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Encyclopedia > Known Space

Known Space is the fictional setting of several science fiction novels and short stories written by author Larry Niven. It is the name given by humans to an area near the Earth which is explored and settled in the future. This area reaches out approximately 60 light-years in all directions from the Earth. The stories span approximately one thousand years of future history, from the first human explorations of the Solar System to the colonization of dozens of nearby systems (and with some references to the far distant past). Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A light-year, symbol ly, is the distance light travels in one year: exactly 9. ... Major features of the Solar System (not to scale; from left to right): Pluto, Neptune, Uranus, Saturn, Jupiter, the asteroid belt, the Sun, Mercury, Venus, Earth and its Moon, and Mars. ... This list of the nearest stars to Earth is ordered by increasing distance out to a maximum of 5 parsecs (16. ...

Contents

Overview

Species

In the process of exploring space, humankind encounters several intelligent alien species, including the following: “Green people” redirects here. ...

  • The Kzinti: a very large and belligerent species of cat-like aliens with whom humans fight several brutal interstellar wars. Kzinti tactics are somewhat cat-like in nature, 'Scream and leap' being the primary mode of attack. Niven himself wrote little about the Man-Kzin wars, although many of his stories refer to them having taken place in the past. The Man-Kzin Wars short-story collections were primarily written by other authors. The Kzinti "crossed-over" in to the Star Trek universe in the animated episode "The Slaver Weapon", which was written by Larry Niven and draws heavily from Niven's own short story "The Soft Weapon."
  • Pierson's Puppeteers: a highly technologically advanced race of three-legged, twin-necked herbivores descended from herd animals, and noted for their so-called cowardice. Their commercial empire directly and indirectly controls events throughout Known Space and beyond, and Puppeteer plots are behind many of the larger events in Known Space.
  • The Outsiders: fragile, low-temperature (they drink liquid helium) aliens that cruise through deep space. The Outsiders trade information, and are responsible for introducing FTL travel to humans. They have a mysterious connection with the starseeds, a space-born plant that travels to and from the galactic core.
  • The Pak: interstellar ancestors of humanity whose life-cycle mimics the stages of human aging. A Pak who reaches the age of 30 to 40 may become a 'Protector' of his descendants. Pak Protectors were the builders of the Ringworld.
  • The Kdatlyno: a slave species of the Kzinti until humans free them. Kdatlyno "see" by way of radar and create sculptures intended to be "seen" by Kdatlyno, but which can be felt by other species such as humans and puppeteers.
  • The Thrintun: an apparently long-extinct ancient species who ruled the galaxy through telepathic mind control. One of their technologies, the stasis field, has effects that include indefinite suspended animation and imperviousness to damage, which has figured in several Niven stories. Thrintun are small (approximately 1 meter tall), reptilian, with green scaly skin, pointed teeth, and a single eye.
  • The Grogs: sessile sentient creatures, shaped like furry cones. They are eyeless, earless, and have a prehensile tongue. They can also control animals telepathically. The Grogs are thought to be the descendants of the Thrintun species, after two billion years of de-evolution.
  • The Tnuctipun: an apparently extinct ancient race of carnivores contemporaneous with and mostly enslaved by the Thrintun. They were known for their technological prowess, especially in genetic engineering. They secretly plotted to overthrow their Thrintun masters using many of their creations. When it appeared that they would succeed, the Thrintun used a psychic amplifier that forced every living creature in the galaxy with a notochord to commit suicide.
  • The Bandersnatchi: colossal slug-like creatures, originally created by the Tnuctipun to be grown as a food source by the Thrintun. Believed to have only animal intelligence by the Thrintun, the Tnuctipun actually engineered them as highly evolved both mentally and physically, in an apparent plan to breed an army to help overthrow the Thrintun. At one time found throughout the Thrintun empire, the only survivors during modern time are on the planet Jinx, though they are later found on the Ringworld and a forested planet called Beanstalk.
  • The Trinocs: named for their three eyes; they also have three fingers, and a triangular mouth. Methane breathers and culturally paranoid, at least by human standards. First encountered by Louis Wu in the short story "There is a Tide."
  • Martians: primitive humanoids who lived beneath the sands. Martians burst into flames when brought in contact with water. In the novel Protector, the Martians were wiped out when Jack Brennan caused an ice asteroid to crash into the surface of Mars. Some Martians still exist on the "Map of Mars" on the Ringworld.
  • The Jotoki: sentient octopus-shaped beings formed by the joining of the lobes of five non-sentient eel-like life forms into a single brain. Former rulers of an interstellar empire, they used Kzinti as bodyguards, but the Kzinti rebelled and used the Jotoki technology to create their own empire.
  • Morlocks: semi-sentient humanoid cave dwellers on Wunderland. Named by humans for the creatures in H.G. Wells' The Time Machine.
  • Whrloo: Meter tall insectoids with long eyestalks, their homeworld has low gravity with a thick, high density atmosphere. They never saw the stars until they were enslaved by the Kzinti.

Also figuring in some stories were intelligent cetaceans and various offshoots of Homo sapiens lineage such as the Hominids of the Ringworld. Most life in Known Space shared similar biochemistries, since they evolved from the Thrintun practice of seeding barren worlds with food yeast. The Kzinti (singular Kzin) are a fictional, very warlike and bloodthirsty race of felinoid aliens in Larry Nivens Known Space series. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Kzin (plural Kzinti) are a fictional, very warlike and bloodthirsty race of felinoid aliens in Larry Nivens Known Space series. ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... The Slaver Weapon is an episode of Star Trek: The Animated Series. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Piersons Puppeteers, often known just as Puppeteers, are a fictional alien race from Larry Nivens Known Space books. ... The Outsiders are an alien race in Larry Nivens Known Space series. ... Helium exists in liquid form only at very low temperatures. ... Faster-than-light (also superluminal or FTL) communications and travel are staples of the science fiction genre. ... Starseeds, also called sailseeds, are a fictional life form in the Known Space science fiction series by Larry Niven. ... Map of the Star Wars galaxy released by Star Wars Insider The fictional galaxy where the setting of the Star Wars saga occurs is known simply as the Star Wars galaxy while in the canon it is referred as the Galaxy or the Known Galaxy. ... Protector eating Tree-of-Life root Pak Breeders and Pak Protectors are two generic forms of fictional life in Larry Nivens Known Space universe. ... Ringworld is a Hugo and Nebula award-winning 1970 science fiction novel by Larry Niven, set in his Known Space universe. ... The Kdatlyno are a fictional alien species. ... Spoiler warning: In Larry Nivens fictional Known Space universe, the Thrintun (singular Thrint) were a long-extinct species which ruled the galaxy through telepathic mind control. ... Stasis (IPA: ), or hypersleep, is a science fiction concept akin to suspended animation. ... The Grogs, in the Known Space, are sessile furry cones, which can control animals telepathically. ... Look up sessile in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The term devolution, which normally means a delegation of powers, is sometimes erroneously used to refer to the evolution of a species into more primitive forms. ... The Tnuctipun are a fictional alien species in Larry Nivens Known Space series. ... The notochord is a flexible, rod-shaped body found in embryos of all chordates. ... Rather than surrender to US soldiers, the Mayor (Bürgermeister) of Leipzig Germany, committed suicide along with his wife and daughter on April 20, 1945. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Jinx is a fictional planet in Larry Nivens Known Space. ... Ringworld is a Hugo and Nebula award-winning 1970 science fiction novel by Larry Niven, set in his Known Space universe. ... Trinocs are a fictional alien species in the Known Space universe, so named for the fact that they have three eyes, giving them trinocular vision. ... Louis Gridley Wu is the main protagonist in the Ringworld series of books, written by Larry Niven. ... Fictional representations of Mars have been popular for over a century. ... The term humanoid refers to any being whose body structure resembles that of a human. ... Protector is a 1973 science fiction novel by Larry Niven, set in his Known Space universe. ... Jack Brennan is a fictional character in Larry Nivens Known Space universe, from the novel Protector. ... Ringworld is a Hugo and Nebula award-winning 1970 science fiction novel by Larry Niven, set in his Known Space universe. ... The Jotoki (singular Jotok) are a fictional alien race from Larry Nivens Known Space books. ... For other uses, see Eel (disambiguation). ... Morlocks are a fictional species, created by H.G. Wells for his novel, The Time Machine. The Morlocks, as well as another supposed offshoot of humans, the Eloi, exist in the future world in the year AD 802,701 in The Time Machine. The Morlocks are said to have descended... The term humanoid refers to any being whose body structure resembles that of a human. ... Wunderland is a chain of video arcades, which conists many five-cent video games that come in arcade machines. ... The Time Machine is a novel by H. G. Wells, first published in 1895, later made into two films of the same title. ... Suborders Mysticeti Odontoceti (see text) The order Cetacea includes whales, dolphins and porpoises. ... In the Ringworld series of novels by Larry Niven, the Ringworld is populated by a vast variety of hominid species, ranging in intelligence from merely animals, to full sapience. ... Spoiler warning: In Larry Nivens fictional Known Space universe, the Thrintun (singular Thrint) were a long-extinct species which ruled the galaxy through telepathic mind control. ...

Cover of January 1975 Analog for The Borderland of Sol showing Jinx (artist: John Schoenherr)
Cover of January 1975 Analog for The Borderland of Sol showing Jinx (artist: John Schoenherr)

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Falling Torch (1962 paperback edition), cover painting by John Schoenherr John Schoenherr is an American illustrator who was born in New York City, July 5, 1935. ...

Locations

One aspect of the Known Space universe is that most of the planets colonized by humans are suboptimal for Homo sapiens. During the first phase of human interstellar colonization (i.e., before humanity acquired FTL), simple robotic probes were sent to nearby stars to assess their planets for habitation. The programming of these probes was flawed: they sent back a "good for colonization" message if they found a habitable point, rather than a habitable planet. Sleeper ships containing human colonists were sent to the indicated star systems. Too often, those colonists had to make the best of a bad situation. Homo sapiens (Latin: wise man) is the scientific name for the human species. ... FTL may refer to: Faster-than-light, a general scientific concept FTL Games, the video game development division of Software Heaven Inc. ... A sleeper ship is a hypothetical type of manned spaceship in which most or all of the crew spends the journey in some form of hibernation or suspended animation. ...

  • Earth, the human homeworld, is oppressive to an extent that would be unbelievable to most twentieth-century humans. For centuries, due to the perfection of organ transplant technology, all state executions are done in hospitals to provide organ transplants, and to maximise their availability, nearly all crimes carried the death penalty. This period ended when Jack Brennan, who had consumed the Tree-of-Life root and become a human version of the Pak Protector, used his superior intelligence to engineer social change in medical technology and social attitudes that eventually made the organ banks obsolete. Part of Brennan's manipulation was the development of a science known as 'psychistry'. Psychistry was used to 'correct' all forms of 'mental aberration'—the populace is incredibly docile. To combat overpopulation (one estimate is 18 billion people!), a licence is required to procreate, only available after exhaustive testing has determined that a prospect is free of 'abnormalities'; failure to acquire one before procreating is a capital crime. Due to the existence of the transfer booth and a one-world language and economy, the populace eventually becomes fairly genetically homogeneous. To prevent the development of new WMDs, all scientific research is regulated and all potentially dangerous technology is suppressed; there have been very few real breakthroughs in science since the twentieth century. A common title for people born on Earth is 'Flatlander', and they are considered naïve, vain and arrogant by the rest of the galaxy, having been born and raised in the only environment in Known Space without inherent dangers.
  • The Moon is a separate entity, but is under the control of the same government as Earth. It, however, has its own distinct culture. Humans native to the Moon are called "Lunies", and tend toward tall, lean body types regularly reaching eight feet in height. They are frequently referred to as looking much like Tolkien Elves due to their physiques and alien allure.
  • Mars, fourth planet in our solar system and the first planetary colony in Known Space. Native Martians were exterminated by the Brennan Monster. No one goes there, as resources are plentiful in the Belt and Jovian moons.
  • The Sol Belt possesses an abundance of valuable ores, which are easily accessible due to the low to nonexistent gravity of the rocks containing them. Originally a harsh frontier under UN control, the Belt declared independence after creating Confinement Asteroid, a habitat with spin gravity that permitted safe gestation of children, and Farmer's Asteroid, the Belt's primary food source. Almost immediately a cold war began between the fiercely independent Belters and the technology police of the UN. Several years of tension followed, but soon settled into a relatively peaceful trade relationship that held until the first Man-Kzin War. Transmissions received from exploration ships that pronounced the aliens hostile were decreed by the authoritarian and pacifistic Earth government as signs of psychosis by the explorers. When the Kzin invasion began, Earth suppressed all efforts at resistance, as they could not believe the aliens were hostile, but merely misunderstanding human communications as threats. Finally, a number of Belters engineered a small scale rebellion on Mercury, using the laser transport network to destroy the invaders. The consequences of the invasion severely damaged Earth-Belt relations for centuries.
  • Down is the home world of the Grogs. It orbits a K-type star, significantly redder and cooler than Sol. Grogs, though friendly, are feared by humanity, due to their telepathic ability to control the minds of animals (and possibly sentient species as well). Because of this fear, humans have placed a Bussard ramjet field generator in close orbit about Down's sun to destroy the Grog population, should they take threatening action against any sentient species.
  • Jinx, orbiting Sirius, is a massive moon of a gas giant, stretched by tidal forces into an egg shape, with gravity near the limits of human habitability. The poles lie in vacuum, the equatorial regions are Venus-like (and inhabited by the Bandersnatchi); the zones between have atmosphere breathable by humans. Jinx's poles become a major in vacuo manufacturing area.
  • Wunderland is a planet circling Alpha Centauri, and was the earliest extra-solar colony in Known Space's human history. It has a gravity of 6/10's that of Earth's and is extremely hospitable to human life. Wunderland was invaded and its population enslaved by the Kzinti during the first Man-Kzin war. It was freed near the end of the war by the human Hyperdrive Armada. The system has an asteroid belt in the shape of a semicircle, which gives it its name—the Serpent Swarm. The capital asteroid, Tiamat, houses one of the largest Kzin populations in Known Space.
  • We Made It orbiting Procyon, got its name because the first colony ship crash-landed. Gravity is about three-fifths Earth's. The planet's axis is pointed along the plane of the ecliptic (like Uranus), creating ferocious winds of as much as 1,500 mph during half of the planet's year, forcing the people to live underground. Natives are known as Crashlanders, and tend to be very tall albinos. Their capital, which was the site of their ship's crash landing, is called Crashlanding City. We Made It also has one ocean.
  • Plateau in the Tau Ceti system is Venus-like, with a plateau (called Mount Lookitthat), half the size of California, rising high enough into the dense atmosphere to be habitable. Inhabitants (mountaineers) are divided into rigid hereditary castes, the crew and the colonists, depending on whether their ancestors piloted the colonizing vessel. The crew are the upper caste, and hold power through their monopoly on organ transplantation. The original colonists signed the "Covenant of Planetfall", agreeing that this outcome was just recompense for the labors of the crew during the voyage; that they signed at gunpoint as they were awakened from hibernation was kept secret from later generations. This repressive system is changed by events in A Gift From Earth, and appears to be nonexistent by the time "The Ethics of Madness" takes place.
  • Home was one of Earth's most distant colonies, orbiting the star Epsilon Indi. The planet was so named by the colonists, due to its remarkable similarity to Earth. It was decimated by war with the Pak, but re-colonized in later centuries.
  • Canyon was once was an uninhabitable Mars-like world known as Warhead. It was being used as a military outpost by the Kzinti, until the planet was hit by a weapon called the "Wunderland Treatymaker". The attack tore a long, narrow, kilometers-deep crater into the crust approximately the size of the Baja peninsula. Most of the planet's thin atmosphere fell into this artificial canyon, resulting in a breathable environment, complete with a sea at the bottom. The planet was then renamed for the crater, and settled by humans in a huge city running up the crater wall.
  • Gummidgy is a jungle world popular with hunters. It is home to the Gummidgy Orchid-Thing, a sessile carnivore that hangs from trees and is a popular trophy for the wealthy.
  • Fafnir is a former Kzin colony covered almost entirely in water. It has one continent, called Shast. It was captured by humans during the Man-Kzin Wars.
  • Margrave is still a frontier world. It is home to enormous birds the inhabitants have dubbed Rocs.
  • Silvereyes is, at the time of Ringworld, the furthest Human world from Earth (60 days at Quantum-I hyperdrive speeds). Though never given anything more than a name check in Niven's own stories, the Man/Kzin Wars books state it is entirely covered by a world ocean, with groves of Slaver Sunflowers growing up from the bottom of the ocean.
  • The Fleet of Worlds are the five planets that are home to the Puppeteers (see above), presently being moved in formation at sub-light speeds out of the galaxy to avoid destruction as the wave of radiation from an explosion of the galactic core sweeps towards the outer reaches of the galaxy.
  • Kobold was an artificial world created in the outer Solar System by Jack Brennan, a human Protector. Composed of a small sphere in the center ringed by a larger torus. Gravity generators facilitated movement between the two sections and were used in games and art. Brennan destroyed Kobold just prior to leaving for his war with the Pak Protectors.
  • Ringworld, an artificial world three million times larger than earth, built in the shape of a giant ring orbiting its sun, a million miles across and with a diameter of 186 million miles. It was built by the Pak, who later abandoned it. It is inhabited by a number of different evolved hominid species, as well as Bandersnatchi, Martians and Kzinti.
  • Sheathclaws, a planet colonized by humans aboard Angel's Pencil and descendants of a rogue Kzinti telepath. It orbits an as-yet-unspecified star 98 light years from Earth, and kept its existence secret for several centuries.
  • Kzin, translates as Home-of-the-Kzinti or Kzinhome in the Hero's Tongue. It orbits 61 Ursa Majoris and has higher gravity than earth and more oxygen in the atmosphere. It has two moons, known as the Hunter's Moon and the Traveler's Moon.

This article is about Earth as a planet. ... An organ transplant is the moving of a whole or partial organ from one body to another (or from a donor site on the patients own body), for the purpose of replacing the recipients damaged or failing organ with a working one from the donor site. ... Jack Brennan is a fictional character in Larry Nivens Known Space universe, from the novel Protector. ... The tree of life as represented in Kabbalah, containing the Sephiroth. ... Protector eating Tree-of-Life root Pak Breeders and Pak Protectors are two generic forms of fictional life in Larry Nivens Known Space universe. ... a transfer booth is akin to a phone booth, but when you dial a number you are transferred via some form of matter transmission (or transported as in Star Trek) to the number dialed instead of merely voice contact. ... 1993 Time Magazine cover which shows a computer-generated face of the hypothetical future multi-ethnic race of the United States The Race of the Future theory/idea states that due to the process of miscegenation, the mixing of different ethnicities or races, especially in marriage, cohabitation, or sexual relations... For the album, see Weapons of Mass Destruction (album). ... Flatlander is a term used in Larry Nivens Known Space series, initially to describe one who has never left Earth. ... Apparent magnitude: up to -12. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916, wearing his British Army uniform in a photograph from the middle years of WW1. ... For alternate meanings, see Lightning (disambiguation). ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ... The name Martian is given to the hypothetical native inhabitants of the planet Mars. ... Jack Brennan is a fictional character in Larry Nivens Known Space universe, from the novel Protector. ... For details on the physical properties of bodies in the asteroid belt see Asteroid and Main-belt comet. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... In Larry Nivens Known Space universe, a Belter refers to a resident of the Asteroid Belt around Sol, sometimes known as the Sol Belt to differentiate it from Alpha Centauris Serpent Swarm. ... This article is about the planet. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Grogs, in the Known Space, are sessile furry cones, which can control animals telepathically. ... In astronomy, stellar classification is a classification of stars based initially on photospheric temperature and its associated spectral characteristics, and subsequently refined in terms of other characteristics. ... Standards Of Learning SOL stands for The Standards Of Learning. ... Artists conception of a Bussard ramjet. ... Jinx is a fictional planet in Larry Nivens Known Space. ... Sirius (α CMa / α Canis Majoris / Alpha Canis Majoris) (IPA: ) is the brightest star in the night-time sky with a visual apparent magnitude of −1. ... (*min temperature refers to cloud tops only) Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 9. ... Wunderland is a chain of video arcades, which conists many five-cent video games that come in arcade machines. ... Alpha Centauri (α Cen / α Centauri, also known as Rigil Kentaurus), is the brightest star system in the southern constellation of Centaurus. ... The Kzin (plural Kzinti) are a fictional, very warlike and bloodthirsty race of Felinoid aliens in Larry Nivens Known Space series. ... Known Space is the fictional setting of many of Larry Nivens science fiction stories. ... Procyon (α CMi / α Canis Minoris / Alpha Canis Minoris) is the brightest star in the constellation Canis Minor and the eighth brightest star in the nighttime sky. ... Adjectives: Uranian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 120 kPa (at the cloud level) Composition: 83% Hydrogen 15% Helium 1. ... Crashlander is a fixup by Larry Niven published in 1994. ... Albinism is a genetic condition resulting in a lack of pigmentation in the eyes, skin and hair. ... Plateau is a human colony in Larry Nivens Known Space. ... Tau Ceti (Ï„ Cet / Ï„ Ceti) is a star commonly mentioned by science fiction authors since it is similar to the Sun in mass and spectral type in addition to being relatively close to us. ... (*min temperature refers to cloud tops only) Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 9. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... A Gift From Earth is a science fiction novel by Larry Niven, first published in 1968 and set in his Known Space universe. ... A Gift From Earth is a science fiction novel by Larry Niven, first published in 1968 and set in his Known Space universe. ... Known Space is the fictional setting of several science fiction novels and short stories written by author Larry Niven. ... Epsilon Indi (ε Ind / ε Indi) is a star approximately 11. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... Pak may refer to: 2. ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ... Baja California Peninsula (highlighted) The Baja California Peninsula or Lower California is a peninsula in the west of Mexico. ... Known Space is the fictional setting of many of Larry Nivens science fiction stories. ... This article is about the Roc, a mythical bird. ... Fleet of Worlds are both a location and a book in Larry Nivens Known Space series. ... Jack Brennan is a fictional character in Larry Nivens Known Space universe, from the novel Protector. ... In geometry, a torus (pl. ... Ringworld is a Hugo and Nebula award-winning 1970 science fiction novel by Larry Niven, set in his Known Space universe. ... In the Ringworld series of novels by Larry Niven, the Ringworld is populated by a vast variety of hominid species, ranging in intelligence from merely animals, to full sapience. ... The Kzinti (singular Kzin) are a fictional, very warlike and bloodthirsty race of felinoid aliens in Larry Nivens Known Space series. ...

Technology

The series feature a number of "gee whiz" inventions which figure as plot devices. Stories earlier in the timeline feature technology such as Bussard ramjets, and explore how organ transplantation technology enables the new crime of Organlegging, while later stories feature hyperdrive, invulnerable starship hulls, stasis fields, molecular monofilaments, Dyson Spheres, transfer booths (teleporters used only on planetary surfaces), the lifespan-extending drug boosterspice, and the tasp which is capable of stimulating the pleasure centers of the brain from a distance. Artists conception of a Bussard ramjet. ... An organ transplant is the transplantation of an organ (or part of one) from one body to another, for the purpose of replacing the recipients damaged or failing organ with a working one from the donor. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Hyperdrive is a name given to certain methods of traveling faster than light (FTL) in science fiction. ... General Products is the name of a fictional alien production company, used repeatedly by science fiction author Larry Niven in his stories that take place in his Known Space universe. ... This article or section should be merged with Stasis A stasis field is an imaginary phenomenon that is often used in science fiction that slows the passage of time inside it, or stops it entirely. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Monomolecular wire. ... Diagram of an idealized Dyson shell of 1 AU radius A Dyson sphere is a hypothetical megastructure first described in 1959 by the physicist Freeman Dyson in a short paper published in the journal Science entitled Search for Artificial Stellar Sources of Infra-Red Radiation. It is an artificial hollow... a transfer booth is akin to a phone booth, but when you dial a number you are transferred via some form of matter transmission (or transported as in Star Trek) to the number dialed instead of merely voice contact. ... Teleportation, or teletransportation, is the process of moving objects (or more likely with present techniques, fundamental particles) from one place to another by encoding information about the object, transmitting the information to another place, such as on a radio signal, and creating a copy of the original object in the... In Larry Nivens Known Space universe, boosterspice is a compound that increases the longevity and reverses aging of human beings. ... A tasp is a fictional device appearing in Larry Nivens Known Space novels. ... The limbic system (Latin limbus: border or edge) includes the structures in the human brain involved in emotion, motivation, and emotional association with memory. ...


The impact of inventions and technology on society is a recurring theme in Niven's work. For example, addiction to electric brain stimulation resulting in Wireheads, or the effects of the invention of teleportation (not often addressed in the Known Space canon). In Larry Nivens Known Space novels, a wirehead is someone who has been fitted with an electronic brain implant to the pleasure centers of their brain. ...


The milieu can be viewed as representing the climax of the pre-cyberpunk era of science fiction, as the cyberpunk themes of information technology and competition of various sub-governmental groups do not figure in the stories. Berlins Sony Center reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ...


ARM

The ARM are the police force of the United Nations. ARM used to be an acronym for the Amalgamation of Regional Militia, though this is not a term in current usage by the time of the Known Space novels. An agent of the ARM, Gil Hamilton, is the protagonist of Niven's sci-fi detective series, Flatlander. The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... Acronyms and initialisms are abbreviations formed from the initial letter or letters of words, such as NATO and XHTML, and are pronounced in a way that is distinct from the full pronunciation of what the letters stand for. ... Gilbert Gilgamesh Hamilton is a fictional character in the Known Space universe created by Larry Niven. ...


Their basic function is to enforce a number of laws to the effect of ensuring the long-term survival of the human race, specifically control of population growth and weapons of mass destruction. In short, the ARM hunts down women who refuse birth control and suppresses all new technologies. This makes them incredibly unpopular despite an ongoing campaign of propaganda—when asked, they will make claims of suppressing inventions that would destroy the world economy, force the legalization of murder, annihilate planets, etc. Of course, these claims, by their very nature, can never be proven. Early in their existence they were able to put on a friendly face by directing a portion of their efforts to policing "organlegging", but they were forced to abandon this when artificial organs were developed despite their anti-tech laws (see A Gift From Earth). However, they are able to maintain control through their monopoly on many advanced technologies that they have suppressed and developed themselves. Among the many technologies they control and outlaw are all trained forms of armed and unarmed combat, as well as chemical and electronic mind control (collectively known as psychistry). Agents of the ARM are commonly known as Schizes, due to the artificially induced state of paranoid schizophrenia they are kept in to enhance their usefulness as law enforcement officials in a society that keeps most of its populace docile and naive through the aforementioned science of psychistry (see "Madness Has Its Place"). This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... A Gift From Earth is a science fiction novel by Larry Niven, first published in 1968 and set in his Known Space universe. ... Schizophrenia (from the Greek word σχιζοφρένεια, or shjzofreneja, meaning split mind) is a psychiatric diagnosis that describes a mental disorder characterized by impairments in the perception or expression of reality and by significant social or occupational dysfunction. ...


Their jurisdiction is limited to the Earth-Moon system; other human colonies have their own militia. Nevertheless, in many Known Space stories, ARM agents operate or exert influence in other human star systems through the "Bureau of Alien Affairs" (see "In the Hall of the Mountain King", "Procrustes", "The Borderland of Sol", and "Neutron Star"). These interventions begin following the Man-Kzin Wars and the introduction of hyperdrive, presumably as part of a general re-integration of human societies. In law, jurisdiction (from the Latin ius, iuris meaning law and dicere meaning to speak) is the practical authority granted to a formally constituted legal body or to a political leader to deal with and make pronouncements on legal matters and, by implication, to administer justice within a defined area... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... Apparent magnitude: up to -12. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia A Militia is an organization of citizens to provide defense, emergency or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ... Larry Nivens short story Procrustes, published in 1994, is the sixth in the series of stories about crashlander Beowulf Shaeffer. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Larry Nivens short story Neutron Star, published in 1966, is widely considered to be the literary cornerstone of his Known Space collection. ...


Stories in Known Space

Unlike many fictional universes, the component tales of Known Space were largely released as short stories or serials in various science fiction anthology magazines. These stories were generally subsequently released in one or more collection volumes. To add some further confusion, some of the shorter novels were also later re-released as part of collections. Due to the large number of stories, it is particularly difficult for a completionist fan of the series to have read the entire span of the work. There are also a number of short stories that are very similar to Known Space stories in style and technology, but which are not a part of the Known Space Universe. ("Bordered in Black" and "Wait It Out" are examples.)


After the mid-1970s, Larry Niven began to write significantly fewer Known Space stories. In his note that accompanies "Man-Kzin Wars", he indicates that it had become more and more difficult to be inspired to write in the universe as, as said above, good stories require conflict, and the ARM, as of the early 31st century, has made Known Space so safe and staid that conflict is all but impossible to find. (see Safe at Any Speed). At that point, he opened up the series to works by other authors. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


In the Known Space stories Niven had created a number of technological devices (GP hull, stasis field, Ringworld material) which, combined with the 'Teela Brown' gene, made it very difficult to construct engaging stories beyond a certain date—the combination of factors made it tricky to produce any kind of creditable threat/problem without complex contrivances. Niven demonstrated this, to his own satisfaction, with "Safe at Any Speed." Piersons Puppeteers, often known just as Puppeteers, are a fictional alien race from Larry Nivens Known Space books. ... The term stasis has several meanings: A state of stabilty, in which all forces are equal and opposing, therefore they cancel out each other. ... Scrith, usually written italicized as scrith, is a fictional substance conceived by Larry Niven. ... Teela Brown is a fictional character created by Larry Niven in the Ringworld novels. ...


Stories by Niven himself

Title Published First appearance Collection
"The Coldest Place" 1964 Worlds of If Tales of Known Space
"The World of Ptavvs"[1] 1965 Worlds of Tomorrow
"Becalmed in Hell" 1965 The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction Tales of Known Space
"Eye of an Octopus" 1966 Galaxy Magazine Tales of Known Space
"The Warriors" 1966 Worlds of If Tales of Known Space
"Neutron Star" 1966 Worlds of If Neutron Star
"How the Heroes Die" 1966 Galaxy Magazine Tales of Known Space
"At the Core" 1966 Worlds of If Neutron Star
"A Relic of the Empire" 1966 Worlds of If Neutron Star
"At the Bottom of a Hole" 1966 Galaxy Magazine Tales of Known Space
"The Soft Weapon" 1967 Worlds of If Neutron Star
"Flatlander" 1967 Worlds of If Neutron Star
"The Ethics of Madness" 1967 Worlds of If Neutron Star
"Safe at any Speed" 1967 The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction Tales of Known Space
"The Adults"[2] 1967 Galaxy Magazine
"The Handicapped" 1967 Galaxy Magazine Neutron Star
"The Jigsaw Man" 1967 Dangerous Visions Tales of Known Space
"Slowboat Cargo"[3] 1968 Worlds of If
"The Deceivers"[4] 1968 Galaxy Magazine Tales of Known Space
"Grendel" 1968 (collection only) Neutron Star
"There is a Tide" 1968 Galaxy Magazine Tales of Known Space
World of Ptavvs 1968 (novel)
A Gift From Earth 1968 (novel)
"Wait It Out" 1968 Futures Unbounded Tales of Known Space
"The Organleggers"[5] 1968 Galaxy Magazine The Shape of Space
Ringworld 1970 (novel)
"Cloak of Anarchy" 1972 Analog Science Fiction Tales of Known Space
Protector 1973 (novel)
The Defenseless Dead 1973 (collection only) The Long ARM of Gil Hamilton
The Borderland of Sol 1974 Analog Science Fiction Tales of Known Space
"ARM" 1975 Epic The Long ARM of Gil Hamilton
The Ringworld Engineers 1980 (novel)
The Patchwork Girl 1980 (novel)
"Madness Has Its Place" 1990 (collection only) Man-Kzin Wars III
"Procrustes" 1994 (collection only) Crashlander
"Ghost" 1994 (framing story, collection only) Crashlander
"The Woman in Del Rey Crater" 1995 (collection only) Flatlander
The Ringworld Throne 1996 (novel)
"Choosing Names" 1998 (collection only) Man-Kzin Wars VIII
"Fly-By-Night" 2002 (collection only) Man-Kzin Wars IX
Ringworld's Children 2004 (novel)
"The Hunting Park" 2005 (collection only) Man-Kzin Wars XI
Fleet of Worlds (co-authored with Edward M. Lerner) 2007 (scheduled) (novel)
Juggler of Worlds (co-authored with Edward M. Lerner) 2008? (scheduled) (novel)

(Note that most stories appeared in more than one collection, though only one each is listed here.) 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Larry Nivens short story Neutron Star, published in 1966, is widely considered to be the literary cornerstone of his Known Space collection. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Larry Nivens short story At the Core, published in 1966, is the second in the series of Known Space stories featuring crashlander Beowulf Shaeffer. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Flatlander is a term used in Larry Nivens Known Space series, initially to describe one who has never left Earth. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... Larry Nivens short story Grendel, published in 1968, is the fourth in the series of Known Space stories featuring crashlander Beowulf Shaeffer. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... World of Ptavvs is a science fiction novel by Larry Niven, set in his Known Space universe. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... A Gift From Earth is a science fiction novel by Larry Niven, first published in 1968 and set in his Known Space universe. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... Death by Ectasy is a short story in the Known Space universe by Larry Niven. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... Ringworld is a Hugo and Nebula award-winning 1970 science fiction novel by Larry Niven, set in his Known Space universe. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Protector is a 1973 science fiction novel by Larry Niven, set in his Known Space universe. ... Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ... The Defenseless Dead is a short story in the Known Space universe by Larry Niven. ... Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ... Larry Nivens short story The Borderland of Sol, published in 1975, is the fifth in the Known Space series of stories about crashlander Beowulf Shaeffer. ... A blonde haired, very skilled worker with a 70s look. ... ARM is a story in Known Space by Larry Niven. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Ringworld Engineers is a novel by Larry Niven first published in 1980. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Flatlander is a term used in Larry Nivens Known Space series, initially to describe one who has never left Earth. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Larry Nivens short story Procrustes, published in 1994, is the sixth in the series of stories about crashlander Beowulf Shaeffer. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Crashlander is a fixup by Larry Niven published in 1994. ... Ghost is the framing story in Larry Nivens 1994 fixup Crashlander that lightly connects and extends the other Beowulf Shaeffer stories published up to that time. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... Crashlander is a fixup by Larry Niven published in 1994. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Flatlander is a term used in Larry Nivens Known Space series, initially to describe one who has never left Earth. ... The Ringworld Throne is a novel by Larry Niven first published in 1996. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Ringworlds Children is a 2004 science fiction novel by Larry Niven, the fourth in the Ringworld series set in the Known Space universe. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fleet of Worlds are both a location and a book in Larry Nivens Known Space series. ... Edward M. Lerner (born 1949) is a US author of science fiction and techno-thrillers. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Edward M. Lerner (born 1949) is a US author of science fiction and techno-thrillers. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Man-Kzin Wars

Main article: Man-Kzin Wars

The Kzin (plural Kzinti) are a fictional, very warlike and bloodthirsty race of felinoid aliens in Larry Nivens Known Space series. ...

Playground

Niven has described his fiction as "playground equipment", encouraging fans to speculate and extrapolate on the events described. Debates have been made, for example, on who built the Ringworld (Pak Protectors and the Outsiders being the traditional favorites, but see Ringworld's Children for a possibly definitive answer), and what happened to the Tnuctipun. However, Niven also states that this is not an invitation to violate his copyrights, so fans should try to avoid publishing works that are too obviously based in the Known Space universe without Niven's given permission. Ringworlds Children is a 2004 science fiction novel by Larry Niven, the fourth in the Ringworld series set in the Known Space universe. ...


Niven was also reported to have said that "Known Space should be seen as a possible future history told by people that may or may not have all their facts right."


A rough draft of a "final" Known Space story titled "Down in Flames" is in circulation, which includes a controversial revelation about the Tnuctipun. However, the publication of Ringworld appears to make this draft obsolete. The writing of "Down in Flames" was a result of a conversation between Norman Spinrad and Niven in 1968, but at the time of its first publication in 1977 some of the concepts were invalidated by Niven's writings between '68 and '77. Ringworld is a Hugo and Nebula award-winning 1970 science fiction novel by Larry Niven, set in his Known Space universe. ...


References

  1. ^ Expanded and republished as a novel in 1968
  2. ^ Expanded and republished as Protector in 1973.
  3. ^ Expanded and republished as A Gift From Earth in 1968.
  4. ^ Subsequently renamed "Intent to Deceive"
  5. ^ Subsequently renamed "Death by Ecstasy"

Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Known Space - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2405 words)
Known Space is the fictional setting of several science fiction novels and short stories written by author Larry Niven.
One aspect of the Known Space universe is that most of the planets colonized by humans are suboptimal for Homo sapiens.
Agents of the ARM are commonly known as Schizes, due to the artificially induced state of paranoid schizophrenia they are kept in to enhance their usefulness as law enforcment officials in a society that keeps most of its populace docile and naive through the aforementioned science of psychistry (see Madness Has Its Place).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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