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Encyclopedia > Kings of Aragon

Here is a list of the rulers of Aragon, now a region of north-eastern Spain. The Aragonese kingdom included the present-day autonomous community of Aragon. The Aragonese kings of the House of Barcelona ruled as well Catalonia (which included Roussillon, nowadays the département of Pyrenées-Orientales in France), the kingdom of Valencia, the kingdom of Majorca, the kingdom of Sicily, Sardinia and assorted territories in the South of France, including the city of Montpellier. This state is referred to as the Crown of Aragon, as opposed to the Kingdom of Aragon (i.e. Aragon proper)


Early counts of Aragon

  • ???–809:Aureolus (attested 807-809 but probably was ruling before 802)
  • 809820: Aznar I Galíndez. c. 820 the Frankish influence is eliminated.
  • 820833: García I Galíndez of Pamplona (married to Matrona, daugther of Aznar I)
  • 833844: Galindo Garcés, son of García I Galindez
  • 844867: Galindo I Aznárez, son of Aznar I
  • 867893: Aznar II Galíndez, son of Galindo I
  • 893922: Galindo II Aznárez, son of Aznar II
  • 922–???: Andregota Galíndez (married García Sánchez of Navarre)

NOTE: Names and order of rulers is extremely uncertain. Other persons cited as counts of Aragon include, among others, Jimeno Aznar, Galindo García and Fortun Jiménez, that seems to be from the kingdom of Sobrarbe.


Counts of Aragon and Kings of Navarre


(for kings of Navarre prior to the dynastic union with Aragon see: List of Navarrese monarchs)

Kings of Aragon and Navarre

Kings of Aragon

Kings of Aragon and Counts of Barcelona, of the House of Barcelona


(for counts of Barcelona prior to the dynastic union with Aragon see: List of Counts of Barcelona)

Kings of Aragon and Valencia, Counts of Barcelona, of the House of Barcelona

interregnum 1410 - 1412


Kings of Aragon and Valencia, Counts of Barcelona, of the Trastámara dynasty

Kings of Aragon and Counts of Barcelona who occupied the throne during the War Against Joan II (none of these reigned in Valencia, which remained under the control of John II)

Kings of Aragon, Castile and Valencia, Counts of Barcelona, of the Habsburg dynasty (or House of Austria)


(for kings of Castile prior to the dynastic union with Aragon see: List of Castilian monarchs)

Kings of Aragon and Counts of Barcelona, of the Bourbon dynasty, during the Reapers' War (none of these reigned in Valencia, which remained under the control of Phillip IV of Spain)

Kings of Aragon, Castile and Valencia, Counts of Barcelona, of the Habsburg dynasty (or House of Austria)

Kings of Aragon, Castile and Valencia, Counts of Barcelona during the War of the Spanish Succession

==> the Catalan-Aragonese confederation was occupied and annexed by Spain: after this time, there are no more Aragonese monarchs.


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
James I Of Aragon - LoveToKnow 1911 (857 words)
JAMES I., the Conqueror (1208-1276), king of Aragon, son of Peter II., king of Aragon, and of Mary of Montpellier, whose mother was Eudoxia Comnena, daughter of the emperor Manuel, was born at Montpellier on the 2nd of February 1208.
The king fell very ill at Alcira, and resigned his crown, intending to retire to the monastery of Poblet, but died at Valencia on the 27th of July 1276.
King James was the author of a chronicle of his own life, written or dictated apparently at different times, which is a very fine example of autobiographical literature.
Ferdinand II, king of Aragon. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05 (574 words)
or Ferdinand the Catholic, 1452–1516, king of Aragón (1479–1516), king of Castile and León (as Ferdinand V, 1474–1504), king of Sicily (1468–1516), and king of Naples (1504–16).
The Catholic kings also instituted the Inquisition in Spain to bolster religious and political unity.
During the reign of the Catholic kings the power of the throne grew.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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