and AC Entertainment , first held in 2002. ... Bush Brothers and Company is a family-owned corporation based in Knoxville, Tennessee, best known for its baked beans and related products. ... Clayton Homes is a manufactured and modular housing company based in Knoxville, Tennessee, U.S.A. It was founded in 1966 by Jim Clayton. ... EdFinancial Services is a private nonprofit corporation headquartered in Knoxville, Tennessee, providing student loan servicing. ... One of Goodys Family Clothing stores (Rome, Georgia). ... Jewelry Television is an American television network, similar to the Home Shopping Network. ... Petros Chili & Chips is a fast-food chain specialising in the Petro, a mixture of corn chips, chili, cheese, green onions, tomatoes, and sour cream. ... Pilot Corporation (Pilot) owns 50% of Pilot Travel Centers, LLC (PTC). ... Regal Entertainment Group (NYSE: RGC) is North Americas largest movie theatre chain, operating 6,273 screens in 584 locations in 40 U.S. states. ... The E.W. Scripps Company (NYSE: SSP) is a media conglomerate founded by Edward W. Scripps on November 2, 1878, originally known as the Cleveland Penny Press. ... Sea Ray, headquartered in Knoxville, Tennessee, is the worlds largest manufacturer of pleasure boats. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Weigels is a gas station and convenience store chain located in the Knoxville, Tennessee area. ...

Colleges and universities

The University of Tennessee at Knoxville is the state's flagship public university.
The University of Tennessee at Knoxville is the state's flagship public university.

Knoxville is home to the main campus of the University of Tennessee. It is also home to: Image File history File links I took this photo and allow its full use. ... Image File history File links I took this photo and allow its full use. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ...

Johnson Bible College is a private college located six miles southeast of Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Knoxville College is a historically black college in Knoxville, Tennessee, founded in 1875 by the United Presbyterian Church of North America. ... Pellisippi State Technical Community College is a community college operated by the Tennessee Board of Regents and located in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Tennessee Wesleyan College is a small liberal arts college founded in 1857 in the East Tennessee town of Athens. ... Tusculum College is Tennessee’s oldest college, and the 23rd oldest operating college in the United States. ... ITT Technical Institute (often shortened to ITT Tech) is a private, for-profit, nationally accredited technical institute with over 85 campuses in over 30 states of the United States. ... Strayer University, formerly Strayer College of Washington, D. C., is a private, for-profit educational institution. ... Lincoln Memorial University is a private four-year co-educational liberal arts college located in Harrogate, Tennessee. ...

Culture

Tennessee Theatre.
Tennessee Theatre.

Knoxville is home to a rich arts community and has many festivals throughout the year. Its contributions to old-time, bluegrass and country music are numerous, from Flatt & Scruggs and Homer & Jethro to the Everly Brothers and Hank Williams, who spent the last night of his life there. For the past several years an award-winning listener-funded radio station, WDVX, has broadcast weekday lunchtime concerts of bluegrass music, old-time music and more from the Knoxville Visitor's Center on Gay Street, as well as streaming its music programming to the world over the Internet. Flatt and Scruggs Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs were influential bluegrass musicians during the 1950s and 1960s. ... Homer & Jethro were a country band with two members, Henry D. Haynes (Homer): July 27, 1920 - August 7, 1971 and Kenneth Burns (Jethro): March 10, 1920 - February 4, 1989 Link error in previous sentence: Link from Kenneth Burns points to Kenneth L Burns. ... Don (born February 1, 1937 in Brownie, a small coal-mining town (now defunct) near Central City, Muhlenberg County, Kentucky) and Phil Everly (born January 18, 1939 in Chicago, Illinois) are country-influenced rock and roll performers who had their greatest success in the 1950s. ... For other persons named Hank Williams, see Hank Williams (disambiguation). ... A live performance at WDVX WDVX-FM is a Knoxville, Tennessee, FM radio station broadcasting at 89. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music. ... West Virginia fiddler Edden Hammons, accompanied by his son James on the banjo Old-time music is a form of North American folk music, with roots in the folk musics of many countries, including England, Scotland, Ireland and Africa. ... Streaming media is multimedia that is continuously received by, and normally displayed to, the end-user while it is being delivered by the provider. ...


Knoxville also boasts an overachieving Opera Company which has been guided by Don Townsend for over two decades now. The KOC performs a season of opera every year with a talented chorus as the backbone of each production.[citation needed]


In its May 2003 "20 Most Rock & Roll towns in the U.S." feature, Blender ranked Knoxville the 17th best music scene in the United States.[citation needed]In the ’90s, noted alternative-music critic Ann Powers, author of Weird Like Us: My Bohemian America, referred to the city as “Austin without the hype".[citation needed] Blender is an American music magazine that bills itself as the ultimate guide to music and more. ...


The city also hosts numerous art festivals, including the 17-day Dogwood Arts Festival in April, which features art shows, crafts fairs, food and live music. Also in April is the Rossini Festival, which celebrates opera and Italian culture. June’s Kuumba (meaning creativity in Swahili) Festival commemorates the region’s African American heritage and showcases visual arts, folk arts, dance, games, music, storytelling, theater, and food. Autumn on the Square showcases national and local artists in outdoor concert series at historic Market Square, which has been revitalized with specialty shops and residences. Every Labor Day brings Boomsday, the largest Labor Day fireworks display in the United States, to the banks of the Tennessee River between the University of Tennessee football stadium and downtown.[citation needed] This article is about the holiday in the United States. ... The Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Opera House illuminated under New Years Eve Fireworks 2005 A fireworks event (fireworks display, fireworks show) is a spectacular display of the effects produced by firework devices on various occasions. ...


Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist and playwright James Agee was born in Knoxville and spent his early years there.[citation needed] His novel A Death in the Family centers around the Fort Sanders neighborhood where the Agees lived and chronicles the death of Agee's father.[citation needed] Another Pulitzer recipient, Cormac McCarthy, spent most of his childhood in Knoxville.[citation needed] McCarthy graduated from Knoxville Catholic High School and later attended the University of Tennessee, and his novel Suttree revolves around life among the city's lowly in the early 1950s.[citation needed] Other notable natives include Patricia Neal, Quentin Tarantino, and Johnny Knoxville.[citation needed] The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... James Rufus Agee (November 27, 1909 – May 16, 1955) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, screenwriter, journalist, poet, and film critic. ... A Death in the Family is an autobiographical novel by author James Agee, set in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... For the musician, see Cormac McCarthy (musician). ... Cormac McCarthy looks out over the river in Knoxville where Suttree is set (1979) Suttree is a semi-autobiographical novel by Cormac McCarthy, published in 1979. ... Patricia Neal (born January 20, 1926, Packard, Kentucky) is an Academy Award winning American actress. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an Academy Award- and Palme dOr-winning American film director, screenwriter and actor. ... Philip John Clapp (born March 11, 1971 in Knoxville, Tennessee), better known as Johnny Knoxville, is an American comic actor and daredevil. ...


Events

  • Boomsday
  • Corvette Expo
  • Dogwood Arts Festival
  • Destination ImagiNation Global Finals
  • Great Knoxville Rubber Duck Race
  • GreekFest
  • Honda Hoot
  • Knoxville Brewers' Jam
  • Knoxville Marathon
  • Knoxville Symphony Orchestra
  • Kuumba Festival
  • Market Square Farmers' Market
  • Rossini Festival
  • Ska Weekend
  • Sundown in the City
  • Vestival

Boomsday is an annual fireworks celebration presented by the Knoxville Tourism and Sports Corporation in conjunction with the radio stations of Journal Broadcast Group (HOT 104. ... The Destination ImagiNation logo Destination ImagiNation (DI) is a creativity and problem solving program for kids from elementary age to college age. ... The Knoxville Marathon is an annual marathon foot-race run in Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. The 26. ... Ska Weekend is a music festival in Knoxville, TN that began in 2003 with only a few bands and had grown to more than 30 bands by 2005. ...

Media

  • WATE 6 - ABC affiliate, owned by Young Broadcasting.
  • WMAK 7 - Digital independent station, owned by Knoxville Ch 7, LLC (also seen on low-power analog WEZK-LP 28)
  • WVLT 8 - CBS affiliate, owned by Gray Television.
  • WVLT-DT2 - My Network TV affiliate, digital subchannel of WVLT.
  • WBIR 10 - NBC affiliate, owned by Gannett Corporation.
  • WKOP 15 - PBS member station
  • WBXX 20 - CW affiliate, owned by ACME Television
  • WTNZ 43 - FOX affiliate, owned by Raycom Media.
  • WPXK 54 - i affiliate, owned by Paxson Communications
  • WIVK-FM 107.7 - owned by Citadel Broadcasting
  • Knoxville News Sentinel
  • Knoxville Voice
  • Metropulse
  • Knoxville Journal

WATE-TV is an affiliate of the ABC television network, serving Knoxville, Tennessee. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... WMAK-DT channel 7 is a digital television station serving the Knoxville, Tennessee area. ... Digital television (DTV) refers to the sending and receiving of moving images and sound by means of discrete (digital) signals, in contrast to the analog signals used by analog TV. Introduced in the late 1990s, this technology appealed to the television broadcasting business and consumer electronics industries as offering new... An independent station is a television station that is not affiliated with any network. ... WMAK-DT channel 7 is a digital television station serving the Knoxville, Tennessee area. ... WVLT-TV, WVLT Volunteer TV is an affiliate of the CBS television network, serving Knoxville, Tennessee, the 58th DMA in America according to Nielsen Media Research. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... WVLT-TV, WVLT Volunteer TV is an affiliate of the CBS television network, serving Knoxville, Tennessee, the 58th DMA in America according to Nielsen Media Research. ... WBIR-TV channel 10 is the NBC affiliate Knoxville, Tennessee. ... This article is about the television network. ... Gannett Company, Inc. ... PBS redirects here. ... WBXX-TV (East Tennessees WB) is the WB affiliate in the Knoxville, Tennessee television market. ... The CW Television Network, normally abbreviated to The CW, also known as The New CW in its first season of the network, is a television network in the United States launched during the 2006 television season. ... FOX redirects here. ... . The initial letter is shown capitalized due to technical restrictions. ... WIVK-FM is a FM radio station broadcasting at 107. ... The Knoxville News Sentinel is a newspaper in Knoxville, Tennessee, USA covering general news. ... Knoxville Voice is a populist alternative newspaper in Knoxville, Tennessee. ...

Nearby attractions

  • Farragut Folklife Museum, Farragut
  • Little River Railroad & Lumber Company Museum, Townsend
  • Sequoyah Birthplace Museum
  • Norris Dam
  • Tuckaleechee Caverns
  • Christus Gardens
  • Forbidden Caverns
  • Knoxville Mountain Bike Trails
  • Obed Wild & Scenic River (National Park Service)
  • TVA Lakes
  • Andrew Johnson National Historic Site, Greeneville
  • Loudon County Museum/Carmichael Inn, Loudon
  • House Mountain State Park
  • Big Ridge State Park
  • Roan Mountain State Park

Cades Cove panorama The Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a United States National Park that straddles the ridgeline of the Great Smoky Mountains, part of the Blue Ridge Mountains which are a division of the larger Appalachian Mountain chain. ... League Southern League Division North Division Year founded 2000 Major League affiliation Chicago Cubs Home ballpark Smokies Park Previous home ballparks Bill Meyer Stadium City Kodak, Tennessee Current uniform colors red, navy Previous uniform colors navy blue, green Logo design The Smokies wordmark in silver outlined in navy blue. ... Gatlinburg is a city in Sevier County, Tennessee, with a total population of 3,828, as of the 2000 U.S. census. ... Dollywood is a theme park owned by country music singer Dolly Parton and the Herschend Family Entertainment Corporation. ... Dollywoods Splash Country is a Smoky Mountain-themed water park located in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee adjacent to the Dollywood theme park. ... Pigeon Forge is a city in Sevier County, Tennessee, United States. ... The Museum of Appalachia, located in Norris, Tennessee, 20 miles north of Knoxville, is a living history museum of pioneer, mountain, and early artifacts of the Southern Appalachian region of the United States. ... Located in the heart of the city the American Museum of Science and Energy (AMSE) inspires young and old to explore atomic energy. ... Rugby is a settlement in Morgan County, Tennessee which has a population of around 85. ... The Lost Sea is the United States largest underground lake. ... Norris Dam is a Tennessee Valley Authority hydorelectric and flood control structure located on the Clinch River in East Tennessee. ...

Sites of interest

The Sunsphere, from the 1982 World's Fair, characterizes the Knoxville skyline
The Sunsphere, from the 1982 World's Fair, characterizes the Knoxville skyline

Sunsphere, Knoxville TN - used by permission File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Sunsphere, Knoxville TN - used by permission File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Sunsphere is an 81. ... The Bijou Theatre is also known as the Lamar House/Bijou Theatre. ... Bleak House is an antebellum house in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... The Blount Mansion was the home of the first and only territorial governor of the Southwest Territory, William Blount. ... James White Civic Coliseum is a 7,141-seat multi-purpose arena in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... The Frank H. McClung Museum is a museum of natural history on the campus of the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. ... Whites Fort, also known as James Whites Fort, was an 18th century settlement that became Knoxville, Tennessee. ... The Knoxville Museum of Art is located at 1050 Worlds Fair Park in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Knoxville Zoo is an zoo located in Knoxville, TN. The Knoxville Zoo has more than 800 animals and has had success breeding animals, especially Red Pandas and White Rhinos. ... Thompson-Boling Arena is a 24,535-seat multi-purpose arena on the campus of the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... The Sunsphere is an 81. ... The Mabry-Hazen House is located at 1711 Dandridge Avenue in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Marble Springs was the home of John Sevier, the first governor of Tennessee. ... For specific places, see Market Square (disambiguation). ... Neyland Stadium is a sports stadium in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Ramsey House is a two-story, stone house in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... The Tennessee Theatre, located in Knoxville, is the Official State Theatre of Tennessee and opened in 1928. ... The Womens Basketball Hall of Fame honors men and women who have contributed to the sport of womens basketball. ... The 1982 Worlds Fair logo. ... The National Register of Historic Places includes many historic structures in Knox County, Tennessee. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ...

Sports

The Knoxville Noise are a 2006-2007 expansion American Basketball Association franchise owned by Gavin Raiteri. ... The American Basketball Association (ABA) is a mens basketball league founded in 1999. ... The Knoxville Ice Bears are a professional ice hockey team. ... The Southern Professional Hockey League (SPHL) is a professional ice hockey league with teams located in the southeastern United States. ... League Southern League Division North Division Year founded 2000 Major League affiliation Chicago Cubs Home ballpark Smokies Park Previous home ballparks Bill Meyer Stadium City Kodak, Tennessee Current uniform colors red, navy Previous uniform colors navy blue, green Logo design The Smokies wordmark in silver outlined in navy blue. ... The Southern League is a minor league baseball league which operates in the Southern United States. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1871, 1874-1889) (a. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the primary institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee system, Tennessees flagship public university. ... The Knoxville Rugby Club, founded in 1980, is an adult rugby union club serving the greater Knoxville area. ... The sport of rugby in the United States has always had a close relationship with the sport of American football. ...

Notable Knoxvillians

For a longer list of notable Knoxvillians, see Category:People from Knoxville, Tennessee

10 Years are an American alternative metal band, formed in Knoxville, Tennessee in 2000. ... Robert Huntington Adams (1792 - July 2, 1830) was a United States Senator from Mississippi. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... James Rufus Agee (November 27, 1909 – May 16, 1955) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, screenwriter, journalist, poet, and film critic. ... A Death in the Family is an autobiographical novel by author James Agee, set in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... The Aldridge Sisters is an American singing act that appeared on The Lawrence Welk Show from 1977 to 1982. ... Victor Henderson Ashe II (born January 1, 1945) was mayor of Knoxville, Tennessee (1988-2003), and in 2004 became U.S. ambassador to Poland. ... This article is about the musician. ... Ava Barber of the Lawrence Welk Show Ava Barber (born June 28, 1954, Knoxville, Tennessee) is a U.S. country singer, best known for her association with The Lawrence Welk Show, on which she was a regular from 1974 through the shows cancellation in 1982. ... The Lawrence Welk Show is a musical variety show hosted by former big band leader Lawrence Welk. ... // Dave Barnes (born David Barnes on June 20, 1978) is a rock-r&b singer-songwriter from Kosciusko, Mississippi in the USA. Barnes is known - aside from his music - by his humorous and witty anecdotes. ... George Franklin Barber (1854-1915) was a popular and successful architect of the late Victorian period in America. ... Overview Dr. William M. Bass is a forensic anthropologist renowned for his research on human osteology and human decomposition. ... // For the Patricia Cornwell novel, see The Body Farm (novel). ... Brian Bell (born December 9, 1968 in Iowa City ,Iowa is an official member of the band, Weezer and has his own band, the Space Twins, as well as a new project called The Relationship. ... For the albums, see Weezer (1994 album) and Weezer (2001 album). ... Polly Bergen (born Nellie Paulina Burgin on July 14, 1930, in Knoxville, Tennessee) is an American actress, singer, and entrepreneur. ... Italic text:For the English scholar see William Blount, 4th Baron Mountjoy. ... William Gannaway Brownlow William Gannaway Brownlow (August 29, 1805 – April 29, 1877) was Governor of Tennessee from 1865 to 1869 and a Senator from Tennessee from 1869 to 1875. ... Frances Hodgson Burnett Frances Burnetts blue plaque in central London Frances Hodgson Burnett, (November 24, 1849 - October 29, 1924) was an English playwright and author. ... For other uses, see Secret Garden (disambiguation). ... Jacob Franklin Butcher (sometimes called Jake) (1936 - ) was an American banker. ... The 1982 Worlds Fair logo. ... AC Entertainment is a music promotion company based in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... The Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival is a four day annual music festival created and produced by Superfly Productions and AC Entertainment , first held in 2002. ... Kenny Chesney (born Kenneth Arnold Chesney, March 26, 1968 in Knoxville, Tennessee[1] ) is an American country music singer-songwriter. ... Henry Cho (Born 1962 in Knoxville, Tennessee ) is a Korean-American comedian. ... Darby Conley is an American cartoonist best known for the popular comic strip Get Fuzzy. ... Get Fuzzy is an American daily comic strip written and drawn by Darby Conley. ... Mary Costa (born April 5, 1930 in Knoxville, Tennessee) is an American singer, best known for playing the voice of Princess Aurora in the 1959 Disney film Sleeping Beauty. ... Disney redirects here. ... Sir Edward Burne-Jones painted The Sleeping Beauty. ... Cylk (pronounciation sounds like silk) Cozart (born February 1, 1957 in Knoxville, TN) is an American actor that has appeared in over 30 films and 20 television shows. ... John Cullum is an American actor and singer. ... The Antoinette Perry Awards for Excellence in Theatre, more commonly known as the Tony Awards, recognize achievement in live American theatre and are presented by the American Theatre Wing and The Broadway League [1] at an annual ceremony in New York City. ... Lowell Cunningham is the creator and writer of the comic book series the Men in Black. ... The comic book The Men in Black was created and written by Lowell Cunningham and published by Aircel Comics. ... John Davis circa February 2005 For other people named John Davis, see John Davis (disambiguation). ... Superdrag is a power pop/alternative rock band from Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Beauford Delaney (December 30, 1901 – March 25, 1979) African-American artist / modernist painter. ... George Roby Dempster (16 September 1887-18 September 1964) was an industrialist and inventor, and also served as mayor of Knoxville. ... David Glasgow Farragut (July 5, 1801 – August 14, 1870) was the first senior officer of the U.S. Navy during the American Civil War. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Phillip Fulmer (born September 1, 1950 in Winchester, Tennessee), is the head football coach at the University of Tennessee, where he has been since 1992. ... Yolande Cornelia Nikki Giovanni (born June 7, 1943 in Knoxville, Tennessee) is a Grammy-nominated American poet, activist and author. ... Guilford Glazer (born in 1921) is an American real estate developer and philanthropist. ... Alexander Murray Palmer Haley (August 11, 1921 – February 10, 1992) was an American writer. ... Categories: Literature stubs | 1976 books | American novels | Books starting with S ... George Washington Harris (March 20, 1814, Allegheny City, Pennsylvania - December 11, 1869, near Knoxville, Tennessee), was an American humorist. ... James Haslam Sr. ... Pilot Corporation (Pilot) is a petroleum corporation in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Dr. William H. Hastie (1904–April 14, 1976) was both the first African American Governor of the United States Virgin Islands and the first African American judge on a Federal appeals court. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the following United States District Courts: District of Delaware District of New Jersey Western, Middle, and Eastern Districts of Pennsylvania District of the United States Virgin Islands The court is based at... Todd Lynn Helton[1] (born August 20, 1973 in Knoxville, Tennessee)[2] is a Major League Baseball first baseman who has played for the Colorado Rockies since the 1997 season. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... The position of the first baseman First base redirects here. ... Major league affiliations National League (1993–present) West Division (1993–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Colorado Rockies (1993–present) Other nicknames The Rox, Blake Street Bombers. ... Homer and Jethro were an American country music team with a long career from the 1940s through the 1960s, sometimes known as the thinking mans hillbillies, specializing in comedy records and satirical versions of popular songs. ... William Edward (Ed) Hooper (born March 10, 1964) is a nationally recognized author, news broadcaster and writer from Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Con Hunley is a soulful country music performer. ... Dennis Hwang, or Hwang Jung-mok is a graphic artist who designs the festive logos for Google on special days. ... This article is about the corporation. ... Glen Thomas Jacobs (born April 26, 1967) better known by his ring name Kane, is an American professional wrestler. ... For the former Assistant Secretary of Energy for Fossil Energy, see Jeffrey D. Jarrett. ... David Keith (born May 8, 1954 in Knoxville, Tennessee) is an American actor and director. ... Philip John Clapp (born March 11, 1971 in Knoxville, Tennessee), better known as Johnny Knoxville, is an American comic actor and daredevil. ... Joseph Wood Krutch (November 25, 1893 - May 22, 1970) was an American writer, critic, and naturalist. ... The Mabry-Hazen House is a historic home located at 1711 Dandridge Avenue in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... For the musician, see Cormac McCarthy (musician). ... Walter Brownie McGhee (November 30, 1915 - February 16, 1996) was a folk-blues singer and guitarist, best known for his collaborations with the harmonica player Sonny Terry. ... Granville Stick McGhee (March 23, 1917 - August 15, 1961) was an American guitarist (Brownie McGhees younger brother) best known for Drinkin Wine Spo-Dee-O-Dee, one of the earliest prototypical rock and roll songs, which Jerry Lee Lewis memorably covered. ... Patricia Neal (born January 20, 1926, Packard, Kentucky) is an Academy Award winning American actress. ... Gerald R. North (June 26, 1938 - ) is Distinguished Professor and Holder of the Harold J. Haynes Endowed Chair in Geosciences at Texas A&M University, and Head of the Department of Meteorology. ... Cover of Time Magazine (September 1, 1924) Adolph Simon Ochs (b. ... Randal Randy Keith Orton[1] (born on April 1, 1980), nicknamed The Legend Killer, is an American professional wrestler currently signed to World Wrestling Entertainment wrestling on its RAW brand. ... James Chadwick Chad Pennington [1](born June 26, 1976 in Knoxville, Tennessee) is an American football quarterback, who is currently the backup quarterback for the NFLs New York Jets. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White, Jersey Jets Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... Dr. Jerry Punch (born August 20, 1953) is an auto racing and college football commentator on ESPN. Dr. Punch worked as an emergency room physician before moving to ESPN in 1984 as a pit reporter for NASCAR races. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... Raskulinecz (right, in the back) with Nick Oliveri Nick Raskulinecz (born in Knoxville, Tennessee)[1] is a Grammy-winning American record producer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Florence Reece (born April 12, 1900, Sharps Chapel, Tennessee – died August 3, 1986, Knoxville, Tennessee) was an American social activist, poet, and folksong writer. ... Bradley Barron Renfro (July 25, 1982 - May 22, 2007) was an American actor, born in Knoxville, Tennessee and was raised by his grandmother. ... Glenn Reynolds (author photo). ... John Sevier (pronounced severe) (23 September 1745 – 25 September 1815) served four years (1785–1789) as the only governor of the State of Franklin and twelve years (1796–1801 and 1803–1809) as governor of Tennessee, and as a U.S. Representative from Tennessee from 1811 until his death. ... Pat Summitt (born Patricia Sue Head on June 14, 1952 in Clarksville, Tennessee) is the coach of the Tennessee Lady Vols basketball team. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an Academy Award- and Palme dOr-winning American film director, screenwriter and actor. ... For other persons of the same name, see David Thomas. ... Wendys is an international chain of fast food restaurants founded by Dave Thomas in 1969 in Columbus, Ohio. ... Jake Thomas (born January 30, 1990) is an American actor and singer known for his role in the television show Lizzie McGuire, in which he plays Lizzies younger brother, Matt McGuire. ... Bob Thomas was one of the top radio announcers in Knoxville, Tennessee for 25 years. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Channel One News is a United States television news program that public and private schools agree to show their students in exchange for the loan of TV equipment. ... Edison Schools are a type of American public school which is run for profit. ... Chris Woodruff (born January 3, 1973) is a former American professional male tennis player. ... Tina Wesson (born December 26, 1960 in Knoxville, Tennessee) won $1,000,000 as the winner of Survivor: The Australian Outback. ...

Sister cities

Knoxville has seven sister cities as designated by Sister Cities International: Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... Sister Cities International is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting and fostering town twinning, especially between cities in the United States and cities in other countries. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... Chełm is a town in eastern Poland with 68,595 inhabitants (2004). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Not to be confused with Chengde. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Region City seat Lingya District (苓雅區) Government  - Mayor Chen Chu (陳菊) Area  - Total 154 km² (59. ... Sister Cities International is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting and fostering town twinning, especially between cities in the United States and cities in other countries. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Larissa (Greek: Λάρισα, Lárisa) is the capital city of the Thessaly periphery of Greece, and capital of the Larissa Prefecture. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Muroran (室蘭市; -shi) is a city and port located in Iburi, Hokkaido, Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... Neuquén is a city in Argentina and is the capital of Neuquén Province. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Yesan County (Yesan-gun) is a county in South Chungcheong Province, South Korea. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Knoxville Demographics. KnoxvilleTennessee.com (2007-03-10). Retrieved on 2007-06-03.
  2. ^ Knoxville (city) QuickFacts. United States Census Bureau (2007-05-07). Retrieved on 2007-06-03.
  3. ^ a b American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ US Board on Geographic Names. United States Geological Survey (2007-10-25). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ Find a County. National Association of Counties. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ Jack Neely, The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), xxi.
  7. ^ Fletcher Jolly III, "40KN37: An Early Woodland Habitation Site in Knox County, Tennessee," Tennessee Archaeologist 31, nos. 1-2 (1976), 51.
  8. ^ Frank H. McClung Museum, "Woodland Period." Retrieved: 25 March 2008.
  9. ^ Fletcher Jolly III, "40KN37: An Early Woodland Habitation Site in Knox County, Tennessee," Tennessee Archaeologist 31, nos. 1-2 (1976), 51.
  10. ^ James Strange, "An Unusual Late Prehistoric Pipe from Post Oak Island (40KN23)," Tennessee Archaeologist 30, no. 1 (1974), 80.
  11. ^ Richard Polhemus, The Toqua Site — 40MR6, Vol. I (Norris, Tenn.: Tennessee Valley Authority, 1987), 1240-1246.
  12. ^ Cora Tula Watters, "Shawnee." The Encyclopedia of Appalachia (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 2006), 278-279.
  13. ^ Ima Stephens, "Creek." The Encyclopedia of Appalachia (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 2006), 252-253.
  14. ^ James Mooney, Myths of the Cherokee and Sacred Formulas of the Cherokee (Nashville: Charles Elder, 1972), 526.
  15. ^ Jefferson Chapman, Tellico Archaeology: 12,000 Years of Native American History (Norris, Tenn.: Tennessee Valley Authority, 1985), 97.
  16. ^ Henry Timberlake, Samuel Williams (ed.), Memoirs, 1756-1765 (Marietta, Georgia: Continental Book Co., 1948), 54.
  17. ^ William MacArthur, Knoxville, Crossroads of the New South (Tulsa, Okla.: Continental Heritage Press, 1982), 1-15.
  18. ^ Yong Kim, The Sevierville Hill Site: A Civil War Union Encampment on the Southern Heights of Knoxville, Tennessee (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Transportation Center, 1993), 9.
  19. ^ Kim, The Sevierville Hill Site, 9.
  20. ^ MacArthur, 17.
  21. ^ William MacArthur, Jr., Knoxville: Crossroads of the New South (Tulsa, Oklahoma: Continental Heritage Press, 1982), 17-22.
  22. ^ G. H. Stueckrath, "Incidents in the Early Settlement of East Tennessee and Knoxville." Originally published in De Bow's Review Vol. XXVII (October 1859), O.S. Enlarged Series. Vol. II, No. 4, N.S. Pages 407-419. Transcribed for web content by Billie McNamara, 1999-2002. Retrieved: 25 February 2008.
  23. ^ Kim, The Sevierville Hill Site, 9.
  24. ^ W. Bruce Wheeler, "Knoxville." The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture, 2002. Retrieved: 26 February 2008.
  25. ^ MacArthur, Knoxville: Crossroads of the New South, 23.
  26. ^ Kim, The Sevierville Hill Site, 9.
  27. ^ W. Bruce Wheeler, "Knoxville." The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture, 2002. Retrieved: 26 February 2008.
  28. ^ Jonathan Atkins, "Hugh Lawson White." The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture, 2002. Retrieved: 26 February 2008.
  29. ^ Forrest Conklin, "William Gannaway "Parson" Brownlow." The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture, 2002. Retrieved: 27 February 2008.
  30. ^ Durwood Dunn, Cades Cove: The Life and Death of An Appalachian Community (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1988), 125.
  31. ^ Knoxville-Knox County Metropolitan Planning Commission, "Designated Properties: Knoxville Historic Zoning Commission." Retrieved: 27 February 2008.
  32. ^ MacArthur, Knoxville: Crossroads of the New South, 42-44.
  33. ^ Kim, The Sevierville Hill Site, 10.
  34. ^ Kim, The Sevierville Hill Site, 10-12.
  35. ^ Kim, The Sevierville Hill Site, 15-17.
  36. ^ William Bruce Wheeler, "Knoxville, Tennessee." The Encyclopedia of Appalachia (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 2006), 375.
  37. ^ William Bruce Wheeler, "Knoxville, Tennessee." The Encyclopedia of Appalachia (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 2006), 375.
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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Sources

  • Carey, Ruth. "Change Comes to Knoxville." in These Are Our Voices: The Story of Oak Ridge 1942-1970, edited by James Overholt, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 1987.
  • Deaderick, Lucile, ed. Heart of the Valley--A History of Knoxville, Tennessee Knoxville: East Tennessee Historical Society, 1976.
  • Jennifer Long; "Government Job Creation Programs-Lessons from the 1930s and 1940s" Journal of Economic Issues . Volume: 33. Issue: 4. 1999. pp 903+, a case study of Knoxville.
  • Knoxville. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved on 2006-03-14.
  • Knoxville. Tennessee History for Kids. Retrieved on 2007-02-07.
  • Knoxville History. Retrieved on 2007-02-07.
  • The Mcclung museum at The University of Tennessee Knoxville, "Archaeology & the Native Peoples of Tennessee" exhibit. Exhibit Link.
  • McDonald, Michael, and Bruce Wheeler. Knoxville, Tennessee: Continuity and Change in an Appalachian City University of Tennessee Press, 1983. the standard academic history
  • The Future of Knoxville's Past: Historic and Architectural Resources in Knoxville, Tennessee. (Knoxville Historic Zoning Commission, October, 2006).
  • Rothrock, Mary U., editor. The French Broad-Holston Country: A History of Knox County, Tennessee. (Knox County Historical Committee; East Tennessee Historical Society, 1946).
  • Isenhour, Judith Clayton. Knoxville, A Pictorial History. (Donning Company, 1978, 1980).
  • Barber, John W., and Howe, Henry. All the Western States and Territories, . . . (Cincinnati, Ohio: Howe's Subscription Book Concern, 1867). pp. 631-632.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Knoxville Tennessee Information (213 words)
Metropolitan Knoxville was recently ranked the "best place to live in the United States and Canada" among cities with a population of fewer than 1 million.
The Knoxville, Alcoa, Maryville and Oak Ridge areas are blessed with highly ranked schools.
Knoxville is the best small city in the country!
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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