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Encyclopedia > Kiosk
a pagoda-like kiosk in Lausanne.
a pagoda-like kiosk in Lausanne.
Kiosks like this one in Patmos can be found all over Greece.
Kiosks like this one in Patmos can be found all over Greece.
Kiosks like this one were found all over Romania from 1959 till 1989
Kiosks like this one were found all over Romania from 1959 till 1989
A kiosk in Constantinople, the Ottoman Empire in 19th century

In the Mediterranean Basin and the Near East, a kiosk (Turkish Köşk; Persian كوشك Kushk; French Kiosque) is a small, separated garden pavilion open on some or all sides. Kiosks were common in Persia, India, and in the Ottoman Empire from the 13th century onward. Today, there are many kiosks in and around the Topkapi Palace in Istanbul, and they are still a relatively common sight in Greece. Turkish kiosks are usually polygonal. Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 896 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 896 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A pagoda at Sibu, Sarawak, Malaysia A pagoda is the general term in the English language for a tiered tower with multiple eaves common in China, Japan, Korea, and other parts of Asia. ... Lausanne is a city in the French-speaking part of Switzerland, situated on the shores of Lake Geneva (French: Lac Léman), and facing Évian-les-Bains (France) and with the Jura hills to its north. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1045 KB)A kiosk in Skala, Patmos, Greece, July 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1045 KB)A kiosk in Skala, Patmos, Greece, July 2005. ... Skala viewed from the Monastery of Agios Ioannis Theologos, one of the UN World Heritage Sites. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 521 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kiosk Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 521 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kiosk Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File links Turkish_Figures_Before_a_Kiosk,_Preziosi. ... Image File history File links Turkish_Figures_Before_a_Kiosk,_Preziosi. ... The Mediterranean Basin refers to the lands around and surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea. ... The Near East is a term commonly used by archaeologists, geographers and historians, less commonly by journalists and commentators, to refer to the region encompassing the Levant (modern Israel, Jordan, Syria and Lebanon), Turkey, Mesopotamia (Iraq and eastern Syria). ... Persian is an Indo-European language spoken in Iran, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Bahrain, Iraq, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... A garden is a planned space, usually outdoors, set aside for the display, cultivation, and enjoyment of plants and other forms of nature. ... Pavilion may refer to a type of building: Pavilion (structure) or to a specific building: Pavilion, New York London Pavilion Royal Pavilion Balboa Pavilion Pavilion is a brand name of computers and notebooks made by Hewlett-Packard. ... Motto: Persian: Esteqlāl, āzādÄ«, jomhÅ«rÄ«-ye eslāmÄ« (English: Independence, freedom, (the) Islamic Republic)[citation needed] Anthem: SorÅ«d-e MellÄ«-e Īrān Capital Tehran Largest city Tehran Official language(s) Persian (Farsi) Government Islamic Republic  - Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei  - President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad Revolution Overthrew Monarchy... now. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Topkapı Palace (Topkapı Sarayı in Turkish, literally the Cannongate Palace - named after a nearby gate), located in Istanbul (Constantinople), was the administrative center of the Ottoman Empire from 1465 to 1853. ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural, and economic centre. ... Look up Polygon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


During the 18th century, Turkish influences in Europe established the kiosk (gazebo) as an important feature in European gardens. The word, which is of Turkish origin, refers to an object that acts as a shadow or shade-maker. In fact, more detailed etymological studies reveal that the word "köşk" has the same ancient root as the Turkish word for shadow ("gölge"). (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... World map showing Europe Political map (neighboring countries in Asia and Africa also shown) Europe is one of the seven traditional continents of the Earth. ... A large gazebo on the grounds of Iolani Palace, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA A gazebo inside the spacious Singapore Botanic Gardens A gazebo is a pavilion structure commonly found in parks, gardens, and spacious public areas. ...


The word "köşk" is currently used to refer to an old Ottoman style building, made of wood and clad with natural stones, with multiple stories, mainly used as a summer or winter recreational residence for the wealthy within the old Ottoman Imperial Palace.


In English-speaking countries, a kiosk is a booth with an open window on one side. Some vendors operate from kiosks, selling small, inexpensive consumables such as newspapers, magazines, lighters, street maps, cigarettes, and confections. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A collection of magazines A magazine is a periodical publication containing a variety of articles, generally financed by advertising and/or purchase by readers. ... A metal naphtha lighter A lighter is a device used to create fire with the intent to ignite another substance such as a cigarette, smoking pipe, bong, hookah or charcoal in a grill. ... A map is a simplified depiction of a space, a navigational aid which highlights relations between objects within that space. ... A lit cigarette will burn to ash on one end. ... The term confectionery refers to food items rich in sugar. ...


An information kiosk (or information booth) dispenses free information in the form of maps, pamphlets, and other literature, and/or advice offered by an attendant. Polish soldiers reading a German leaflet during the Warsaw Uprising A pamphlet is an unbound booklet (that is, without a hard cover or binding). ...


An electronic kiosk (or computer kiosk or interactive kiosk) houses a computer terminal that often employs custom kiosk software designed to function flawlessly while preventing users from accessing system functions. Indeed, kiosk mode is a euphemism for such a mode of software operation. Computerized kiosks may store data locally, or retrieve it from a computer network. Some computer kiosks provide a free, informational public service, while others serve a commercial purpose. Touchscreens, trackballs, computer keyboards, and pushbuttons are all typical input devices for interactive computer kiosk. An Internet kiosk with a touchscreen in Vienna, Austria in 2005 An Interactive kiosk is a computer terminal that provides information access via electronic methods. ... Kiosk software is the system and user interface software designed for a kiosk or Internet kiosk. ... A euphemism is an expression intended by the speaker to be less offensive, disturbing, or troubling to the listener than the word or phrase it replaces, or in the case of doublespeak to make it less troublesome for the speaker. ... In general, data consist of propositions that reflect reality. ... A computer network is a system for communication between computers. ... Podium touchscreen Touchscreens, touch screens, touch panels or touchscreen panels are display overlays which are typically either pressure-sensitive (resistive), electrically-sensitive (capacitive), acoustically-sensitive (SAW - surface acoustic wave) or photo-sensitive (infra-red). ... Logitech Marble Mouse Trackball A trackball is a pointing device consisting of a ball housed in a socket containing sensors to detect rotation of the ball about two axes—like an upside-down mouse, but with the ball sticking out more. ... A computer keyboard is a peripheral modeled after the typewriter keyboard. ... A number of devices, called input devices, are used for entering data into a machine, typically a computer. ... In the fields of information science, communication, and industrial design, there is debate over the meaning of Interactivity. ...

Contents

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History and Origins of the Kiosk

The kiosk can be defined as an open summer-house or pavillion usually having its roof supported by pillars with screened or totally open walls. As a building type it was first introduced by the Seljuks as a small building attached to the main mosque, which consisted of a domed hall with open arched sides. This architectural concept gradually evolved into a small yet grand residence used by Ottoman sultans, the most famous examples of which are quite possibly the Chinili Kiosk ("Çinili Köşk" in Turkish) and Baghdad Kiosk ("Bağdat Köşkü" in Turkish). The former was built in 1473 by Mehmed II ("the Conqueror") at the Topkapi Palace, Istanbul, and consists of a two storey building topped with a dome and having open sides overlooking the gardens of the palace. The Baghdad Koshk was also built at the Topkapi Palace in 1638-39, by Sultan Murad 4th. The building is again domed, offering direct views onto the gardens and park of the Palace as well as the architecture of the city of Istanbul. The Seljuk Turks (Turkish: Selçuk; Arabic: سلجوق Saljūq, السلاجقة al-Salājiqa; Persian: سلجوقيان Saljūqiyān; also Seldjuk, Seldjuq, Seljuq) were a major branch of... now. ... Mehmed II (also known as el-Fatih (الفاتح), the Conqueror, in Ottoman Turkish, or, in modern Turkish, Fatih Sultan Mehmet) (March 30, 1432 – May 3, 1481) (Arabic: محمد الثاني) was first the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire for a short time from 1444 to 1446, and later from 1451 to 1481. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Sultan Ahmed III (1703-1730) also built a glass room of the Sofa Kiosk at the Topkapi Palace incorporating some Western elements, such as the gilded brazier designed by the elder John Claude Duplessis which was given to the Ottoman Ambassador by King Louis 15th. Sultan Ahmed III Köçeks at a fair. ...


The first English contact with Turkish Kiosk came through Lady Wortley Montagu (1689-1762), the wife of the English ambassador to Constantinople, who in a letter written in 1 April 1717 to Anne Thistlethwayte, mentions a “chiosk” describing it as ‘raised by 9 or 10 steps and enclosed with gilded lattices” (Halsband, 1965 ed.). Historic sources confirm the transfer of these kiosks to European monarchs. The king of Poland, and the father in law of Louis 15th, Stanilsas of Lorraine built kiosks for himself based on his memories of his captivity in Turkey. These kiosks were used as garden pavilions serving coffee and beverages but later were converted into band stands and tourist information stands decorating most European gardens, parks and high streets.

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From Kiosk to Conservatory

From the kiosk evolved also the so called conservatories, glass rooms erected in gardens of most of European houses. Historic sources indicate that the earliest conservatories were perhaps those made by Humphry Repton for the Royal Pavilion at Brighton. These early conservatories were in the form of corridors connecting the Pavilion to the stables and consisting of a passage of flowers covered with glass and linked with orangery, a greenhouse, an aviary, a pheasantry and hothouses. The influence of Muslim and Islamo-Indian forms appears clearly in these buildings and particularly in the pheasantry where its higher part was an adaptation of the kiosks found on the roof of Allahabad Palace and illustrated by Thomas Daniell. Today’s conservatories still incorporate many Muslim elements, although modern art forms have shifted from the classical motifs. Surroundings of Allahabad, India. ... Thomas Daniell (1749-March 19, 1840) was an English landscape painter. ...

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Sources

  • Halsband, R. (1965 edn.), ‘The complete letters of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu’, Clarendon Press, Oxford.
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See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Kiosk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (866 words)
Kiosks like this one in Patmos can be found all over Greece.
Kiosks were common in Persia, India, and in the Ottoman Empire from the 13th century onward.
Sultan Ahmed III (1703-1730) also built a glass room of the Sofa Kiosk at the Topkapi Palace incorporating some Western elements, such as the gilded brazier designed by the elder John Claude Duplessis which was given to the Ottoman Ambassador by King Louis 15th.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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