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Encyclopedia > Kipchak language

The Kipchak language was an extinct Turkic language of Kipchak-Bolghar group. This is the disambiguation page for the terms Turk, Turkey, Turkic, and Turkish. ...


The descendants of the Kipchak language are the most of Turkic languges (such as Crimean Tatar) in Eastern Europe and Caucasus as this language was a lingua franca in Golden Horde ruled lands. The Crimean Tatar language or Crimean-Turkish (in its own script: Qırımtatar tili, Qırım Tatar dili resp. ... Lingua franca, literally Frankish language in Italian, was originally a mixed language consisting largely of Italian plus a vocabulary drawn from Turkish, Persian, French, Greek and Arabic and used for communication throughout the Middle East. ... This article refers to the Mongol state in what is now Russia. ...


Siberian Tatars was remaints of Eastern Kipchak tribes lived in Northern Kazakhstan in 10th century, but migrated to Europe later. So, their language originate from pure Kipchak, but later was influenced by Volga Tatar language, which also partly originates from Kipchak. The Native Western Siberian Tatars (200,000) is an ethnos or part of the Tatar ethnos (disputed). ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... The Tatar language (Tatar tele, Tatarça) is an Turkic language belonging to the Altaic branch of the Ural-Altaic family of languages. ...


Bolgar language-speaking Volga Bulgarians (or Kazan Tatars), Astrakhan Tatars, Balkars, Bashkirs and Mongolian aristocracy adopted to Kipchak language in Golden Hord. Later, modern Tatar language of Kazan Tatars and other languages appeared. Bolgar (also Bolğar), the language of the Bulgars, was a language, now extinct, whose classification is unknown. ... Volga Bulgaria or Volga-Kama Bolghar, is a historic state that existed between the 7th and 13th centuries around the confluence of the Volga and Kama rivers in what is now the Russian Federation. ... Tatars or Tartars is a collective name applied to the Turkic-speaking people of Europe and Asia. ... The Balkar (малкъар /malqar/balqar) people are a Turkic people of the Caucasus region, the titular population of Kabardino-Balkaria. ... The Bashkirs, a Turkic people, live in Russia, mostly in the republic of Bashkortostan. ... The Tatar language (Tatar tele, Tatarça) is an Turkic language belonging to the Altaic branch of the Ural-Altaic family of languages. ... Tatars or Tartars is a collective name applied to the Turkic-speaking people of Europe and Asia. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Kipchaks - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (552 words)
The western Kipchaks was known as Cumans (Kuman, Kuns) in Western Europe and Polovtsy (Polovtsians) in Russia and Ukraine, or by other names, most of which have the meaning "pale", or "sallow".
Kipchaks were a conferderation of pastoralists and warriors of Turkic origin who lived in yurts (movable tents), known in Russian as Polovtsi, coming from the region of the River Irtysh.
The Kipchak spoke a Turkic language whose most important surviving record is the Codex Cumanicus, a late 13th-century dictionary of words in Kipchak and Latin.
Kipchak language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (136 words)
The Kipchak language (also spelled Qypchaq) is an extinct Turkic language of the Kipchak group.
The descendants of the Kipchak language include the majority of Turkic languages spoken in Eastern Europe and the Caucasus today, as Kipchak was used as a lingua franca in Golden Horde-ruled lands.
Kazakhs are remnants of Eastern Kipchak tribes who lived in Northern Kazakhstan in the 10th century, but migrated to Europe later.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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