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Encyclopedia > Knitting
Knit hat, yarn, and knitting needles

Knitting is a craft by which thread or yarn may be turned into cloth. Similar to crochet, knitting consists of loops called stitches pulled through each other. Knitting differs from crochet in that multiple stitches are 'active', or in use, at the same time, and crochet uses a single tool, a crochet hook, instead of a minimum of two knitting needles. The active stitches are held on a needle until another loop can be passed through them with a second needle. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Description: Photo of knitted hat, yarn, and knitting needles Source: Photograph taken by Jared C. Benedict on 06 March 2004. ... Description: Photo of knitted hat, yarn, and knitting needles Source: Photograph taken by Jared C. Benedict on 06 March 2004. ... Yarn Spools of thread Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibers, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking. ... Bamboo knitting needles A little dexterity is helpful in working with knitting needles A knitting needle or knitting pin is a long stick or rod used as a tool in the manufacture of hand knitted fabric. ... Yarn Spools of thread Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibers, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking. ... It has been suggested that Textile be merged into this article or section. ... Detail of a crocheted doily, Sweden Crochet (IPA: krəʊʃeɪ) is a process of creating fabric from yarn or thread using a crochet hook. ... The hook A crochet hook is a type of needle with a hook at one end used to draw thread through knotted loops. ... Bamboo knitting needles A little dexterity is helpful in working with knitting needles A knitting needle or knitting pin is a long stick or rod used as a tool in the manufacture of hand knitted fabric. ...


Knitting may be done by hand or by machine. By hand, there are numerous styles and methods. Some of these produce an entirely different end-product; some produce very similar results. Flat knitting, which is done on two straight needles, produces a length of cloth, while circular knitting, which is done on circular or double-pointed needles, produces a seamless tube.


Different yarns and knitting needles may be used to achieve different end products, by giving the final piece different colour, texture, weight or integrity.

Contents

Types of knitting

A modern knitting machine in action — knitting machines perform most warp knitting, while weft knitting is generally done by hand.
A modern knitting machine in action — knitting machines perform most warp knitting, while weft knitting is generally done by hand.

Image File history File links Rundstrickmaschine_Zungennadeln. ... Image File history File links Rundstrickmaschine_Zungennadeln. ... Warp knitting is a family of knitting methods in which the yarn zigzags vertically, i. ... Warp knitting is a family of knitting methods in which the yarn zigzags vertically, i. ...

Weft knitting versus warp knitting

Main articles: Weft knitting and Warp knitting

There are two major varieties of knitting: weft knitting and warp knitting.[1] A weft-knitted fabric consists of horizontal, parallel courses of yarn and requires only a single yarn. By contrast, warp knitting requires one yarn for every stitch in the course, or horizontal row; these yarns make vertical parallel wales. [2] Warp knitting is resistant to runs, and is common in lingerie fabric such as tricot. Warp knitting is a family of knitting methods in which the yarn zigzags vertically, i. ... Warp knitting is a family of knitting methods in which the yarn zigzags vertically, i. ... Warp knitting is a family of knitting methods in which the yarn zigzags vertically, i. ... Warp knitting is a family of knitting methods in which the yarn zigzags vertically, i. ... For other uses, see Textile (disambiguation). ... Assorted lingerie styles. ...

Circular knitting on a circular needle
Circular knitting on a circular needle
Flat knitting. The loops on the metal needle are the active stitches, and the yarn coming out of the knitting on the right is the working yarn.
Flat knitting. The loops on the metal needle are the active stitches, and the yarn coming out of the knitting on the right is the working yarn.

Warp knitting is generally done by machine, whereas weft knitting may be done by machine or by hand (Spencer 1989:11-12). Knitting machines use a different mechanical system to produce results nearly identical to those produced by hand-knitting. Image File history File links Knitting and photo by Clancy Ratliff Source: http://culturecat. ... Image File history File links Knitting and photo by Clancy Ratliff Source: http://culturecat. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... A modern industrial knitting machine in action The knitting machine, sometimes called knitting frame, knitting loom, or hand knitting machine, is used to produce knit fabrics on a fixed bed of hooked needles. ...


Flat knitting versus circular knitting

Main articles: Circular knitting and Flat knitting

Circular knitting (also called "knitting in the round") is a form of knitting that creates a seamless tube. Knitting is worked in rounds (the equivalent of rows in flat knitting) in a spiral. Originally, circular knitting was done using a set of four or five double-pointed knitting needles. Later, circular needles were invented. A circular needle resembles two short knitting needles connected by a cable between them. Flat knitting, on the other hand, is used, in its most basic form, to make flat, rectangular pieces of cloth.[3] It is done with two straight knitting needles and is worked in rows, horizontal lines of stitches. Circular knitting or knitting in the round, is a form of knitting that creates a seamless tube. ... Flat knitting is a method for producing knitted fabrics in which the work is turned periodically, i. ... Bamboo knitting needles A little dexterity is helpful in working with knitting needles A knitting needle or knitting pin is a long stick or rod used as a tool in the manufacture of hand knitted fabric. ...


Circular knitting is employed to create pieces that are circular or tube-shaped, such as hats, socks, mittens, and sleeves. Flat knitting is usually used to knit flat pieces like scarves, blankets, afghans, and the backs and fronts of sweaters. A hat is an item of clothing which is worn on the head; a kind of headgear. ... For other uses, see Sock (disambiguation). ... A glove (Middle English from Old English glof) is a type of garment which covers the hand. ... Sleeve (O. Eng. ... This article is about the article of clothing. ... It has been suggested that Wool blankets be merged into this article or section. ... A jumper from Marks & Spencer A sweater (also called sweatshirt, pullover, jumper, and jersey) is a relatively heavy garment intended to cover the torso and arms of the human body (though, in some cases, sweaters are made for dogs and occasionally other animals) and typically to be worn over a...


History and culture

This woman is knitting at a coffee shop; although it is usually done by one person alone, knitting is commonly a social activity. There are many knitting guilds and other knitting groups.
This woman is knitting at a coffee shop; although it is usually done by one person alone, knitting is commonly a social activity. There are many knitting guilds and other knitting groups.
Main article: History of knitting

One of the earliest known examples of knitting was finely decorated cotton socks found in Egypt in the end of the first millennium AD.[4] The first knitting trade guild was started in Paris in 1527. [5] With the invention of the knitting machine, however, knitting "by hand" became a useful but non-essential craft. Similar to quilting, spinning, and needlepoint, knitting became a social activity. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Knitting Girl by William-Adolphe Bouguereau, 1869 // An exact geographical origin for knitting cannot be specified. ... (1st millennium BC – 1st millennium – 2nd millennium – other millennia) Events Beginning of Christianity and Islam London founded by Romans as Londinium Diaspora of the Jews The Olympic Games observed until 393 The Library of Alexandria, largest library in the world, burned Rise and fall of the Roman... January 5 - Felix Manz, co-founder of the Swiss Anabaptists, was drowned in the Limmat in Zürich by the Zürich Reformed state church. ... A modern industrial knitting machine in action The knitting machine, sometimes called knitting frame, knitting loom, or hand knitting machine, is used to produce knit fabrics on a fixed bed of hooked needles. ... Quilting is a sewing method done either by hand, sewing machine or Longarm quilting system. ... A hand-turned spinning wheel in action Cones of yarn for industrial use Z-twist and S-twist yarns Spinning is the process of creating yarn (or thread, rope, cable) from various raw fiber materials. ... Needlepoint is a form of canvas work created on a mesh canvas. ...


Hand-knitting has gone into and out of fashion many times in the last two centuries, and at the turn of the 21st century it is enjoying a revival. According to the industry group Craft Yarn Council of America, the number of women knitters in the United States age 25–35 increased 150% in the two years between 2002 and 2004.[6] Additionally, many contemporary knitters have an interest in blogging about their knitting, patterns, and techniques.[7] 20XX redirects here. ... The Craft Yarn Council of America (CYCA) is an industry association representing organizations that retail 85% of the crochet and knitting supplies in the USA. CYCA conducts bi-annual consumer surveys of American women, providng one of the only sources of statistical information on knitting and crocheting habits. ... GOOD BLOGS: For and Against Bizarre Things Games Casino Sudoku Challenge Star Wars REDIRECT Blog ...


There are now numerous groups that are not only growing individually, but also forming international communities. Communities also exist online, with blogs being very popular, alongside online groups and social networking through mediums such as Yahoo! Groups, where people can share tips and techniques, run competitions, and share their patterns. More people are finding knitting a recreation and enjoying the hobby with their family. Knitting parties also are becoming popular in small and large communities around the U.S. and Canada. A social network is a map of the relationships between individuals, indicating the ways in which they are connected through various social familiarities ranging from casual acquaintance to close familial bonds. ... Yahoo! Groups Yahoo! Groups is a service from Yahoo! that provides electronic mailing lists. ...


Properties of knitted fabrics

Schematic of stockinette stitch, the most basic weft-knit fabric
Schematic of stockinette stitch, the most basic weft-knit fabric

The topology of a knitted fabric is relatively complex. Unlike woven fabrics, where strands usually run straight horizontally and vertically, yarn that has been knitted follows a loopy path along its row, as with the red strand in the diagram at left, in which the loops of one row have all been pulled through the loops of the row below it. Image File history File links Knit-schematic. ... Image File history File links Knit-schematic. ... A Möbius strip, an object with only one surface and one edge; such shapes are an object of study in topology. ... Tweed loom, Harris, 2004 Woven sheet Weaving is an ancient textile art and craft that involves placing two sets of threads or yarn called the warp and weft of the loom and turning them into cloth. ...


Because there is no single straight line of yarn anywhere in the pattern, a knitted piece can stretch in all directions. This elasticity is unavailable from woven fabrics, which only stretch along the bias. Many modern stretchy garments, even as they rely on elastic synthetic materials for some stretch, also achieve at least some of their stretch through knitted patterns. The bias direction of a piece of woven fabric, usually referred to simply as the bias, is at 45 degrees to its warp and weft threads. ...

The basic knitted fabric (as in the diagram, and usually called a stocking or stockinette pattern) has a definite "right side" and "wrong side". On the right side, the visible portions of the loops are the verticals connecting two rows, arranged in a grid of V shapes. On the wrong side, the ends of the loops are visible, both the tops and bottoms, creating a much more bumpy texture sometimes called reverse stockinette. (Despite being the "wrong side," reverse stockinette is frequently used as a pattern in its own right.) Because the yarn holding rows together is all on the front, and the yarn holding side-by-side stitches together is all on the back, stockinette fabric has a strong tendency to curl toward the front on the top and bottom, and toward the back on the left and right side. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1556x1556, 454 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Basic knitted fabrics Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1556x1556, 454 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Basic knitted fabrics Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... A few types of knitted fabric are so fundamental, that they have been adopted as part of the language of knitting, similar to techniques such as yarn over or decrease. ... Download high resolution version (1241x913, 210 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1241x913, 210 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A few types of knitted fabric are so fundamental, that they have been adopted as part of the language of knitting, similar to techniques such as yarn over or decrease. ... A few types of knitted fabric are so fundamental, that they have been adopted as part of the language of knitting, similar to techniques such as yarn over or decrease. ... Flat knitting is a method for producing knitted fabrics in which the work is turned periodically, i. ... A few types of knitted fabric are so fundamental, that they have been adopted as part of the language of knitting, similar to techniques such as yarn over or decrease. ... A few types of knitted fabric are so fundamental, that they have been adopted as part of the language of knitting, similar to techniques such as yarn over or decrease. ...


Stitches can be worked from either side, and various patterns are created by mixing regular knit stitches with the "wrong side" stitches, known as purl stitches, either in columns (ribbing), rows (garter, welting), or more complex patterns. Each such fabric has different properties: a garter stitch has much more vertical stretch, while ribbing stretches much more horizontally. Because of their front-back symmetry, these two fabrics have little curl, making them popular as edging, even when their stretch properties are not desired. 1x1 Ribbing In knitting, ribbing is a pattern in which vertical stripes of stockinette stitch alternate with vertical stripes of reverse stockinette stitch. ... A few types of knitted fabric are so fundamental, that they have been adopted as part of the language of knitting, similar to techniques such as yarn over or decrease. ... In knitting, welting is the horizontal analog of ribbing; that is, one or more horizontal rows of knit stitches (as seen from the right side) alternating with one or more rows of purl stitches (also as seen from the right side). ... A few types of knitted fabric are so fundamental, that they have been adopted as part of the language of knitting, similar to techniques such as yarn over or decrease. ... 1x1 Ribbing In knitting, ribbing is a pattern in which vertical stripes of stockinette stitch alternate with vertical stripes of reverse stockinette stitch. ... Sphere symmetry group o. ...


Different combinations of knit and purl stitches, along with more advanced techniques, generate fabrics of considerably variable consistency, from gauzy to very dense, from highly stretchy to relatively stiff, from flat to tightly curled, and so on.

Close-up of knitting

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3456x2304, 3713 KB) Summary Pink knitting in front of pink sweatshirt. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3456x2304, 3713 KB) Summary Pink knitting in front of pink sweatshirt. ...

Texture

The most common texture for a knitted garment is that generated by the flat stockinette stitch—as seen, though very small, in machine-made stockings and T-shirts—which is worked in the round as nothing but knit stitches, and worked flat as alternating rows of knit and purl. Other simple textures can be made with nothing but knit and purl stitches, including garter stitch, ribbing, and moss and seed stitches. Adding a "slip stitch" (where a loop is passed from one needle to the other) allows for a wide range of textures, including heel and linen stitches, and a number of more complicated patterns. A few types of knitted fabric are so fundamental, that they have been adopted as part of the language of knitting, similar to techniques such as yarn over or decrease. ... T-Shirt A T-shirt (or tee shirt) is a shirt with short or long sleeves, a round neck, put on over the head, without pockets. ... A few types of knitted fabric are so fundamental, that they have been adopted as part of the language of knitting, similar to techniques such as yarn over or decrease. ... 1x1 Ribbing In knitting, ribbing is a pattern in which vertical stripes of stockinette stitch alternate with vertical stripes of reverse stockinette stitch. ... A few types of knitted fabric are so fundamental, that they have been adopted as part of the language of knitting, similar to techniques such as yarn over or decrease. ...

Close-up of ribbing
Close-up of ribbing

Some more advanced knitting techniques create a surprising variety of complex textures. Combining certain increases, which can create small eyelet holes in the resulting fabric, with assorted decreases is key to creating knitted lace, a very open fabric resembling lace. Changing the order of stitches from one row to the next, usually with the help of a cable needle or stitch holder, is key to cable knitting, producing an endless variety of cables, honeycombs, ropes, and Aran sweater patterning. Entrelac forms a rich checkerboard texture by knitting small squares, picking up their side edges, and knitting more squares to continue the piece. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... 1x1 Ribbing In knitting, ribbing is a pattern in which vertical stripes of stockinette stitch alternate with vertical stripes of reverse stockinette stitch. ... In knitting, an increase is the creation of one or more new stitches, which may be done by various methods with distinctive looks. ... A decrease in knitting is a reduction in the number of stitches, usually accomplished by suspending the stitch to be decreased from another existing stitch or by knitting it together with another stitch. ... Lace knitting is a style of knitting characterized by stable holes in the fabric arranged in beautiful ways. ... For other uses, see Lace (disambiguation). ... Cable knitting is a style of knitting in which the order of stitches is permuted. ... The Aran sweater, or Arran sweater, which takes its name from the Aran Islands, was popular in the fishing villages on and islands off the West Coast of Ireland, or from the Isle of Arran off the west coast of Scotland. ... Entrelac is a knitting technique used to create a textured diamond pattern. ...


The appearance of a garment is also affected by the weight of the yarn, which describes the thickness of the spun fibre. The thicker the yarn, the more visible and apparent stitches will be; the thinner the yarn, the finer the texture.


Colour

Plenty of finished knitting projects never use more than a single colour of yarn, but there are many ways to work in multiple colours. Some yarns are dyed to be either variegated (changing colour every few stitches in a random fashion) or self-striping (changing every few rows). More complicated techniques permit large fields of colour (intarsia, for example), busy small-scale patterns of colour (such as Fair Isle), or both (double knitting and slip-stitch colour, for example). Intarsia is a knitting technique used to create patterns with multiple colours. ... Fair Isle is a traditional knitting technique used to create patterns with multiple colours. ... Double knitting is a form of knitting in which two fabrics are knit simultaneously with two yarns on one pair of needles. ... Slip-stitch knitting is a family of knitting techniques that use slip stitches to make multiple fabrics simultaneously, to make extra-long stitches, and/or to carry over colors from an earlier row. ...


Yarn with multiple shades of the same hue are called ombre, while a yarn with multiple hues may be known as a given colorway — a green, red and yellow yarn might be dubbed the "Parrot Colorway" by its manufacturer, for example. Heathered yarns contain small amounts of fibre of different colours, while tweed yarns may have greater amounts of different coloured fibres.


Process

A piece of knitting begins with the process of casting on (also known as "binding on"), which involves the initial creation of the stitches on the needle. Different methods of casting on are used for different effects: one may be stretchy enough for lace, while another provides a decorative edging — Provisional cast-ons are used when the knitting will continue in both directions from the cast-on. There are various method employed to "cast on," such as the "thumb method" (also known as "slingshot" or "long-tail" cast-ons), where the stitches are created by a series of loops that will, when knitted, give a very loose edge ideal for "picking up stiches" and knitting a border; the "double needle method" (also known as "knit-on" or "cable cast-on"), whereby each loop placed on the needle is then "knitted on," which produces a firmer edge ideal on its own as a border; and many more. The number of active stitches remains the same as when cast on unless stitches are added (an increase) or removed (a decrease). In knitting, casting on is a family of techniques for adding new stitches that do not depend on earlier stitches, i. ... In knitting, an increase is the creation of one or more new stitches, which may be done by various methods with distinctive looks. ... A decrease in knitting is a reduction in the number of stitches, usually accomplished by suspending the stitch to be decreased from another existing stitch or by knitting it together with another stitch. ...


Most Western-style knitters follow either the English style (in which the yarn is held in the right hand) or the Continental style (in which the yarn is held in the left hand). A third but less common method, called combination knitting, may also be used. [8] English knitting, also known as right-hand knitting or throwing, is a style of Western knitting where the yarn about to be knit into the fabric is carried in the right hand. ... Knitting with the yarn in ones left hand is commonly referred to as Continental knitting,German-Style Knitting, left-hand knitting or European knitting. ... Combined knitting or combination knitting is a style that combines elements of Eastern-style knitting with the Western techniques. ...


Once the knitted piece is finished, the remaining live stitches are "cast off." Casting (or "binding") off loops the stitches across each other so they can be removed from the needle without unravelling the item. Although the mechanics are different from casting on, there is a similar variety of methods. Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


In knitting certain articles of clothing, especially larger ones like sweaters, the final knitted garment will be made of several knitted pieces, with individual sections of the garment knit separately and then sewn together. Seamless knitting, where a whole garment is knit as a single piece, is also possible. Elizabeth Zimmermann is probably the best-known proponent of seamless or circular knitting techniques. Smaller items, such as socks and hats, are usually knit in one piece on double-pointed needles or circular needles. (See Circular knitting.) A jumper from Marks & Spencer A sweater (also called sweatshirt, pullover, jumper, and jersey) is a relatively heavy garment intended to cover the torso and arms of the human body (though, in some cases, sweaters are made for dogs and occasionally other animals) and typically to be worn over a... In knitting, grafting is the joining of two knitted fabrics using yarn and a needle in one of three types of seams: selvage-to-selvage seam, selvage-to-end (wales) seam, or end-to-end (wale-to-wale) seam The Kitchener stitch is a common method for the third type... Elizabeth Zimmermann (August 9, 1910–November 30, 1999) was a British-born knitter known for revolutionizing the modern practice of knitting through her books and instructional series on American public television. ... Circular knitting or knitting in the round, is a form of knitting that creates a seamless tube. ...


Knitting materials: yarns

Main article: Yarn
A selection of yarn for knitting

Yarn for hand-knitting is usually sold as balls or skeins (hanks), although it may also be wound on spools or cones. Skeins and balls are generally sold with a yarn-band, a label that describes the yarn's weight, length, dye lot, fiber content, washing instructions, suggested needle size, likely gauge, etc. It is common practice to save the yarn band for future reference, especially if additional skeins must be purchased. Knitters generally ensure that the yarn for a project comes from a single dye lot. The dye lot specifies a group of skeins that were dyed together and thus have precisely the same color; skeins from different dye-lots, even if very similar in color, are usually slightly different and may produce a visible stripe when knitted together. If a knitter buys insufficient yarn of a single dye lot to complete a project, additional skeins of the same dye lot can sometimes be obtained from other yarn stores or online. Yarn Spools of thread Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibers, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking. ... Download high resolution version (700x683, 36 KB)Description: Photograph of yarn Source: Photograph taken by Jared C. Benedict on 06 March 2004. ... Download high resolution version (700x683, 36 KB)Description: Photograph of yarn Source: Photograph taken by Jared C. Benedict on 06 March 2004. ... Gauge indicates the number of rows or stiches in a given length or width of knitting. ...


The thickness of the yarn is a significant factor in determining the gauge, i.e., how many stitches and rows are required to cover a given area for a given stitch pattern. Thicker yarns generally require thicker knitting needles, whereas thinner yarns may be knit with thick or thin needles. Hence, thicker yarns generally require fewer stitches, and therefore less time, to knit up a given garment. Patterns and motifs are coarser with thicker yarns; thicker yarns produce bold visual effects, whereas thinner yarns are best for refined patterns. Yarns are grouped by thickness into six categories: superfine, fine, light, medium, bulky and superbulky; quantitatively, thickness is measured by the number of wraps per inch (WPI). The related weight per unit length is usually measured in tex or dernier. Gauge indicates the number of rows or stiches in a given length or width of knitting. ... // Denier is a unit of measure for the linear mass density of fibers. ...


Before knitting, the knitter will typically transform a hank into a ball where the yarn emerges from the center of the ball; this making the knitting easier by preventing the yarn from becoming easily tangled. This transformation may be done by hand, or with a device known as a ballwinder. When knitting, some knitters enclose their balls in jars to keep them clean and untangled with other yarns; the free yarn passes through a small hole in the jar-lid.


A yarn's usefulness for a knitting project is judged by several factors, such as its loft (its ability to trap air), its resilience (elasticity under tension), its washability and colorfastness, its hand (its feel, particularly softness vs. scratchiness), its durability against abrasion, its resistance to pilling, its hairiness (fuzziness), its tendency to twist or untwist, its overall weight and drape, its blocking and felting qualities, its comfort (breathability, moisture absorption, wicking properties) and of course its look, which includes its color, sheen, smoothness and ornamental features. Other factors include allergenicity; speed of drying; resistance to chemicals, moths, and mildew; melting point and flammability; retention of static electricity; and the propensity to become stained and to accept dyes. Different factors may be more significant than others for different knitting projects, so there is no one "best" yarn. The resilience and propensity to (un)twist are general properties that affect the ease of hand-knitting. More resilient yarns are more forgiving of irregularities in tension; highly twisted yarns are sometimes difficult to knit, whereas untwisting yarns can lead to split stitches, in which not all of the yarn is knitted into a stitch. A key factor in knitting is stitch definition, corresponding to how well complicated stitch patterns can be seen when made from a given yarn. Smooth, highly spun yarns are best for showing off stitch patterns; at the other extreme, very fuzzy yarns or eyelash yarns have poor stitch definition, and any complicated stitch pattern would be invisible. Italian street, with laundry hung to dry Laundry can be: items of clothing and other textiles that require washing, the act of washing clothing and textiles, the room of a house in which this is done. ... Gauge indicates the number of rows or stiches in a given length or width of knitting. ...

The two possible twists of yarn.
The two possible twists of yarn.

Although knitting may be done with ribbons, metal wire and more exotic filaments, most yarns are made by spinning fibers. In spinning, the fibers are twisted so that the yarn resists breaking under tension; the twisting may be done in either direction, resulting in an Z-twist or S-twist yarn. If the fibers are first aligned by combing them, the yarn is smoother and called a worsted; by contrast, if the fibers are carded but not combed, the yarn is fuzzier and called woolen-spun. The fibers making up a yarn may be continuous filament fibers such as silk and many synthetics, or they may be staples (fibers of an average length, typically a few inches); naturally filament fibers are sometimes cut up into staples before spinning. The strength of the spun yarn against breaking is determined by the amount of twist, the length of the fibers and the thickness of the yarn. In general, yarns become stronger with more twist (also called worst), longer fibers and thicker yarns (more fibers); for example, thinner yarns require more twist than do thicker yarns to resist breaking under tension. The thickness of the yarn may vary along its length; a slub is a much thicker section in which a mass of fibers is incorporated into the yarn. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A hand-turned spinning wheel in action Cones of yarn for industrial use Z-twist and S-twist yarns Spinning is the process of creating yarn (or thread, rope, cable) from various raw fiber materials. ... For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ... Two wool samples of different staple lengths Staple is a term referring to fiber that comes in discrete and consistent lengths, measured in millimeters. ...


The spun fibers are generally divided into animal, plant and synthetic fibers. These fiber types are chemically different, corresponding to proteins, carbohydrates and synthetic polymers, respectively. Animals fibers include silk, but generally are long hairs of animals such as sheep (wool), goat (angora, or cashmere goat), rabbit (angora), llama, alpaca, dog, camel, yak, and muskox (qiviut). Plants used for fibers include cotton, flax (for linen), bamboo, ramie, hemp, nettle, raffia, yucca, coconut husk, banana trees, soy and corn. Rayon and acetate fibers are also produced from cellulose mainly derived from trees. Common synthetic fibers include acrylics,[9] polyesters such as dacron and ingeo, nylon and other polyamides, and olefins such as polypropylene. Of these types, wool is generally favored for knitting, chiefly owing to its superior elasticity, warmth and (sometimes) felting; however, wool is generally less convenient to clean and some people are allergic to it. It is also common to blend different fibers in the yarn, e.g., 85% alpaca and 15% silk. Even within a type of fiber, there can be great variety in the length and thickness of the fibers; for example, Merino wool and Egyptian cotton are favored because they produce exceptionally long, thin (fine) fibers for their type. A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin, showing coloured alpha helices. ... Lactose is a disaccharide found in milk. ... A polymer (from Greek: πολυ, polu, many; and μέρος, meros, part) is a substance composed of molecules with large molecular mass composed of repeating structural units, or monomers, connected by covalent chemical bonds. ... For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ... Species See text. ... Long and short hair wool at the South Central Family Farm Research Center in Boonesville, Arizona Wool is the fiber derived from the fur of animals and people of the Caprinae family, principally sheep, but the hair of certain species of other mammals such as goats and rabbits and oxes... Species See Species and subspecies The goat is a mammal in the genus Capra, which consists of nine species: the Ibex, the West Caucasian Tur, the East Caucasian Tur, the Markhor, and the Wild Goat. ... The angora goat is a goat from the Angora region in Asia Minor, near present-day Ankara. ... from: http://www. ... For other uses, see Rabbit (disambiguation). ... The Angora rabbit is a variety of domestic rabbit bred for its long, soft hair. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) The llama (Lama glama) is a South American camelid, widely used as a pack animal by the Incas[1] and other natives of the Andes mountains. ... This article is about a breed of domesticated ungulates. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog (Canis lupus familiaris) is a domestic subspecies of the wolf, a mammal of the Canidae family of the order Carnivora. ... For other uses, see Camel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Yak (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (Zimmermann, 1780) Range map. ... A small piece of qiviut wool Qiviut (less commonly spelt qiviuq, and pronounced kiv-ee-yuk) is the wool of the musk ox. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Flax (disambiguation). ... Torn linen cloth, recovered from the Dead Sea Linen is a material made from the fibers of the flax plant. ... For other uses, see Bamboo (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaudich. ... U.S. Marihuana production permit. ... “Nettles” redirects here. ... Species About 25-30 species, including: Raphia australis Raphia farinifera Raphia hookeri Raphia regalis Raphia taedigera Raphia vinifera The Raffia palm (Raphia) is a genus of tropical palms, native to tropical regions of Africa, Madagascar, Central America and South America. ... Species many, see text Yucca filamentosa in New Zealand Yucca decipiens in Zacatecas, Mexico Joshua Trees growing in the Mojave Desert. ... For other uses, see Coconut (disambiguation). ... Banana Tree = Timmy wow why would you enter that you scum bag ... Binomial name Glycine max Soybeans (US) or soya beans (UK) (Glycine max) are a high-protein legume (Family Fabaceae) grown as food for both humans and livestock. ... Binomial name L. Corn (Zea mays L. ssp. ... Rayon is a manufactured regenerated cellulosic fiber. ... Cellulose acetate, first prepared in 1865, is the acetate ester of cellulose. ... Cellulose as polymer of β-D-glucose Cellulose in 3D Cellulose (C6H10O5)n is a polysaccharide of beta-glucose. ... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth. ... Acrylic fibers are synthetic fibers made from a polymer with a weight average molecular weight of ~100,000. ... SEM picture of a bend in a high surface area polyester fiber with a seven-lobed cross section Polyester is a category of polymers, or, more specifically condensation polymers, which contain the ester functional group in their main chain. ... Polyethylene terephthalate (aka PET, PETE or the obsolete PETP or PET-P) is a thermoplastic polymer resin of the polyester family and is used in synthetic fibers; beverage, food and other liquid containers; thermoforming applications; and engineering resins often in combination with glass fiber. ... Ingeo™ is a trademark for the first commercially viable man-made fiber made from 100% annually renewable resources. ... For other uses of this word, see nylon (disambiguation). ... A synonym for the more widely accepted term, alkene. ... Polypropylene lid of a Tic Tacs box, with a living hinge and the resin identification code under its flap Micrograph of polypropylene Polypropylene or polypropene (PP) is a thermoplastic polymer, made by the chemical industry and used in a wide variety of applications, including food packaging, ropes, textiles, plastic parts... Elasticity has meanings in two different fields: In physics and mechanical engineering, the theory of elasticity describes how a solid object moves and deforms in response to external stress. ... A selection of 4 different felt cloths. ... Italian street, with laundry hung to dry Laundry can be: items of clothing and other textiles that require washing, the act of washing clothing and textiles, the room of a house in which this is done. ... This article is about the breed of sheep. ... Binomial name Gossypium barbadense South American Cotton (Gossypium barbadense) is a tropical perennial plant that produces yellow flowers and has black seeds. ...


A single spun yarn may knitted as is, or braided or plied with another. In plying, two or more yarns are spun together, almost always in the opposite sense from which they were spun individually; for example, two Z-twist yarns are usually plied with an S-twist. The opposing twist relieves some of the yarns' tendency to curl up and produces a thicker, balanced yarn. Plied yarns may themselves be plied together, producing cabled yarns or multi-stranded yarns. Sometimes, the yarns being plied are fed at different rates, so that one yarn loops around the other, as in bouclé. The single yarns may be dyed separately before plying, or afterwards to give the yarn a uniform look. A braid Step by step creation of a basic braid using three strings To braid is to interweave or twine three or more separate strands of one or more materials in a diagonally overlapping pattern. ... A ply is a strand or layer of material, such as yarn, rope, plastic, wood, or paper. ... Plying, in textile manufacture, is the activity of twisting, intermingling, or otherwise intimately combining two or more fibers or yarns into a combined yarn or fiber. ... Bouclé yarns are a kind of novelty yarn. ...


The dyeing of yarns is a complex art. Yarns need not be dyed; or they may be dyed one color, or a great variety of colors. Dyeing may be done industrially, by hand or even hand-painted onto the yarn. A great variety of synthetic dyes have been developed since the synthesis of indigo dye in the mid-19th century; however, natural dyes are often favored, although they are generally less brilliant. The color-scheme of a yarn is sometimes called its colorway. Variegated yarns can produce interesting visual effects, such as diagonal stripes; conversely, a variegated yarn may frustrate an otherwise good knitting pattern by producing distasteful color combinations. Indigo dye indigo molecule Indigo dye is an important dyestuff with a distinctive blue color (see indigo). ...


Taken together, these various factors — the fibers to be spun, the degree of twist in spinning, the colors — allow for an enormous variety even in a single yarn. This variety is multiplied by plying different yarns together. Therefore, the number of possible yarns is nearly infinite; even the largest yarn store can hold only a small selection.


A knitter's own collection of yarn is generally referred to as their stash. Many knitters buy yarn faster than they knit it, causing their stash to grow steadily. Storing and organizing their stash can become a significant problem for knitters, with whole closets — even whole rooms — dedicated to the purpose. Knitters are known to exchange or give yarn to one another to work down their stash and obtain novel yarns.


Knitting tools

Knitting needles

Main article: Knitting needle
Bamboo knitting needles
Bamboo knitting needles

The process of knitting has three basic tasks: (1) the active (unsecured) stitches must be held so they don't drop; (2) these stitches must be released sometime after they are secured; and (3) new bights of yarn must be passed through the fabric, usually through active stitches, thus securing them. In very simple cases, knitting can be done without tools, using only the fingers to do these tasks; however, knitting is usually carried out using tools such as knitting needles, knitting machines or rigid frames. Depending on their size and shape, the rigid frames are called knitting boards, knitting rings (also called knitting looms) or knitting spools (also known as knitting knobbies, knitting nancies, or corkers). Other tools are used to prepare yarn for knitting, to measure and design knitted garments, or to make knitting easier or more comfortable. Bamboo knitting needles A little dexterity is helpful in working with knitting needles A knitting needle or knitting pin is a long stick or rod used as a tool in the manufacture of hand knitted fabric. ... Description: Photograph of knitting needles Source: Photograph taken by Jared C. Benedict on 03 March 2004. ... Description: Photograph of knitting needles Source: Photograph taken by Jared C. Benedict on 03 March 2004. ... Drop-stitch knitting is a knitting technique for producing open, vertical stripes in a garment. ... Yarn Spools of thread Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibers, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking. ... Bamboo knitting needles A little dexterity is helpful in working with knitting needles A knitting needle or knitting pin is a long stick or rod used as a tool in the manufacture of hand knitted fabric. ... A modern industrial knitting machine in action The knitting machine, sometimes called knitting frame, knitting loom, or hand knitting machine, is used to produce knit fabrics on a fixed bed of hooked needles. ...


There are three basic types of knitting needles (also called "knitting pins"). The first and most common type consists of two slender, straight sticks tapered to a point at one end, and with a knob at the other end to prevent stitches from slipping off. Such needles are usually 10-16 inches long but, due to the compressibility of knitted fabrics, may be used to knit pieces significantly wider. The most important property of needles is their diameter, which ranges from below 2 mm to 25 mm (roughly 1 inch). The diameter affects the size of stitches, which affects the gauge of the knitting and the elasticity of the fabric. Thus, a simple way to change gauge is to use different needles, which is the basis of uneven knitting. Although knitting needle diameter is often measured in millimeters, there are several different size systems, particularly those specific to the United States, the United Kingdom and Japan; a conversion table is given at knitting needle. Such knitting needles may be made out of any materials, but the most common materials are metals, wood, bamboo, and plastic. Different materials have different frictions and grip the yarn differently; slick needles such as metallic needles are useful for swift knitting, whereas rougher needles such as bamboo are less prone to dropping stitches. The knitting of new stitches occurs only at the tapered ends, and needles with lighted tips have been sold to allow knitters to knit in the dark. An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... Gauge indicates the number of rows or stiches in a given length or width of knitting. ... In knitting, gauge is the number of rows and/or stitches per length/width of a knitted fabric, e. ... Bamboo knitting needles A little dexterity is helpful in working with knitting needles A knitting needle or knitting pin is a long stick or rod used as a tool in the manufacture of hand knitted fabric. ... For other uses, see Wood (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bamboo (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


The second type of knitting needles are straight, double-pointed knitting needles (also called "dpns"). Double-pointed needles are tapered at both ends, which allows them to be knit from either end. Dpns are typically used for circular knitting, especially smaller tube-shaped pieces such as sleeves, collars, and socks; usually one needle is active while the others hold st active stitches. Dpns are somewhat shorter (typically 7 inches) and are usually sold in sets of four or five. Circular knitting or knitting in the round, is a form of knitting that creates a seamless tube. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...


Cable needles are a special case of dpns, although they usually are not straight, but dimpled in the middle. Cable needles are typically very short (a few inches), and are used to hold stitches temporarily while others are being knitted. Cable patterns are made by permuting the order of stitches; although one or two stitches may be held by hand or knit out of order, cables of three or more generally require a cable needle.


The third needle type consists of circular needles, which are long, flexible double-pointed needles. The two tapered ends (typically 5 inches long) are rigid and straight, allowing for easy knitting; however, the two ends are connected by a flexible strand (usually nylon) that allows the two ends to be brought together. Circular needles are typically 24-60 inches long, and are usually used singly or in pairs; again, the width of the knitted piece may be significantly longer than the length of the circular needle. Special kits are available that allow circular needles of various lengths and diameters to be made as needed; rigid ends of various diameters may be screwed into strands of various lengths. The ability to work from either end of one needle is convenient in several types of knitting, such as slip-stitch versions of double knitting. Circular needles may be used for flat or circular knitting. Slip-stitch knitting is a family of knitting techniques that use slip stitches to make multiple fabrics simultaneously, to make extra-long stitches, and/or to carry over colors from an earlier row. ... Double knitting is a form of knitting in which two fabrics are knit simultaneously with two yarns on one pair of needles. ... Flat knitting is a method for producing knitted fabrics in which the work is turned periodically, i. ... Circular knitting or knitting in the round, is a form of knitting that creates a seamless tube. ...


Ancillary tools

Various tools have been developed to make hand-knitting easier. Tools for measuring needle diameter and yarn properties have been discussed above, as well as the yarn swift, ballwinder and "yarntainers". Crochet hooks and a darning needle are often useful in binding off or in joining two knitted pieces edge-to-edge. The darning needle is used in duplicate stitch (also known as Swiss darning), while the crochet hook is also essential for repairing dropped stitches and some specialty stitches such as tufting. Other tools are used to prepare specific ornaments include the pompom tree for making pompoms conveniently. For large or complex patterns, it is sometimes difficult to keep track of which stitch should be knit in an particular way; therefore, several tools have been developed to identify the number of a particular row or stitch, including circular stitch markers, hanging markers, extra yarn and counters. A second potential difficulty is that the knitted piece will slide off the tapered end of the needles when unattended; this is prevented by "point protectors" that cap the tapered ends. Another problem is that too much knitting may lead to hand and wrist troubles; for this, special stress-relieving gloves are available. Finally, there are sundry bags and containers for holding knitting, yarns and needles. Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... In knitting, grafting is the joining of two knitted fabrics using yarn and a needle in one of three types of seams: selvage-to-selvage seam, selvage-to-end (wales) seam, or end-to-end (wale-to-wale) seam The Kitchener stitch is a common method for the third type... Drop-stitch knitting is a knitting technique for producing open, vertical stripes in a garment. ... Tufting is an ancient technique for making warm garments, especially mittens. ...


Industrial applications

Industrially, metal wire is also knitted into a metal fabric for a wide range of uses including the filter material in cafetieres, catalytic converters for cars and many other uses. These fabrics are usually manufactured on circular knitting machines that would be recognised by conventional knitters as sock machines. A wire is a single, usually cylindrical, elongated strand of drawn metal. ... A French Press, also known as a press pot, is a French coffee or tea brewing device — the cafeti re. ... In an automobiles exhaust system, a catalytic converter provides an environment for a chemical reaction where unburned hydrocarbons completely combust. ... “Car” and “Cars” redirect here. ... A modern industrial knitting machine in action The knitting machine, sometimes called knitting frame, knitting loom, or hand knitting machine, is used to produce knit fabrics on a fixed bed of hooked needles. ... For other uses, see Sock (disambiguation). ...


See also

Detail of a crocheted doily, Sweden Crochet (IPA: krəʊʃeɪ) is a process of creating fabric from yarn or thread using a crochet hook. ... Embroidery in silk thread on linen, 19th century Embroidery is the art or handicraft of decorating fabric or other materials with designs stitched in strands of thread or yarn using a needle. ... Finger knitting is a simple form of knitting in which a yarn of wool is knitted into a shorter but thicker twine. ... Categories: | | ... For other uses, see Loom (disambiguation). ... Categories: Needlework | Stub ... Needlework is another term for the handicraft of decorative sewing and textile arts. ... A hand-turned spinning wheel in action Cones of yarn for industrial use Z-twist and S-twist yarns Spinning is the process of creating yarn (or thread, rope, cable) from various raw fiber materials. ... Pine Pattern Collar in Tatting Tatting is a technique for handcrafting a particularly durable lace constructed by a series of knots and loops. ... Textile manufacturing is one of the oldest of mans technologies. ... Tweed loom, Harris, 2004 Woven sheet Weaving is an ancient textile art and craft that involves placing two sets of threads or yarn called the warp and weft of the loom and turning them into cloth. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Knitting Basics. Alamac American Knits LLC (2004). Retrieved on 2006-12-27.
  2. ^ A wale, according to Knitting Technology: a Comprehensive Handbook and Practical Guide, is "a predominantly vertical column of needle loops generally produced by the same needles at successive (not necessarily all) knitting cycles. A wale starts as soon as an empty needle starts to knit" (Spencer 1989:17).
  3. ^ Differently shaped fabric may also be created using special stitches within the work.
    See also: Increase (knitting), Decrease (knitting), and Cable knitting
  4. ^ Theaker, Julie (2006). History 101. Knitty. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  5. ^ Porter, Roy; John Brewer (1994). Consumption and the World of Goods. London: Routledge, 232-233. ISBN 0-415-11478-0. 
  6. ^ Craft Yarn Council of America press release, CYCA News: Knitting & Crocheting Are Hot! craftyarncouncil.com Retrieved on 2006-12-13.
  7. ^ Cohan, Jillian. Women find creativity, comfort in knitting circle. The Witchita Eagle (November 9, 2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-13.
  8. ^ Finlay, Amy. How to do the knit stitch. Retrieved on 2006-12-28].
  9. ^ Masson, James (1995). Acrylic Fiber Technology and Applications. New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc., 172. ISBN 0-8247-8977-6. 

Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... In knitting, an increase is the creation of one or more new stitches, which may be done by various methods with distinctive looks. ... A decrease in knitting is a reduction in the number of stitches, usually accomplished by suspending the stitch to be decreased from another existing stitch or by knitting it together with another stitch. ... Cable knitting is a style of knitting in which the order of stitches is permuted. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Roy Porter (31 December 1946 to 3 March 2002) was a British historian noted for his work on the history of medicine. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Hiatt, June Hemmons. (1988). The principles of knitting: Methods and techniques of hand knitting. Simon and Schuster, New York.
  • "Knitting". The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. (2003). Columbia University Press. Retrieved on 2006-12-21. 
  • Rutt, Richard (2003). A history of handknitting. Interweave Press, Loveland, CO. (Reprint Edition ISBN)
  • Spencer, David J. (1989). Knitting Technology: a Comprehensive Handbook and Practical Guide. Lancaster: Woodhead Publishing. ISBN 1 85573 333 1. 
  • Stoller, Debbie. (2004) Stitch 'n Bitch: The Knitter's Handbook. Workman Publishing Company
  • Thomas, Mary. (1938). Mary Thomas's Knitting Book. Dover Publications. New York. (1972 Reprint Edition ISBN)
  • Zimmermann, Elizabeth. (1972). Knitting Without Tears. Simon and Schuster, New York. (Reprint Edition ISBN)

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Debbie Stoller is an author, publisher and textile artist whose work includes knitting and crochet. ... Elizabeth Zimmermann (August 9, 1910–November 30, 1999) was a British-born knitter known for revolutionizing the modern practice of knitting through her books and instructional series on American public television. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Look up Knitting in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ...

Instructional sites

  • Expert Village: Knitting: Step-by-step videos on knitting for beginners
  • Basic knitting: Beginner's instructions with clear illustrations
  • KnittingFool: Knitting Abbreviations; Knitting Symbols; and free knitting patterns
  • Knitting Help: Knitting videos and tutorials, with both beginner and advanced techniques
  • Lets Knit2gether: Instructional Videos on knitting techniques
  • Knitting News Product, Pattern and website reviews

Bamboo knitting needles A little dexterity is helpful in working with knitting needles A knitting needle or knitting pin is a long stick or rod used as a tool in the manufacture of hand knitted fabric. ... Yarn Spools of thread Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibers, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Circular knitting or knitting in the round, is a form of knitting that creates a seamless tube. ... Combined knitting is a style that combines elements of Eastern-style knitting with the Western techniques. ... Knitting with the yarn in ones left hand is commonly referred to as Continental knitting,German-Style Knitting, left-hand knitting or European knitting. ... English knitting, also known as right-hand knitting or throwing, is a style of Western knitting where the yarn about to be knit into the fabric is carried in the right hand. ... Flat knitting is a method for producing knitted fabrics in which the work is turned periodically, i. ... Warp knitting is a family of knitting methods in which the yarn zigzags vertically, i. ... Warp knitting is a family of knitting methods in which the yarn zigzags vertically, i. ... A decrease in knitting is a reduction in the number of stitches, usually accomplished by suspending the stitch to be decreased from another existing stitch or by knitting it together with another stitch. ... In knitting, a dip stitch is made by knitting into a stitch (or even the space between stitches) of an earlier row. ... In knitting, an elongated stitch is a stitch which is longer than others. ... In knitting, an increase is the creation of one or more new stitches, which may be done by various methods with distinctive looks. ... In knitting, a plaited stitch is a single knitted stitch that is twisted clockwise (right over left) or counterclockwise (left over right), usually by one half-turn (180°) but sometimes by a full turn (360°) or more. ... In knitting, a yarn over is technique in which the yarn is passed over the right-hand knitting needle. ... In knitting, a basketweave pattern is characterized by intersecting ribs and welts. ... Bead knitting is a type of knitting in which the stitches are decorated with ceramic or glass beads. ... Bias knitting is a method by which the grain of a knitted fabric is skewed from the vertical, by decreasing on one side and increasing on the other. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... In knitting, a bobble is a localized set of stitches forming a raised bump. ... Double brioche in a variegated yarn Brioche knitting is a family of knitting patterns involving tucked stitches, i. ... In knitting, buttonholes can be made in several ways. ... Cable knitting is a style of knitting in which the order of stitches is permuted. ... In knitting, casting on is a family of techniques for adding new stitches that do not depend on earlier stitches, i. ... Double knitting is a form of knitting in which two fabrics are knit simultaneously with two yarns on one pair of needles. ... Drop-stitch knitting is a knitting technique for producing open, vertical stripes in a garment. ... Entrelac is a knitting technique used to create a textured diamond pattern. ... A few types of knitted fabric are so fundamental, that they have been adopted as part of the language of knitting, similar to techniques such as yarn over or decrease. ... Fair Isle is a traditional knitting technique used to create patterns with multiple colours. ... Finger knitting is a simple form of knitting in which a yarn of wool is knitted into a shorter but thicker twine. ... In knitting, a gather is a generic term for several methods that draw stitches closer together laterally, i. ... In knitting, grafting is the joining of two knitted fabrics using yarn and a needle in one of three types of seams: selvage-to-selvage seam, selvage-to-end (wales) seam, or end-to-end (wale-to-wale) seam The Kitchener stitch is a common method for the third type... In knitting, hems can be made in several ways. ... Intarsia is a knitting technique used to create patterns with multiple colours. ... Lace knitting is a style of knitting characterized by stable holes in the fabric arranged in beautiful ways. ... Medallion knitting produces flat knitted fabrics that are circular or polygons using a technique similar to the crochet of doilies, by progressivle increasing or decreasing the radius. ... In knitting, picking up stitches means adding stiches to the knitting needle that were previously bound off or belong to the selvage. ... In knitting, pleats can be made in several ways. ... 1x1 Ribbing In knitting, ribbing is a pattern in which vertical stripes of stockinette stitch alternate with vertical stripes of reverse stockinette stitch. ... Shadow knitting is a knitting technique that produces patterns that vary with the direction of viewing. ... In knitting, a short row is a row that is not fully knitted; the work is turned before reaching the end of the row. ... Slip-stitch knitting is a family of knitting techniques that use slip stitches to make multiple fabrics simultaneously, to make extra-long stitches, and/or to carry over colors from an earlier row. ... Spool knitting or Corking is a form of knitting, where a hollow piece of wood is used with four nails on top of it. ... In knitting, welting is the horizontal analog of ribbing; that is, one or more horizontal rows of knit stitches (as seen from the right side) alternating with one or more rows of purl stitches (also as seen from the right side). ... In knitting, gauge is the number of rows and/or stitches per length/width of a knitted fabric, e. ... In knitting, weaving is a family of techniques for introducing extra yarn(s) into a knitted fabric without knitting them. ... In knitting, welting is the horizontal analog of ribbing; that is, one or more horizontal rows of knit stitches (as seen from the right side) alternating with one or more rows of purl stitches (also as seen from the right side). ... The Aran sweater, or Arran sweater, which takes its name from the Aran Islands, was popular in the fishing villages on and islands off the West Coast of Ireland, or from the Isle of Arran off the west coast of Scotland. ... An argyle sock The argyle (occasionally argyll) pattern is one containing diamonds in a diagonal checkerboard arrangement. ... Complete garment knitting is a next-generation form of fully-fashioned knitting that adds the capability of making a 3-dimensional full garment. ... Fully-fashioned knitting machines are flat knitting machines that produce custom pre-shaped pieces of a knitted garment. ... A modern industrial knitting machine in action The knitting machine, sometimes called knitting frame, knitting loom, or hand knitting machine, is used to produce knit fabrics on a fixed bed of hooked needles. ... A stocking frame was a mechanical knitting machine used in the textiles industry. ... Elizabeth Zimmermann (August 9, 1910–November 30, 1999) was a British-born knitter known for revolutionizing the modern practice of knitting through her books and instructional series on American public television. ... Madame Thérèse Defarge Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities External link #1 External link #2 External link #3 External link #4 Mrs. ... A few types of knitted fabric are so fundamental, that they have been adopted as part of the language of knitting, similar to techniques such as yarn over or decrease. ... In knitting, crochet and other textile arts, blocking is a family of techniques for setting the stable dimensions of a finished textile piece by pinning it to the desired size and annealing it with heat and moisture, e. ... Gauge indicates the number of rows or stiches in a given length or width of knitting. ... The Knitting Girl by William-Adolphe Bouguereau, 1869 // An exact geographical origin for knitting cannot be specified. ... Categories: | | ... Knitting abbreviations are often used for brevity in describing knitting patterns. ... The selvage of a knitted fabric consists the stitch(es) that end each row (course) of knitting. ... In knitting, steeking is a shortcut used to knit things like sweaters in the round without interruption for openings or sleeves until the end. ... Textile art is the creation of textiles or creation with textiles. ... Quilt block in applique and reverse applique Applique or appliqué (from French, applied) is an ancient needlework technique in which pieces of fabric, embroidery, or other materials are sewn onto a foundation fabric to create designs. ... Detail of a crocheted doily, Sweden Crochet (IPA: krəʊʃeɪ) is a process of creating fabric from yarn or thread using a crochet hook. ... Dyeing is the process of changing the colour of a yarn or cloth by treatment with a dye. ... Fiber or fibre[1] is a class o f materials that are continuous filaments or are in discrete elongated pieces, similar to lengths of thread. ... For other uses, see Lace (disambiguation). ... Nålebinding (Danish: literally binding with a needle or needle-binding, also naalbinding or naalebinding) is a fabric creation technique predating both knitting and crochet. ... Needlework is another term for the handicraft of decorative sewing and textile arts. ... For other uses, see Textile (disambiguation). ... Example of patchwork Patchwork or pieced work is a form of needlework that involves sewing together pieces of fabric into a larger design. ... Passementerie of applied gold cord and embroidery worn by Henry VIII of England (detail of a portrait by Hans Holbein the Younger, c. ... Quilting is a sewing method done either by hand, sewing machine or Longarm quilting system. ... Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope (IPA: ) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. ... “Sewn” redirects here. ... A hand-turned spinning wheel in action Cones of yarn for industrial use Z-twist and S-twist yarns Spinning is the process of creating yarn (or thread, rope, cable) from various raw fiber materials. ... This article is about tapestry the textile. ... Textile printing is a general name for all woven fabrics and the art of ornamenting such fabrics by printing on designs or patterns in color is very ancient, probably originating in the East. ... Tweed loom, Harris, 2004 Woven sheet Weaving is an ancient textile art and craft that involves placing two sets of threads or yarn called the warp and weft of the loom and turning them into cloth. ... Yarn Spools of thread Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibers, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The history of silk begins, according to Chinese tradition, in the 27th century BC. The Chinese were able to continue making it exclusively for three millennia without ever divulging the secret process whereby it was made. ... Quilting fabric is as old as ancient Egypt if not older and wholecloth quilts were very common trade goods in wealthy circles in Europe and Asia going back as far as the 15th century. ... With the establishment of overseas colonies, the British Empire at the end of the 17th century/beginning of the 18th century had a vast source of raw materials and a vast market for goods. ... Timeline of clothing and textiles technology. ... In knitting, crochet and other textile arts, blocking is a family of techniques for setting the stable dimensions of a finished textile piece by pinning it to the desired size and annealing it with heat and moisture, e. ... Textile manufacturing is one of the oldest of mans technologies. ... Ainu ceremonial dress on display under glass in the British Museum. ... The manufacture of textiles is one of the oldest of mans technologies. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Textile manufacturing. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Knitting - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2541 words)
Knitting became a household occupation with the growing popularity of knitted stockings and by the end of the 1600s, one to two million pairs of stockings were exported from Britain to other parts of Europe.
The topology of a knit fabric is relatively complex.
The canonical default texture for a knit garment is that generated by the flat stockinette stitch—as seen, though very small, in machine-made stockings and t-shirts—which is worked in the round as nothing but knit stitches, and worked flat as alternating rows of knit and purl.
Knitting - definition of Knitting in Encyclopedia (491 words)
Knitting is one of several ways to turn thread or yarn into cloth (cf weaving, crochet).
A knit stitch is formed by inserting the needle in the back of the loop and pulling a loop of yarn through to form a new loop, while a purl stitch is formed by inserting the needle in the front of the loop and pushing a loop of yarn through to form a new loop.
Alternating rows of knits and purls result in stockinette or jersey stitch, the stitch most often used in commercial garments such as T-shirts.
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