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Encyclopedia > Knife

A knife is a sharp-edged (single or double edged) instrument consisting of a thin blade used for cutting and fitted with a handle. The knife can be used as a tool or a weapon. Considered by some to be one of the most useful tools of all time, its origins date as far back as two-and-a-half million years ago, as evidenced by the Olduwan tools.[1][2] A Knife is a sharpened hand tool. ... A blade is the flat part of a tool or weapon that normally has a cutting edge and/or pointed end typically made of a metal, most recently, steel intentionally used to cut, stab, slice, throw, thrust, or strike an animate or inainimate object. ... A modern hammer is directly descended from ancient hand tools A tool or device is a piece of equipment which typically provides a mechanical advantage in accomplishing a physical task, or provides an ability that is not naturally available to the user of a tool. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Stone Age fishing hook. ... Chopper with a Simple edge. ...

Contents

History

The Knife Grinder - Drawn by P. Weenix and engraving by W. French - Published for the Proprietors by AH Payne, Dresden & Leipzig - 1853 (From the Dr. Nuno Carvalho de Sousa Private Collections - Lisbon)
The Knife Grinder - Drawn by P. Weenix and engraving by W. French - Published for the Proprietors by AH Payne, Dresden & Leipzig - 1853 (From the Dr. Nuno Carvalho de Sousa Private Collections - Lisbon)

The earliest knives were shaped by percussion flaking from rock, particularly water-worn creek cobbles made out of volcanic rock. During the Paleolithic era Homo habilis likely made similar tools out of wood, bone, and similar highly perishable material that has not survived.[2][3] As recent as five thousand years ago, as advances in metallurgy progressed, stone, wood, and bone blades were gradually succeeded by copper, bronze, iron, and eventually steel. Modern knives may be made from many different materials such as carbon fiber, ceramics, and titanium. Knives gained prominence during the Middle Ages as one of the three major items of cutlery in the western world, accompanying the fork and spoon, and in this way much of the world's population is exposed to knives on a daily basis. There is a very active community of modern custom knife makers and collectors. The American Bladesmith Society promotes forged blades; the Knifemakers Guild promotes all custom knives. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 761 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1936 × 1526 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 761 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1936 × 1526 pixel, file size: 2. ... Chopper with a Simple edge. ... For other uses, see Rock (disambiguation). ... // The Paleolithic is a prehistoric era distinguished by the development of stone tools. ... Binomial name Leakey et al, 1964 Homo habilis (IPA ) (handy man, skillful person) is a species of the genus Homo, which lived from approximately 2. ... For other uses, see Wood (disambiguation). ... This article is about the skeletal organs. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Georg Agricola, author of De re metallica, an important early book on metal extraction Metallurgy is a domain of materials science that studies the physical and chemical behavior of metallic elements, their intermetallic compounds, and their mixtures, which are called alloys. ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... Assorted ancient Bronze castings found as part of a cache, probably intended for recycling. ... For other uses, see Iron (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Steel (disambiguation). ... Carbon fiber composite is a strong, light and very expensive material. ... Fixed Partial Denture, or Bridge The word ceramic is derived from the Greek word κεραμικός (keramikos). ... General Name, symbol, number titanium, Ti, 22 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 4, 4, d Appearance silvery metallic Standard atomic weight 47. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Used cutlery: a plate, a fork and knife, and a drinking glass. ... The American Bladesmith Society is dedicated to preserving the ancient art and history of crafting hand forged knives. ...


Materials and construction

Today, knives come in many forms but can be categorized between two different types: fixed blade knives and folding, or pocket, knives. Although each has inherent advantages, the two have many similar characteristics. A pocket knife is a type of folding knife with a blade that fits inside the handle. ...

Characteristic parts of the knife

Modern knives consist of a blade (1) and handle (2). The blade can be fine or serrated. The handle, used to grip and manipulate the blade safely, may include the tang, a portion of the blade that extends into the handle. The blade consists of the point (3), the end of the knife used for piercing, the edge (4), the cutting surface of the knife extending from the point to the heel, the grind (5), the cross-section shape of the blade, the spine, (6), the top, thicker portion of the blade, the fuller (7), the groove added to lighten the blade, and the bolster (8), the thick portion of the blade joining the blade and the handle. The guard (9) is a barrier between the blade and the handle which protects the hand from an opponent, or the blade of the knife itself. A choil, where the blade is unsharpened and possibly indented as it meets the handle, may be used to prevent scratches to the handle when sharpening or as a forward-finger grip. The end of the handle, or butt (10), may allow a lanyard (11), used to secure the knife to the wrist.[4][5] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A blade is the flat part of a tool or weapon that normally has a cutting edge and/or pointed end typically made of a metal, most recently, steel intentionally used to cut, stab, slice, throw, thrust, or strike an animate or inainimate object. ... A handle is a part of, or attachment to, an object that can be moved or used by hand. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... The tang of a sword or fixed-blade knife is that part of the blade extending into and usually through the grip that is fastened to it. ... Mobile phone technology: Enhanced Data Rates for GSM Evolution Processor technology: Explicit Data Graph Execution Biology: Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered Category: ... For other uses, see Grind (disambiguation). ... Prussian bayonet, with a prominent fuller A Fuller is a rounded or beveled groove on the flat side of a blade, such as a sword, knife, or bayonet (shown). ... This article is about the pillow called a bolster. ... Hilt of Szczerbiec silver damascened rapier guard, between 1580 and 1600. ... A lanyard (sword knot) fixed to an infantry sword handle A lanyard, also spelled laniard, is a rope or cord often worn around the neck or wrist to carry something. ...


Blade

Main article: Blade
Knife blade mass production in Guangzhou, China.
Knife blade mass production in Guangzhou, China.

Knife blades can be manufactured from a variety of materials, each of which has advantages and disadvantages. Carbon steel, an alloy of iron and carbon, can be very sharp, hold its edge well, and remain easy to sharpen, but is vulnerable to rust and stains. Stainless steel is an alloy of iron, chromium, possibly nickel, and molybdenum, with only a small amount of carbon. It is not able to take quite as sharp an edge as carbon steel, but is highly resistant to corrosion. High carbon stainless steel is stainless steel with a higher amount of carbon, intended to combine the best attributes of carbon steel and stainless steel. High carbon stainless steel blades do not discolor or stain, and maintain a sharp edge. Laminate blades use multiple metals to create a layered sandwich, combining the attributes of both. For example, a harder, more brittle steel may be sandwiched between an outer layer of softer, tougher, stainless steel to reduce vulnerability to corrosion. In this case, however, the part most affected by corrosion, the edge, is still vulnerable. Pattern-welding is similar to laminate construction. Layers of different steel types are welded together, but then the stock is manipulated to create patterns in the steel. Titanium is metal that is lighter, more wear resistant, and more flexible than steel. Although less hard and unable to take as sharp an edge, carbides in the titanium alloy allow them to be heat-treated to a sufficient hardness. Ceramic blades are incredibly hard, lightweight blades; so hard that they will maintain a sharp edge for months or years with no maintenance at all. They are immune to corrosion, but can only be sharpened on silicon carbide sandpaper and some grinding wheels. Plastic blades are not very sharp at all but are typically serrated, and are usually considered disposable.[6] A blade is the flat part of a tool or weapon that normally has a cutting edge and/or pointed end typically made of a metal, most recently, steel intentionally used to cut, stab, slice, throw, thrust, or strike an animate or inainimate object. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 390 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1928 × 2960 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 390 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1928 × 2960 pixel, file size: 2. ... Guangzhou is the capital and the sub-provincial city of Guangdong Province in the southern part of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Carbon steel,is very fun 2 play with also called plain carbon steel, is a metal alloy, a combination of two elements, iron and carbon, where other elements are present in quantities too small to affect the properties. ... The 630 foot high, stainless-clad (type 304L) Gateway Arch defines St. ... The 630 foot high, stainless-clad (type 304L) Gateway Arch defines St. ... Laminate flooring Laminated core transformer A laminate is a material constructed by uniting two or more layers of material together. ... Pattern welded pocket knife Pattern welding is the practice in sword and knife making of forming a blade of several metal pieces of differing composition that are forge-welded together and twisted and manipulated to form a pattern. ... General Name, symbol, number titanium, Ti, 22 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 4, 4, d Appearance silvery metallic Standard atomic weight 47. ... Fixed Partial Denture, or Bridge The word ceramic is derived from the Greek word κεραμικός (keramikos). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Steel blades are commonly shaped by forging or stock removal. Forged blades are made by heating a single piece of steel, then shaping the metal while hot using a hammer or press. Stock removal blades are shaped by grinding and removing metal. With both methods, after shaping, the steel must be heat treated. This involves heating the steel above its critical point, then quenching the blade to harden it. After hardening, the blade is tempered to remove stresses and make the blade tougher. With common kitchen cutlery, forged blades are often seen in more expensive knives. Forged blades can often be distinguished from stock removal blades by the presence of an integral bolster. This article is about smithing. ... Heat treatment is a method used to alter the physical, and sometimes chemical, properties of a material. ... Quenching is a general term for non-radiative de-excitation. ... Tempering is a heat treatment technique for metals and alloys. ...


The edge of the knife can be sharpened to a cutting surface in a number of different ways. Flat ground blades have a profile that tapers from the thick spine to the sharp edge in a straight or convex line. Seen in cross section, the blade would form a long, thin triangle, or where the taper does not extend to the back of the blade, a long thin rectangle with one peaked side. Hollow ground blades have concave, beveled edges that are ground starting midway down the blade, instead of at the spine. The resulting blade has a thinner edge, so it may have better cutting ability, but it is lighter and less durable than flat ground blades. Serrated blade knives have a wavy, scalloped or saw-like blade. Serrations make knives ideal for cutting things that are hard on the outside and soft on the inside that might otherwise be damaged by a knife with a plain edge blade. Serrated knives cut much better than plain edge blade knives when dull, so they may last longer without sharpening, and require a special tool to be sharpened.


Fixed blade features

A fixed blade knife does not fold or slide, and is typically stronger due to the tang, the extension of the blade into the handle, and lack of movable parts.[6]


Folding blade features

A folding knife can pivot, allowing the blade to fold into the handle. Although not likely to have a guard or full tang, folding knives typically have a locking mechanism. One common mechanism, found traditionally on pocket knives, is the slip joint. Once opened, the blade does not lock, but is held in place by a spring device that allows the blade to fold if a certain amount of pressure is applied. Alternately, the lockback can be used. Like the slip-joint the lockback includes a pivoted latch connected to a spring, and can be disengaged only by pressing the latch down to release the blade.[6] A pocket knife is a type of folding knife with a blade that fits inside the handle. ... A slip joint is a mechanical construction allowing extension and compression in a linear structure. ...


Another feature associated with the folding knife is a small knob, disk or hole that allows the user to open the knife with one hand, leaving the other hand free.


Sliding blade features

A sliding knife is a knife which can be opened by sliding the knife blade out the front of the handle. One method of opening is where the blade exits out the front of the handle point-first and then is locked into place (an example of the this is the gravity knife). Another form is a O-T-F (out-the-front) switchblade, which only requires the push of a button or spring, the knife is "slid" out of the handle, and locked into place. To retract the blade back into the handle, a release lever or button, or linerlock is pressed. A gravity knife is a knife which can be opened solely by the forces of gravity or centripetal force. ...


Handle

Main article: Handle (grip)

The handles of knives can be made from a number of different materials, each of which has advantages and disadvantages. Wood handles provide good grip, but are more difficult to care for. They do not resist water well, and will crack or warp with prolonged exposure to water. Plastic handles are more easily cared for than wooden handle, but can be slippery and become brittle over time. Lighter than other materials, this may result in a knife that is unbalanced or too light. Stainless steel handles are durable and sanitary, but can be slippery. To counter this, many premium knife makers make handles with ridges, bumps, or indentations to provide extra grip. A handle is a part of, or attachment to, an object that can be moved or used by hand. ... For other uses, see Wood (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The 630 foot high, stainless-clad (type 304L) Gateway Arch defines St. ...


Types of knives

For more details on the various types of knives, see Blade#Patterns of knife blades.

A blade is the flat part of a tool or weapon that normally has a cutting edge and/or pointed end typically made of a metal, most recently, steel intentionally used to cut, stab, slice, throw, thrust, or strike an animate or inainimate object. ...

Knives as weapons

As a weapon, the knife is universally adopted as an essential tool. For example:

  • Knife bayonet: A knife-shaped close-quarter fighting weapon designed to fit on or over the muzzle of a rifle barrel or similar weapon, used as a last-resort weapon or tool
  • Combat knife: Any knife intended to be used mainly in close-quarter fighting
  • Trench knife: Purpose-made or improvised knives, intended for close-quarter fighting, particularly in trench warfare
  • Shiv: A crudely made homemade knife out of everyday materials, especially prevalent in prisons among inmates.

A knife bayonet is a knife or short sword which can be used both as a bayonet or fighting or utility knife. ... Combat knives are mainly used in close combat. ... Please note: trench knives are specialized fighting knives and are not synonymous with brass knuckles - although some famous designs incorporate them, and thus these weapons deserve a page of their own. ... Trench warfare is a form of war in which both opposing armies have static lines of defence. ... A prison shiv christened the Throat cutter A shiv (from the Romani word chiv) is a slang term for a sharp or pointed implement used as an improvised knife-like weapon. ...

Knives as utensils

Table knives
Table knives

A primary aspect of the knife as a tool includes dining, used either in food preparation or as cutlery. Examples of this include: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2017x1000, 365 KB) Summary I bought these in Geneva in 1975, a the Centre Social Protestant flea market. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2017x1000, 365 KB) Summary I bought these in Geneva in 1975, a the Centre Social Protestant flea market. ... Cooking is the act of preparing food. ... Used cutlery: a plate, a fork and knife, and a drinking glass. ...

// A kitchen knife is any knife that is intended to be used in food preparation. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... A boning knife is a type of kitchen knife with a sharp point and narrow blade. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kinnikuman character, see Meat Alexandria. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... // A kitchen knife is any knife that is intended to be used in food preparation. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... For other meanings of ham or Ham, see Ham (disambiguation). ... A chefs knife. ... An electric knife is a kitchen electrical device used for slicing food such as bread, chicken, pork etc. ... // A kitchen knife is any knife that is intended to be used in food preparation. ... A butter knife is a flat, metal knife used to spread butter, peanut butter, vegemite or other spreads. ... // A kitchen knife is any knife that is intended to be used in food preparation. ... Table setting refers to the way to set a table with tableware—such as eating utensils and dishware—for serving and eating. ... Assorted forks. ... A spoon. ...

Knives as tools

As a utility tool the knife can take many forms, including:[6]

  • Bowie knife: Commonly, any large sheath knife, or a specific style of knife designed by Colonel Jim Bowie
  • Butterfly knife: A folding knife also known as a balisong, with two handles counter-rotating around the tang such that, when closed, the blade is concealed within the handles
Diver's knife
Diver's knife
  • Diver's knife: A knife adapted for use in diving and watersports and a necessary part of standard diving dress
  • Electrician's knife: An insulated knife used to cut electrical wire
  • Hunting knife: A knife used to dress large game
  • Pocket knife: Also known as a multi-tool or jackknife, a knife which may contain several blades, as well as other tools
  • Palette knife: A knife, or frosting spatula, lacking a cutting edge, used by artists for tasks such as mixing and applying paint, and in cooking for spreading icing
  • Scalpel: A medical knife, used to perform surgery
  • Straight razor: A reusable knife blade used for shaving hair
  • Survival knife: A sturdy knife, sometimes with a hollow handle filled with survival equipment
  • Switchblade: A knife with a folding blade that springs out of the grip when a button or lever on the grip is pressed
  • Utility knife: A knife used for cutting sheet materials, including cardboard boxes
  • Wood carving knife: Knifes used for wood carving, often with short and thin blades for better control

A typical bowie knife, with its hallmark large blade and unique shape. ... James Bowie James Bowie (probably April 10, 1796 - March 6, 1836), aka Jim Bowie, was a nineteenth century pioneer and soldier who took a prominent part in the Texas Revolution and was killed at the Battle of the Alamo. ... A variety of different handmade custom balisongs. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 160 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This is my picture of diving knife, a part of three-bolt equipment (russian standard diving dress). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 160 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This is my picture of diving knife, a part of three-bolt equipment (russian standard diving dress). ... The standard diving dress was used from its invention in 1837 until replaced by the rise of SCUBA and other modern diving outfits in the 1960s. ... Bowie knife is a term commonly used in modern times to refer to any large sheath knife. ... A pocket knife is a type of folding knife with a blade that fits inside the handle. ... A multitool is a portable, versatile hand tool that combines several individual tool functions in a single grip or in the shape of a credit card. ... A common palette knife A palette knife is a blunt knife with a very flexible steel blade and no sharpened cutting edge. ... Typical frosting spatula A frosting spatula is a special type of spatula designed especial for the use of spreading a substance, like frosting, onto something with a flat surface, like a cake. ... Cooking is the act of preparing food. ... This cake has an icing made with sour cream. ... A scalpel is a very sharp knife used for surgery, anatomical dissection, and various arts and crafts. ... “Surgeon” redirects here. ... A straight razor Straight razor is the name given to a reusable knife blade used for shaving facial hair. ... A man shaving using a straight razor. ... Survival knives are intended for survival purposes when lost in a wilderness environment. ... A switchblade (also known as automatic knife, switch, or in British English flick knife), is a type of knife with a folding blade that springs out of the grip when a button or lever on the grip is pressed. ... a Stanley 99E fully retracted A utility knife (also called a box cutter, a razor blade knife, a carpet knife, or a stationery knife) is a common tool used in various trades and crafts for a variety of purposes. ... Staple corrugated box Cardboard boxes are industrially prefabricated boxes, which are primarily used for packaging goods and materials. ... Carved wooden cranes Wood carving is a form of working wood by means of a cutting tool held in the hand (this may be a power tool), resulting in a wooden figure or figurine (this may be abstract in nature) or in the ornamentation of a wooden object. ...

Knives as a tradition

  • Kukri: A Nepalese knife used as both tool and weapon
  • Laguiole knife: A traditional French pocket-knife, originally produced in the town of Laguiole in the Aveyron region of southern France in the early 19th century
  • Lajinaa: A small spear, sometimes used in close range battles, used mostly by Spaniard pirates who raided trade ships in the gulf coast
  • Mora knife: Similar in design to Finnish puukkos, a range of belt-knives manufactured by the cutleries of the town of Mora in Dalarna, Sweden
  • Opinel knife: A simple, inexpensive, wooden pocket-knife, manufactured since the 1890s in the town of Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne in the Savoie region of France
  • Puukko: A traditional Finnish or Scandinavian style woodcraft belt-knife used as a tool rather than a weapon
  • Sabatier: A cooking knife manufactured in Thiers, France from well established manufacturers from the early 19th century
  • Seax: A Germanic single-edged knife, used primarily as a tool, but may also have been a weapon
  • Ulu: An Inuit woman's all-purpose knife

For the genus of snakes having the common name kukri snakes, see oligodon. ... The Laguiole knife is a high-quality traditional French pocket-knife, originally produced in the town of Laguiole in the Aveyron region of southern France. ... Laguiole is a village of some 1,200 inhabitants in the Aubrac district of southern France, one of the 304 communes of the Aveyron département. ... Aveyron (Occitan: Avairon) is a department in southern France named after the Aveyron River. ... A Lajinaa was a small spear used mostly by Spaniard pirates who raided trade ships in the gulf coast. ... Used mora The mora is a term used to refer to a range of popular belt-knives manufacturedby the cutleries of town Mora in Dalarna, Sweden, primarily by Frosts of Sweden. ... Mora is a Municipality in Dalarna County, in central Sweden. ... There is also Norwegian region called Dalane. ... The Opinel knife, or simply Opinel, is a simple, inexpensive wooden pocket-knife, manufactured since the 1890s in the town of Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne in the Savoie region of France. ... Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne is a commune in the upper valley of the River Arc, and the capital and name of a canton and an arrondissement (formerly in the in the Départment of Haute Savoie) of the present Savoie département, in the southeastern Rhône-Alpes region of... Savoie is a French département located in the Alps. ... Look up Puukko in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Scandinavia is a historical and geographical region centered on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe which includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. ... The name (or brand) Sabatier is famous in the cooking knife industry. ... Thiers is a commune of the Puy-de-Dôme département, in France. ... Some Merovingian seaxes The remains of a seax together with a reconstructed replica A Seax (also Hadseax, Sax, Seaxe, Scramaseax and Scramsax), was a type of Germanic single-edged knife. ... An ulu in the western Arctic style An ulu (Inuktitut syllabics: ᐅᓗ) is an Inuit womans all-purpose knife. ... For other uses, see Inuit (disambiguation). ...

Rituals and superstitions

See also: Ritual and Superstition

The knife plays a significant role in some cultures through ritual and superstition. As the knife was an essential tool for survival since early man[2], it can be found from the cradle—a knife placed under the bed while giving birth is said to ease the pain, or stuck into the headboard of a cradle to protect the baby[7][8]—to grave—so the dead would not be defenseless in the next world.[9][10][11] As such, the knife plays an important role in some initiation rites, and many cultures perform rituals with a variety of knives, including the ceremonial sacrifices of animals.[12] Samurai warriors, as part of bushido, could perform ritual suicide, or seppuku, with a tantō, a common Japanese knife.[13] An athame, a ceremonial black-handled knife, is used in Wicca and other forms of modern witchcraft.[14][15] A ritual is a set of actions, performed mainly for their symbolic value, which is prescribed by a religion or by the traditions of a community. ... For other uses, see Superstition (disambiguation). ... A ritual is a set of actions, performed mainly for their symbolic value, which is prescribed by a religion or by the traditions of a community. ... For other uses, see Superstition (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Initiation (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Samurai (disambiguation). ... Japanese samurai in armor, 1860s. ... Seppuku (Japanese: 切腹, belly-cutting) is a form of Japanese ritual suicide by disembowelment. ... Two Tantō tantō blade hidden in a fan-shaped mounting A Tantō (短刀) is a Japanese knife or dagger with a blade length of about 15 - 30 cm (6 - 12). There is a disputed saying about the tantō, wakizashi, and katana stating they are The Tantō differs from the others as... Athame Athame, athamé or arthame is what some practitioners of ritual magic call their ceremonial knives. ... For other uses, see Wicca (disambiguation). ... “Witch” redirects here. ...


In Greece a black-handled knife placed under the pillow is used to keep away nightmares.[16] As early as 1646 reference is made to a superstition of laying a knife across another piece of cutlery.[17] A common belief is that if a knife is given as a gift, the relationship of the giver and recipient will be severed. Something such as a small coin is exchanged for the gift, rendering "payment."[8]


Legislation

Main article: Knife Legislation

Knives are typically restricted by law, although restrictions vary greatly by country or state and type of knife. For example, some laws restrict carrying an unconcealed knife in public while other laws can restrict even private ownership of certain knives, such as switchblades. // Carrying knives in public is forbidden by law in many countries. ... A switchblade (also known as automatic knife, switch, or in British English flick knife), is a type of knife with a folding blade that springs out of the grip when a button or lever on the grip is pressed. ...


Further reading

  • Everybody's Knife Bible by Don Paul, ISBN 0-938263-23-4

References

  1. ^ No. 1 The Knife - Forbes.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-07.
  2. ^ a b c Early Human Evolution: Early Human Culture. Retrieved on 2007-05-07.
  3. ^ World's Oldest Stone Tools. Retrieved on 2007-05-07.
  4. ^ Identify Basic Knife Parts. Retrieved on 2007-05-07.
  5. ^ Knife Anatomy, Parts, Names. Retrieved on 2007-05-07.
  6. ^ a b c d Greatest Tool #10: The Knife - lifehack.org. Retrieved on 2007-05-07.
  7. ^ Bad Luck and Superstition 5. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  8. ^ a b HouseholdFolklore. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  9. ^ "The Knife Lore of the Anglo-Saxons" - Knife Articles : Custom Knives - Knife. Retrieved on 2007-05-09.
  10. ^ The Heroic Age: The Anglo-British Cemetery at Bamburgh. Retrieved on 2007-05-09.
  11. ^ Bronze age grave goods from Bedd Branwen burial site, Anglesey :: Gathering the Jewels. Retrieved on 2007-05-09.
  12. ^ Ritual knife. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  13. ^ Howstuffworks "How Samurai Work". Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  14. ^ Hellenic Magical Ritual. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  15. ^ The Clavicle of Solomon, revealed by Ptolomy the Grecian. (Sloane 3847). Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  16. ^ The Magic of the Horseshoe: The Magic Of The Horse-shoe: VI. Iron As A Protective Charm. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.
  17. ^ KNIFE laid across - A Dictionary of Superstitions - HighBeam Research. Retrieved on 2007-05-08.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Bold text This article is about the weapon. ... Dirk is a Scots word for a long dagger; sometimes a cut-down sword blade mounted on a dagger hilt, rather than a knife blade. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The US Marine Corps OKC-3S Bayonet A bayonet (from French baïonnette) is a knife- or dagger-shaped weapon designed to fit on or over the muzzle of a rifle barrel or similar weapon. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Knife

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ...


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