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Encyclopedia > Kite
Yokaichi Giant Kite Festival held on the fourth Sunday every May in Higashiomi, Shiga, Japan
Yokaichi Giant Kite Festival held on the fourth Sunday every May in Higashiomi, Shiga, Japan
A man flying a kite on the beach, a good location for flying as winds travelling across the sea contain few up or down draughts which cause kites to fly erratically.
A man flying a kite on the beach, a good location for flying as winds travelling across the sea contain few up or down draughts which cause kites to fly erratically.

A kite is a flying tethered man-made object. The necessary lift that makes the kite fly is generated when airflow over and under the kite creates low pressure above the kite and high pressure below it. In addition to the lift, this deflection generates horizontal drag along the direction of the wind. This drag is opposed with the tension of the one or more lines held by the operator of the kite. The word kite may mean: Kite, a light, man-made object designed to be supported by the wind Kite, a device in tow that converts tow force to a net positive lift opposing the direction of the towing in any medium; this admits soil kites (specialized soil anchors are one... Image File history File links Yokaichi01. ... Image File history File links Yokaichi01. ... The Yokaichi Giant Kite Festival is held on the fourth Sunday every May. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 561 KB) Author: Myself. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 561 KB) Author: Myself. ... For other uses, see Beach (disambiguation). ... In fluid dynamics, turbulence or turbulent flow is a flow regime characterized by chaotic, stochastic property changes. ... The lift force, lifting force or simply lift is a mechanical force generated by solid objects as they move through a fluid. ... An object falling through a gas or liquid experiences a force in direction opposite to its motion. ... Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope (IPA: ) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. ...


Today, in addition to kites that are mainly flown for recreation, art or practical use, there are sport kites and power kites. Sport kites are flown in aerial ballet. Power kites are multi-line steerable kites designed to generate excess force which can be applied in related activities such as kite surfing, kite landboarding or kite buggying. “Fun” redirects here. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... Developments in multi-line kites in recent years has allowed forms of kite flying to develop into a sport. ... A power kite or traction kite is a large kite designed to provide significant pull. ... For other uses, see Ballet (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Force (disambiguation). ... Kiteboarders use inflatable kites tethered to harnesses to glide through water and air. ... Kite landboarding also known as Kiteboarding or Land kiteboarding or flyboarding, is based on the ever-growing sport of Kitesurfing, where a rider on a surf-style board is pulled over water by a kite. ... Kite buggying, also known as kitebuggying, involves using a power kite to pull a Kite buggy (purpose-built 3-wheeled cart). ...

Contents

History

Approximately 2800 years ago the kite was first invented and popularized in China, where materials ideal for kite building were readily available: silk fabric for sail material, fine, high-tensile-strength silk for flying line, and resilient bamboo for a strong, lightweight framework. The kite was said to be the invention of the famous 5th century BC Chinese philosophers Mozi and Lu Ban. By at least 549 AD paper kites were being flown, as it was recorded in that year a paper kite was used as a message for a rescue mission.[1] Ancient and medieval Chinese sources list other uses of kites for measuring distances, testing the wind, lifting men, signaling, and communication for military operations.[1] The earliest known Chinese kites were flat (not bowed) and often rectangular. Later, tailless kites incorporated a stabilizing bowline. Kites were decorated with mythological motifs and legendary figures; some were fitted with strings and whistles to make musical sounds while flying.[2] For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bamboo (disambiguation). ... Mozi (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Mo Tzu, Lat. ... Lu Ban (Chinese: 鲁班; Pinyin: LÇ” Bān, ?-?) was a famous architect of ancient China. ... For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ...


After its appearance in China, the kite migrated to Japan, Korea, Myanmar (Burma), India, Arabia, and North Africa, then farther south into the Malay Peninsula, Indonesia, and the islands of Oceania as far east as Easter Island. Since kites made of leaves have been flown in Malaya and the South Seas from time immemorial, the kite could also have been invented independently in that region.[2] This article is about the Korean civilization. ... The Arabian Peninsula The Arabian Peninsula is a mainly desert peninsula in Southwest Asia at the junction of Africa and Asia and an important part of the greater Middle East. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ... The Malay Peninsula (Malay: Semenanjung Tanah Melayu) is a major peninsula located in Southeast Asia. ... For other uses, see Oceania (disambiguation). ... Rapa Nui redirects here. ...


One ancient design, the fighter kite, became popular throughout Asia. Most variations, including the fighter kites of India and Japan, are small, flat, roughly diamond-shaped kites made of paper, with a tapered bamboo spine and a balanced bow. Flown without tails that would hinder their agility, these highly maneuverable flat kites have a length of cutting line coated with an abrasive attached to the bridle, which is then tied to a light cotton flying line. Although the rules of kite fighting varied from country to country, the basic combat was to maneuver the swift kite in such a way as to cut the opponent's flying line.[2]


Kite flying began much later in Europe than in Asia. While unambiguous drawings of kites first appeared in print in the Netherlands and England in the 17th century, pennon-type kites that evolved from military banners dating back to Roman times and earlier were flown during the Middle Ages.[2] For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...

Hang gliders are manned glider kites which instead of a tether, use gravity.
Hang gliders are manned glider kites which instead of a tether, use gravity.

During the 18th century tailless bowed kites were still unknown in Europe. Flying flat arch- or pear-shaped kites with tails had become a popular pastime, mostly among children. The first recorded scientific application of a kite took place in 1749 when Alexander Wilson of Scotland used a kite train (two or more kites flown from a common line) as a meteorologic device for measuring temperature variations at different altitudes.[2] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (980 × 653 pixel, file size: 120 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Hang glider flying in the alps. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (980 × 653 pixel, file size: 120 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Hang glider flying in the alps. ... Hang gliding is one of the windsports. ... Alexander Wilson. ... This article is about the country. ...


Three years after, in June 1752, in what is the most famous of kite experiments, the American inventor and statesman Benjamin Franklin, with the aid of his son, lofted a flat kite fitted with a pointed wire and silk sail on a hemp line during a thunderstorm. Somehow both father and son avoided electrocution as a metal key attached to the flying line became electrified. Franklin proved that lightning was the natural phenomenon called electricity, not the wrath of the gods. One immediate and weird practical outcome of the experiment was Franklin's invention of the lightning rod. Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... Electricity (from New Latin ēlectricus, amberlike) is a general term for a variety of phenomena resulting from the presence and flow of electric charge. ... An example of a standard, pointed-tip air terminal The term lightning rod is also used as a metaphorical term to describe those who attract controversy. ...


Materials

Art kites at a German Kite Festival
Art kites at a German Kite Festival

Kites typically consist of one or more spars to which a paper or fabric sail is attached, although some, such as foil kites, have no spars at all. Classic kites use jelly, sheep hearts, or some other strong but flexible wood for the spars, paper or light fabrics such as silk for the sails, and are flown on string or twine. Modern kites use synthetic materials, such as ripstop nylon or more exotic fabrics for the sails, fiberglass or carbon fiber for the spars and dacron or dyneema for the kite lines. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1000x854, 60 KB) en: Description: Two light-wind-kites in the sky close together. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1000x854, 60 KB) en: Description: Two light-wind-kites in the sky close together. ... For other uses, see Textile (disambiguation). ... Foil kites are soft kites. ... Look up jelly in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Wood (disambiguation). ... For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ... Ripstop nylon is the primary material used in Hot air balloons Rip-stop Nylon is a light-weight, water-repellent nylon fabric with inter-woven ripstop reinforcement threads in a crosshatch pattern, so the material resists ripping or tearing. ... Bundle of fiberglass Fiberglass (also called fibreglass and glass fibre) is material made from extremely fine fibers of glass. ... Graphite-reinforced plastic or carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP or CRP), is a strong, light and very expensive composite material or fibre reinforced plastic. ... The term plastics covers a range of synthetic or semi-synthetic organic condensation or polymerization products that can be molded or extruded into objects or films or fibers. ... Dyneema or Spectra is a synthetic fiber based on ultra high molecular weight polyethylene which is 15 times stronger than steel and up to 40% stronger than Kevlar. ...



Kites can be designed with many different shapes, forms, and sizes. They can take the form of flat geometric designs, boxes and other three-dimensional forms, or modern sparless inflatable designs. Kites flown by children are often simple geometric forms (for example, the diamond). In Asia, children fly dried symmetrical leaves on sewing thread and sled-style kites made from sheets of folded writing paper.[citation needed] A kite showing its equal sides and its inscribed circle. ...


Chinese kite designs often emulate flying insects, birds, and other beasts, both real and mythical. The finest Chinese kites are made from split bamboo (usually golden bamboo), covered with silk, and hand painted. On larger kites, clever hinges and latches allow the kite to be disassembled and compactly folded for storage or transport. Cheaper mass-produced kites are often made from printed polyester rather than silk. SEM picture of a bend in a high surface area polyester fiber with a seven-lobed cross section Polyester (aka Terylene) is a category of polymers which contain the ester functional group in their main chain. ...


Tails are used for some single-line kite designs to keep the kite's nose pointing into the wind. Spinners and spinsocks can be attached to the flying line for visual effect. There are rotating wind socks which spin like a turbine. On large display kites these tails, spinners and spinsocks can be 50 feet (15 m) long or more. A Siemens steam turbine with the case opened. ...


Modern acrobatic kites use two or four lines to allow fine control of the kite's angle to the wind. Traction kites may have an additional line to de-power the kite and quick-release mechanisms to disengage flyer and kite in an emergency.


A recent addition to the kite family is the rotorkite. This type of kite consists of a rotor or rotors much like the rotors found on helicopters and autogyros. In a proper wind the rotors spin and create lift. This type of kite may have two control lines, one for each hand. For other uses, see Helicopter (disambiguation). ... An autogyro is a type of rotorcraft invented by Juan de la Cierva in 1919, making its first successful flight on January 9, 1923 at Cuatro Vientos Airfield in Madrid, Spain. ...


Practical uses

Chinese dragon kite more than one hundred feet long which flew in the annual Berkeley, California, kite festival in 2000. It is a kite-train of hundreds of linked circles (with outriggers ending in feathers for balance). The dragon's head is a bamboo frame with painted silk covering.
Chinese dragon kite more than one hundred feet long which flew in the annual Berkeley, California, kite festival in 2000. It is a kite-train of hundreds of linked circles (with outriggers ending in feathers for balance). The dragon's head is a bamboo frame with painted silk covering.
A quad-line traction kite, commonly used as a power source for kite surfing
A quad-line traction kite, commonly used as a power source for kite surfing

Kites have been used for military uses in the past, both for delivery of messages and munitions, and for observation, by lifting an observer above the field of battle, and by using kite aerial photography. Image File history File linksMetadata 1O20-rotated. ... Image File history File linksMetadata 1O20-rotated. ... Berkeley is a city on the east shore of San Francisco Bay in Northern California, in the United States. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Kite333. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Kite333. ... Kiteboarders use inflatable kites tethered to harnesses to glide through water and air. ... Early kite photo from 1906 Kite aerial photography (KAP) is a hobby and a type of photography. ...


Kites have also been used for scientific purposes, such as Benjamin Franklin's famous (but dangerous) experiment proving that lightning is electricity. Kites were the precursors to aircraft, and were instrumental in the development of early flying craft. Alexander Graham Bell experimented with very large man-lifting kites, as did the Wright brothers and Lawrence Hargrave. Kites had an historical role in lifting scientific instruments to measure atmospheric conditions for weather forecasting. Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... Not to be confused with lighting. ... Electricity (from New Latin ēlectricus, amberlike) is a general term for a variety of phenomena resulting from the presence and flow of electric charge. ... Alexander Graham Bell (3 March 1847 - 2 August 1922) was a Scottish scientist, inventor and innovator. ... Roald Amundsen, the polar explorer, is lifted from the ground using a man-lifting kite during tests in 1909. ... The Wright brothers, Orville (August 19, 1871–January 30, 1948) and Wilbur (April 16, 1867–May 30, 1912), were two Americans generally credited with building the worlds first successful airplane and making the first controlled, powered and heavier-than-air human flight on December 17, 1903. ... Hargrave (seated) and Swain demonstrate the manlift kites (labelled A, B, D, & E), sling seat and spring balance in the parkland behind Stanwell Park beach, November 1894 Lawrence Hargrave (29 January 1850 – 6 July 1915) was an engineer, explorer, astronomer, inventor and aeronautical pioneer. ... Modern weather predictions aid in timely evacuations and potentially save lives and property damage Human beings have attempted to predict the weather since time immemorial. ...


Kites can also be used for radio technical purposes, either by kites carrying antennas or by using a kite, which carries up an antenna wire ( for MF, LF or VLF-transmitters). This was done in the past, for the reception station of the first transatlantic transmission by Marconi. Captive balloons may be more convenient for such experiments, because kite carried antennas require a lot of wind, which may be not always possible with heavy equipment and a ground conductor. It must be taken into account during experiments, that a conductor carried up by a kite in the sky can lead due to a high voltage toward ground, which can endanger people and equipment, if suitable precautions (grounding through resistors or a parallel resonant-circuit tuned to transmission frequency) are not taken. Moored balloons can carry instruments and sensors for long durations that are impractical for other aircraft. ...


Kites can also be used as light effect carrier, for example by carrying lightsticks or battery powered light effects.


A German company has developed ship-pulling kites as an additional power source for cargo ships. Trials on a 55m ship have shown that, in favorable winds, the kite increases fuel-efficiency by up to 30%. This SkySail system is planned to be in commercial production by 2008. [3] Kites are also available as an auxiliary sail or emergency spinnaker for sailing boats. Self-launching Parafoil kites are attached to the mast. Hapag-Lloyd Container ship Container ship A cargo ship or freighter is any sort of ship or vessel that carries cargo, goods, and materials from one port to another. ... For other uses, see Spinnaker (disambiguation). ... A sailboat is a relatively small wind-driven vessel used primarily for sports and personal purposes. ... A parafoil is a nonrigid airfoil, designed with an aerodynamically inflated cell structure. ...

Launch of ram-air inflated Peter Lynn single-line kite, shaped like an octopus and 90 feet long.
Launch of ram-air inflated Peter Lynn single-line kite, shaped like an octopus and 90 feet long.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (588 × 783 pixel, file size: 132 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Self-made image, Cervia, Italy, April 2007 Clappingsimon talk 13:30, 29 May 2007 (UTC) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (588 × 783 pixel, file size: 132 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Self-made image, Cervia, Italy, April 2007 Clappingsimon talk 13:30, 29 May 2007 (UTC) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file... The Worlds Largest Kite, 2005. ...

Ancient military use of kites

Kites were often used in the military of China as signal equipment. Military adoption of this was more common in East Asia than in Europe. Much like modern flares, kites were flown engulfed in fire to provide a way to deliver messages to nearby or distant allies or soldiers. East Asia Geographic East Asia. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Bell bottoms are trousers that become more wide from the knees downwards. ...


Kites were also used by Admiral Yi of the Joseon (1392-1910) Dynasty of Korea.[citation needed] During the Japanese invasions of Korea (1592-1598), Admiral Yi commanded his navy with kites. His kites had specific markings directing his fleet to perform his order. Admiral Yi was said to have over 300 such kites.[citation needed] The war eventually resulted in a Chinese and Korean victory, and although kites played a minor role in the war's conclusion, they were by no means a predecessor to modern day radio and/or flares. Yi Sun-sin (March 8, 1545 – November 19, 1598), was a Korean naval leader best known for his victories against the Japanese navy during the Seven Year War, during the Joseon Dynasty. ... Joseon or Chosun (Korean: 조선; Hanja: 朝鮮; Revised: Joseon; McCune-Reischauer: Chosŏn; Chinese: Cháoxiǎn; Japanese: Chōsen) is a name for Korea, as used in the following cases: As part of the name of several ancient kingdoms (including Gojoseon, Gija Joseon, and Wiman Joseon); During most of the Joseon... Combatants Korea under the Joseon Dynasty, China under the Ming Dynasty, Jianzhou Jurchens Japan under Toyotomi Hideyoshi Commanders Korea King Seonjo Crown Prince Gwanghae Yi Sun-sin†, Gwon Yul, Yu Seong-ryong, Yi Eok-gi†, Won Gyun†, Kim Myeong-won, Yi Il, Sin Rip†, Gwak Jae-u, Kim Si-min... Naval redirects here. ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ...


In more modern times the British navy also used kites to haul human lookouts high into the air to see over the horizon and possibly the enemy ships. The famed Cody Kite (named after the creator Samuel Franklin Cody) (see, for example, this webpage) is known for its classic beauty as well as its lifting abilities.


Cultural uses

Kite festivals are a popular form of entertainment throughout the world. They include small local events, traditional festivals which have been held for hundreds of years and major International Festivals which bring in kite flyers from overseas to display their unique art kites and demonstrate the latest technical kites.


Kite flying is very popular in the People's Republic of China, Korea, Japan, Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Thailand, and many other Asian countries. In all of these countries 'kite fighting', in which kite fighters try to snag each other's kites or cut other kites down, is popular. Fighter kites are usually small, flat, flattened diamond-shaped kites made of paper and bamboo. Tails were left off of the fighter kites so that agility and maneuverability were not compromised. The usual goal of a 'kite fighter' is to maneuver his/her kite to cut the opponent's string.[4] In Afghanistan this is known as Gudiparan Bazi. Some kite fighters pass their strings through a mixture of ground glass powder and glue. The resulting strings are very abrasive and can sever the competitor's strings. The modernization of the sport of 'kite fighting' comes with newer technology, as canny arms dealers begin importing a flexible razor sharp wire from China, rather than the old, nylon fishing line used for kite string.[5] However, this practice is dangerous since the abrasive strings can also injure people. During the Taliban rule in Afghanistan, kite flying was banned, among various other recreations. This article is about the Korean civilization. ... The Taliban (Pashto: , also anglicized as Taleban) are a Sunni Muslim and ethnic Pashtun movement [2] that ruled most of Afghanistan from 1996 until 2001, when their leaders were removed from power by a cooperative military effort between the Northern Alliance, United States, Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom. ...


In Vietnam, kite flown by adults are "tail-less". Instead small flutes are attached allowing the wind to "hum" a musical tune. There are other forms of sound-making kites. In Bali, large bows are attached to the front of the kites to make a deep throbbing vibration, and in Malaysia row of gourds with sound-slots are use to create a whistle as the kite flies.


The Indian festival of Makar Sankranti is devoted to kite fighting in some states. This spring festival is celebrated every January 14 (or January 15 on leap years), with millions of people flying kites all over northern India. The cities of Ahmedabad and Jaipur are particularly notable for their kite fighting festivals. Highly maneuverable single-string paper and bamboo kites are flown from the rooftops while using line friction in an attempt to cut each other's kite lines, either by letting the line loose at high speed or by pulling the line in a fast and repeated manner. The activity is not without risk as the line is treated to be abrasive and flyers can, and occasionally do, fall from the rooftops. In some Indian cities kite flying/fighting is an important part of other celebrations, including Republic Day, Independence Day, Raksha Bandhan, and Janmashtami. Makara Sankranti is a mid-winter Hindu festival of India and Nepal. ... , Ahmedabad (Gujarati: , Hindi: अहमदाबाद ) is the largest city in the state of Gujarat and the seventh-largest urban agglomeration in India, with a population of almost 51 lakhs (5. ... , Jaipur   (Hindi: जयपुर, Rajasthan Capital), also popularly known as the Pink City, historically sometimes rendered as Jeypore, is the capital of Rajasthan state, India. ... Republic Day is the name of a public holiday in several countries to commemorate the day when they first became republics. ... Raksha bandhan or Rakhi is a Hindu festival to signify and extend the brother-sister relationship. ... Janmashtami (जन्माष्टमी) is a celebration of the birth of Lord Krishna the eighth avatar (incarnation) of Vishnu, and every ritual in the celebration of this auspicious occasion is associated with various phases of his life, which have been immortalized in both...

Making traditional Wau jala budi kite, Malaysia. The bamboo frame is covered with plain paper and then decorated with multiple layers of cut-outs of paper and foil.

In Greece, flying kites is a tradition for Clean Monday, the first day of Lent. Image File history File links Malaysiakite. ... Image File history File links Malaysiakite. ... Clean Monday (Greek: Καθαρή Δευτέρα), also known as Ash Monday or (in Cyprus only) Green Monday, is the first day of the Eastern Orthodox Christian lent. ... It has been suggested that Cuaresma be merged into this article or section. ...


In Pakistan, kite flying is a ritual for the spring festival known as Basant. However, kite flying is currently banned as some kite fliers engage in kite battles by coating their strings with glass or shards of metal, leading to injuries and death. Kite fighting is a very popular sport in Pakistan, mainly centered in Lahore people spend thousands of dollars in preparing different types of kites and threads best suited to battle. The kites that are manufactured for battling are very different from the conventional kites as they are especially designed and made for this purpose. Kup, Patang, Guda, Nakhlaoo, etc are some of the kites used in the battle and they vary in balance, weight and speed through the air. Threads for kite battling are manufactured using especial glues, chemicals and crushed glass and are numbered based on their ability to cut other threads and to handle kite's weight. Kite Battle is an art and the more experienced a person is in this art the more likely he is to win the battle. It is a very popular social event in Pakistan that happens once a year and the festivities are worth seeing. Kites on display before Basant festival in Lahore Basant, sometimes called Basant panchami in Hindi , is thought to be a festival celebrating the arrival of Spring, although some trace its background as a Hindu celebration. ...   (Urdu: لاہور, Punjabi: لہور, pronounced ) is the capital of the Punjab and is the second largest city in Pakistan after Karachi. ...


In Guyana, on Easter Weekend thousands turn out for mass kite flying. In the capital city of Georgetown the massive sea wall protecting the city from the Atlantic ocean is filled with throngs of families picnicking and flying kites of all shapes and colors. Many participate in kite flying competitions.


Weifang (Shandong, China) promotes itself as the Kite Capital of the World. It is home to the largest kite museum in the world, which has a display area of 8100 m². Weifang hosts an annual International Kite Festival on the large salt flats south of the city. There are several kite museums in Japan and others in England, Malaysia, Indonesia, Taiwan, Thailand and the USA. Dongfeng Street in Downtown Weifang Weifang (潍坊; Pinyin: Wéifāng) is an important city in central Shandong province, China. ...


Whether kite flying is a once a year holiday activity, as in Greece, or a religious symbol, as in Japan, kite fighting is woven into many cultures.


Popular Culture

This article is about the novel. ... Khaled Hosseini (Persian: خالد حسینی)(IPA pronunciation: [1])(born March 4, 1965) is an Tajik-American novelist and physician,who is an ethnic Tajik from Afghanistan. ... For other places with the same name, see Kabul (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ... This article is about the character from Peanuts. ...

General Safety Issues

There are safety issues involved in kite-flying, more so with power kites. Kite lines can strike and tangle on electrical power lines, causing power blackouts and running the risk of electrocuting the kite flier. Wet kite lines or wire can act as a conductor for static electricity and lightning when the weather is stormy. Kites with large surface areas or powerful lift can lift the kite flier off the ground or drag them into stationary objects. In urban areas there is usually a ceiling on how high a kite can be flown, to prevent the kite and line infringing on the airspace of helicopters and light aircraft. In Asia the twine is coated with powdered glass to cut opponent's lines and these threads have been reported to have killed pedestrians or motorcyclists.[6][7] For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ...


Types of Kites

A simple geometric kite with a tail.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (732x1786, 130 KB) Summary A picture I took of a simple, cheap geometric kite with a tail. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (732x1786, 130 KB) Summary A picture I took of a simple, cheap geometric kite with a tail. ... Bow kites are LEI kites that incorporate a bridle on the leading edge. ... Some kites such as Japanese Rokkaku kites are tensioned into a bow in order to improve their stability to the point where a tail often becomes unnecessary. ... Diagram of Box kite Hargrave (seated) and Swain demonstrate the Hargrave box kite, November 1894. ... Fighter kites are kites that are used for kite fighting. ... Foil kites are soft kites. ... The Indoor kite was developed from low-wind kites as ultralight modern kitemaking materials became available. ... A parafoil is a nonrigid airfoil, designed with an aerodynamically inflated cell structure. ... A stunt kite, also known as a sport kite, is a special type of kite flown on two or four control lines that allows the user to perform acrobatic maneouvers such as spins, axels and loops. ... A tetrahedral kite is a multicelled rigid box kite composed of tetrahedrally shaped cells. ...

Types of Kite Line

For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... The term plastics covers a range of synthetic or semi-synthetic organic condensation or polymerization products that can be molded or extruded into objects or films or fibers. ... Dyneema or Spectra is a synthetic fiber based on ultra high molecular weight polyethylene which is 15 times stronger than steel and up to 40% stronger than Kevlar. ... U.S. Marihuana production permit. ... Kevlars molecular structure; BOLD: monomer unit; DASHED: hydrogen bonds. ... Torn linen cloth, recovered from the Dead Sea Linen is a material made from the fibers of the flax plant. ... For other uses of this word, see nylon (disambiguation). ... SEM picture of a bend in a high surface area polyester fiber with a seven-lobed cross section Polyester (aka Terylene) is a category of polymers which contain the ester functional group in their main chain. ... Rayon is a manufactured regenerated cellulosic fiber. ... For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ...

See also

The Bali Kite Festival is an annual international kite festival held in July in Padang Galak area, Sanur Beach, Bali. ... Power kites at Coche, Venezuela Kitesurfing in the Columbia River Gorge Kitesurfers use power kites tethered to harnesses to glide through water and air Kitesurfing, also known as kiteboarding, involves using a power kite to pull a rider through the water on a small surfboard or a kiteboard (a wakeboard... Kite buggying, also known as kitebuggying, involves using a power kite to pull a Kite buggy (purpose-built 3-wheeled cart). ... Kite landboarding also known as Kiteboarding or Land kiteboarding or flyboarding, is based on the ever-growing sport of Kitesurfing, where a rider on a surf-style board is pulled over water by a kite. ... The term Windsports refers to wind powered recreation, usually including any sporting use of a nonrigid airfoil, such as a power kite or parafoil. ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into aerostat. ... A captive helicopter is a helicopter, which is as a captive balloon with a rope toward the ground. ... A captive plane is a modell plane, which does not fly free, but is hold like a kite by a rope from the pilote. ... A kite showing its equal sides and its inscribed circle. ... Hang gliding is one of the windsports. ... The kite generator is a new wind-power concept under development in Italy. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Needham, Volume 4, Part 1, 127.
  2. ^ a b c d e (2007). In Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved March 29, 2007, from Encyclopedia Britannica Online
  3. ^ Skysail ship pulling system
  4. ^ Kite.(2007) Encyclopedia Britannica Online
  5. ^ The Kite Maker. (2007) Time Magazine.
  6. ^ Kite deaths mar Pakistan festival
  7. ^ Pakistan tackles killer kites By Shahid Malik

External links

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Ocean City Kites | Kite Flying On the Beach in Ocean City Maryland (448 words)
A wide selection of kites and kite accessories are available at department, hobby, and toy stores.
There have been kites for thousands of years of world history and kiting is found among many cultures.
With a wide variety of kite types, shapes and sizes, and each one flying differently from the others, you can try one or try all.
Kite Traction (5237 words)
Kites have been used to pull large sailing ships from wind sheltered harbors; experimental "war" kites were used to lift scouts into the air to guide artillery shells.
Kite lore tells that in China, kites were used to predict the fortune of a voyage.
Apparent wind is the wind the kite or sail 'feels' which is the vector, speed and direction, sum of the true wind and the velocity of the kite or sail.
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