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Encyclopedia > Kingston upon Hull
City of Kingston upon Hull
Victoria Square, Hull

Crest
Hull shown within England
The unitary authorities of the Ceremonial East Riding.
1. East Riding of Yorkshire (Unitary)

2. Kingston upon Hull (Unitary) Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 465 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike License v. ... Victoria Square is the name of several public squares around the world. ... Image File history File links 3-crowns. ... One of the admnistrative counties of England File links The following pages link to this file: Kingston upon Hull Categories: GFDL images ... Image File history File links East_Riding_Ceremonial_Numbered. ...

Coordinates: 53°43′N 0°20′W / 53.717, -0.333
Sovereign state Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
Constituent country Flag of England England
Region Yorkshire and the Humber
Ceremonial county East Riding of Yorkshire
Admin HQ Kingston upon Hull
Founded 12th Century
City Status 1897
Government
 - Type Unitary authority, City
 - Governing body Hull City Council
 - Leadership: Leader & Cabinet
 - Executive: Liberal Democrat
 - MPs: Alan Johnson (L)
Diana Johnson (L)
John Prescott (L)
Area
 - Unitary & City 27.6 sq mi (71.45 km²)
Population (2005 est / Urban 2006)
 - Unitary & City 249,100 (Ranked 39th)
 - Density 9,028.7/sq mi (3,486/km²)
 - Ethnicity
(2001 Census)
97.7% White
Time zone Greenwich Mean Time (UTC+0)
Postcode Area HU
Area code(s) (01482)
ISO 3166-2 GB-KHL
ONS code 00FA
Website: www.hull.gov.uk

Kingston upon Hull, more usually referred to simply as Hull, is a city and unitary authority in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. It is located on the north bank of the Humber estuary, near the east coast, and on both sides of the River Hull, which flows into the Humber. Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia[1], the Soviet Union and European institutions such as the Council of... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... Yorkshire and the Humber is one of the regions of England. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... The East Riding of Yorkshire is a local government district with unitary authority status, and a ceremonial county of England. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... Hull City Council is a unitary authority council, covering the the whole of the city of Kingston upon Hull. ... The United Kingdom is divided into four parts, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... Liberal democracy is a form of representative democracy where elected representatives that hold the decision power are moderated by a constitution that emphasizes protecting individual liberties and the rights of minorities in society, such as freedom of speech and assembly, freedom of religion, the right to private property and privacy... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... Alan Arthur Johnson MP (born 17 May 1950, London) is a British Labour Party politician. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Diana Johnson (b. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... John Leslie Prescott (born 31 May 1938) is a British Labour Party politician, former Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Secretary of State and current Member of Parliament for the constituency of Hull East. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005 from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of English cities by population - List of English counties by population - List of Ceremonial counties of England by Population - List of English districts by area - List of English districts by ethnic diversity... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing summer time Greenwich Mean Time (Media:Example. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The HU postcode area, also known as the Hull postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts around Beverley, Brough, Cottingham, Hessle, Hornsea, Hull, North Ferriby and Withernsea in England. ... The ISO 3166-2 codes for the United Kingdom correspond to the nations administrative divisions. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... The East Riding of Yorkshire is a local government district with unitary authority status, and a ceremonial county of England. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... River Hull tidal barrier. ... Rio de la Plata estuary Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Estuaries An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... The River Hull is a river in the East Riding of Yorkshire in the north of England. ...

Contents

History

Since the 12th century, a settlement has existed on this site. It was established as a result of the founding between 1150 and 1179 of the Meaux Abbey in the area. It is said that William le Gros, Earl of Albemarle and founder of the abbey was hunting in the area and decided that the point at which the River Hull met the River Humber was ideally suited for a market and port. Cistercian Abbey founded in 1150 by William le Gros Earl of Albemarle and Count of Aumale the fourth lord of Holderness, near Beverley in East Yorkshire. ...


The town was originally called Wyke (or Wyke-upon-Hull), but in 1293 Edward I, as a consequence of an arrangement between the king and the Abbot of Meaux, Wyke was granted the right to hold a market and fair, was made a manor and a free borough, had a harbour constructed, and had its named changed to Kingston upon Hull ('the King's town upon Hull').[1] Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and who tried to do the same to Scotland. ...


The location became strategically important to the English in conflict with the Scottish in the late 13th century. Edward I selected the site for its ideal proximity to his kingdom's adversary. Kingston-upon-Hull was an advantageous port from which to launch his campaigns, sufficiently deep within the boundaries of England to afford security. The associated royal charter, dated April 1, 1299 remains preserved in Hull's Guildhall Archives. The Wars of Scottish Independence were a series of military campaigns fought between Scotland and England in the late 13th and early 14th centuries. ... This article is about the country. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and who tried to do the same to Scotland. ... A Royal Charter is a charter given by a monarch to legitimize an incorporated body, such as a city, company, university or such. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Osman I declares the independence of the Ottoman Principality The County of Holland is annexed by the County of Hainaut April 1, 1299 Kings Towne on the River Hull granted city status by Royal Charter of King Edward I of England. ...


The charter of 1440, constituted Kingston upon Hull a corporate town and granted that instead of a Mayor and Bailiffs there should be a Mayor, Sheriff and twelve Aldermen who should be Justices of the Peace within the town and county. Hull was a major port during the later Middle Ages and its merchants traded widely to ports in northern Germany, the Baltics and the Low Countries. Wool, cloth and hides were exported, and timber, wine, furs and dyestuffs imported. Leading merchant, Sir William de la Pole, helped establish a family prominent in government. Bishop John Alcock, founder of Jesus College and patron of the grammar school in Hull, hailed from another Hull mercantile family. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Population density in the wider Baltic region. ... It has been suggested that Regents: Low Countries be merged into this article or section. ... William de la Pole is the name of several prominent Englishmen in the 14th century, all from the same family. ... College name The College of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Saint John the Evangelist and the glorious Virgin Saint Radegund, near Cambridge Named after The Virgin Mary Saint John the Evangelist Saint Radegund Jesus Lane and Jesus Parish Established 1496 Location Jesus Lane Admittance Men and women Master Prof. ...


Between the 13th and 16th centuries, Hull was the second port of England (after London), and a sophisticated metropolitan and international city. Its maritime history is thought to have been a key factor in the transmission of syphilis: the earliest evidence of syphilis in medieval Europe is at the site of an Augustinian friary (destroyed 1539) in Hull. This friary provided medical care including palliative care and burial rites for "wretched souls". Carbon-dated skeletons from the friary display bone lesions typical of tertiary venereal syphilis. This casts doubt on the New World origin theory of syphilis. Examination of the friary site revealed bone lesions on two/thirds of the skeletons examined, including those closest to the altar, a position reserved for richer and more generous patrons of the order. This suggests that the privileged of Hull had had syphilis for a long time.[2] Carbon dated skeletons of monks who lived in the friary showed bone lesions typical of venereal syphilis. The find in Hull disputes the assertion that syphilis came from the New World through contact of Christopher Columbus's crew with American natives.[3] Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum. ... Radiocarbon dating is the use of the naturally occurring isotope of carbon-14 in radiometric dating to determine the age of organic materials, up to ca. ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator and maritime explorer credited as the discoverer of the Americas. ...


Hull grew in prosperity and importance during the 16th and early 17th centuries. This is reflected in the construction of a number of fine, distinctively decorated brick buildings of which Wilberforce House (now a museum dedicated to the life of William Wilberforce) is a rare survivor. William Wilberforce (24 August 1759 – 29 July 1833) was a British politician, philanthropist, and abolitionist who led the parliamentary campaign against the slave trade. ...


In 1642 Hull's governor Sir John Hotham declared for the Parliamentarian cause and later refused Charles I entry into the city and access to its large arsenal. He was declared a traitor and despite a parliamentarian pardon was later executed. (He was actually executed by the parliamentarians, not the royalists, when he tried to change sides.) This series of events was to precipitate the English Civil War since Charles I felt obliged to respond to the 'insult' by besieging the city, an event which played a critical role in triggering open conflict between the Parliamentarian and Royalist causes. For some of the Civil War, and for some of the Interregnum, Robert Overton was governor of Hull. Sir John Hotham (d. ... The Roundheads was the nickname given to the supporters of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... The English Civil War consisted of a series of armed conflicts and political machinations that took place between Parliamentarians (known as Roundheads) and Royalists (known as Cavaliers) between 1642 and 1651. ... The Siege of Hull in 1642 was the first major action of the English Civil War. ... Prince Rupert an archetypical cavalier For other uses, see Cavalier (disambiguation). ... The English Interregnum was the period of republican rule after the English Civil War between the regicide of Charles I in 1649 and the restoration of Charles II in 1660. ... Major General Robert Overton (abt 1609–1678) He was a Major General in the New Model Army. ...

Hull in 1866.
Hull in 1866.

Hull developed as a British trade port with mainland Europe. Whaling until the mid 19th century and deep sea fishing until the Anglo-Icelandic Cod War 1975–1976, which resolution led to a major decline in Hull's economic fortune. At one stage it was the "third port" in England, due largely to the success of the Wilson Line of Hull shipping firm, the largest privately owned shipping concern at that time. The significance of this successful firm in Hull is seen by statues in the city centre to the brothers that ran it. It was only when it was sold to John Ellerman in 1915 that it declined and was in correlation with the decline of Hull as a port to rival London and Liverpool. It remains a major port dealing mostly with bulk commodities and commercial road traffic by RORO ferry to Rotterdam and Zeebrugge on mainland Europe. The city remains a UK centre of food processing. Image File history File linksMetadata Hull1866. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Hull1866. ... The crew of the oceanographic research vessel Princesse Alice, of Albert Grimaldi (later Prince Albert I of Monaco) pose while flensing a catch. ... The Cod Wars (also called the Iceland Cod Wars) were a series of confrontations between the United Kingdom and Iceland over Icelands claims of authority over tracts of ocean off their coastline as being their exclusive fishery zone. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... // Sir John Reeves Ellerman, 1st Baronet (1862–1933) was an English shipowner and investor. ... The Pride of Burgundy, a P&O Ferries car ferry on the Dover-Calais route A ferry is a boat or a ship carrying passengers, and possibly their vehicles, on a relatively short-distance, regularly-scheduled service. ... Nickname: Motto: Sterker door strijd (Stronger through Struggle) Location of Rotterdam Coordinates: , Country Netherlands Province South Holland Government  - Mayor Ivo Opstelten  - Aldermen Jeannette Baljeu Hamit Karakus Orhan Kaya Lucas Bolsius Jantine Kriens Dominic Schrijer Roelf de Boer Leonard Geluk Area [1]  - City 319 km²  (123. ... The church of Zeebrugge Zeebrugge (French: Zeebruges) is a harbour-town at the coast of Belgium, a subdivision of Bruges, for which it is the modern port. ...


Because of its docks, industry and proximity to continental Europe, the city sustained particularly significant damage in bombing raids during the Second World War and much of the city centre was devastated. In fact, Hull was the most severely bombed city outside London during World War II, with 95% of houses being damaged or destroyed.[4] Of a population of approximately 320,000 at the beginning of World War II, approximately 192,000 were made homeless as a result of bomb destruction or damage. The worst of the bombing occurred during 1941. Little was known about this destruction by the rest of the country at the time since most of the radio and newspaper reports did not reveal Hull by name but referred to it as a "North-East" town.[5] Most of the centre was rebuilt in the years following the war, but it is only recently that the last of the "temporary" car parks that occupied the spaces of destroyed buildings have been redeveloped. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


2007 flooding

Hull was hit particularly hard by the June 2007 United Kingdom floods, with the local topography resulting in standing water over a wide area affecting 20% of the city's housing and damaging 90 out of its 105 schools. Despite this, the city was largely overlooked by the media, which favoured the more dramatic but localised flooding in Sheffield and Doncaster, leading council leader Carl Minns to declare Hull the "forgotten city" of the floods.[6] Damage to schools alone has been estimated at £100 million.[7] A Pizza Hut restaurant surrounded by flood water in Chesterfield, UK. Two kayakers make their way through a street in Yorkshire. ... Sheffield is a city and metropolitan borough in South Yorkshire, England. ... Doncaster is a town in the English county of South Yorkshire, and the principal settlement of the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in South Yorkshire. ...


Geography

The Tidal Surge Barrier
The Tidal Surge Barrier

Kingston upon Hull is near the east coast of the United Kingdom, on the northern bank of the Humber estuary. The city centre is close to the Humber, making the city roughly semi-circular in shape. The city is surrounded by the rural East Riding of Yorkshire, making it quite isolated from many of the large cities of the United Kingdom, when compared to the large conurbations of West Yorkshire for example. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3888 × 2592 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3888 × 2592 pixel, file size: 2. ... Humber is also the name of one of the ranges of cars manufactured by the Rootes Group Humber is also the name of a river in Newfoundland, Canada, as well as a river and a college, both in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... The East Riding of Yorkshire is a local government district with unitary authority status, and a ceremonial county of England. ... A conurbation is an urban area comprising a number of cities, towns and villages which, through population growth and expansion, have physically merged to form one continuous built up area. ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ...


Much of Hull lies on reclaimed land at or below sea level. The Hull Tidal Surge Barrier is at the point where the River Hull joins the Humber Estuary and is lowered at times when unusually high tides are expected. It is used between 8 and 12 times per year and protects approximately 10,000 people from flooding.[8] Due to its low level, Hull is expected to be at increasing levels of risk from flooding due to global warming.[9]


The boundaries of the city are tightly drawn and exclude many of the nearby villages which make up the larger metropolitan area. Cottingham is the largest of these. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cottingham is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. ...


Administration

Hull's administrative status has changed several times. It was a county borough within the East Riding of Yorkshire from 1889 and in 1974 it became a non-metropolitan district of Humberside. When that county was abolished in 1996 it was made a unitary authority. County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... East Yorkshire Holderness Kingston upon Hull Beverley Boothferry Scunthorpe Glanford Great Grimsby Cleethorpes The Arms of Humberside County Council Humberside was a non-metropolitan county of England from April 1, 1974 until April 1, 1996. ...


The governing body of the city is now Hull City Council. The council was designated as the UK's worst performing authority in both 2004 and 2005, but is now rated as a two star improving adequately council after its recent corporate performance assessment. [10] The Liberal Democrats won overall control of the City Council in the 2007 local elections, ending several years where no single party had a majority.[11] Hull City Council is a unitary authority council, covering the the whole of the city of Kingston upon Hull. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Entrance to a polling station in the market town of Haverhill, Suffolk on 3 May 2007. ...


Twinning

Hull is twinned with:

and is sistered with Image File history File links Flag_of_Sierra_Leone. ... For other cities of the same name, see Freetown (disambiguation). ...

Hull, Massachusetts in the USA is named after this city, as is Hull, Quebec, which is part of the Canadian national capital region. Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Niigata ) is the capital and the most populous city of Niigata Prefecture, Japan. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Motto: You Can See the Whole State from Here Map of Wake County, North Carolina Coordinates: , Country United States State North Carolina County Wake County Founded 1792 Government  - Mayor Charles Meeker (D) Area  - City  134. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iceland. ... Location in Iceland Coordinates: , Constituency Reykjavík North Reykjavík South Government  - Mayor (Borgarstjóri) Vilhjálmur Þ. Vilhjálmsson Area  - City 274. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Nickname: Motto: Sterker door strijd (Stronger through Struggle) Location of Rotterdam Coordinates: , Country Netherlands Province South Holland Government  - Mayor Ivo Opstelten  - Aldermen Jeannette Baljeu Hamit Karakus Orhan Kaya Lucas Bolsius Jantine Kriens Dominic Schrijer Roelf de Boer Leonard Geluk Area [1]  - City 319 km²  (123. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Hull is a town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States. ... Hull, Québec, as seen from Ottawa Hull is part of the city of Gatineau, Quebec, Canada. ...


Economy

Industry

Hull is a very busy port, with 18.5% of UK imports and 15% of the UK's seaborne trade passing through in 2004.[12] Seaport, a painting by Claude Lorrain, 1638 The Port of Wellington at night. ...


Hull is also home to some major industries and well known British brands, such as BP, Croda International, Smith & Nephew, Reckitt Benckiser, BAe Systems and Seven Seas. BP plc (LSE: BP), NYSE: BP, TYO: 5051 ), formerly known as British Petroleum, is a British energy company / multinational oil company (oil major) with headquarters in London. ... Croda International plc is a chemicals company based in Yorkshire in northern England. ... Smith & Nephew is a British medical devices company headquartered in London and active internationally. ... Reckitt Benckiser plc is one of the worlds leading manufacturers of cleaning products and a member of the FTSE 100 Index of the largest companies traded on the London Stock Exchange. ...

Princes Quay Shopping Centre built over Princes Dock.
Princes Quay Shopping Centre built over Princes Dock.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1029x539, 110 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kingston upon Hull Princes Quay ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1029x539, 110 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kingston upon Hull Princes Quay ... Princes Quay shopping centre over Princes Dock, Hull. ...

Shopping

There are two large shopping centres in Hull - the Prospect Centre and Princes Quay Shopping Centre, the latter of which is built on stilts in the former Princes Dock. There is also a new Vue cinema due for completion autumn 2007. The indoor Trinity Market features around fifty stalls and is situated next to the city's Holy Trinity Church. Due for completion in Autumn 2007, the new St. Stephen's development will also become home to several large stores, including Zara, H&M, Next, Oasis, and Topshop, whilst the Quay West development due for completion in 2010 will see Prince's Quay extended with another 60 shops and two new department stores (John Lewis and Debenhams are tipped to lease these) and other leisure facilities. Princes Quay shopping centre over Princes Dock, Hull. ... Vue company logo Vue is a cinema company in Ireland and the UK. The company was formed in May 2003 when SBC International Cinemas bought Warner Village Cinemas. ... St. ...


Shops in Hull took £484m between April 2006 and 2007. A rise of £13m over the previous 12 month period. [1]


Statistics

This is a chart of trend of regional gross value added of Kingston-upon-Hull at current basic prices published (pp.240-253) by Office for National Statistics with figures in millions of British Pounds Sterling.

Year Regional Gross Value Added1 Agriculture2 Industry3 Services4
1995 2,748 5 1,014 1,729
2000 3,231 3 1,205 2,023
2003 3,711 6 1,406 2,299

1 Components may not sum to totals due to rounding
2 includes hunting and forestry
3 includes energy and construction
4 includes financial intermediation services indirectly measured


Demographics

According to the 2001 UK census, Hull had a population of 253,400, a decline of 5.3% since the 1991 UK census. The population figure has subsequently been re-estimated to 249,100 as of July 2005.[13] For many years Hull was one of the least racially diverse cities in England, however in recent years large numbers of foreigners have come to the city as refugees, students or workers. Census 2001 is the name by which the national census conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001 is known. ...


Education

Universities

Kingston upon Hull is home to the University of Hull, which was founded in 1927. There are 16,000 students in attendance.[14] Associated with the university is the Hull York Medical School (HYMS), which took its first intake of students in 2003 as a part of the British government's attempts to train more doctors. The Venn Building The University of Hull, also known as Hull University, is an English university located in Hull (or Kingston upon Hull), a city in the East Riding of Yorkshire. ... The Hull York Medical School (HYMS) is a medical school in the United Kingdom which took its first intake of students in 2003. ...


The University of Lincoln grew out of the University of Humberside, a former polytechnic which was based in Hull. Through the 1990s the focus of the institution moved to nearby Lincoln, where the administrative headquarters and management moved to in 2001. Since then the main campus has been sold to the University of Hull and now contains the Faculty of Health & Social Care, Business School and the Hull York Medical School. The University of Lincoln retains a small campus in Hull city centre. This page is about the British university. ... The term polytechnic, from the Greek πολύ polú meaning many and τεχνικός tekhnikós meaning arts, is commonly used in many countries to describe an institution that delivers vocational or technical education and training, other countries do not use the term and use alternative terminology. ... Lincoln (pronounced //) is a cathedral city and county town of Lincolnshire, England. ...


Schools

There are over 100 local schools, including the independent Hymers College and Hull Collegiate School (Formed by the joining of Hull Grammar School and Hull High School in September 2005). There is a large further education college, Hull College and two large sixth form colleges, Wyke College and Wilberforce College. The following is a partial list of currently operating schools in the Yorkshire and Humber region of England. ... Hymers College is a co-educational independent school located on the site of the old Botanic Gardens of Hull, Yorkshire, England. ... Further education (often abbreviated FE) is post-secondary, post-compulsory education (in addition to that received at secondary school). ... A sixth form college is an educational institution in England, Wales or Northern Ireland where students aged 16 to 18 complete post-compulsary further education qualifications, such as A Levels. ...


Hull has had low examination success rates for many years and was often found near the bottom of government league tables. This, however, is a problem that many large inner-city Local Education Authorities have. In 2006, Hull’s secondary schools’ examination succession rate rocketed by 75% from 28.9% of pupils achieving 5 or more GCSEs with grades of C or higher in 2004 to more than 50%, bringing Hull close to the national average. This was partly due to a major restructuring of Hull's secondary education system, which involved several closures, mergers and the construction of an entirely new school. In common with many other regions, the number of pupils passing five GCSEs dropped when the system was changed to count only those pupils passing English and Maths as part of the five. Trinity House school situated in Myntongate is one of the oldest Guilds and the oldest presea training school in the UK. A Local Education Authority (LEA) is the part of a council in England or Wales that is responsible for education within that councils jurisdiction. ...


Religion

Holy Trinty Church - Hull.
Holy Trinty Church - Hull.

Hull is in the Diocese of York and has a Suffragan Bishop. In 2001, the city had the lowest church attendance in the United Kingdom.[15] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 479 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (799 × 1000 pixel, file size: 159 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 479 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (799 × 1000 pixel, file size: 159 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Diocese of York is an administrative division of the Church of England, part of the Province of York. ... A suffragan bishop is a bishop subordinate to a metropolitan bishop. ...


Unlike many other ancient English cities, Hull has no cathedral. It does, however, contain Holy Trinity Church, which is the largest parish church in England when floor area is the measurement for comparison. Other churches, such as St Nicholas's in Great Yarmouth, are larger when other measurements are taken. The church dates back to about 1300[16] and contains what is widely acknowledged to be some of the finest mediæval brick-work in the country, particularly in the transepts. For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... Holy Trinty Church The alter Holy Trinty Church The font Holy Trinty Church Holy Trinity Church is an Anglican parish church in the centre of Kingston upon Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, England. ... A parish church is the church which acts as the religious centre of a parish, the basic administrative unit of episcopal churches. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II... Great Yarmouth, often known to locals simply as Yarmouth, is an English coastal town in the county of Norfolk. ...


There are several seamen's missions and churches based in Hull. The Mission to Seafarers has a centre at West King George Dock. The St Nikolaj Danish Seamen's Church is located at 104 Osborne Street, Hull and has services (in Danish) every Sunday. The Mission to Seafarers (formerly, The Missions to Seamen) is an international Anglican mission serving mariners and sailors through chapels in over 300 ports around the world. ...


Transport and infrastructure

The Humber Bridge from the south side
The Humber Bridge from the south side

The main route into and out of Hull by road is the M62 motorway, which is one of the main east-west routes in northern England. It provides a link to the cities of Liverpool, Manchester and Leeds as well as the rest of the country via the UK motorway network. The motorway itself ends some distance from the city; the rest of the way is along the dual carriageway A63. The east-west route forms a small part of the European road route E20. Humber Bridge from south side. ... Humber Bridge from south side. ... The Humber Bridge is the fourth-largest single-span suspension bridge in the world, near Kingston upon Hull in England. ... The route of the M62, in dark blue. ... The A63 is a major road in Yorkshire, England. ... From west to east: Shannon Airport - Limerick - Dublin . ...


The city's rail terminus is Hull Paragon railway station. Services are provided to the rest of the UK, including direct services to London, provided by Hull Trains. Hull Paragon railway station is the main railway station in Kingston-upon-Hull, England. ... ^ Pick up northbound, set down southbound; selected weekday services only Hull Trains is a train operating company in the United Kingdom, running up to seven long distance services each day between London Kings Cross and Hull. ...


Transport within the city is provided by two main bus operators: Stagecoach in Hull and East Yorkshire Motor Services. A smaller operator, Alpha Bus and Coach, provides one of the two Park and Ride services in the city, whilst East Yorkshire Motor Services provide the other. Generally, routes within the city are operated by Stagecoach and those which leave the city are operated by EYMS. Stagecoach in Hull is the sector of the Stagecoach Group that operates buses in Kingston Upon Hull, UK. // Services Stagecoach provide mainly local services within the City Boundary, with the addition of X62 service to Leeds,West Yorkshire and services to Wawne, Cottingham, and Hedon, all in the East Riding... East Yorkshire Motor Services (EYMS) operates a fleet of approximately 350 buses and coaches throughout Kingston Upon Hull, East Yorkshire, the North Yorkshire coast and North York Moors. ... a park-and-ride bus in Oxford Park and ride terminals are public transport stations that allow commuters to drive short distances in their personal automobiles to catch a ride on a bus or railroad system (usually classified as light rail or the heavier commuter rail). ...


The new St Stephen's development will integrate Hull's bus and railway stations into one structure. The combination is expected to see 24,000 people passing through each day.[17] The development will also include shopping and leisure facilities along with car parking space. It is currently under construction and is expected to be completed in 2007 at a cost of £160 million.


P&O Ferries provide daily overnight ferry services from King George Dock in Hull to Zeebrugge and Rotterdam. Services to Rotterdam are worked by ferries Pride of Rotterdam and Pride of Hull, the largest ferries operating in the United Kingdom. P&O Ferry Pride of Rotterdam one of the Hull-Rotterdam sister flagships of P&O Ferries P&O Ferries (formerly P&O European Ferries) is a constituent company of DP World (which took over its parent company, the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company (P&O) in March 2006). ... The church of Zeebrugge Zeebrugge (French: Zeebruges) is a harbour-town at the coast of Belgium, a subdivision of Bruges, for which it is the modern port. ... Nickname: Motto: Sterker door strijd (Stronger through Struggle) Location of Rotterdam Coordinates: , Country Netherlands Province South Holland Government  - Mayor Ivo Opstelten  - Aldermen Jeannette Baljeu Hamit Karakus Orhan Kaya Lucas Bolsius Jantine Kriens Dominic Schrijer Roelf de Boer Leonard Geluk Area [1]  - City 319 km²  (123. ... The Pride of Rotterdam (along with its Sister Ship The Pride of Hull) is P&O Ferries flagship of the fleet and is one of the worlds largest ferries, working the route between the ports of Hull and Rotterdam. ...


The nearest airport is in Lincolnshire, Humberside Airport, which mostly provides charter flights and also has four KLM scheduled flights to Amsterdam and Aberdeen each day. Doncaster/Sheffield airport is within one hour's drive of the city and provides low cost flights to many European destinations. Humberside Airport (IATA: HUY, ICAO: EGNJ) is situated in North Lincolnshire, England, 10 nautical miles (18. ... KLM Royal Dutch Airlines (in full: Koninklijke Luchtvaart Maatschappij, literally Royal Aviation Company; usual English: Royal Dutch Airlines) is a subsidiary of Air France-KLM. Prior to its merger with Air France, KLM was the national airline of the Netherlands. ...


Hull has the most 20 miles per hour zones and speed bumps in the UK, in an attempt to increase safety in its residential areas.[citation needed]


Hull is close to the Humber Bridge, which provides road links to destinations south of the Humber. The bridge was constructed between 1972 and 1981 and at the time was the longest single-span suspension bridge in the world. It is now fourth in the list.[18] Prior to construction of the bridge those wishing to cross the Humber could either take a ferry or travel inland as far as Goole. The Humber Bridge is the fourth-largest single-span suspension bridge in the world, near Kingston upon Hull in England. ... River Hull tidal barrier. ... The Goole skyline showing the docks and the salt and pepper pots - the twin water towers Goole is a town, civil parish and port located on the River Ouse in the East Riding of Yorkshire, in northeast England. ...


Telephone system

A Kingston Communications K6 telephone box in Hull, without the Royal Crown of its national counterparts
A Kingston Communications K6 telephone box in Hull, without the Royal Crown of its national counterparts

Hull is the only city in the UK with its own independent telephone network company, Kingston Communications. Its distinctive cream telephone boxes can be seen across the city. The company was formed in 1902 as a municipal department by the City Council and is a fine example of municipal enterprise. It remains the only locally operated telephone company in the UK, although it is now privatised. Initially Hull City Council retained a 44.9 per cent interest in the company and used the proceeds from the sale of shares to fund the city's sports venue, the KC Stadium, amongst other things. On 24 May 2007 they sold their remaining stake in the company for over £107 million.[19] Image File history File links White_payphone. ... Image File history File links White_payphone. ... K2 red telephone boxes behind Enzo Plazzottas bronze, Young Dancer, on Broad Street, Covent Garden, London A K6 red telephone box in Oxford The red telephone box, a public telephone kiosk designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, was a once familiar sight on the streets of the United Kingdom. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Kingston Communications PLC is a telecommunications provider based in Kingston upon Hull serving primarily the East Yorkshire area. ... A classic UK red telephone box. ... Kingston Communications Stadium or KC Stadium is a new facility for the city of Hull hosting football, rugby league and a series of pop concerts. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


Kingston Communications were one of the first telecoms operators in Europe to offer ADSL to business users, and the first in the world to run an interactive television service using ADSL, known as Kingston Interactive TV (Or KiT). As such, Hull has a modern telephone infrastructure. Indeed, as early as the 1950s, Hull had an advanced telecommunication infrastructure. This included cable television and radio, which was installed as default into every new council house (of which there were many), and most private properties in the city. Kingston Communications has significant market power in both the dial-up and ADSL broadband internet market in Hull and the adjoining built-up areas. Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL) is a form of DSL, a data communications technology that enables faster data transmission over copper telephone lines than a conventional modem can provide. ... Coaxial cable is often used to transmit cable television into the house. ...


Policing

Policing in Kingston upon Hull is undertaken by Humberside Police. In October 2006 the force was named (jointly with Northamptonshire Police) as the worst performing police force in the United Kingdom, based on data released from the Home Office.[20] Humberside Police is the police force for Humberside in England. ... Northamptonshire Police is the Home Office police force responsible for policing Northamptonshire in the East Midlands of England. ... The modern concept of Small Office and Home Office or SoHo , or Small or Home Office deals with the category of business which can be from 1 to 10 workers. ...


HM Prison Hull is located in the city and is operated by HM Prison Service. It caters for up to 1000 adult male prisoners. HM Prison Hull is a prison located in Hedon Road, Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England. ... Her Majestys Prison Service is the British Executive Agency reporting to the Home Office tasked with managing many of the prisons within the United Kingdom. ...


Culture

Museums and art

The Deep at night.
The Deep at night.

Hull has an extensive museum and visitor quarter which includes Wilberforce House, Hull and East Riding Museum, the Ferens Art Gallery, the Maritime Museum, Streetlife and Transport Museum, the Spurn Lightship, the Arctic Corsair and the Deep. Worthy of mention is the Fish Trail, which takes you around the Old Town following a wide variety of sealife engraved in the pavement. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3888 × 2592 pixel, file size: 3 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Deep, Hull File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3888 × 2592 pixel, file size: 3 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Deep, Hull File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Wilberforce House is the birth place of William Wilberforce and is located in Kingston upon Hull, England. ... The Ferens Art Gallery is an art gallery in the English city of Kingston upon Hull. ... The Hull Maritime Museum (grid reference TA09562880) is a museum in Kingston upon Hull (Hull), England, that explores the seafaring heritage of the city and its environs. ... The Spurn Lightship is a lightvessel (i. ... The Arctic Corsair is a deep sea trawler which was opened in 1999 as a museum. ... The Deep is a large underwater aquarium situated at Sammys Point, at the confluence of the Hull and Humber rivers in Hull, England. ...


Classical music

Hull is home to Hull Sinfonietta, the only large professional chamber ensemble in the Humber region, and the Hull Philharmonic Orchestra, one of the most accomplished amateur orchestras in the country. Also resident in the city is one of the UK's oldest independent youth orchestras - Hull Philharmonic Youth Orchestra, which was established in 1952. Hull Sinfonietta is one of the major forces changing Hulls cultural dynamic. ... The Hull Philharmonic Orchestra (colloquially known as The Hull Phil) is an amateur orchestra based in Kingston upon Hull, England. ...


The city is also the home of the Hull Choral Union, the Hull Bach Choir - which specialises in the performance of 17th and 18th century choral music, the Hull Male Voice Choir, the Dagger Lane Operatic Society - a Gilbert & Sullivan society, the Arterian Singers and the Kingston Singers. Playwright/lyricist William S. Gilbert (1836-1911) and composer Arthur S. Sullivan (1842-1900) defined operetta in Victorian England with a series of their internationally successful and timeless works. ...


Literature

Hull seems to be particularly attractive to poets - the Australian author Peter Porter has described it as "the most poetic city in the United Kingdom". Peter Neville Frederick Porter (born 1929 is an Australian born British poet. ...


Philip Larkin, arguably the greatest English poet of the mid-20th century, wrote extensively in his poems about Hull. Among poems which contain descriptions of the area are "The Whitsun Weddings", "The Building" (about the Hull Royal Infirmary) and "Here". He also christened the city as "Coventry-by-the-Sea", as he saw many parallels between the two industrial cities. Philip Arthur Larkin, CH, CBE, FRSL, (9 August 1922 – 2 December 1985) was an English poet, novelist and jazz critic. ... Hull Royal Infirmary is one of the two main hospitals for Kingston upon Hull (the other being Castle Hill Hospital in nearby Cottingham). ...


Scottish-born Douglas Dunn's Terry Street, a portrait of working-class Hull life, is one the outstanding poetry collections of the 1970s. Dunn was an important mentor to younger Hull poets including Peter Didsbury, Sean O'Brien and others, many of whom appeared in the 1982 Bloodaxe anthology A Rumoured City. Current Poet Laureate, Andrew Motion, lectured at the University of Hull between 1976 and 1980 and Roger McGough studied there. Among the younger poets associated with Hull are Maggie Hannan, David Wheatley and Caitriona O'Reilly. Peter Didsbury is an English poet, born in Fleetwood, Lancashire, in 1946 but resident for most of his life in Hull, Yorkshire, where he has worked as an archaeologist and creative writing tutor. ... Image:Sean OBrien1. ... A Poet Laureate is a poet officially appointed by a government and often expected to compose poems for state occasions and other government events. ... Andrew Motion, FRSL, (born October 26, 1952) is an English poet, novelist and biographer who is the current Poet Laureate. ... The Venn Building The University of Hull, also known as Hull University, is an English university located in Hull (or Kingston upon Hull), a city in the East Riding of Yorkshire. ... Front cover of the 1983 revised edition of The Mersey Sound Roger McGough CBE (born November 9, 1937) is a well-known British performance poet. ... David Wheatley (born 1970 in Dublin) is an Irish poet and critic. ... Caitriona OReilly (born in Dublin in 1973) is an Irish poet and critic. ...


Theatre

The city has three main theatres. The larger is the Hull New Theatre, which opened in 1939. It features musicals, opera, ballet, drama, children's shows and pantomime. The Hull Truck Theatre is a smaller independent theatre established in 1971. It regularly features plays, notably those written by John Godber. The Hull Truck Theatre will have a new home in the St Stephen's development. The Northern Theatre Company is also based in the city. Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... Hull New Theatre The Hull New Theatre is a theatre in Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, United Kingdom. ... The Hull Truck Theatre is a theatre in Kingston upon Hull, England which presents a high standard of drama production. ... John Godber (born 1956) is a British playwright, known mainly for his innovative theater and observational comedies with an edge. He was born in Upton, West Yorkshire, trained as a teacher of drama, and was artistic director of Hull Truck Theatre Company. ...


Nightlife

Hull has a lively nightlife, attracting people from outlying areas as well as inhabitants of the city. Hull has the concentration of pubs and bars expected of any large city in contemporary Britain. Until recently at which point late 4-6am bars have taken over with many of the notable clubs shutting down including Heaven and Hell, Rhythm Room and Planet Earth. The drinking culture in this city tends to step towards late bars. An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada...


Some of the most popular bars and clubs in the City include The Welly Club, Magma, Sharkeys, Spiders, Zachariah Pearson and The Old Picture House. There are lots of popular wine bars and pubs around Hull University and its student accommodation area, including Haworth Arms and Gardeners arms. The University of Hull, also known as Hull University, is an English university in East Yorkshire which was founded in 1927. ...


Popular music

In the 1960s, Hull band Rats were spotted by David Bowie. They changed their name to 'The Spiders From Mars' and became a globally known sensation. Mick Ronson (guitar) was the best known of the band members and he later went on to record with Lou Reed and Bob Dylan. There is a Mick Ronson Memorial Stage in Queen's Gardens in Hull. David Bowie (IPA: []) (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an English singer, songwriter, actor, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer. ... The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, or simply Ziggy Stardust for short, is a 1972 concept album by David Bowie, praised as the definitive album of the 1970s by Melody Maker magazine. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Queens Gardens is a set of gardens in the centre of Kingston upon Hull, England. ...


In the 1980s, Hull bands such as The Red Guitars, The Housemartins and Everything But the Girl found mainstream success. Paul Heaton, former member of The Housemartins who then went on to front The Beautiful South. Another former member of The Housemartins, Norman Cook, now performs as Fatboy Slim. In 1983 Hull born Paul Anthony Cook, Stuart Mathewman and Paul Spencer Denman formed the group Sade, in 1984 the singer Helen Adu signed to CBS and the group released the album Diamond Life. The album went Triple Platinum in the UK and is still the biggest selling album from a UK female singer to date. Also vocalist and actor Roland Gift (who formed the Fine Young Cannibals) grew up in Hull. The Red Guitars were a British indie rock band active from 1982 to 1986. ... The Housemartins were an English indie rock/accapella band that was active in the 1980s. ... Everything but the Girl Is a song composed and written by Tyler Buckkie of Ontario. ... Paul David Heaton (born May 9, 1962) is an English singer-songwriter. ... The Housemartins were an English indie rock/accapella band that was active in the 1980s. ... It has been suggested that Jacqui Abbott be merged into this article or section. ... Fatboy Slim (born Quentin Leo Cook on July 31, 1963[1], also known as Norman Cook) is a British big beat musician. ... Paul Anthony Cook (aka Paul Cooke), born 18 December 1961 is an English drummer, percussionist and composer best known for his work on the album Diamond Life by the group he co-founded, Sade. ... Sade can mean: Sade (movie) starring French actor Daniel Auteuil. ... Roland Gift as Xavier St. ... The Raw and the Cooked (1989) Fine Young Cannibals were an English band best known for its 1989 hits She Drives Me Crazy and Good Thing. Formed in Birmingham, England, by vocalist Roland Gift and former The Beat members David Steele and Andy Cox. ...


Current bands from Hull include The Paddingtons, who were signed by former Oasis mentor Alan McGee and have had two singles enter the UK's Top 30 and the music scene currently boasts well in excess of 250 unsigned bands. Ones to look out for include, Turismo, Mr Beasley, The Favours, The Neat, The Johnsons, 59 Violets, The Talks, Fonda 500, Windum Earl, Last People On Earth, The Ivy Sins, Ernest and Kill Surf City and many many more. Fonda 500 (A.K.A. F500 or Fonda500) are a British band hailing from Kingston-upon-Hull. ...


The Adelphi is locally known and regarded as the home of live music in the city and has achieved legendary status worldwide, having giving breaks to such bands as The Stone Roses, Radiohead, and Oasis in it's 26 years.


Other local music venues remain popular including The Springhead which caters for cover bands and has been recognised nationally as a Live Music Pub of the Year.


Original Live Music Nights to take note of are The Sesh night at the popular Linnet & Lark on Princes Ave and The Sidekicks Lounge at The Lamp on Bev Rd. Both nights support local talent and both are free entry gigs which are well supported with over 200 + attending on a weekly basis. The Ringside on Bev Rd caters for the Punk and Emo crowd and the likes of The Wellington Pub and Tigers Lair host many a fine acoustic nights feat. more local talent.


Up 'n' Coming talent from across the UK is featured at The Welly club through it's association with Club NME every Thursday and it sometimes plays host to some star names at it's successful Indie Night Yo Yo.


The bigger National bands play either at Hull City Hall, KC Stadium, University Of Hull, or at the Hull Arena.


One thing is for sure : Hull has a thriving music scene. Do not ignore it.


On the record label front, Pork Recordings started in Hull back in the mid 1990s and has released some fine workings of Fila Brazillia and Mr Beasley amongst others. The Sesh night has released four DIY compilations featuring the cream of Hull's live music scene and there are currently a few labels emerging in the city, including Purple Worm Records and Empire. Pork Recordings is a record label based in Hull, north-east England, that specialises in electronica, mostly in the downtempo or chill-out styles. ... Fila Brazillia are a music group from Hull in North-East England. ...


Festivals

The city hosts the The Humber Mouth literature festival every year- the 2007 season features writers such as Will Self, Shami Chakrabarti, Joanne Harris, Raj Persaud, Mike Gayle, Jackie Kay, Jean 'Binta' Breeze, Robin Ince, Dan Rhodes, Steven Hall, Christopher Reid. Will Self William Self (born September 26, 1961) is an English novelist, reviewer and columnist. ... Shami Chakrabarti CBE (born in London, June 16, 1969) has been the director of Liberty since September 2003. ... Joanne Michèle Sylvie Harris (born July 3, 1964) is a British author. ... Prof. ... Mike Gayle is a British author and freelance journalist contributing to a variety of magazines including FHM and Sunday Times Style. ... The poet and writer Jackie Kay was born in Edinburgh in 1961 to a Scottish mother and a Nigerian father. ... Jean Binta Breeze (born 1956) is a Jamaican dub poet, and storyteller. ... Robin Ince (born 1969) is an English stand-up comedian, actor and writer. ... Dan Rhodes is a British author who was born in 1972. ... Steven Hall is a British author, born in Derbyshire in 1975 and now lives in Hull, England. ... Christopher Reid (born in 1949) is a British poet, essayist, cartoonist, and writer. ...


The annual Hull Jazz Festival takes place around the Marina area for a week at the beginning of August. This is followed, in early September, by the Sea Fever Festival, an International Sea Shanty Festival. Hull Marina is a marina for pleasure boats situated in the English city of Kingston upon Hull. ... Sea shanties (singular shanty, also spelled chantey; derived from the French word chanter, to sing) were shipboard working songs. ...


Early October sees the arrival of Hull Fair which is Europe's largest travelling funfair and takes place on land adjacent to the KC Stadium. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... A travelling funfair has many attractions, including adult or thrill rides, childrens rides, and sideshows consisting of games of skill, strength, or luck. ... Kingston Communications Stadium or KC Stadium is a new facility for the city of Hull hosting football, rugby league and a series of pop concerts. ...


In 2007 the Hull Metalfest began in the Welly Club, it is the second largest UK Metal festival after the Download Festival. It featured Major Label bands hailing from America, Canada and Italy, as well as the UK.


Sport

The city has a professional football team playing in the Championship (second tier), Hull City AFC, who play at the Kingston Communications Stadium. The club has never played in the first tier, making Hull England's largest city never to have seen first division football. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 597 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (3000 × 3012 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 597 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (3000 × 3012 pixel, file size: 1. ... Kingston Communications Stadium (also referred to as the KC Stadium). It is named after the stadiums sponsors, Kingston Communications and is a new facility for the city of Hull hosting football, rugby league and a series of pop concerts. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ... Hull City Association Football Club is an English football club based in Kingston upon Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire. ... Kingston Communications Stadium (also referred to as the KC Stadium). It is named after the stadiums sponsors, Kingston Communications and is a new facility for the city of Hull hosting football, rugby league and a series of pop concerts. ...


Hull is something of a rugby league hub, boasting two teams; rugby league is the second most popular sport in the city, behind only football. Hull FC are in the Super League and, along with Hull City AFC, play at the Kingston Communications Stadium. Hull Kingston Rovers have recently been promoted to the Super League and play at Craven Park. In addition, there are several lower league teams in the city, such as East Hull, West Hull, Hull Dockers and Hull Isberg, who all play in the National Conference League. Hull FC is a professional rugby league football club formed in 1865 and based in Hull, England. ... Super League (Europe) began in March 1996 and is the only full-time professional rugby league competition operating in the northern hemisphere. ... Kingston Communications Stadium (also referred to as the KC Stadium). It is named after the stadiums sponsors, Kingston Communications and is a new facility for the city of Hull hosting football, rugby league and a series of pop concerts. ... Hull Kingston Rovers or Hull KR is a British rugby league club playing in Super League (Europe), having won promotion from League One of the National League in the 2006 season. ... Super League (Europe) began in March 1996 and is the only full-time professional rugby league competition operating in the northern hemisphere. ... New Craven Park is the home of Hull Kingston Rovers RLFC, situated on Preston Road in Hull. ... The National Conference League is the top league in the pyramid of amateur rugby leagues run by the British Amateur Rugby League Association (BARLA). ...


The city also boasts Hull Ice Arena, a large ice rink and concert venue, which is home to the Hull Stingrays ice hockey team who play in the Elite Ice Hockey League. Hull Arena is an Sports Arena situated in Kingston Upon Hull, United Kingdom. ... League: EPIHL Founded: 2003 Home Ice: Hull Ice Arena Capacity: 2000 Ice Size: 197ft x 98ft City: Kingston upon Hull, United Kingdom Colours: White, Blue, and Green Head Coach: Rick Strachan Ownership: Mike and Sue Pack Hull Stingrays are a British ice hockey club from Kingston upon Hull, England. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Elite Ice Hockey League (also known for sponsorship reasons as the bmibaby Elite League) is a professional ice hockey league in the United Kingdom. ...


New to the city is the Hull Hornets American Football Club, which, as of 5 November 2006, has acquired full member status of the British American Football League and is now eligible to apply for competition in the 2007 regular season. Hull Hornets are a new American Football team that have started up in the Kingston upon Hull and East Riding of Yorkshire area. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Logo of the British American Football League The British American Football League (BAFL) is the United Kingdoms primary American Football league. ...


In mid-2006 Hull was home to the professional wrestling company 1PW, which held the Devils Due event on 27 July in the Gemtec Arena. 1PW is a United Kingdom wrestling promotion. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gemtec Arena (formally the Vulcan Arena) is a sports centre located next to the Kingston Communications Stadium in Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England. ...


The city did have, up until 2006, a Speedway Team, called Hull Vikings. However, they disbanded when they were evicted from Craven Park and ran into considerable financial difficulty. The sport has long and interesting history. Previous to the Second World War meetings were staged at Hull White City. In the early post war years the Hull Angels raced in the National League Division Three at Hedon before closure late summer 1949 saw the team move to Swindon. The sport was revived at The Boulevard and operated for many years with the Hull Vikings featuring World Champions Ivan Mauger, Barry Briggs and Egon Muller at various times. For details of the activities of the Angels and the Vikings compiled by local speedway historian Roger Hulbert look at www.speedwayresearcher.org.uk Hull Vikings, was a Speedway team from Hull. ... There are two rugby league grounds in Britain called Craven Park: Craven Park (Barrow) for the home of Barrow Raiders Craven Park (Hull) for the home of Hull Kingston Rovers This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Media

Hull's daily newspaper is the Hull Daily Mail which was named Yorkshire Daily Newspaper of the Year in 2003, 2004 and 2006. Mail News and Media also has an internet presence, with separate sites for local news, sports and nightlife. Local listings and what's on guides include Tenfoot City Magazine and Sandman Magazine. The BBC has its new Yorkshire and Lincolnshire regional headquarters at Queen's Gardens, from which the regional news programme Look North is broadcast. Radio services come from BBC Radio Humberside, Viking FM, Magic 1161, Hull University Union's Jam 1575, KCFM and Kingstown Radio, the hospital-based radio station, which all broadcast to the city. The Hull Daily Mail is the local daily newspaper for Kingston Upon Hull and is published along with the free weekly, Hull Advertiser. ... Sandman is a free music magazine originating in Sheffield, UK. There are now editions published in Leeds, Kingston upon Hull, York and Nottingham. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... Queens Gardens is a set of gardens in the centre of Kingston upon Hull, England. ... The programme titles were created by Lambie-Nairn. ... BBC Radio Humberside is a BBC Local Radio service covering the area of the former English county of Humberside, which was returned to North Lincolnshire, North East Lincolnshire and the East Riding of Yorkshire on April 1st 1996. ... Viking FM is a commercial radio station which has broadcast music and local information to the East Yorkshire, North Lincolnshire and North-East Lincolnshire counties of England since 1984. ... Magic 1161 is a commercial radio station which broadcasts to the East Riding of Yorkshire and Northern Lincolnshire in England since 1997. ... Jam 1575 is Hull University Unions radio station broadcasting all year round. ... KCFM is the new independent local radio station for Hull. ... Kingstown Radio is a hospital radio station based in Kingston upon Hull, England. ...


Accent

The local accent is quite distinctive and noticeably different from the rest of the East Riding; however it is still categorised amongst Yorkshire accents. The most notable feature of the accent is the strong I-muatation[21] in words like goat, which is [gəʊt] in standard English and [goːt] across most of Yorkshire, becomes [gɵːt] ("geuht") in and around parts of Hull, although there is variation across areas and generations. In common with much of England (outside of the far north), another feature is dropping the H from the start of words, for example Hull is more often pronounced 'Ull in the city. The vowel in "Hull" is pronounced the same way as in Standard English, however, and not as the very short /U/ that exists in Lincolnshire. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Standard English is a controversial term used to denote a form of written and spoken English that is thought to be normative for educated users. ...


The rhythm of the accent is more like that of northern Lincolnshire than that of the rural East Riding, which is perhaps due to migration from Lincolnshire to the city during its industrial growth. One feature that it does share with the surrounding rural area is that an /i/ sound in the middle of a word often becomes an /a:/: for example, "five" may sound like "fahve", "time" like "tahme", etc.


The vowel sound in words such as burnt, nurse, first is pronounced with an /E:/ sound, as is also heard in Liverpool and in Middlesbrough, yet this sound is very uncommon in most of Yorkshire. Location within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state United Kingdom Constituent country England Region North West England Ceremonial county Historic county Merseyside Lancashire Admin HQ Liverpool City Centre Founded 1207 City Status 1880 Government  - Type Metropolitan borough, City  - Governing body Liverpool City Council Area  - Borough & City 43. ... This article is about the town in North East England. ...


The generational and/or geographic variation can be heard in word pairs like pork/poke or cork/coke, or hall/hole, or spur/spare, which some people pronounce identically while others make a distinction; anyone called "Paul" (for example) soon becomes aware of this.


An amusing postcard is produced mocking the Hull accent. It lists a number of words and phrases as they are spoken (by some) in the city and a 'translation' to the Queen's English. For example, someone in Hull telling you that they had received a fern curl could be telling someone they had received a phone call. For the record label, see Postcard Records. ... Received Pronunciation (RP) is a form of pronunciation of the English language, sometimes defined as the educated spoken English of southeastern England. According to the Fowlers Modern English Usage (1965), the term is the Received Pronunciation. RP speech is non-rhotic, meaning that written r is pronounced only if...


Reputation

British Extracting Company building standing derelict beside the river Hull
British Extracting Company building standing derelict beside the river Hull

Hull's history is that of a solidly industrial city, with working-class sensibilities. Like many other cities and towns, it has suffered the negative effects of Britain's transition to a post-industrial society. These effects include, among other things, a decaying infrastructure, an obsolete industrial base, and areas of urban blight. These factors contribute to Hull having the second highest level of deprivation in England, after Liverpool.[22] In 2005, Hull was named "the worst place to live in Britain" in the Channel 4 programme "The Best and Worst Places to Live in Britain".[23] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (427 × 640 pixel, file size: 56 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (427 × 640 pixel, file size: 56 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The River Hull is a river in the East Riding of Yorkshire in the north of England. ... A post-industrial society is a proposed name for an economy that has undergone a specific series of changes in structure after a process of industrialization. ... Symptoms of urban blight: graffiti-covered abandoned and deteriorating buildings and garbage-strewn vacant lots. ... Location within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state United Kingdom Constituent country England Region North West England Ceremonial county Historic county Merseyside Lancashire Admin HQ Liverpool City Centre Founded 1207 City Status 1880 Government  - Type Metropolitan borough, City  - Governing body Liverpool City Council Area  - Borough & City 43. ... Channel 4 is a public-service British television station, broadcast to all areas of the United Kingdom (and also the Republic of Ireland), which began transmissions in 1982. ...


In spite of these issues, many of the city's residents are very proud of Hull, its history, and its traditions, using such terms as "underrated", "thriving", "fantastic", and "wonderful" to describe their home.[24] Many residents and visitors also credit it for its down-to-earth, working class-attitude and its friendly nature.[24] The University of Hull boasts a reputation of being one of the friendliest universities in the United Kingdom.[25] The Venn Building The University of Hull, also known as Hull University, is an English university located in Hull (or Kingston upon Hull), a city in the East Riding of Yorkshire. ...


Hull's national reputation is also reflected by the positive striving of the Council to improve the city's welfare. However, the city has had poor performance in terms of most socioeconomic indicators in comparison with the rest of the UK. Hull City Council was designated as the UK's worst performing authority in both 2004 and 2005, which the Council are trying to improve with its new £160 million St. Stephen's project. These efforts helped ensure Hull's absence from the 2006 list of "Worst Places to Live in Britain", a list which included, among other places, Nottingham, Manchester, and areas of London.[26] Nottingham is a city, unitary authority, and county town of Nottinghamshire in the East Midlands of England. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Hull is seen as something of a national oddity: a large city, in the midst of a very rural part of Yorkshire, at the very edge of the nation.[27] The rest of the East Riding has always looked upon Hull as a very different entity, and government decisions have taken this into account with things such as post codes, telephone networks and other regional groupings.


Regeneration

As with many cities across the country, areas of Hull are undergoing regeneration. These include the St Stephen's and Quay West projects. Quay West (being built on brownfield land) will provide an open air expansion of the existing Princes Quay shopping centre. Urban regeneration (also called urban renewal in American English) is a movement in urban planning that reached its peak in the United States from the late 1940s through the early 1970s. ... Examples of brownfields that were redeveloped into productive properties Brownfields are abandoned, idled, or under-used industrial and commercial facilities where expansion or redevelopment is complicated by real or perceived environmental contaminations. ...

Office building at the Humber Quays complex
Office building at the Humber Quays complex

Overlooking the Humber, the new £165m Humber Quays development, now with World Trade Centre status, is adding new high quality office space to Hull's waterfront. Phase 1 of the project includes two office buildings (one complete, one under construction), and 51 new apartments. Phase 2 will include a new 200 bedroom 4 star hotel, a restaurant, plus more high quality office space. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ...


The East Bank of the River Hull will see a stunning £100m residential development connected to Hull's old town. The Boom will include over 600 luxury riverside apartments, shops, boutiques, bistro cafés, a 120 bed luxury hotel, plus health and education facilities.


St. Stephen's is being built on the site of the old bus station and is a 52,000 sq m scheme, anchored by a 24 hour superstore, providing shop units, residential areas, as well as a new 'transport interchange'. This will include a new bus station and renovated railway station and is said to be the second system in England which integrates railway and bus stations, leisure and shopping facilities under the same roof, after Doncaster's, Frenchagate interchange. This project is aimed to be completed by the end of 2007. Stores leasing area in St Stephens include Zara, Topshop, Oasis, H&M, Next, and Tesco. Zara may refer to: // Zara is the Venetian, Austrian and Italian name of the Adriatic port city of Zadar (official 13th-20th century), former capital of Dalmatia, in Croatia Zara (Turkish district), a district in the Turkish province of Sivas Zara, Eritrea, a city in central-western Eritrea. ... Topshop is a chain of clothing stores situated throughout the United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland and over 30 other countries. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Hennes & Mauritz AB (operating as H&M), is a Swedish clothing company, known for their inexpensive and fashionable clothing offerings. ... Next on Oxford Street Next PLC is a British clothes retailer, with its headquarters in Enderby, Leicestershire, England. ...


People associated with Kingston upon Hull

Most of the notable people associated with the city can be found in the People from Hull and People associated with the University of Hull categories.

Other people associated with the city include:

John Alderton (born November 27, 1940), is a popular British actor. ... Kingston High School is a secondary school on Pickering Road in West Hull, England (now called Pickering High School). It was attended by Amy Johnson, Tom Courtney and John Alderton. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Tom Courtenay (pronounced Courtney) (born February 25, 1937) is a British actor who came to prominence in the early 1960s with a succession of critically-acclaimed films including The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1962), Billy Liar (1963) and Dr. Zhivago (1965). ... Jonathan Peter Culshaw (born June 2, 1968 in Ormskirk, Lancashire) is an English impressionist and comedian. ... Viking FM is a commercial radio station which has broadcast music and local information to the East Yorkshire, North Lincolnshire and North-East Lincolnshire counties of England since 1984. ... John Godber (born 1956) is a British playwright, known mainly for his innovative theater and observational comedies with an edge. He was born in Upton, West Yorkshire, trained as a teacher of drama, and was artistic director of Hull Truck Theatre Company. ... The Hull Truck Theatre is a theatre in Kingston upon Hull, England which presents a high standard of drama production. ... This is an article about the American musician; for the director/writer see Paul Collins. ... Marion Hood (April 1, 1854 - August 14, 1912) was an English operatic soprano in the last decades of the 19th century. ... Music Hall is a form of British theatrical entertainment which reached its peak of popularity between 1850 and 1960. ... JK and Joel (Jason King - born Jason Griffiths in January 1975; and Joel Ross - born Joel Hogg in May 1977) are a British duo who have co-presented radio shows since 1999 and are the current hosts of the official UK chart and the early breakfast show (Monday - Thursday) on... This page redirects from Radio 1. See Radio 1 (disambiguation). ... Viking FM is a commercial radio station which has broadcast music and local information to the East Yorkshire, North Lincolnshire and North-East Lincolnshire counties of England since 1984. ... Philip Arthur Larkin, CH, CBE, FRSL, (9 August 1922 – 2 December 1985) was an English poet, novelist and jazz critic. ... The Venn Building The University of Hull, also known as Hull University, is an English university located in Hull (or Kingston upon Hull), a city in the East Riding of Yorkshire. ... Andrew Lincoln (born 14 September 1973) is an English actor, known for his roles in the series This Life (as Egg) and Teachers. ... Maureen Lipman CBE (born Hull, 10 May 1946), is a British film, theatre and television actress, columnist, and comedienne. ... Barrie Rutter founded the Northern Broadsides theatre company in 1992. ... Clive Sullivan (born in Cardiff) was a Welsh rugby league player, who played with both Hull FC and Hull Kingston Rovers in his career. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

References

  1. ^ John Marius Wilson, Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales (1870-72)
  2. ^ Syphilis, History Focal, retrieved 9 November 2006.
  3. ^ Secrets of the Dead Interview, The Syphilis Enigma, PBS, retrieved 9 November 2006
  4. ^ Listed status for bombed cinema, BBC News, 2 February 2007, retrieved 2 February 2007.
  5. ^ T. Geraghty, "A North East Coast Town", p.7, Mr Pye Books, 1989
  6. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/humber/6270236.stm
  7. ^ http://www.guardian.co.uk/weather/Story/0,,2118791,00.html
  8. ^ Hull Tidal Surge Barrier - Facts and Figures, Environment Agency website, retrieved 9 November 2006.
  9. ^ Yorkshire's grim future: Fires, floods and drought, Yorkshire Post Today, retrieved 9 November 2006.
  10. ^ Council is worst in the country, BBC News Online, retrieved 9 November 2006.
  11. ^ Lib Dems take Hull with big swing, BBC News Online, 4 May 2007, retrieved 4 May 2007.
  12. ^ Hull - Investing > Economic Location, Hull.co.uk, retrieved 9 November 2006.
  13. ^ Quinary age groups and sex for local authorities in the United Kingdom; estimated resident population; Mid-2005 Population Estimates, National Statistics Online, retrieved 9 November 2006.
  14. ^ Facts and Figures, University of Hull webpage, retrieved 9 November 2006.
  15. ^ Empty pews full agendas, Sojourners Magazine, Nov/December 2001 by Martin Wroe, retrieved 9 November.
  16. ^ About Holy Trinity, Holy Trinity website, retrieved 9 November 2006.
  17. ^ Transport, St. Stephen's, Hull, St. Stephen's website, retrieved 9 November 2006.
  18. ^ Longest bridges - Suspension Bridges, Pub Quiz Help, retrieved 9 November 2006. Note: lists some incomplete bridges.
  19. ^ Council Completes KC Shares Sale , This is Hull & East Riding retrieved 24 May 2007
  20. ^ Humberside 'worst police force', BBC News Online, retrieved 9 November 2006.
  21. ^ A Spectrographic Analysis Of Vowel Fronting In Bradford English, Dominic Watt And Jennifer Tillotson, (Microsoft Word Document), retrieved 9 November 2006.
  22. ^ Parkinson, Michael; Tony Champion, Richard Evans, James Simmie, Ivan Turok, Martin Crookston, Bruce Katz, Alison Park, Alan Berube, Mike Coombes, Danny Dorling, Norman Glass, Mary Hutchins, Ade Kearns, Ron Martin, Peter Wood (March 2006). State of the English Cities: Volume 1 (PDF), London: Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, p. 112. ISBN 1-851128-45-X. Retrieved on 2007-07-01. 
  23. ^ "Hull 'worst place to live in UK'", BBC, 2005-08-10. Retrieved on 2007-06-30. 
  24. ^ a b Hull - Word on the street. Buy Home UK. FindaProperty.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-30.
  25. ^ "Smiles all round as Hull is again ranked as one of the UK's friendliest universities", The University of Hull, 2006-06-08. Retrieved on 2007-06-30. 
  26. ^ Worst Places to Live in the UK: 2006. BEST AND WORST PLACES TO LIVE 2006. Channel 4. Retrieved on 2007-06-30.
  27. ^ The Best and Worst Places - Hull. Channel 4. Retrieved on 2007-06-30. “Hull now sits at the end of a motorway, isolated from the rest of the country by the Humber estuary.”

is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News Online logo The BBC News Website in February 2006. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News Online logo The BBC News Website in February 2006. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Places with city status in the United Kingdom

Coordinates: 53°43′N, 0°20′W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
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