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Encyclopedia > Klingon
Klingon
tlhIngan
Founded: circa A.D. 900
Founder: Kahless the Unforgettable
Homeworld: Qo'noS (Kronos)
Capital: First City
Official Language: tlhIngan Hol (sometimes incorrectly called Klingonese), (see: universal translator)
Currency: darsek
Affiliation: Klingon Empire

Klingons (Klingon: tlhIngan) are a warrior race in the fictional Star Trek universe. They were recurring antagonists in Star Trek: The Original Series (TOS) and were later featured in all five spin-off series, eventually becoming uneasy allies of the United Federation of Planets. The Klingon language (tlhIngan Hol in Klingon) is the constructed language spoken by Klingons in the fictional Star Trek universe. ... Image File history File links KlingonInsignia. ... AD redirects here. ... Gyeonhwon formally establishes the kingdom of Hubaekje in southwestern Korea. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, Kahless the Unforgettable is a legendary Klingon portrayed in the Star Trek: The Original Series by Robert Herron and in Star Trek: The Next Generation by Kevin Conway. ... The meeting place of the Klingon High Council in the First City of the Klingon Empire In the fictional Star Trek universe, QonoS is the Klingon homeworld, also known as Kronos or Klinzhai. ... The Klingon language (tlhIngan Hol in Klingon) is the constructed language spoken by Klingons in the fictional Star Trek universe. ... The universal translator is a fictional device common to many science fiction works, especially on television. ... The Klingon language (tlhIngan Hol in Klingon) is the constructed language spoken by Klingons in the fictional Star Trek universe. ... This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... For other uses, see Antagonist (disambiguation). ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Created by screenwriter Gene Coon, Klingons were introduced in the episode "Errand of Mercy" (1967). They were named for Lieutenant Wilbur Clingan, who served with Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry in the Los Angeles Police Department.[1] Gene L. Coon (7 January 1924-8 July 1973) was an American screenwriter and television producer. ... Errand of Mercy is an episode of Star Trek: The Original Series, and was broadcast on March 23, 1967. ... Eugene Wesley Roddenberry (August 19, 1921 – October 24, 1991) was an American scriptwriter and producer. ... LAPD and L.A.P.D. redirect here. ...

Contents

Klingon biology

Star Trek
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Original Series · 80 episodes
Animated Series · 22 episodes
Next Generation · 178 episodes
Deep Space Nine · 176 episodes
Voyager · 172 episodes
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The Motion Picture · II: Wrath of Khan
III: Search for Spock
IV: Voyage Home · V: Final Frontier
VI: Undiscovered Country
Generations · First Contact
Insurrection · Nemesis · Star Trek (XI)
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UFP · Human · Vulcan · Romulan · Q
Klingon · Cardassian · Bajoran · Borg
Ferengi · Dominion · Mirror Universe
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Games · Fan productions · Experience
Further reading
Canon · Characters · Starfleet · Wars
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Prime Directive · Law · Wiki
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Star Trek Portal

This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... Star Trek: The Animated Series is an animated science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... List of Star Trek: The Animated Series episodes This is a list of episodes from the fictional animated television, Star Trek: The Animated Series, set in the Star Trek universe. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... Space station Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (ST:DS9 or STDS9 or DS9 for short) is a science fiction television series produced by Paramount and set in the Star Trek universe. ... The starship Voyager (NCC-74656), an Intrepid-class starship. ... The starship Enterprise (NX-01) Star Trek: Enterprise is a science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... This list of Star Trek: Enterprise episodes is accompanied by each episodes original airdate on UPN in the United States, along with its Nielsen rating, and number of viewers. ... Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Paramount Pictures, 1979; see also 1979 in film) is the first feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series and is released on Friday, December 7. ... Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (Paramount Pictures, 1982; see also 1982 in film) is the second feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (Paramount Pictures, 1984; see also 1984 in film) is the third feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (Paramount Pictures, 1986; see also 1986 in film) is the fourth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (Paramount Pictures, 1989; see also 1989 in film) is the fifth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (Paramount Pictures, 1991; see also 1991 in film) is the sixth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek Generations (Paramount Pictures, 1994) is the seventh feature film based on the Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek: First Contact (Paramount Pictures, 1996; see also 1996 in film), is the eighth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek: Insurrection (Paramount Pictures, 1998) is the ninth Star Trek feature film. ... Star Trek Nemesis (Paramount Pictures, 2002; see also 2002 in film) is the tenth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... This article is about the 2008 film. ... This is a list of species and races from the fictional universe of Star Trek. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In the Star Trek science fiction universe, Humans/Terrans (Homo sapiens sapiens) are one of the races undertaking interstellar travel. ... It has been suggested that Tplana-hath be merged into this article or section. ... Romulans are a fictional alien species in the Star Trek universe related to Vulcans. ... Q In the Star Trek fictional universe, the Q are a race of near-omnipotent, near-omniscient god-like beings from a parallel existence called the Q Continuum. ... This article is about the Star Trek universe. ... Bajorans, a race of humanoids in the fictional Star Trek universe, were introduced in the Next Generation series and played an integral part in the Deep Space Nine series. ... The Borg are a race of cyborgs in the fictional Star Trek universe, first introduced in the Star Trek: The Next Generation TV series. ... The Ferengi are a fictional extraterrestrial race from the Star Trek universe. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, the Dominion is a ruthless and militaristic Gamma Quadrant state, consisting of many different races, with ultimate power held by the xenophobic Changelings. ... The Mirror Universe (MU) is a fictional parallel universe in which the plots of several Star Trek television episodes take place, named for Mirror, Mirror, the original series episode in which it first appeared. ... The Star Trek franchise has produced a large number of novels, comic books, video games, and other materials, which are generally considered non-canon. ... Star Trek: Phase II was a planned television series set to air in Spring 1978 on a proposed Paramount Television Service (which eventually became United Paramount Network) based on the characters of Gene Roddenberrys Star Trek. ... This is a list of the various Star Trek novels, novelisations, short story collections that have been published since 1968. ... Almost continuously since 1967, a number of companies have published comic book series based on Star Trek and its spin off series, including Gold Key Comics, Marvel Comics, DC Comics, Malibu, Wildstorm, and currently IDW Publishing, with varying degrees of success. ... The Star Fleet Universe is the variant of the Star Trek fictional universe as detailed in the series of tactical and strategic interstellar wargames from Amarillo Design Bureau Inc. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... // Video games Throughout the years, the influence of Star Trek has expanded sufficiently to warrant the creation of a long series of PC games. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The view from the outside of the Las Vegas Hilton Star Trek: The Experience is a theme park at the Las Vegas Hilton in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, based on the fictional Star Trek universe. ... The Star Trek canon consists of the television series Star Trek (the original series), Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Star Trek: Voyager, Star Trek: Enterprise, and the ten motion pictures based upon the series. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article is an attempt to list every Star Trek episode from every form of media in order by stardate. ... The below is an abridged timeline of events established in the group of television shows and feature films set in the fictional Star Trek universe. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that List of Starfleet ship classes be merged into this article or section. ... This article is becoming very long. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, the Planet Classification System is a system developed by the Federation to categorize planets by many factors, such as atmospheric composition, age, surface temperature, size, and presence of life. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for an encyclopedia. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Memory Alpha (often abbreviated to MA) is a collaborative project to create the most definitive, accurate and accessible encyclopedic reference for topics related to the Star Trek fictional universe. ... Star Trek is one of the most culturally influential television shows – and perhaps the most influential science fiction TV series – in history. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Where no man has gone before is a saying used in the introductory sequence of all but one of the episodes of the original Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Sexuality in Star Trek refers to the wide range of sexual practices seen in the Star Trek franchise. ...

External

Roughly humanoid in appearance, Klingons typically sport long manes of luxuriant hair with moustaches and beards common among males. Perhaps their most prominent external feature is their ridged forehead. These intricate, bony patterns conform to the individual's nose, forehead, and on down the spine. The patterns, also visible on their feet and backs, vary by family line. The patterns are less prominent on individuals of mixed parentage, such as K'Ehleyr or B'Elanna Torres. For the 1968 stage production, see Hair (musical), for the 1979 film, see Hair (film). ... A moustache (sometimes spelled mustache in the United States) is an outgrowth of hair above the upper lip. ... A full beard A beard is the hair that grows on a mans chin, cheeks, neck, and the area above the upper lip (the opposite is a clean-shaven face). ... KEhleyr is a character in the fictional universe of Star Trek. ... BElanna Torres, played by Roxann Dawson, is a character in Star Trek: Voyager. ...


Change in appearance

In the original series (TOS), Klingons were typically portrayed with bronze skin and facial hair suggestive of North Asian peoples, such as the Mongols, and possessed physical abilities similar to humans (in fact, Gene Coon's only physical description of them in his Errand of Mercy script is "Oriental, hard-faced" and a memo further specifies they should be 'the Ho Chi Minh type'). For Star Trek: The Motion Picture, the Klingons were "reimagined" or retconned and were depicted with ridged foreheads, greater physical strength, new uniforms, and a distinctive language. Precursors to the ridged-forehead look for the Klingons can be found in the Kreeg, a warlike mutant race Roddenberry created for the 1974 pilot "Planet Earth." Regions of Asia:  Northern Asia  Central Asia  Western Asia  Southern Asia  Eastern Asia  Southeastern Asia North Asia or Northern Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... For other uses, see Mongols (disambiguation). ... This article is about modern humans. ... Errand of Mercy is an episode of Star Trek: The Original Series, and was broadcast on March 23, 1967. ... For the city named after him, see Ho Chi Minh City. ... Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Paramount Pictures, 1979; see also 1979 in film) is the first feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series and is released on Friday, December 7. ... Retroactive continuity – commonly contracted to the portmanteau word retcon – refers to the act of changing previously established details of a fictional setting, often without providing an explanation for the changes within the context of that setting. ...


There appeared to be four distinct varieties of the "original" Klingons throughout the various Star Trek series. [2] In TOS, there appeared two "races" -- some who were pale with neatly groomed hair and others much darker (an olive-bronze), with thick, bifurcated eyebrows. The two never appeared together. This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ...


These races were based on the various makeup forms viewed during the run of TOS, the TOS film series, and the "Next Generation" Klingons. In TOS, the Klingons shown lacked ridges on their heads, were olive-bronze (a minority were of a paler complexion; see previous paragraph above). The second "race" were the "Mark Lenard" Klingons, shown in Star Trek: The Motion Picture. They were tall, thin in build, with both a single crested ridge extending over their partially bald heads and an occipital bun on the rear of their skulls. The third Klingon "race" was represented by General Chang in Star Trek: The Undiscovered Country. This Klingon was only slightly ridged in the center of the forehead, lacking the "normal" side ridges. They were largely hairless except for a small wisp at the back of the skull and (in males) a small goatee.[citation needed] The fourth "race," and most common shown in Star Trek, are the triple-ridged or "Worf"-type. These Klingons have individualized or clan-based ridge patterns, ranging from the slight "webbed" ridge pattern of Colonel Worf of Star Trek VI, to the craggy triple ridges of the Emperor Kahless (clone). The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... Mark Lenard (October 15, 1924–November 22, 1996) was an American actor, primarily in television. ... Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Paramount Pictures, 1979; see also 1979 in film) is the first feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series and is released on Friday, December 7. ... Occipital bun is a morphological term used to describe a prominent bulge, or projection, of the occipital bone at the back of the skull. ... Chang is a Klingon character from the Star Trek fictional universe who was portrayed by Christopher Plummer in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country. ... Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (Paramount Pictures, 1991; see also 1991 in film) is the sixth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Worf, played by Michael Dorn, is a main character in both Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, and also the films based on The Next Generation. ... Colonel Worf is an attorney/JAG to the Klingon Empire in the fictional Star Trek universe. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, Kahless the Unforgettable is a legendary Klingon portrayed in the Star Trek: The Original Series by Robert Herron and in Star Trek: The Next Generation by Kevin Conway. ...


The Worf-type Klingons were first portrayed by Lady Valkris and Lord Kruge in Star Trek III: The Search for Spock. They became retconned as the main type of Klingon with The Next Generation, and in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. Kruge is a fictional villain from the Star Trek universe. ... Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (Paramount Pictures, 1984; see also 1984 in film) is the third feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Space station Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (ST:DS9 or STDS9 or DS9 for short) is a science fiction television series produced by Paramount and set in the Star Trek universe. ...


The canonical explanation was revealed in a two-part storyline on Star Trek: Enterprise ("Affliction" and "Divergence") which aired on February 2005. Canon, in the context of a fictional universe, comprises those novels, stories, films, etc. ... The starship Enterprise (NX-01) Star Trek: Enterprise is a science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... Affliction is the title of a Star Trek: Enterprise television episode from season four. ... Divergence is the title of a Star Trek: Enterprise television episode from season four. ...


In an earlier series of episodes, the Augments, humans grown from genetically engineered embryos from the Eugenics Wars of the late 20th century, were defeated by Captain Jonathan Archer and the Enterprise NX-01 in Klingon space. The Klingon High Council feared that Starfleet was developing armies of Augments and that they would pose a serious threat to the Empire's existence. Even when they were told by the Vulcan High Command that the Augments were created without Starfleet's knowledge or consent, they remained suspicious and so decided to fight fire with fire. The Klingons gained access to the genetic material of the human Augments, and wanted to adapt this genetic engineering to augment their own species. The experiment did not work correctly; at first, subjects did gain increased strength and intelligence, but their nervous systems could not handle the strain and they died. One of the test subjects had a virulent flu, which — combined with the genetic changes wrought by the experiment — became a deadly, airborne plague that spread rampantly across the Empire, from world to world, causing the physical changes to change them into the human-looking Klingons of Kirk's day. The Augments were a genetically enhanced race of superhumans in the science fiction television series Star Trek: The Original Series and Star Trek: Enterprise. ... The Eugenics Wars are a backstory event in the Star Trek fictional universe. ... Jonathan Archer is a fictional character and the main character of the television series Star Trek: Enterprise. ... The Enterprise (NX-01) is a starship in the Star Trek fictional universe commanded by Captain Jonathan Archer. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe the Klingon High Council is the supreme ruling body of the Imperial Klingon Empire. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... In the 22nd century, the Vulcan High Command is apparently a form of military government which controls both the Vulcan space fleet and most of the planet itself. ...


Dr. Phlox of the Enterprise NX-01 formulated a cure for the virus, however not before millions of Klingons were physically altered. And owing to the genetic nature of the virus, these alterations were passed to succeeding generations of offspring. Doctor Phlox is a fictional character in the television series Star Trek: Enterprise played by John Billingsley. ... This article is about biological infectious particles. ...


In addition to the change in appearance that the Klingons underwent, Phlox also mentioned "some minor synaptic re-ordering." This could explain why the TOS Klingons behaved very differently from the rest. TOS Klingons did not possess the guttural brutishness of later Klingons. This is particularly evident in the character Koloth, who cowered away from Kirk at the end of "The Trouble With Tribbles" but was less cowardly in "Blood Oath." In "Divergence" a female Klingon also stated that she "felt fear for the first time since I was a child... we have become weak like them (humans)" which also supports the idea that the virus/cure affected their personalities as well. Koloth is a character from the fictional Star Trek universe. ...


The Klingons were apparently so embarrassed by the fallout from this disaster, that they absolutely refused under any circumstances to discuss the incident with outsiders in later years. There is also evidence, illustrated by the ignorance of members of the Deep Space Nine crew who encounter human-like Klingons during time travel into the past [3] that knowledge of the change might have become lost to mankind over time. When Worf was asked about the origin of the human-looking Klingons, he simply replied that it was something that Klingons "do not discuss with outsiders." Bashir and O'Brien ponder possible causes between themselves, genetic engineering and mutated virus, both of which were shown to be the cause. The Enterprise storyline also indicates that an early form of the Starfleet intelligence service Section 31 was somehow involved in the transformation of the Klingons. In the Star Trek fictional universe, Deep Space Nine (or DS9) is a space station. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Section 31 is the unofficial designation of a rogue and officially nonexistent intelligence and defense organization resembling secret police or a black-ops organization in the Star Trek fictional universe. ...


Phlox indicated that "someday" the physical alterations could be reversed.


The episode "Divergence" revealed that not all Klingons were affected by the virus. No canon explanation has yet been offered to suggest why only the humanlike Klingons were seen in The Original Series, save for statements made in "Divergence" that the genetically altered version of the race would be stronger and more intelligent, suggesting they may have been desirable soldiers in later Klingon/Federation conflicts. The Klingons in Star Trek: The Motion Picture were the first Klingon crew that was shown to be dealing with something other than the Federation, so there is no evidence proving these particular Klingons had ever been afflicted. Other possible explanations include the idea that by the time the cure to the virus had been administered to all Klingons, every last one was infected by the virus so that they would have been changed somewhat by the virus anyway. This could also explain the "darker-skinned" Klingon observation stated above. The darker Klingons could have been descendants of Klingons that had only been in the initial stages of alteration when they were cured, so that they retained their more natural pigmentation. It is also possible that some Klingons used cosmetic surgery to restore their pre-alteration appearance. Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Paramount Pictures, 1979; see also 1979 in film) is the first feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series and is released on Friday, December 7. ...


In the Star Trek: Vanguard novel Summon the Thunder, the humanlike Klingons are called QuchHa', or the unhappy ones. They usually serve in their own units, although sometimes they are known to mix with the rest of the fleet personnel.


All attempts at retconning aside, the changes in Klingon appearance can best be explained by an inconsistent treatment of preexisting material by the series' and movies' writers. Fans have followed several variations of both canon and non-canon sources to produce Klingons with varied fusions, mixtures and heritages. These are portrayed in fiction, fan-produced films, and in professional fiction, such as The Final Reflection and How Much for Just the Planet? by John M. Ford and Kahless by Michael Jan Friedman. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Final Reflection is a 1984 Star Trek tie-in novel by John M. Ford which emphasizes developments of Klingon language and culture. ... How Much for Just the Planet? is a 1987 Star Trek tie-in novel by John M. Ford. ... John M. Ford portrait 2000 John Milo Mike Ford (April 10, 1957 – September 25, 2006) was an American science fiction and fantasy writer, game designer, and poet. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, Kahless the Unforgettable is a legendary Klingon portrayed in the Star Trek: The Original Series by Robert Herron and in Star Trek: The Next Generation by Kevin Conway. ... Michael Jan Friedman Michael Jan Friedman is a New York Times bestselling author, Michael Jan Friedman is the author of nearly sixty books of fiction and nonfiction, more than half of which bear are in the Star Trek universe. ...


The Klingons as seen post-TMP were once frequently referred to as Imperial Klingons, most notably in the early editions of the Star Trek Role Playing Games. The Star Fleet Universe represented by the board game Star Fleet Battles and PC game Star Fleet Command also suggests that the Klingons employ numerous subject races. A once widely accepted theory was that the various types of Klingons seen were the result of Imperials (purebreds), interbreeding with the subject races on the various conquered planets in their Empire. To the ancient Mongolians, this not only established their conquest, but it also served the purpose of breeding more warriors. Also worth noting is that the series' creators visualized the Klingon Empire as analogous to the Soviet Union. Just as the Soviet Union was actually an amalgamation of Eurasian states with Russia at its center, the Klingons may be composed of more than one race. This article is about traditional role-playing games. ... The Star Fleet Universe is the variant of the Star Trek fictional universe as detailed in the series of tactical and strategic interstellar wargames from Amarillo Design Bureau Inc. ... Star Fleet Battles is a tactical strategy board game set in the Star Fleet Universe originally created in 1979 by Stephen V. Cole; it has since been updated many times. ... Starfleet Command is a computer game based on the board game Star Fleet Battles. ...


Internal

The series has made several references to Klingon anatomy. Most Klingon body functions incorporate multiple redundancies, such as redundant stomachs, lungs, livers, an eight-chambered heart (although the Star Trek Medical Reference Manual shows a three-chambered heart), and twenty-three ribs. [4] This characteristic, known as "brak'lul," [4] makes Klingons incredibly resilient. Klingon ribs are arranged in a latticework; the structure might be compared to chainmail. Klingon teeth are typically serrated, with multiple edges and ridges. In engineering, the duplication of critical components of a system with the intention of increasing reliability of the system, usually in the case of a backup or fail-safe, is called redundancy. ... In anatomy, the stomach is a bean-shaped hollow muscular organ of the gastrointestinal tract involved in the second phase of digestion, following mastication. ... Human respiratory system The lungs flank the heart and great vessels in the chest cavity. ... For the bird, see Liver bird. ... The heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... The human rib cage. ... Look up lattice in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... David rejects the unaccustomed armour (detail of fol. ...


Mr. Spock once said Klingons lack tear ducts, although Klingon myth states that Kahless once filled the ocean with his tears. The Klingon expected lifespan is at least 150 years (in one movie novelization it was stated that Klingons were "old" at 45 and aged much quicker than humans). However, it is typical that male Klingons die young while in battle and not of natural causes. Spock, commonly called Mr. ... Tears trickling down the cheeks Lacrimation is the bodys process of producing tears, which are a liquid to clean and lubricate the eyes. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, Kahless the Unforgettable is a legendary Klingon portrayed in the Star Trek: The Original Series by Robert Herron and in Star Trek: The Next Generation by Kevin Conway. ...


Reproduction

The series has also explored Klingon reproduction. Klingon pregnancies are said to run 30 weeks.[5] (Human pregnancies are usually about 38 weeks.) The process of giving birth can sometimes take several days. Interbreeding is possible with Betazoids [6], humans [7], Romulans [8], and with medical intervention, Trills [9]. Interbreeding with a Trill involves the humanoid host and not the Trill symbiote genetically, and medical intervention is necessary mainly to insure the continued bond between host and symbiote. Klingon traits remain dominant over several generations regardless of interbreeding. In the fictional Star Trek universe, Betazoids are a sentient humanoid species from the planet Betazed, a member of the United Federation of Planets. ... In the Star Trek science fiction universe, Humans/Terrans (Homo sapiens sapiens) are one of the races undertaking interstellar travel. ... Romulans are a fictional alien species in the Star Trek universe related to Vulcans. ... Jadzia Dax is a Trill who carries the Dax symbiont. ... For other uses, see Symbiosis (disambiguation). ...


Blood

Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country depicts Klingons having violet blood, but all other depictions of Klingon blood have been red like human blood. Director Nicholas Meyer explained in the DVD commentary that the reason for the blood being colored pink was because in the original filming it was meant to be colored red but censors argued that doing so made the film too gory and would necessitate an "R" rating. Changing the color of the blood to pink satisfied the censors, as it no longer resembled human blood, and the film was rated "PG." Meyer saw no need to explain the color of the blood since Klingons were not human and there was no reason to assume their blood would be the same color. Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (Paramount Pictures, 1991; see also 1991 in film) is the sixth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Violet (named after the flower violet) is used in two senses: first, referring to the color of light at the short-wavelength end of the visible spectrum, approximately 380–420 nanometres (this is a spectral color). ... Human blood smear: a - erythrocytes; b - neutrophil; c - eosinophil; d - lymphocyte. ...


Culture

Main article: Klingon culture

Klingon culture describes the customs and practices of members of the Klingon Empire in the fictional Star Trek universe. ...

Language

Main article: Klingon language

They speak one sentance, Hookie cheessy latin monkeys with straws up their nose, in several tones. The Klingon language (tlhIngan Hol in Klingon) is the constructed language spoken by Klingons in the fictional Star Trek universe. ...


Government

Main article: Klingon High Council

As of 2369, the Klingon people and their interstellar empire became governed by the oligarchic Klingon High Council and a figurehead emperor, although in the past the emperor's role was much more powerful. The Klingon political state is referred to as the Klingon Empire, although the name "Klingon Imperial Empire" was used once.[10] Polly Pockets rule all In the fictional Star Trek universe the Klingon High Council is the supreme ruling body of the Imperial Klingon Empire. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Oligarchy (Greek , Oligarkhía) is a form of government where political power effectively rests with a small elite segment of society (whether distinguished by wealth, family or military powers). ... In the fictional Star Trek universe the Klingon High Council is the supreme ruling body of the Imperial Klingon Empire. ... An emperorrefers to Nick Herringshaw, a title, empress may only indicate the wife of an emperor (empress consort. ...


See above dum dum


Legal system

Main article: Klingon law

In the fictional Star Trek universe, Klingon law is that law code which is used in the Klingon Empire. ...

History of the Klingon Empire

Prehistory

Billions of years ago, the first sentient humanoids in the Milky Way seeded their DNA across the galaxy, mixing it with local DNA[11]. Klingons, therefore, developed partly from the indigenous prehistoric life on Qo'noS and partly from alien DNA. For other uses, see Milky Way (disambiguation). ... The meeting place of the Klingon High Council in the First City of the Klingon Empire In the fictional Star Trek universe, QonoS is the Klingon homeworld, also known as Kronos or Klinzhai. ...


Little is known of the Klingons before the establishment of the Empire. Their religion states that the first Klingons destroyed the gods who created them. Klingon physiology with its redundancies and great strength is ideal for military operations. These characteristics suggest the Klingons were at one time a vassal race. This is non-canonically supported by the events of the Star Trek novel Kahless; alternating chapters are set in the 'present' (ie, the 24th Century) and many centuries prior, while Kahless still lived and roamed the Klingon homeworld in a 'feudal' lifestyle. Look up vassal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


1st millennium

Kahless the Unforgettable
Kahless the Unforgettable

The Klingon Empire was founded circa 900 AD on the Klingon homeworld of Qo'noS by Kahless the Unforgettable when, according to dialog in the Deep Space Nine episode "The Sword of Kahless", he slew the tyrant Molor with the first bat'leth. Image File history File links Kahless_(painting). ... Image File history File links Kahless_(painting). ... The meeting place of the Klingon High Council in the First City of the Klingon Empire In the fictional Star Trek universe, QonoS is the Klingon homeworld, also known as Kronos or Klinzhai. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, Kahless the Unforgettable is a legendary Klingon portrayed in the Star Trek: The Original Series by Robert Herron and in Star Trek: The Next Generation by Kevin Conway. ... The Sword of Kahless is the title of an episode from the fourth season of the television series Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ... A batleth (in Klingon, betleH, ultimately said to be from batlh etlh honour sword) is a traditional Klingon sword in the Star Trek universe. ...


The Empire went through several dynasties of rulers, experiencing a period between the 2nd and 3rd known as the "Dark Time", a 10-year experiment in democracy.


Around the 14th century, Qo'noS was invaded by the Hur'q, who pillaged many treasures, including the sword of Kahless. A fictional species of the Star Trek universe, Hurq conquered the Klingon homeworld, QonoS (Kronos) about 1,000 years prior to the timeline of Star Trek:The Next Generation. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, Kahless the Unforgettable is a legendary Klingon portrayed in the Star Trek: The Original Series by Robert Herron and in Star Trek: The Next Generation by Kevin Conway. ...


The Klingons eventually expelled the Hur'q, which is the Klingon word for "outsider", from their homeworld. According to "The Klingon Empire: A History in Brief", found in the official Star Trek Klingon Academy Cadet Manual (page 163), the Klingons gleaned their advanced technology from the invaders, and used it to expand their empire into space. If the Klingon designs were in fact stolen, and not developed on their own, this might explain why Klingon technology seems to advance so little during the ensuing centuries compared to other planets, such as Earth. It also explains how such a warlike and anti-intellectual civilization was able to develop warp drive, in that they reverse engineered it from the technology of an invading race (Although in the 'Star Trek: Enterprise' episode 'Judgement' it appears that the Klingons had only begun to become the warlike race we recognise around the mid-22nd century when the warrior caste began to assert itself, which fits in a long-running theme that the Klingon race had fallen into a state of decline from what it originally was). Reverse engineering (RE) is the process of taking something (a device, an electrical component, a software program, etc. ...


By 2069 the High Council was formed, eliminating the position of Emperor until 2369.


22nd century

Around the early part of the 22nd century, the warrior class began exerting a greater influence throughout Klingon society, radically altering, notably, the justice system. In the fictional Star Trek universe, Klingon law is that law code which is used in the Klingon Empire. ...


In 2151, a faction in the Temporal Cold War from the 28th century attempted to alter the timeline by using the Suliban Cabal to incite unrest within the Klingon Empire. This resulted in the first contact between Klingons and Humans and sparked the first voyage of the Warp 5 vessel, Enterprise. Concurrent with this mission, Enterprise communications officer Hoshi Sato became the first known human to learn the Klingon language. Although initially positive, the relationship between Starfleet and the Klingon Empire remained on shaky ground during the first few years of contact, with Enterprise being fired upon by a Klingon battle cruiser only a few weeks after the vessel's trip to the Klingon homeworld[12]. By 2152-53, Captain Jonathan Archer had become a fugitive from Klingon justice, and at one point Enterprise destroyed a Klingon vessel carrying the then-head of the House of Duras who was pursuing the fugitive. The long-term fallout from this has yet to be revealed in canon, although the crew of Enterprise redeemed themselves somewhat in 2154 by helping the Empire stop the Augment Virus from becoming fatal. The Temporal Cold War is a fictional conflict waged throughout history, notably during the 22nd century AD in the Star Trek universe. ... The 28th century (Gregorian Calendar) comprises the years 2701 to 2800. ... A female Suliban The Suliban are a starfaring race in the fictional Star Trek universe, seen throughout the series Star Trek: Enterprise. ... A cabal is a number of persons united in some close design, usually to promote their private views and interests in a church, state, or other community by intrigue. ... The Enterprise (NX-01) is a starship in the Star Trek fictional universe commanded by Captain Jonathan Archer. ... Spoiler warning: Hoshi Sato (July 9th, 2128-2246) is a character in the fictional Star Trek universe and the communication officer aboard the starship Enterprise (NX-01) in the science fiction television series Star Trek: Enterprise. ... Jonathan Archer is a fictional character and the main character of the television series Star Trek: Enterprise. ...


23rd century

Around 2218, relations between the Empire and the United Federation of Planets degenerated substantially, with intense hostility lasting until 2293. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In 2266, war between the Federation and Klingon Empire was stopped before it could begin by the interference of the Organians. The Organian Peace Treaty forced on both sides held each to a non-aggression pact and the establishment of a neutral zone in which each side must nonviolently compete for trade agreements. The Organian influence, frequently mentioned during the original series, completely disappeared in the movies, for reasons that have yet to be explained. The Organians are a fictional race in the universe of Star Trek. ... The Organian Peace Treaty was the treaty of peace, imposed by the Organians, upon the United Federation of Planets and the Klingon Empire, on stardate 3199. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, a neutral zone is a sort of buffer zone between the territories of two different powers. ...


In 2267 the Klingons and the Romulans forged a military alliance and the Klingons traded several D7 battlecruisers in exchange for cloaking technology[13]. The basis for this alliance was grounded in real-world economics; the script called for a Romulan ship to appear, but the original Romulan ship actually burned in a fire that claimed one of the Star Trek warehouses, so rather than go to the expense of building a new one, the Klingon D7 model was substituted. Klingon starships are fictional spacecraft that appear in the television and film installments of the fictional universe of Star Trek. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ...


In 2293 the atmosphere of Kronos (Qo'noS) was contaminated when Praxis, one of its moons, and its primary mining facility, exploded. This event was a turning point in relations between the Klingons and the United Federation of Planets, as the Klingon Empire could not afford to maintain their excessive military activities and deal with this new problem (parallels with the breakdown of the Cold War, Chernobyl, and the relationship between the United States and the cash-strapped former Soviet Union were obvious). Thus the two powers entered into an alliance, which was maintained for many years -- until the Cardassian invasion of 2372. The resolution to the Kronos atmosphere issue is yet to be explained. Though a planet Kronos is shown to still be inhabited and still the Empire's seat of power well into the 24th Century, differences between both appearance and distance from Earth in various incarnations of Star Trek taking place both before and after this event may indicate the capital was moved to a new planet, maintaining the old name. It is, however, unclear whether this was in fact the intended implication, or merely the result of continuity errors. In the Star Trek universe, Praxis is a moon of the planet QonoS, the homeworld of the Klingon empire. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... Chernobyl reactor number four after the disaster, showing the extensive damage to the main reactor hall (image center) and turbine building (image lower left) The reactor accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant was the worst in history, resulting in a severe nuclear meltdown. ... In the Star Trek universe, the Khitomer Accords comprised a treaty set down between the Klingon Empire, the United Federation of Planets and the Romulan Empire signed on the planet Khitomer in the year 2293. ... This article is about the Star Trek universe. ...


The idea that the capital of the Empire was moved to a new world is supported by dialogue of the Federation President in Star Trek VI. Where bits of his speech are heard in the ensuing events where he mentions the evacuation of the planet within the 50 year timespan, and specifically mentions the term "Phase One, Preparation for Evacuation". This however is often overlooked as viewer attention is more focused on the starship battle overhead, and the assassin who is preparing to kill the President during his speech.


24th century

In 2344 the Klingons and Romulans began a violent war after the Romulans attacked the Klingon outpost Narendra III. The Enterprise-C cemented friendly relations between the Klingon Empire and the Federation by sacrificing itself to protect the outpost from the Romulans. A Klingon outpost planet that was attacked by a squadron of Romulan warbirds in the year 2344. ... USS Enterprise (NCC 1701-C) In the fictional Star Trek universe, the USS Enterprise NCC-1701-C was the fifth Federation Starship Enterprise to carry that name. ...


By 2346, the Romulans, with aid from the Duras, carried out a particularly brutal attack on the Khitomer Outpost. Duras may refer to: Duras, in Star Trek, was a formerly important House in the Klingon Empire Duras is a commune of the Lot-et-Garonne département, in France Oldřich Duras was a Czech chess international grandmaster Marguerite Duras was the pseudonym (after the town) of Marguerite Donnadieu... In the fictional Star Trek universe, Khitomer (QItomer in Klingon) is a planet on the Klingon side of their border with the Romulan Star Empire, where historic peace talks (known as the Khitomer Accords) occurred between the two empires and the Federation in 2293. ...


In 2357, Worf (played by Michael Dorn), Son of Mogh, and himself one of two survivors of the Khitomer massacre, became the first Klingon to enter Starfleet Academy. In 2363 he was assigned to the Enterprise-D as relief conn and Tactical Officer (Rank: Lieutenant j.g.). He was later reassigned as Chief of Security (Rank: Lieutenant, later Lieutenant Commander). Worf, played by Michael Dorn, is a main character in both Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, and also the films based on The Next Generation. ... Michael Dorn (born December 9, 1952) is an American actor known for his role as the Klingon Worf in multiple Star Trek shows and movies. ... In the Star Trek universe, Mogh was a Klingon, and considered for many years to be the traitor who allowed the Romulans to attack and destroy Khitomer. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, Khitomer (QItomer in Klingon) is a planet on the Klingon side of their border with the Romulan Star Empire, where historic peace talks (known as the Khitomer Accords) occurred between the two empires and the Federation in 2293. ... The official logo of Starfleet Academy, circa 2370. ... Enterprise or USS Enterprise are the names of several fictional starships, some of which are the focal point for various television series and films in the Star Trek franchise created by Gene Roddenberry. ... A Lieutenant, Junior Grade, is a division officer in the United States Navy. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... In the Royal Navy, United States Navy and United States Coast Guard, a lieutenant commander (lieutenant-commander or Lt Cdr in the RN) is a commissioned officer superior to a lieutenant and inferior to a commander. ...


In 2367 the Klingon Civil War began following Chancellor K'mpec's assassination. Before his murder, K'mpec had named Captain Jean-Luc Picard his Arbiter of Succession. Gowron was selected, but the House of Duras and their supporters opposed this decision, and the war began. It was later revealed that the Romulans were backing the Duras. Support quickly fell from their favor, ending the war and leaving Gowron as undisputed leader of the Empire. In the Star Trek fictional universe, the Klingon Civil War was the culmination of the power struggle between Gowron and the House of Duras, which continued even after Duras himself was killed at the hands of Lieutenant Worf in 2367. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, Kmpec was a former chancellor of the Klingon Empire. ... Jean-Luc Picard is a fictional human Star Trek character portrayed by actor Patrick Stewart. ... Gowron is a fictional character of the Star Trek universe. ... Duras may refer to: Duras, in Star Trek, was a formerly important House in the Klingon Empire Duras is a commune of the Lot-et-Garonne département, in France Oldřich Duras was a Czech chess international grandmaster Marguerite Duras was the pseudonym (after the town) of Marguerite Donnadieu...


In 2369, the position of Emperor was reinstated, when the clone of Kahless inherited the throne with the blessing of the Chancellor and High Council. Titled Kahless II, the Emperor became titular ruler of the Empire at a time when the Empire needed a figurehead. The bulk of power, however, remained in the hands of the High Council. An emperorrefers to Nick Herringshaw, a title, empress may only indicate the wife of an emperor (empress consort. ... For other uses, see clone. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, Kahless the Unforgettable is a legendary Klingon portrayed in the Star Trek: The Original Series by Robert Herron and in Star Trek: The Next Generation by Kevin Conway. ... Emperor Kahless II is the current ruler of the Klingon Empire. ...


In 2371, relations between the Klingons and the Federation soured over the issue of the Klingon invasion of Cardassia. When the Federation refused to support the Klingon invasion, Chancellor Gowron withdrew from the Khitomer Accords. For the next year, relations between the two powers were hostile. In 2372 fighting broke out between the two powers. However when the Federation and Klingons discovered that they were being manipulated by the Dominion, an uneasy cease-fire was declared. In late 2372, the Cardassians formally announced they had joined the Dominion, and the Jem'Hadar rapidly forced the Klingons to retreat from Cardassian space, inflicting heavy damage on them. Captain Sisko was able to convince Gowron to reinstate the Alliance. Damar of the Cardassian Union, prior to launching a revolution against the Dominion. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, the Dominion is a ruthless and militaristic Gamma Quadrant state, consisting of many different races, with ultimate power held by the xenophobic Changelings. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, the JemHadar are the shock troops of the powerful Dominion located in the Gamma Quadrant. ... Benjamin Lafayette Sisko, played by Avery Brooks, is the main character of the television series Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ...


Again allies, the Klingons and Federation turned their attention to the Dominion and the Cardassians as war against them became inevitable.


When the war began, both the Federation and Klingons fought side-by-side against the Dominion, even though the odds were against them. However, once the Romulans joined them the tide eventually turned against the Dominion. In 2375 the Federation-Romulan-Klingon fleet defeated the Dominion with the assistance of the Cardassian fleet during a final assault on Cardassia Prime. Despite the refusal of Sisko and Ross to drink blood wine with Martok in the Cardassian Central Command, the two powers remained strong allies after the war. Introduction The Romulans, a fictional race in the Star Trek universe, are descended from Vulcans and are characterized as being deceitful, cunning, and treacherous. ... This article is about the Star Trek universe. ... In the fictional series, Star Trek, Cardassia Prime is the main planet in the Cardassian Empire. ...


Shortly before the end of the Dominion War, in 2375, Gowron took direct control of the Klingon fleet (a position held up until that point by the successful General Martok) because he was concerned that Martok was becoming too popular among both the troops and the civilian population from his wartime success. Since new Chancellors can ascend to that position by killing the former Chancellor, Gowron feared that Martok would challenge him for his position. And since Gowron was much more of a politician than a general, the Klingon fleet began to take unnecessary losses which Gowron manipulated to appear to be the fault of Martok. Commander Worf, disgusted with Gowron for using bad tactics in the war simply to hurt Martok's political position, challenged the Chancellor in a meeting to ritual combat and defeated him (actually killing Gowron in the process). By the traditions of the Empire, Worf had the right to become the next Chancellor if he wished, but instead granted the role to Martok, having no desire for a political position himself, although Martok would shortly thereafter have Worf become the UFP's Ambassador to the Klingon Empire. Ironically, Martok never had any designs on Gowron or his position, even accepting the unpopular position in which Gowron had placed him without questioning his orders. USS Sitak (bottom left) and USS Majestic (center) are destroyed during Operation Return, one of the hard-won victories by the Federation Alliance. ... Martok is a fictional character in the Star Trek universe. ... Martok is a fictional character in the Star Trek universe. ... An ambassador, rarely embassador, is a diplomatic official accredited to a foreign sovereign or government, or to an international organization, to serve as the official representative of his or her own country. ...


Possible future

The Klingons will not recover from the losses they suffered during the Dominion War until 2385, according to a 2375 estimate by Section 31. Section 31 is the unofficial designation of a rogue and officially nonexistent intelligence and defense organization resembling secret police or a black-ops organization in the Star Trek fictional universe. ...


In Crewman Daniels' timeline, the Klingons join the Federation by about 2554. In the fictional world of the television series Star Trek: Enterprise, Crewman Daniels is a character who is encountered in several episodes. ...


Alternate timelines

A few episodes featuring alternate timelines have shown a variety of developments in Klingon history and politics.

  • In the future timeline of All Good Things..., TNG, relations between the Federation and the Empire have degraded, as Geordi states that current relations are "not too cozy". In this timeline, the Klingons have also taken control of the Romulan Star Empire.
  • The Deep Space Nine episode The Visitor gives an alternate history for the events after the beginning of season 4 of that series, where the Klingons occupied Deep Space Nine, and the Federation-Dominion conflict never occurred. The episode takes places over a number of decades, and the political climate of the Empire seems to change several times.
  • As depicted in the TNG episode Yesterday's Enterprise, an alternate timeline was formed when the Enterprise-C entered a temporal anomaly instead of being destroyed by the Romulans at Narendra III. In this alternate timeline, the Federation and the Klingons have been at war for decades, with the Federation close to losing.
  • While not an alternate timeline exactly, the Deep Space Nine episode Trials and Tribble-ations features the disgraced Klingon outcast Arne Darvin attempting to change history, and make himself a Klingon hero. His attempts are thwarted, and it seems that almost no changes were made to the timeline as a result of his actions - other than that Tribbles were no longer extinct (and even this could be a result of the Defiant crew accidentally bringing some back to the future with them, rather than a change in the timeline).
  • In the Mirror Universe, the Klingons formed an alliance with the Cardassians to overthrow the Terran Empire. This Alliance is the major political force in the Alpha Quadrant throughout the Deep Space Nine episodes visiting the Mirror Universe.

All Good Things. ... The Visitor is the title of the third episode of the fourth season of the television series Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ... Yesterdays Enterprise is an episode of the 3rd season of Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... Trials and Tribble-ations is a fifth season episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine that was written as a tribute to the original series of Star Trek. ... Arne Darvin was a character in the Star Trek Universe played by Charlie Brill. ... The Mirror Universe (MU) is a fictional parallel universe in which the plots of several Star Trek television episodes take place, named for Mirror, Mirror, the original series episode in which it first appeared. ... This article is about the Star Trek universe. ... The official emblem of the Terran Empire The Terran Empire is, in the fictional universe of Star Trek, the Mirror Universe counterpart of the United Federation of Planets. ...

References

  1. ^ Alexander, David (1994). Star Trek Creator. 
  2. ^ The Evolution of Klingon Foreheads, by Bernd Schneider and Jörg Hillebrand (accessed 14 June 2006)
  3. ^ Trials and Tribble-ations
  4. ^ a b "Ethics" 23 ribs, 2 livers, and an 8-chambered heart are listed by Dr. Russel, a guest neurologist on the Enterprise to help aid in Worf's crushed vertebrae
  5. ^ "Lineage" (VOY, 2001)
  6. ^ "Parallels", (TNG, 1993)
  7. ^ "The Emissary", (TNG, 1989)
  8. ^ "Birthright", (TNG, 1993)
  9. ^ "Children of Time", (DS9, 1997)
  10. ^ "Sins of the Father" (TNG, 1990). It is likely the "imperial" was dropped because of its obvious redundancy.
  11. ^ "The Chase" (TNG, 1993)
  12. ^ "Unexpected" (ENT, 2001)
  13. ^ "The Enterprise Incident" (TOS, 1968)

David Alexander is a controversial Sarasota, Florida-based political activist. ... Trials and Tribble-ations is a fifth season episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine that was written as a tribute to the original series of Star Trek. ... Ethics is a fifth season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... Lineage was the twelfth episode broadcast of the seventh season of the TV series Star Trek: Voyager, first airing in the winter of 2001. ... Parallels is an episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation directed by Robert Weimer from a script by Brannon Braga. ... The Emissary is an episode from the second season of Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... Birthright is a two-part episode of season six of Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Sins of the Father is the title of an episode from the third season of Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... The Chase is the 146th episode of the science fiction television series Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... Unexpected is the 4th episode (production #105) of the television series Star Trek: Enterprise. ... The Enterprise Incident is a third season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series, first broadcast September 27, 1968 and repeated December 27, 1968. ...

See also

This is an article about the Klingons as they exist in the Star Fleet Universe and not in various canon Star Trek sources. ... Gowron is a fictional character of the Star Trek universe. ... Worf, played by Michael Dorn, is a main character in both Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, and also the films based on The Next Generation. ...

External links

Wikipedia
Klingon edition of Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Wiktionary
Klingon edition of Wiktionary, the free dictionary/thesaurus
Wikibooks
Wikibooks' [[wikibooks:|]] has more about this subject:
Klingon

  Results from FactBites:
 
Klingon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4367 words)
Klingon ribs are arranged in a latticework; the structure might be compared to chainmail.
Conversely, Klingons despise the Tribbles as an "ecological menace".
The Klingon AI and standard of discipline is considered slightly lower than that of the Federation, with subordinates generally erring on the side of aggression.
Klingon language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3599 words)
Klingon is sometimes referred to as Klingonese (most notably in the Star Trek: The Original Series episode "The Trouble with Tribbles"), but among the Klingon-speaking community this is often understood to refer to another Klingon language that is described in John M. Ford's Star Trek novels as Klingonaase.
Klingon has been developed with a phonology that, while based on human natural languages, is intended to sound alien.
Klingon syllable structure is extremely strict: a syllable must start with a consonant (including the glottal stop) followed by one vowel.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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