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Encyclopedia > Kingdom of Sweden

The Kingdom of Sweden (Swedish: Konungariket Sverige Sound listen) is a Nordic country in Scandinavia, in Northern Europe. It is bordered by Norway on the west, Finland on the northeast, the Skagerrak Strait and the Kattegat Strait on the southwest, and the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Bothnia on the east. Sweden has a relatively low population density and is known for its large peaceful forests and mountainous wilderness. Swedish (svenska  listen?) is a Scandinavian language language spoken predominantly in Sweden, Finland and Åland by over 8 million native speakers. ... To play the audio file do not click on the -image. ... The Nordic countries (Greenland not shown) The Nordic countries is a term used collectively for five countries in Northern Europe. ... Scandinavia is the cultural and historic region of the Scandinavian Peninsula. ... Northern Europe is a name for the northern part of the European continent. ... The Kingdom of Norway is a Nordic country on the western portion of the Scandinavian Peninsula, bordering Sweden, Finland and Russia, with territorial waters bordering Danish and British waters. ... The Republic of Finland (Finnish: Suomen tasavalta, Swedish: Republiken Finland) is a Nordic country in northeastern Europe, bordered by the Baltic Sea to the southwest, the Gulf of Finland to the southeast and the Gulf of Bothnia to the west. ... Categories: Sweden geography stubs | Norway geography stubs | Danish stubs ... The Baltic Sea The Kattegat, or Kattegatt, is a bay of the North Sea and a continuation of the Skagerrak, bounded by Denmark and Sweden. ... The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, bounded by the Scandinavian Peninsula, the mainland of east and central Europe, and the Danish islands. ... Categories: Finland geography stubs | Sweden geography stubs | Seas | Baltic Sea ...

Konungariket Sverige
(Flag) (Coat of Arms)
National motto: None1
National anthem: Du gamla, Du fria
Location of Sweden
Capital Stockholm
59° 21' N, 18° 4' E
Largest city Stockholm
Official languages None2
Government Constitutional monarchy,
Parliamentarism
Carl XVI Gustaf
Göran Persson
United
10th-13th ct
Area
 - Total
 - Water (%)
 
449,964 km² (54th)
8.67%
Population
 - 2004 est.
 - 2002 census
 - Density
 
9,006,405 (84th)
8,940,788 (est.)
20/km² (189th)
GDP (PPP)
 - Total
 - Per capita
2005 estimate
$267 billion (34th)
$29,544 (13th)
Currency Swedish krona (SEK)
Time zone
 - Summer (DST)
CET (UTC+1)
CEST (UTC+2)
Internet TLD .se
Calling code +46
1 För Sverige i tiden (English: For Sweden; with the times) is adopted by Carl XVI Gustaf as his personal motto in his role as Swedish monarch.

2 The Swedish language is the de facto national language. Five languages are officially recognized as minority languages. Large flag of Sweden Image originally derived from the public domain flags of the CIA World Factbook. ... The Greater Coat of Arms of the Realm is one of two official Coat of Arms of Sweden. ... Flag ratio: 5:8 The merchant flag of Sweden (1844-1905), with the Sweden-Norway union badge. ... The Greater Coat of Arms of the Realm, or Stora Riksvapnet, and the Lesser Coat of Arms of the Realm, or Lilla Riksvapnet, are the official coats of arms of Sweden. ... Here is a list of state mottos for countries and their subdivisions around the world. ... This is a list of national anthems. ... Du gamla, Du fria (Thou Ancient, Thou Free) is the national anthem of Sweden. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... In politics a capital (also called capital city or political capital — although the latter phrase has an alternative meaning based on an alternative meaning of capital) is the principal city or town associated with its government. ... Stockholm [, ] is the capital and the largest City of Sweden. ... Ethnicity Beside the Swedes, the Sweden-Finns are the largest ethnic minority comprising of approximately 50,000 indigenous along the Swedish-Finnish border, and 450,000 first- and second generation immigrated ethnic Finns. ... Stockholm [, ] is the capital and the largest City of Sweden. ... An official language is something that is given a unique status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... This is a list of countries categorized by system of government currently in use. ... Sweden is a constitutional monarchy with a representative democracy based on a parliamentary system. ... The Prime Minister or Statsminister is the head of Government in Sweden. ... A constitutional monarchy is a form of government established under a constitutional system which acknowledges a hereditary or elected monarch as head of state. ... A parliamentary system, or parliamentarism, is distinguished by the executive branch of government being dependent on the direct or indirect support of the parliament, often expressed through a vote of confidence. ... His Majesty King Carl XVI Gustaf (Carl Gustaf Folke Hubertus Bernadotte), styled HM The King (born April 30, 1946), is the reigning Swedish monarch. ... Hans Göran Persson  listen? (born January 20, 1949) is a Swedish politician. ... Here is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... Here is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... This is a list of sovereign states and other territories by population. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Population density can be used as a measurement of any tangible item. ... This is a list of sovereign states and other territories by population. ... List of countries/dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The figures in this table are based on areas including inland water bodies (lakes, reservoirs, rivers. ... This is a list of the worlds economies sorted by their Gross domestic product (GDP) at market or government official exchange rates. ... In economics, purchasing power parity (PPP) is a method used to calculate an alternative exchange rate between the currencies of two countries. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Here is a list of countries of the world sorted by their Gross domestic product (GDP), the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. ... Here is a list of countries of the world sorted by their Gross domestic product (PPP) per capita, the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year, divided by population as of 1 July for the same year. ... This article is about the Swedish unit of currency. ... ISO 4217 is an international standard describing three letter codes to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization or ISO. The first two letters of the code are the two letters of ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 country codes (which are similar to those used... -1... Daylight saving time (also called DST, or Summer Time) is the portion of the year in which a regions local time is advanced by (usually) one hour from its standard official time. ... Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of UTC+1 time zone, 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... UTC also stands for the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, is an atomic realization of Universal Time or Greenwich mean time, the astronomical basis for civil time. ... Central European Summer Time (CEST) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... UTC also stands for the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, is an atomic realization of Universal Time or Greenwich mean time, the astronomical basis for civil time. ... The following is a list of currently existing Internet Top-level domains (TLDs). ... .se is the Internet country code top-level domain ( ccTLD) for Sweden. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Swedish (svenska  listen?) is a Scandinavian language language spoken predominantly in Sweden, Finland and Åland by over 8 million native speakers. ... In 1999, Sweden legally recognized five minority languages of Sweden due to its adoption of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Sweden Pre-historic age 9,000–500 B.C. Sweden, together with Norway, has a high concentration of Petroglyphs, ristningar or hällristningar in Swedish. ...


Conclusive archaeological evidence exists that the area now comprising Sweden was settled during the Stone Age (6,000 BC – 4,000 BC), as the inland ice of the Weichsel glaciation, i.e. the last ice age, receded. The earliest inhabitants are thought to have been hunters and gatherers, living primarily off what the sea (later called the Baltic Sea) could offer. Some evidence supports the theory that southern Sweden was densely populated during the Bronze Age, as remains of large trading communities from this period have been found. Stone Age fishing hook. ... This article or section should be merged with Wisconsinan glaciation The Wisconsin (in North America), Weichsel (in Scandinavia), Devensian (in the British Isles) or Würm glaciation (in the Alps) is the most recent period of the Ice Age, and ended some 10,000 Before Present (BP). ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... In anthropology, the hunter-gatherer way of life is that led by certain societies of the Neolithic Era based on the exploitation of wild plants and animals. ... The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, bounded by the Scandinavian Peninsula, the mainland of east and central Europe, and the Danish islands. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ...


Sweden as a name was originally a plural form of Swede and is a so-called "back-formation", from Old English Sweoðeod, the land of the Suiones. During the Scandinavian Viking culture of the 9th and 10th century, the spheres of interest were so distributed, that trade, raiding and colonisation from present-day Sweden primarily went eastward, to Balticum, Russia and the Black Sea, while the Danes (including those in present-day South-Sweden) went southward, and the Norwegians concentrated on Scotland, Ireland and Iceland. Sweden was originally a plural form of Swede and is a so-called back-formation, from Old English Sweoðeod, which meant people of the Swedes (Old Norse SvíÞjóð, Latin Suetidi). ... Swede (turnip /neep in Scotland) is also the British name for what the Americans call rutabaga. ... In etymology, the process of back-formation is the creation of a neologism by reinterpreting an earlier word as a compound and removing the spuriously supposed affixes. ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ... ... Suiones, Swedes, Svíar or Svear, were an ancient Germanic tribe in Scandinavia. ... Scandinavian can mean: A resident of, or relating to Scandinavia A North Germanic language A music genre, Scandinavian metal This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Viking (disambiguation). ... ( 8th century - 9th century - 10th century - other centuries) Events Beowulf might have been written down in this century, though it could also have been in the 8th century Reign of Charlemagne, and concurrent (and controversially labeled) Carolingian Renaissance in western Europe Viking attacks on Europe begin Oseberg ship burial The... ( 9th century - 10th century - 11th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... A sphere of influence is a metaphorical region of political influences surrounding a country. ... The Baltic Sea The Baltic region (sometimes briefly The Baltics) is an ambiguous term used to denominate an arbitrary region connected to the Baltic Sea (also called The Baltics). ... Satellite view of the Black Sea, taken by NASA MODIS Cities of the Black Sea The Black Sea (known as the Euxine Sea in the antiquity) is an inland sea between southeastern Europe and Asia Minor. ... The Daner were an ancient North Germanic tribe residing in Terra Scania and on the Danish islands. ... Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: Alba) is a country or nation and former independent kingdom of northwest Europe, and one of the four constituent parts of the United Kingdom. ... A true colour image of Ireland, captured by a NASA satellite on January 4, 2003. ... Iceland - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ...


Christianization in the 12th century led to the consolidation of a Swedish state centered at the water-ways of the northern Baltic and the Gulf of Finland. The East-West Schism between Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy was mirrored in frequent wars between Sweden and Novgorod, but stabilized in 1323 by the Treaty of Nöteborg with a border established along a line from the Eastern tip of the Gulf of Finland to the Northern tip of the Gulf of Bothnia. The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once (a political shift as much as a spontaneous mass shift in individual consciences), also includes the practice of converting pagan cult practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... This article discusses states as sovereign political entities. ... The Baltic Sea The Gulf of Finland is an arm of the Baltic Sea that extends between Finland (to the north) and Estonia (to the south) all the way to the city of Saint Petersburg in Russia, where the river Neva drains into it. ... In Christianity, the East-West Schism, usually called the Great Schism (though this latter term sometimes refers to the Western Schism of 1378), was the event that separated Eastern Orthodoxy and Western Catholicism in 1054. ... This article considers Catholicism in the broadest ecclesiastical sense. ... For other cities named Novgorod see Novgorod (disambiguation). ... Events Canonization of Saint Lithuania: Vilnius becomes capital August 12 - The Sweden and Novgorod (Russia) is signed, regulating the border for the first time Births Deaths Categories: 1323 ... The Treaty of Nöteborg, also known as Treaty of Orekhovo signed at Orechovets (Pähkinäsaari) on August 12, 1323, was a treaty between Sweden and Novgorod regulating their border. ...


Like the similarly newly consolidated states of Norway and Denmark, in the 14th century Sweden was struck by crisis that was further aggravated by the Black Death, although Sweden's expansion into the wilderness of the Scandinavian peninsula and present-day Finland continued. The political incorporation into Sweden proper of what would later become Finland is usually dated to 1362, and would last until 1809. The Kingdom of Norway is a Nordic country on the western portion of the Scandinavian Peninsula, bordering Sweden, Finland and Russia, with territorial waters bordering Danish and British waters. ... The Kingdom of Denmark is geographically the smallest Nordic country and is part of the European Union. ... This article concerns the world wide pandemic starting in the mid- 14th century, with a focus on material available from European records and accounts. ... The Republic of Finland (Finnish: Suomen tasavalta, Swedish: Republiken Finland) is a Nordic country in northeastern Europe, bordered by the Baltic Sea to the southwest, the Gulf of Finland to the southeast and the Gulf of Bothnia to the west. ... Sweden proper, or Egentliga Sverige, is a term used to distinguish those territories that were fully integrated into the Kingdom of Sweden, as opposed to the dominions and possessions of, or states in union with, the Realm of Sweden. ... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1357 1358 1359 1360 1361 - 1362 - 1363 1364 1365 1366 1367 See also: 1362 state leaders Events Under Edward III, French as Englands national language, for the first time... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

In 1389, the three countries of Norway, Denmark and Sweden were united under a single monarch. The Kalmar Union was entered into as a personal, not a political, union; and during the 15th century, the Swedes resisted attempts to centralise rule under the Danish crown, even to the point of armed rebellions. Sweden ultimately broke away in 1521, when Gustav Eriksson Vasa, from 1523 known as king Gustav I of Sweden, re-established separation of the Swedish crown from the union. Gustav I of Sweden This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Gustav I of Sweden This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Gustav I of Sweden, Gustav Vasa or Gustav Eriksson Vasa (1496 - 1560), became king of Sweden in 1523 and was the first monarch of the house of Vasa. ... Events February 24 - Margaret I seizes Albert, thus becoming ruler of Denmark, Norway and Sweden June 15 - Battle of Kosovo between Serbs and Ottomans. ... The Kalmar Union united the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden under one monarch in 1397. ... A personal union consists of two or more entities that are internationally considered separate states, only sharing the same Head of State (and thence also sharing whatever political actions are vested in the Head of State, but no, or at least extremely few, others). ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... For usages of The Crown in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, see Crown of the Polish Kingdom. ... Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther. ... Events April - Battle of Villalors - Forces loyal to Emperor Charles V defeat the Comuneros, a league of urban bourgeois rebelling against Charles in Spain. ... Gustav I of Sweden, Gustav Vasa or Gustav Eriksson Vasa (1496 - 1560), became king of Sweden in 1523 and was the first monarch of the house of Vasa. ...


Gustav Vasa's reign was signified by the Protestant Reformation, a renewed consolidation and centralization of the state, the formalization of the taxed yeomanry's participation in decisions on taxes and their use through a four-chamber parliament, and of relatively peaceful international relations. Gustav Vasa is the closest to a Father of the Nation the Swedes know. The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... A tax is an involuntary fee paid by individuals or businesses to a government. ... The Riksdag of the Estates, or Ståndsriksdagen, was the name used for the Estates of the Swedish realm, or Rikets ständer, when they were assembled. ... Father of the Nation is a term used by many countries to describe a political or symbolic leader who was one of the most influential founding fathers of the nation. ...


The 17th century saw the rise of Sweden as one of the great powers in Europe, due to successful participation, initiated by King Gustavus Adolphus, in the Thirty Years' War. This position would crumble in the 18th century when Imperial Russia took the reins of northern Europe in the Great Northern War, and eventually in 1809, splitting off the eastern half of Sweden, thereby creating the Russian Grand Duchy of Finland. In between, Sweden with Finland had experienced 50 years of early Parliamentarism. (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Charles IX Main article: Charles IX of Sweden Charles IX Not till March 6, 1604, after Duke John son of John III of Sweden, had formally renounced his hereditary right to the throne, did Charles IX of Sweden begin to style himself king. ... In the context of international relations and diplomacy, power (sometimes clarified as international power, national power, or state power) is the ability of one state to influence or control other states. ... Gustav II Adolph Gustav II Adolph (December 9, 1594 - November 6, 1632) (also known as Gustav Adolph the Great, under the Latin name Gustavus Adolphus or the Swedish form Gustav II Adolf) was a King of Sweden. ... The victory of Gustavus Adolphus at the Battle of Breitenfeld (1631) The Thirty Years War was a conflict fought between the years 1618 and 1648, principally in the Central European territory of the Holy Roman Empire, but also involving most of the major continental powers. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of Russian history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start... Not to be confused with the Northern Wars (1655–1661) The Swedish Victory at Narva, 1700 by Gustaf Cederström, painted 1910 Battle of Poltava fragment of mosaic, by Mikhail Lomonosov, 1717 The Great Northern War was the war fought between a coalition of Russia, Denmark-Norway and Saxony-Poland (from... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of Russian history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start... The Grand Duchy of Finland was a state that existed 1809–1917. ... A parliamentary system, or parliamentarism, is distinguished by the executive branch of government being dependent on the direct or indirect support of the parliament, often expressed through a vote of confidence. ...


Recent Swedish history has been peaceful, the last war being the Campaign against Norway, 1814, establishing a Sweden-dominated personal union with Norway. The union was peacefully dissolved in 1905, despite some sabre-rattling. A threatening Socialist Revolution was avoided in 1917, following the re-introduction of Parliamentarism, and the country was democratized. Sweden remained a neutral country during World War I and World War II (with a brief exception for the Winter War). It continued to stay non-aligned during the Cold War and still today is not a member of any military alliance. 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1905 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1917 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... A neutral country takes no side in a war between other parties, and in return hopes to avoid being attacked by either of them. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The Winter War (also known as the Russo-Finnish War) broke out when the Soviet Union attacked Finland on November 30, 1939, three months after the start of World War II. As a consequence, the Soviet Union was expelled from the League of Nations on December 14th. ... The Cold War ( 1947- 1991) was the open yet restricted rivalry that developed after World War II between groups of nations practicing different ideologies and political systems. ... A Military alliance is an agreement between two, or more, countries; related to wartime planning, commitments, and/or contingencies; such agreements can be both defensive and offensive. ...


The first ceremony to award the Nobel Prize, founded by the Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel, was held at the Old Royal Academy of Music in Stockholm in 1901; beginning in 1902, the prizes have been formally awarded by the King of Sweden. Remaining outside of World War II military action, except for lucrative contracts with Germany [1] (http://www.dhh-3.de/biblio/news/1997/0607/), gave the Swedes a great advantage when Europe was rebuilt after the war, ensuring them a particularly high standard of living for many decades and allowing the foundation of an extensive welfare state. The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... Alfred Nobel Alfred Bernhard Nobel  listen? ( October 21, 1833, Stockholm, Sweden – December 10, 1896, San Remo, Italy). ... The Royal Swedish Academy of Music or , founded in 1771 by King Gustav III, is one of the Royal Academies in Sweden. ... Stockholm [, ] is the capital and the largest City of Sweden. ... 1901 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Events January-April January 28 - The Carnegie Institution is founded in Washington, DC with a $10 million gift from Andrew Carnegie. ... Sweden is a constitutional monarchy with a representative democracy based on a parliamentary system. ... There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ...


Politics

Main articles: Politics of Sweden Popular government in Sweden rests upon ancient traditions. ...


Sweden has been a monarchy for almost a millennium, with taxation controlled by the parliament. Until 1866, the taxed peasantry was represented in one of the four chambers, then Sweden became a Constitutional monarchy with a bicameral parliament, with the First Chamber indirectly elected by local governments, and the Second Chamber directly elected. For related meanings see also Monarch (disambiguation) A monarchy, (from the Greek monos, one, and archein, to rule) is a form of government that has a monarch as Head of State. ... A millennium is a period of time equal to one thousand years. ... A tax is an involuntary fee paid by individuals or businesses to a government. ... 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ... The Riksdag of the Estates, or Ståndsriksdagen, was the name used for the Estates of the Swedish realm, or Rikets ständer, when they were assembled. ... A constitutional monarchy is a form of government established under a constitutional system which acknowledges a hereditary or elected monarch as head of state. ... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... Local governments are administrative offices of an area smaller than a state. ...


Legislative power was shared between king and parliament until 1975. In 1971, the Parliament, the Riksdag, became unicameral. Constitutionally, the 349-member Riksdag holds supreme authority in Sweden, and its acts are not subject to judicial review. However, acts of the parliament must at every level be made inapplicable if they obviously are against constitutional laws. Legislation may be initiated by the Cabinet or by members of Parliament. Members are elected on the basis of proportional representation for a four-year term. The constitution, "Regeringsformen" (the fundamental law of constitutional level), can be altered by the Riksdag, which requires a supermajority and confirmation after the following general elections. Sweden has three other laws of constitutional level; successionsordningen (The Act of Royal Succession), tryckfrihetsförordningen (The Freedom of the Press Act) and yttrandefrihetsgrundlagen (The Fundamental Law on Freedom of Expression). Riksdag is also the Swedish name of the Parliament of Finland. ... Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ... Judicial review is the power of a court to review a law or an official act of a government employee or agent; for example, although the basis is different in different countries, as unconstitutional or violating of basic principles of justice. ... The Swedish Senate: Riksrådet, from 1809 Statsrådet, from 1975 Regeringen was and is the principal government institution of Sweden The Swedish Senate, Senatus Regni Sueciae, originated as a council of Regional Magnates acting as advisers to the Monarch of the combined Realms of the Swedes (from 996, approximately). ... Proportional Representation (PR) describes various multi-winner electoral systems which try to ensure that the proportional support gained by different groups is accurately reflected in the election result. ... The Swedish Constitution consists of four fundamental laws ( Swedish: grundlagar): The Instrument of Government ( 1974) The Act of Succession ( 1810) The Freedom of the Press Act ( 1766) The Fundamental Law on Freedom of Expression ( 1991) There is also a law on the working order of the Parliament with a special... A supermajority or a qualified majority is a requirement for a proposal to gain a specified level or type of support which exceeds a simple majority in order to have effect. ...


Executive power was shared between the King and a noble Privy Council until 1680, followed by the King's autocratic rule initiated by the common estates of the Parliament. As a reaction to the failed Great Northern War, Parliamentarism was introduced in 1719, followed by three different flavours of Constitutional Monarchy in 1772, 1789 and 1809, the latter granting several civil liberties. This article concerns the British Sovereigns Privy Council. ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... Autocracy is a form of government where unlimited power is held by a single individual. ... Not to be confused with the Northern Wars (1655–1661) The Swedish Victory at Narva, 1700 by Gustaf Cederström, painted 1910 Battle of Poltava fragment of mosaic, by Mikhail Lomonosov, 1717 The Great Northern War was the war fought between a coalition of Russia, Denmark-Norway and Saxony-Poland (from... A parliamentary system, or parliamentarism, is distinguished by the executive branch of government being dependent on the direct or indirect support of the parliament, often expressed through a vote of confidence. ... Events January 23 - The Liechtenstein is created within the Holy Roman Empire April 25 - Daniel Defoe publishes Robinson Crusoe Prussia conducts Europes first systematic census Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) Births November 30 - Augusta of Saxe-Gotha, later Princess of Wales. ... A constitutional monarchy is a form of government established under a constitutional system which acknowledges a hereditary or elected monarch as head of state. ... Events February 17 - First partition of Russia and Prussia, later including Austria May - Watauga Association formed in East Tennessee as the first independent Anglo-American government. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Swedish Constitution consists of four fundamental laws (Swedish: grundlagar): The Instrument of Government (1974) The Act of Succession (1810) The Freedom of the Press Act (1766) The Fundamental Law on Freedom of Expression (1991) There is also a law on the working order of the Parliament with a special...


Parliamentarism was re-introduced in 1917 as King Gustaf V, after decades of struggle and ultimately fearing a threatening revolution, accepted to appoint ministers that could be expected to have the political confidence of a parliamentary majority. This was followed by common and equal suffrage enacted 1918–21. Parliamentarism was upheld by his successor Gustav VI Adolf until a new constitution in 1975 abolished the monarch's political power. 1917 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... King Gustav V of Sweden, Oscar Gustaf Adolf (June 16, 1858 - October 29, 1950), was the eldest son of King Oscar II of Sweden and Norway. ... A minister or a secretary is a politician who heads a government ministry or department (e. ... Universal suffrage (also general suffrage or common suffrage) consists of the extension of voting privileges to all adults, without distinction as to race, sex, belief or social status. ... King Gustav VI Adolf of Sweden, Oskar Fredrik Wilhelm Olaf Gustav Adolf (November 11, 1882 - September 15, 1973), was the eldest son of King Gustav V. At birth he was created Duke of Scania. ... The Swedish Constitution consists of four fundamental laws ( Swedish: grundlagar): The Instrument of Government ( 1974) The Act of Succession ( 1810) The Freedom of the Press Act ( 1766) The Fundamental Law on Freedom of Expression ( 1991) There is also a law on the working order of the Parliament with a special...


The monarch remains as the formal, but merely symbolic, head of state with mainly ceremonial duties. A head of state or chief of state is the chief public representative of a nation-state, federation or commonwealth, whose role generally includes personifying the continuity and legitimacy of the state and exercising the political powers, functions and duties granted to the head of state in the countrys... A ceremony is an activity, infused with ritual significance, performed on a certain occasion. ...


Social Democracy has played a dominant political role since 1917, after Reformists had confirmed their strength and the Revolutionaries left the party. Social Democratic influence over society and government is often described as Hegemony. 19321956 Social Democrats and Agrarians formed a stable governing majority, that was widened during WWII. After 1956, the Cabinets have been totally dominated by the Social Democrats, in the parliament often supported by the Left Party (formerly the Communists, and still with a large and influential Communist fraction) and the Greens (Environment party), except for six years 19761982 and three years 19911994. Social democracy is a political ideology emerging in the late 19th and early 20th centuries from supporters of Marxism who believed that the transition to a socialist society could be achieved through democratic evolutionary rather than revolutionary means. ... Reformism (also called revisionism or revisionist theory) is the belief that gradual changes in a society can ultimately change its fundamental structures. ... A revolution is a relatively sudden and absolutely drastic change. ... Hegemony is the dominance of one group over other groups, with or without the threat of force, to the extent that, for instance, the dominant party can dictate the terms of trade to its advantage; or more broadly, that cultural perspectives become skewed to favor the dominant group. ... 1956 is a leap year starting on Sunday. ... The Centre Party (Centerpartiet) is a political party in Sweden. ... German soldiers at the Battle of Stalingrad World War II was the most extensive and costly armed conflict in the history of the world, involving the great majority of the worlds nations, being fought simultaneously in several major theatres, and costing tens of millions of lives. ... The Swedish Senate: Riksrådet, from 1809 Statsrådet, from 1975 Regeringen was and is the principal government institution of Sweden The Swedish Senate, Senatus Regni Sueciae, originated as a council of Regional Magnates acting as advisers to the Monarch of the combined Realms of the Swedes (from 996, approximately). ... The Left Party (Vänsterpartiet) is a political party in Sweden. ... The Green Party (Miljöpartiet de Gröna) is a political party in Sweden. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ...


The judicial system is divided between courts with regular civil and criminal jurisdiction and special courts with responsibility for litigation between the public and governmental authorities. Swedish law is codified and its court system consists of local courts (tingsrätter/länsrätter), regional appellate courts (hovrätter/kammarrätter), and a Supreme Court (Högsta Domstolen/Regeringsrätten) where the latter are the administrative benches.


Counties

Main article: Counties of Sweden A County, or Län, is an administrative and political subdivision of Sweden. ...


Sweden is divided into 21 counties or län. In each county there is a County Administrative Board or länsstyrelse which is appointed by the Government. In each county there is also a separate County Council or landsting, which is the municipal representation appointed by the county electorate. Each county further divides into a number of municipalities or kommuner, making a total of 290 municipalities, in 2004. There are also older historical divisions of the Swedish Realm, primarily into provinces and lands. Originally, a county was the land under the jurisdiction of a count (in Great Britain, an earl, though the original earldoms covered larger areas) by reason of that office. ... Län and lääni are the Swedish and Finnish terms for the administrative divisions used in Sweden and Finland, and sometimes in other countries, especially as a translation of the Russian word oblast. ... A County Administrative Board is a Government appointed board of a County in Sweden. ... A County Council, or Landsting, is an elected assembly of a County in Sweden. ... The Municipalities or Kommuner represent the local level of self government in Sweden. ... The Realm of Sweden or Svenska väldet is a term that historically was used to comprise all the territories under the control of the Swedish monarchs. ... The provinces or landskap were the subdivision of Sweden until 1634, when they were replaced by counties in a reform, led by Axel Oxenstierna, that still remains in force in Sweden proper. ... Sweden was historically divided into four Lands or Landsdelar: Götaland Svealand Norrland Österland Götaland and Svealand were once rival kingdoms before being united under one Crown by Svealand. ...

Enlarge
Map of Sweden

Download high resolution version (351x754, 32 KB)CIA map Sweden with bridge added. ... Download high resolution version (351x754, 32 KB)CIA map Sweden with bridge added. ... Blekinge County, or Blekinge län is a County or län in the south of Sweden. ... Dalarna County, or Dalarnas län is a County or län in middle Sweden. ... Gotland County, or Gotlands län, is a County or län of Sweden. ... Gävleborg County, or Gävleborgs län, is a County or län on the Baltic Sea coast of Sweden. ... Halland County, or Hallands län, is a County or län on the western coast of Sweden. ... Jämtland County, or Jämtlands län, is a County or län in the north of Sweden. ... Jönköping County, or Jönköpings län is a County or län in southern Sweden. ... Kalmar County, or Kalmar län is a County or län in southern Sweden. ... Kronoberg County, or Kronobergs län, is a County or län in southern Sweden. ... Norrbotten County, or Norrbottens län, or North Bothnia is a County or län in the extreme north of Sweden. ... Skåne County, or Skåne län, is the southernmost County or län, of Sweden. ... Stockholm County, or Stockholms län, is a County or län on the Baltic sea coast of Sweden. ... Södermanland County, or Södermanlands län is a County or län on the south east coast of Sweden. ... Uppsala County, or Uppsala län is a County or län on the eastern coast of Sweden. ... Värmland County, or Värmlands län, is a County or län in eastern middle Sweden. ... Västerbotten County, or Västerbottens län is a County or län in the north of Sweden. ... Västernorrland County, or Västernorrlands län is a County or län in the north of Sweden. ... Västmanland County or Västmanlands län, is a County or län in central Sweden. ... Västra Götaland County, or Västra Götalands län is a County or län on the western coast of Sweden. ... Örebro County, or Örebro län,, is a County or län in middle Sweden. ... Östergötland County, or Östergötlands län, is a County or län on the south east of Sweden. ...

Geography

Main article: Geography of Sweden Location Northern Europe, Scandinavian Peninsula, bordering the Baltic Sea, Gulf of Bothnia, Kattegat, and Skagerrak, between Finland and Norway. ...

Sweden in winter (February 19, 2003)

Sweden enjoys a mostly temperate climate despite its northern latitude, mainly due to the Gulf Stream. In the south of Sweden leaf-bearing trees are prolific, in the north pines and hardy birches dominate the landscape. In the mountains of northern Sweden a sub-arctic climate predominates. North of the Arctic Circle, the sun never sets during the summer, and in the winter night is unending. Download high resolution version (540x611, 127 KB)From NASAs Earth Observatory; http://earthobservatory. ... Download high resolution version (540x611, 127 KB)From NASAs Earth Observatory; http://earthobservatory. ... In geography, temperate latitudes of the globe lie between the tropics and the polar circles. ... Latitude, denoted φ, gives the location of a place on Earth north or south of the Equator. ... For the album by Ocean Colour Scene, see North Atlantic Drift (album) The Gulf Stream is orange and yellow in this representation of water temperatures of the Atlantic. ... This article is about the biological organisms known as trees. ... This article deals with the tree; for the e-mail client see Pine email client Species About 115. ... Species many species see text and classification Birch is the name of any tree of the genus Betula, in the family Betulaceae, closely related to the beech/oak family, Fagaceae. ... Arctic Circle - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ...


East of Sweden is the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Bothnia, providing a long coastline, and mellowing the climate further yet. To the west is the Scandinavian mountain chain, a range that separates Sweden from Norway. The Baltic Sea is located in Northern Europe, bounded by the Scandinavian Peninsula, the mainland of east and central Europe, and the Danish islands. ... Categories: Finland geography stubs | Sweden geography stubs | Seas | Baltic Sea ... The Scandinavian Mountains, or Skanderna, Kölen or Fjällen, are a mountain range that runs through the Scandinavian Peninsula. ... The Kingdom of Norway is a Nordic country on the western portion of the Scandinavian Peninsula, bordering Sweden, Finland and Russia, with territorial waters bordering Danish and British waters. ...


The southern part of the country is chiefly agricultural, with forests covering a larger percentage of the land the further north one goes. Population density is also higher in southern Sweden, with centers being in the valley of lake Mälaren and the Öresund region. Mälaren is the third largest lake in Sweden, after lakes Vänern and Vättern. ... Northern Öresund Oresund (Öresund in Swedish or Øresund in Danish) or The Sound, is the strait that separates Zealand from Scania, and thereby Denmark from Sweden. ...


Gotland and Öland are the two largest Islands of Sweden. Gotland is the largest island in the Baltic Sea. ... Öland is an island in the Baltic Sea. ... This is a list of the largest islands of Sweden. ...


Economy

Main article: Economy of Sweden Sweden is an industrialized country. ...

The Swedish Krona

Aided by peace and neutrality for the whole of the 20th century, Sweden has achieved an enviable standard of living under a mixed system of high-tech capitalism and extensive welfare benefits. It has a modern distribution system, excellent internal and external communications, and a skilled labour force. Timber, hydropower, and iron ore constitute the resource base of an economy heavily oriented toward foreign trade. Swedish Krona The text on the coin reads Carl XVI Gustaf, Sveriges Konung (Carl XVI Gustaf, King of Sweden). ... Swedish Krona The text on the coin reads Carl XVI Gustaf, Sveriges Konung (Carl XVI Gustaf, King of Sweden). ... Peace is generally defined as a state of quiet or tranquillity, as an absence of disturbance or agitation (Latin derivation Pax = Absentia Belli). ... A neutral country takes no side in a war between other parties, and in return hopes to avoid being attacked by either of them. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Capitalism has been defined in various ways (see definitions of capitalism). ... Timber Timber is a term used to describe clusters of trees. ... Hydropower (or waterpower) harnesses the energy of moving or falling water. ... General Name, Symbol, Number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metal Group, Period, Block 8 (VIIIB), 4 , d Density, Hardness 7874 kg/m3, 4. ... An ore is a mineral deposit containing a metal or other valuable resource in economically viable concentrations. ... Economics is the social science studying production and consumption through measurable variables. ... Wiktionary has a definition of: Trade Trade centers on the exchange of goods and/or services. ...


Privately-owned firms account for about 90% of industrial output, of which the engineering sector accounts for 50% of output and exports. Agriculture accounts for only 2% of GDP and 2% of the jobs. The government's commitment to fiscal discipline resulted in a substantial budgetary surplus in 2001, which was cut by more than half in 2002, due to the global economic slowdown, revenue declines, and spending increases. The Swedish Riksbank is focusing on price stability with its inflation target of 2%. Growth is expected to reach 3.5% in 2004, assuming a continued moderate global recovery. However, open unemployment has steadily increased since 2001 and stood at 5.5% as of March 2005, although there are a great many more persons of working age without a job,. The communications and transportation systems of Sweden are important components of the infrastructure. Farming, ploughing rice paddy, in Indonesia Agriculture is the process of producing food, feed, fiber and other desired products by cultivation of certain plants and the raising of domesticated animals ( livestock). ... In economics, the gross domestic product (GDP) is a measure of the amount of the economic production of a particular territory in financial capital terms during a specific time period. ... Sweden is a constitutional monarchy with a representative democracy based on a parliamentary system. ... Sveriges Riksbank is the central bank of Sweden, sometimes called just the Bank of Sweden. ... Communications in Sweden Telephones main lines in use: 6. ... Transportation in Sweden. ...


Demographics

Main article: Demographics of Sweden Ethnicity Beside the Swedes, the Sweden-Finns are the largest ethnic minority comprising of approximately 50,000 indigenous along the Swedish-Finnish border, and 450,000 first- and second generation immigrated ethnic Finns. ...


Sweden has one of the world's highest life expectancies and one of the lowest birth rates. The country counts at least 17,000 indigenous Samis among its population. Also some 50,000 of the ethnic Finns of Sweden consist an indigenous minority, although many more of the Sweden Finns descend from 20th century immigrants. In demography, life expectancy is a statistical measure of the average, or mathematical expected value, of the remaining lifetime of an individual in the given group. ... In demography, the crude birth rate of a population is the number of childbirths per 1000 persons per year. ... Indigenous peoples are: Peoples living in an area prior to colonization by a state Peoples living in an area within a nation-state, prior to the formation of a nation-state, but who do not identify with the dominant nation. ... Sami flag The Sami people (there are other names and spellings including Sámi, Saami and Lapp) are an indigenous people of northern Sweden, Norway, Finland and Russia, covering a total area in the Nordic countries corresponding to the size of Sweden. ... The ethnic Finns are the dominant ethnic group in Finland, and the largest ethnic minority in Sweden, the Sweden-Finns. ... Sweden Finns (Ruotsinsuomalaiset in Finnish, Sverigefinnarna in Swedish) are a Finnish speaking minority in Sweden. ...


The Swedish nation has been transformed from a nation of emigration ending after World War I to a nation of immigration from World War II and on. Almost 12% of the residents were born abroad, and about one fifth of Sweden's population are either immigrants or the children of immigrants. The largest immigrant groups are from Finland, the former Yugoslavia, Iran, Norway, Denmark, and Poland. This reflects the inter-Nordic migrations, earlier periods of labor immigration, and later decades of refugee and family immigration. Emigration is the action and the phenomenon of leaving ones native country to settle abroad. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... The Republic of Finland (Finnish: Suomen tasavalta, Swedish: Republiken Finland) is a Nordic country in northeastern Europe, bordered by the Baltic Sea to the southwest, the Gulf of Finland to the southeast and the Gulf of Bothnia to the west. ... The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state that existed from 1945 to 1992. ... Iran (Persian: ایران) is a Middle Eastern country located in southwestern Asia. ... The Kingdom of Norway is a Nordic country on the western portion of the Scandinavian Peninsula, bordering Sweden, Finland and Russia, with territorial waters bordering Danish and British waters. ... The Kingdom of Denmark is geographically the smallest Nordic country and is part of the European Union. ... The Republic of Poland, a democratic country with a population of 38,626,349 and area of 312,685 km², is located in Central Europe, between Germany to the west, the Czech Republic and Slovakia to the south, Ukraine and Belarus to the east, and the Baltic Sea, Lithuania and...


The Finns were the first large group of immigrants to contemporary Sweden. During World War II some 70,000 war children were evacuated from Finland. 15,000 of them stayed after the war, and many more returned as adults. Post-war hardship in Finland pushed large contingents of unemployed Finns to Sweden's booming economy in the 1950s60s. At its height, over 400,000 Finns lived in Sweden, but following the 1973 energy crisis the unemployment rate in Sweden worsened while steady Soviet trade was to Finland's advantage. Since then, the number of immigrated Sweden-Finns has decreased to below 200,000. During World War II some 70,000 war children were evacuated from Finland to Scandinavia, chiefly to Sweden. ... Events and trends Technology United States tests the first fusion bomb. ... Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s - 1960s - 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s Years: 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... (Redirected from 1973 energy crisis) United States, drivers of vehicles with odd numbered license plates were allowed to purchase gasoline only on odd-numbered days of the month, while drivers with even-numbers were limited to even-numbered days. ... Sweden Finns (Ruotsinsuomalaiset in Finnish, Sverigefinnarna in Swedish) are a Finnish speaking minority in Sweden. ...

A typical 19th, early 20th century farmer's house

Soviet intervention against the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and the 1968 Czechoslovakian liberalization resulted in the first surges of intellectual political refugees. American deserters from the Vietnam War often found refuge among the Swedes, who in international politics took a clear stand against what they typically viewed as imperialism executed by both the Soviet Union and the United States of America. After the 1973 coup in Chile, and the following military dictatorships in Chile and other South American countries, political refugees came to dominate the image of immigration to Sweden, including refugees from Iran, Iraq and Palestine. Of the refugees from the Yugoslav wars, 135,000 remain in Sweden (2001). Red house with white knots http://www. ... Red house with white knots http://www. ... Hungarians investigate a disabled Soviet tank in Budapest The 1956 Hungarian Revolution, also known as the Hungarian Uprising, was a popular revolt against Soviet influence and control in Hungary. ... This article refers to a period of history of Czechoslovakia in 1968. ... Power lines leading to a trash dump hover just overhead in El Carpio, a Nicaraguan refugee camp in Costa Rica Under international law, a refugee is a person who is outside his/her country of nationality or habitual residence; has a well-founded fear of persecution because of his/her... Imperialism is the policy of extending the control or authority over foreign entities as a means of acquisition and/or maintenance of empires, either through direct territorial or through indirect methods of exerting control on the politics and/or economy of other countries. ... (Redirected from 1973 coup in Chile) The Chilean coup détat of September 11, 1973, was a watershed event in the history of Chile and the Cold War. ... The Republic of Chile is a country in South America occupying a long coastal strip between the Andes mountains and the Pacific Ocean. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Iran (Persian: ایران) is a Middle Eastern country located in southwestern Asia. ... The Republic of Iraq is a Middle Eastern country in southwestern Asia encompassing the ancient region of Mesopotamia at the confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers. ... The term Palestine may refer to: Palestine: A geographical region in the Middle East, centered on Jerusalem. ... The Yugoslav wars were a series of violent conflicts in the territory of the former Yugoslavia that went on in the 1990s. ...


Swedish is a Germanic language related to Danish and Norwegian but different in pronunciation and orthography. English is by far the leading foreign language, particularly among students and those under age 50. The Swedish language has held a de facto dominant position to such a degree that making it an official language never has been a political issue. However, the recognition of five minority languages, on April 1, 2000, has raised the issue of whether Swedish should have a standing as the official language in Sweden. Sami, Meänkieli and Finnish may be used in dealing with municipal and government agencies, courts, preschools and nursing homes in parts of Norrbotten County. Proto-Indo-European Indo-European studies The Germanic languages form one of the branches of the Indo-European (IE) language family, spoken by the Germanic peoples who settled in northern Europe along the borders of the Roman Empire. ... Swedish (svenska  listen?) is a Scandinavian language language spoken predominantly in Sweden, Finland and Åland by over 8 million native speakers. ... An official language is something that is given a unique status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... Sami is a general name for a group of Finno-Ugric languages spoken in parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia, in Northern Europe. ... Meänkieli, or Torne Valley Finnish, is a dialect of Finnish that since the split of the Swedish realm in 1809 has developed in partial isolation from standard Finnish. ... Finnish is spoken by the majority (92%) in Finland and by ethnic Finns outside Finland. ... The Municipalities or Kommuner represent the local level of self government in Sweden. ... The Government Agencies in Sweden are state controlled organizations who act independently to carry out the policies of the Swedish Government. ... This article is about courts of law. ... A nursery school is a school for the education of very young children (generally five years of age and younger). ... A nursing home is a place of residence for people who require constant medical care, but at a lower level than a hospital. ... Norrbotten County, or Norrbottens län, or North Bothnia is a County or län in the extreme north of Sweden. ...


Sweden has an extensive childcare system that guarantees a place for all young children from 1-5 years old in a public day-care facility. From ages 6-16, children attend compulsory comprehensive school. After completing the ninth grade, 90% attend upper secondary school for either academic or technical education. Childcare is the act of caring for and supervising minor children. ...


Swedes benefit from an extensive social welfare system, which provides for childcare and maternity and paternity leave, a ceiling on health care costs, old-age pensions, and sick leave among other benefits. Parents are entitled to a total of 480 days paid leave between birth and the child's eighth birthday, with 30 days reserved specifically for each parent. A ceiling on health care costs makes it easier for Swedish workers to take time off for medical reasons. Social welfare can be taken to mean the welfare or well-being of a society. ...


As of approximately August 12, 2004, the population of Sweden for the first time exceeded 9,000,000, according to Statistics Sweden. August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Statistics Sweden, or Statistiska centralbyrån (SCB), is a Government Agency responsible of producing the official statistics on Sweden. ...


Culture

Main article: Culture of Sweden Swedish 20th-century culture is noted by pioneering works by the early days of cinema, with Mauritz Stiller and Victor Sjöström. ...


Swedish 20th century culture is noted by pioneering works in the early days of cinema, with Mauritz Stiller and Victor Sjöström. Later on, filmmakers like Ingmar Bergman and actresses such as Greta Garbo, Zarah Leander, Ingrid Bergman and Anita Ekberg made careers abroad. Victor Sjöström  listen, in US sometimes known as Victor Seastrom (born September 20, 1879 - died January 3, 1960), was a Swedish actor, screenwriter, and film director. ... Ingmar Bergman (born July 14, 1918) is a Swedish film director. ... Garbo in the 1920s Greta Garbo (September 18, 1905 – April 15, 1990) was a Swedish actress. ... Zarah Leander Zarah Leander (March 15, 1907 - June 23, 1981) was a famous European actress and singer of Swedish nationality. ... Ingrid Bergman (b. ... Anita Ekberg (born September 29, 1931 in Malmö) was a model and actress. ...


Swedish music is in many minds connected with ABBA, although more recently indie bands like Millencolin, Soundtrack Of Our Lives and The Hives have started achieving international fame. Also worthy of mention are bob hund, Roxette, Ace of Base, The Cardigans, and Yngwie J. Malmsteen ABBA on the cover of their album The Definitive Collection (2001) ABBA were a Swedish pop music group, the most successful to date from that country. ... Millencolin Millencolin is a skate-punk band that was formed in October of 1992 by Erik Ohlsson, Mathias Färm and Nikola Sarcevic in Örebro, Sweden. ... The Hives are a punk band from Fagersta, Sweden that emerged in the US and United Kingdom in the early 2000s. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Roxette is a Swedish duo, consisting of pop musicians Per Gessle and Marie Fredriksson. ... Ace of Base is a Swedish pop band that consists of Jonas Berggren (Joker), Ulf Ekberg (Buddha), Linn Berggren and Jenny Berggren; the three Berggrens are siblings. ... The Cardigans are a Swedish indie/pop band that formed in 1992. ... Yngwie J. Malmsteen (born Lars Johan Yngve Lannerbäck, June 30, 1963) is a guitarist from Sweden who achieved widespread acclaim in the 1980s due to his technical proficiency and fusion of classical music elements with heavy rock guitar. ...


In underground circles, Sweden is known for a large number of death metal and black metal acts, often viewed as pioneering or at the forefront of the scene. Swedish metal bands include Bathory, Opeth, Dark Tranquility, Naglfar, In Flames, and Vintersorg. Cover of Stop at Nothing by Dying Fetus Death metal is a form of heavy metal music with thrash influences which emerged in the United States (especially Florida and California), Europe (especially the United Kingdom and Sweden) and Canada in the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... Black metal is a musical genre, related to styles of heavy metal, such as death metal. ... Bathory is a Swedish heavy metal band, and is regarded as one of the forefathers of the black metal and viking metal genres. ... Opeth is a progressive death metal band from Sweden. ... Dark Tranquillity is a melodic-death metal band from Sweden. ... In Norse mythology, Naglfar was a ship made entirely from the nails of the dead. ... Categories: Music stubs | In Flames ... Vintersorg is a Swedish Viking metal band formed in 1994. ...


Swedish literature is also vibrant and active, Sweden ranking third in the list of countries with most Nobel Prize laureates in literature. The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes...

Swedish cuisine, like that in the other Scandinavian countries (Denmark and Norway), is traditionally rich in fat. ... Systembolaget is the national alcoholic beverage retailing monopoly in Sweden. ... Sweden has a long history of folk musics, including polka, schottis, waltz, polska and mazurka. ...

Holidays

Main article: Holidays in Sweden All official holidays in Sweden are established by acts of Parliament. ...


The Swedish holiday calendar consists mainly of Christian holidays. Many of these are however a continuation of pre-christian customs, such as Midsummer and Walpurgis Night. Apart from official holidays and a few de facto holidays there are also official flag day observances and minor observances in the namesday calendar. Midsummer celebration, Åmmeberg, Sweden Midsummer is the period of time centered upon the summer solstice. ... Walpurgis Night (Valborgsmässoafton in Swedish, Vappu in Finnish, Volbriöö in Estonian, Valpurģu nakts or Valpurģi in Latvian, Walpurgisnacht in German) is a holiday celebrated on April 30, in Finland, Sweden, Estonia, Latvia and Germany. ... By Swedish law a number of days of the calendar year are designated as official flag days. ... Namesdays or name days are a Swedish tradition of attaching personal names to each day of the year, and celebrating the association of particular days with those having this name. ...

Date English Name Local Name Remarks
January 1 New Year's Day Nyårsdagen  
January 6 Epiphany Trettondagen  
Moveable Friday Good Friday Långfredag The Friday before Easter Sunday
Moveable Sunday Easter Sunday Påskdagen  
Moveable Monday Easter Monday Annandag påsk The day after Easter Sunday
May 1 May Day Första maj See also Walpurgis Night
Moveable Thursday Ascension Day Kristi himmelsfärdsdag 40 days after Easter
Moveable Sunday Pentecost Pingstdagen 50 days after Easter
Moveable Monday Whitmonday Annandag Pingst 51 days after Easter, to 2004
June 6 National Day of Sweden Nationaldagen from 2005
Friday before Midsummer day Midsummer Eve Midsommarafton Non official - however a de facto full holiday
Saturday between June 20 and 26 Midsummer Day Midsommardagen  
Saturday between October 31 and November 6 All Saints Day Alla helgons dag Moved from November 1
December 24 Christmas Eve Julafton Non official - however a de facto full holiday
December 25 Christmas Day Juldagen  
December 26 Boxing Day Annandag jul  
December 31 New Year's Eve Nyårsafton Non official - however a de facto full holiday
All Sundays     Official holidays - names follow the Liturgical year

This page deals with the annual event. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... This article is about the Christian feast. ... For the novel by Ernest Hemingway, see A Moveable Feast. ... Good Friday is a special day celebrated by Christians on the Friday before Easter or Pascha. ... For the novel by Ernest Hemingway, see A Moveable Feast. ... Easter (also called Pascha) is generally accounted the most important holiday of the Christian year, observed March or April each year to celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus from the dead (after his death by crucifixion; see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year, almost two... For the novel by Ernest Hemingway, see A Moveable Feast. ... Easter (also called Pascha) is generally accounted the most important holiday of the Christian year, observed March or April each year to celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus from the dead (after his death by crucifixion; see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year, almost two... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... For the distress signal, see: Mayday; For the James Bond villain see May Day (James Bond) May Day is a name for various holidays celebrated on May 1 (or in the beginning of May). ... Walpurgis Night (Valborgsmässoafton in Swedish, Vappu in Finnish, Volbriöö in Estonian, Valpurģu nakts or Valpurģi in Latvian, Walpurgisnacht in German) is a holiday celebrated on April 30, in Finland, Sweden, Estonia, Latvia and Germany. ... For the novel by Ernest Hemingway, see A Moveable Feast. ... For other meanings see Ascension (disambiguation) The Ascension is one of the great feasts in the Christian liturgical calendar, and commemorates the bodily Ascension of Jesus into Heaven forty days after his resurrection from the dead. ... For the novel by Ernest Hemingway, see A Moveable Feast. ... Note: This article is mostly about the Christian holiday of Pentecost. ... For the novel by Ernest Hemingway, see A Moveable Feast. ... Note: This article is mostly about the Christian holiday of Pentecost. ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining. ... The Flag of Sweden The National Day of Sweden formerly known as the Day of the Swedish flag or Sveriges nationaldag and Svenska flaggans dag, occurring on June 6, is the national holiday of Sweden. ... Midsummer celebration, Åmmeberg, Sweden Midsummer is the period of time centered upon the summer solstice. ... Midsummer celebration, Åmmeberg, Sweden Midsummer is the period of time centered upon the summer solstice. ... June is the sixth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four with the length of 30 days. ... Midsummer celebration, Åmmeberg, Sweden Midsummer is the period of time centered upon the summer solstice. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining, as the final day of October. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... All Saints in Poland The festival of All Saints, also sometimes known as All Hallows, or Hallowmas, is a feast celebrated in honour of all the saints and martyrs, known or unknown. ... December 24 is the 358th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (359th in leap years). ... See also Christmas Christmas Eve, December 24, the day before Christmas Day, is treated to a greater or a lesser extent in most Christian societies as part of the festivities. ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 6 days remaining. ... Joseph and Mary with baby Jesus, at the first Christmas Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a holiday in the Christian calendar, usually observed on December 25, which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, 361st in leap years. ... Boxing Day is a public holiday observed in many Commonwealth countries on 26 December. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... This page deals with the annual event. ... The liturgical year, also known as the Christian year, consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in some Christian churches which determines when Feasts, Memorials, Commemorations, and Solemnities are to be observed and which portions of Scripture are to be read. ...

Miscellaneous topics

The right of public access to the wilderness, or everymans right, is a convention of property rights in the Nordic countries of Sweden, Finland and Norway, which allows the common public the right of access to the land, be it public or privately owned. ... The Government Agencies in Sweden are state controlled organizations who act independently to carry out the policies of the Swedish Government. ... Primary and Secondary School The educational system in Sweden is based on a nine year primary school, or Grundskola with mandatory attendance. ... This is a list of universities and academic institutions in Sweden. ... Swede (turnip /neep in Scotland) is also the British name for what the Americans call rutabaga. ... The foreign policy of Sweden is based on the premise that national security is best served by staying free of alliances in peacetime in order to remain a neutral country in the event of war. ... The Swedish Armed Forces, or Försvarsmakten, is a Government Agency responsible for the peacetime operation of the armed forces of Sweden. ... This is a list of wars fought by Sweden between 1521 and 1814: The Swedish War of Liberation or Befrielsekriget (1521-1523) The Armstice of Gotland (1524) The Recess of Malmö (1524) The Danish Count Feud or Danska Grevefejden (1534-1536) The Armstice of Copenhagen (1537) The Great Russian War... This is a list of Swedish regiments and other military units (divisions, brigades, battalions, companies) that has existed since the 16th century, most formations has changed name several times during its existence, but is only listed with its most known or used name. ... The Royal Academies are independent organisations, founded on Royal command, and acts to promote arts, culture and sciences in Sweden. ... This is a list of Swedish monarchs, that is, the Kings and ruling Queens of Sweden with Regents and Viceroys of the Kalmar Union up until the present time. ... Business & Industry Confederation of Swedish Enterprise (Svenskt Näringsliv) Swedish Confederation of Professional Associations (SACO) Swedish Confederation of Professional Employees (TCO) Swedish Union of Clerical and Technical Employees in Industry (SIF) Swedish Trade Union Confederation (LO) Defense Society and Defense (Folk och Försvar) Think Tanks Timbro Foundations Nobel Foundation... Communications in Sweden Telephones main lines in use: 6. ... Posten, the Swedish mail service, was established in 1636 by Axel Oxenstierna, and by the 18th century it had been extended throughout the country. ... Transportation in Sweden. ... Contents // Categories: Stub ... The Church of Sweden, or Svenska kyrkan, is the national church of Sweden. ... The Catholic Church in Sweden is a relatively small but growing branch of the Roman Catholic Church in the predominantly Sweden. ... Nature and the Swedish summer See also: Allemansrätten In the summer the sun hardly sets in Sweden, especially in the far north where it does not set at all. ... Reporters Without Borders, or RWB ( French: Reporters sans frontières, or RSF) is an international non-governmental organization devoted to freedom of the press. ... Sweden Sweden, a country in Europe History of Sweden Politics of Sweden Counties of Sweden Municipalities of Sweden Economy of Sweden Geography of Sweden Demographics of Sweden Culture of Sweden Swedish language Swedes, the inhabitants of Sweden Finland The Åland Islands, an autonomous and unilingually Swedish province of Finland The... This is a list of well known Swedes (and Finland-Swedes), ordered alphabetically within categories: Actors Main article: List of Swedish actors Greta Garbo Ann-Margret, entertainer Ingrid Bergman, (1915-1982), actress May Britt, (born 1933), actress Anita Ekberg, actress Gösta Ekman, (1920-1971), actor Greta Garbo, (1905-1990... This is a list of Swedish companies: Companies Asea Brown Boveri (Swedish-Swiss) Alfa Laval Akzo Nobel Arla Foods Autoliv Assa Abloy AstraZeneca (Swedish-British) Atlas Copco Axel Johnson AB Axfood Boliden Bure Equity Civitas Holding AB (owner of Vasakronan AB) Eniro Ericsson Electrolux ESAB Gambro Getinge Hasselblad Holmen Handelsbanken... This is a list of television channels that broadcast for a Swedish language audience. ... This is a list of radio stations that broadcast for a Swedish language audience. ... This is a list of Swedish newspapers with respective city of publication: Morning newspapers Göteborgs-Posten (Gothenburg) Dagens Nyheter. ...

International rankings

  • CIA World Factbook - GDP (http://www.odci.gov/cia/publications/factbook/rankorder/2004rank.html) - (PPP) per capita
    • 2004: 24th of 232 countries [2] (http://www.odci.gov/cia/publications/factbook/docs/notesanddefs.html)
  • Reporters Without Borders Worldwide Press Freedom Index
    • 2002: 7th of 139 countries [3]  (http://www.rsf.fr/article.php3?id_article=4116)
    • 2003: 9th of 166 countries [4]  (http://www.rsf.org/article.php3?id_article=8247)
    • 2004: 11th of 167 countries [5]  (http://www.rsf.fr/article.php3?id_article=11715)
  • Save the Children: State of the World's Mothers
    • 2004 [6] (http://www.savethechildren.org/mothers/report_2004/images/pdf/SOWM_2004_final.pdf)
      • Mothers' index rank: 1st of 119 countries
        • Women's index rank: 1st of 119 countries
        • Children's index rank: 10th of 119 countries
      • Infant mortality rate: lowest
      • % women with seats in the national government: highest
  • UN Human Development Index
    • 1975: 4th [7] (http://hdr.undp.org/reports/global/2000/en/pdf/hdr_2000_back1.pdf)
    • 1980: 7th [8] (http://hdr.undp.org/reports/global/2000/en/pdf/hdr_2000_back1.pdf)
    • 1985: 8th [9] (http://hdr.undp.org/reports/global/2000/en/pdf/hdr_2000_back1.pdf)
    • 1990: 11th [10] (http://hdr.undp.org/reports/global/2000/en/pdf/hdr_2000_back1.pdf)
    • 1998: 6th of 174 countries [11] (http://hdr.undp.org/reports/global/2000/en/pdf/hdr_2000_back1.pdf)
    • 2001: 4th of 162 countries [12]  (http://hdr.undp.org/reports/global/2001/en/pdf/hdi.pdf)
    • 2002: 2nd of 173 countries [13]  (http://hdr.undp.org/reports/global/2002/en/pdf/HDR%20PR_HDI.pdf)
    • 2003: 3rd of 175 countries [14] (http://hdr.undp.org/reports/global/2003/pdf/presskit/HDR03_PKE_HDI.pdf)
    • 2004: 2nd of 177 countries [15] (http://hdr.undp.org/reports/global/2004/pdf/presskit/HDR04_PKE_HDI.pdf)
  • World Economic Forum Global Competitiveness Report [16] (http://www.weforum.org/pdf/Gcr/Growth_Competitiveness_Index_2003_Comparisons)

Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Reporters Without Borders, or RWB ( French: Reporters sans frontières, or RSF) is an international non-governmental organization devoted to freedom of the press. ... Infant mortality is the death of infants in the first year of life. ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... The UN Human Development Index (HDI) measures poverty, literacy, education, life expectancy, and other factors. ... The World Economic Forum (WEF) is a Geneva-based foundation whose Annual Meeting of chief executives of the worlds richest corporations, some national political leaders (presidents, prime ministers and others), and selected intellectuals and journalists, about 2000 people in all, is usually held in Davos, Switzerland. ...

References

World Factbook 2004 cover The World Factbook is an annual publication by the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States with basic almanac-style information about the various countries of the world. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ...

External links

  • SWEDEN.SE (http://www.sweden.se/) - The Official Gateway to Sweden
  • The Swedish Government (http://www.sweden.gov.se/) - Official site
  • The Riksdag (http://www.riksdagen.se/Index_en.asp) - Official site of the Swedish Parliament
  • Webcam in Sweden (http://webcam.deili.info/en,1,39)
  • The Royal Court of Sweden (http://www.royalcourt.se/2.53abbbfd7ffdfa677fff23627.html)
  • Study in Sweden (http://www.studyin.sweden.se/)
  • Sweden's Travel and Tourism Council (http://www.visit-sweden.com/)
  • Statistics Sweden (http://www.scb.se/default____2154.asp)
  • Radio Sweden (in English) (http://www.radiosweden.org/)


 
European Union (EU)

Austria | Belgium | Cyprus |  Czech Republic | Denmark | Estonia | Finland | France | Germany | Greece | Hungary | Ireland | Italy | Latvia | Lithuania |  Luxembourg | Malta | Netherlands | Poland | Portugal | Slovakia | Slovenia | Spain | Sweden | United Kingdom The European Union or EU is an intergovernmental organisation of European countries, which currently has 25 member states. ... Download high resolution version (1200x800, 13 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Austria Belgium Bulgaria Czech Republic Croatia Cyprus Economy of Cyprus Economy of the Czech Republic Council of Europe Economy of Denmark Drachma European Union Estonia Euro European Parliament Talk:European Union European Free Alliance... Fixed size, hues based on World Flag Database. ... The Republic of Austria (German: Republik Österreich) is a landlocked country in Central Europe. ... General info: Large flag of Belgium Dimensions: 348x302 pixels Source: Image originally derived from the public domain flags of the CIA World Factbook License: originally public domain, modifications under GFDL Most of the flags have had their colours improved and many have been resized to the proper ratios. ... The Kingdom of Belgium (Dutch: Koninkrijk België, French: Royaume de Belgique, German: Königreich Belgien) is a country in Western Europe, bordered by the Netherlands, Germany, Luxembourg, France, and the North Sea. ... General info: Large flag of Cyprus Dimensions: 503x302 pixels Source: Image originally derived from the public domain flags of the CIA World Factbook License: Originally public domain, modifications under GFDL Most of the flags have had their colours improved and many have been resized to the proper ratios. ... Cyprus (in Greek Kypros Κύπρος and in Turkish Kıbrıs) is an island in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, 113 kilometres (70 miles) south of Turkey and around 120 km west of the Syrian coast. ... General info: Large flag of the Czech Republic Dimensions: 453x302 pixels Source: Image originally derived from the public domain License: Originally public domain, modifications under GFDL Most of the flags have had their colours improved and many have been resized to the proper ratios. ... National motto: Truth prevails (Czech: Pravda vítězí) Official language Czech Capital Praha (Prague) President Václav Klaus Prime Minister Jiří Paroubek Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 114th 78,866 km² 2% Population  - Total (2003)  - Density Ranked 76th 10. ... General info: Large civil flag of Denmark Dimensions: 399x302 pixels Source: Image originally derived from the public domain flags of the CIA World Factbook License: Originally public domain, modifications under GFDL Most of the flags have had their colours improved and many have been resized to the proper ratios. ... The Kingdom of Denmark is geographically the smallest Nordic country and is part of the European Union. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Austria Belgium Czech Republic Cyprus Economy of the Czech Republic European Union Estonia Foreign relations of Estonia European Parliament Talk:European Union European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party European Peoples Party (Christian Democrats) and European Democrats Finland France Germany Economy... The Republic of Estonia is a country in Northern Europe, bordering the Baltic Sea to the west and the Gulf of Finland to the north. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Austria AZ Alkmaar Belgium Czech Republic Cyprus Economy of the Czech Republic Charlton Athletic F.C. Chelsea F.C. European Union Estonia European Parliament Talk:European Union European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party European Peoples Party (Christian Democrats) and European... The Republic of Finland (Finnish: Suomen tasavalta, Swedish: Republiken Finland) is a Nordic country in northeastern Europe, bordered by the Baltic Sea to the southwest, the Gulf of Finland to the southeast and the Gulf of Bothnia to the west. ... Tricolore of France Created by User:Anthony S. Tsoumbris French Tricolore flag File links The following pages link to this file: Austria Arsenal F.C. Ajax Amsterdam A.S. Roma A.C. Milan Belgium Czech Republic Cyprus Economy of the Czech Republic Corsica Chelsea F.C. European Union Estonia European... The French Republic or France (French: République française or France) is a country whose metropolitan territory is located in western Europe, and which is further made up of a collection of overseas islands and territories located in other continents. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Large flag of Greece Image originally derived from the public domain flags of the CIA World Factbook. ... Greece, officaly called the Hellenic Republic (Greek: Ελληνική Δημοκρατία), is a country in the southeast of Europe on the southern tip of the Balkan peninsula. ... Large flag of Hungary Image originally derived from the public domain flags of the CIA World Factbook. ... The Republic of Hungary (Magyar Köztársaság) or Hungary (Magyarország) is a landlocked country in Central Europe, bordered by Austria, Slovakia, Ukraine, Romania, Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Austria Arsenal F.C. Belgium Czech Republic Cyprus Economy of the Czech Republic Charlton Athletic F.C. Chelsea F.C. European Union Estonia European Parliament Talk:European Union European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party European Peoples Party (Christian Democrats) and... The Republic of Ireland ( Irish: Poblacht na hÉireann) is the official description of an independent state which covers approximately five-sixths of the island of Ireland, off the coast of north-west Europe. ... Download high resolution version (1200x800, 1 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Austria Arsenal F.C. A.S. Roma A.C. Milan ACF Fiorentina Belgium Czech Republic Cyprus Economy of the Czech Republic Chievo Verona Chelsea F.C. European Union Estonia European Parliament Talk:European Union... The Italian Republic or Italy (Italian: Repubblica Italiana or Italia) is a country in southern Europe. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Austria Belgium Czech Republic Cyprus Economy of the Czech Republic European Union Estonia European Parliament Talk:European Union European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party European Peoples Party (Christian Democrats) and European Democrats Finland France Germany Economy of Germany Greece Hungary... The Republic of Latvia ( Latvian: Latvijas Republika), or Latvia ( Latvian: Latvija), is a country in Northern Europe. ... Large flag of Lithuania Image originally derived from the public domain flags of the CIA World Factbook. ... The Republic of Lithuania (in Lithuanian, Lietuva) is a republic in Northeastern Europe. ... Headline text File links The following pages link to this file: Austria Belgium Czech Republic Cyprus Economy of the Czech Republic European Union Estonia European Parliament Talk:European Union European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party European Peoples Party (Christian Democrats) and European Democrats Finland France Germany Economy of Germany... The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg is a small landlocked state in the north-west of the continental European Union, bordered by France, Germany and Belgium. ... Flag of Malta. ... This article is about the European nation. ... Large flag of the Netherlands. ... Large flag of Poland Image originally derived from the public domain flags of the CIA World Factbook. ... The Republic of Poland, a democratic country with a population of 38,626,349 and area of 312,685 km², is located in Central Europe, between Germany to the west, the Czech Republic and Slovakia to the south, Ukraine and Belarus to the east, and the Baltic Sea, Lithuania and... File links The following pages link to this file: Austria A.C. Milan Belgium Czech Republic Cyprus Economy of the Czech Republic Chelsea F.C. European Union Estonia European Parliament Talk:European Union European Peoples Party (Christian Democrats) and European Democrats Finland France Fulham F.C. Football World Cup... File links The following pages link to this file: Austria Belgium Czech Republic Cyprus Economy of the Czech Republic European Union Estonia European Parliament Talk:European Union European Liberal Democrat and Reform Party European Peoples Party (Christian Democrats) and European Democrats Finland France Germany Economy of Germany Greece Hungary... National motto: None Official language Slovak Capital Bratislava President Ivan Gašparovič Prime Minister Mikuláš Dzurinda Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 126th 49,035 km² Negligible Population  - Total ( 2004)  - Density Ranked 103rd 5,379,455 109/km² Independence January 1, 1993 (division of Czechoslovakia) Currency Slovak koruna Time zone  - in summer CET... Large Flag of Slovenia, originally from flags of the CIA World Factbook, 2004. ... The Republic of Slovenia ( Slovenian: Republika Slovenija) is a coastal sub-Alpine country in south central Europe bordering Italy to the west, the Adriatic Sea to the southwest, Croatia to the south and east, Hungary to the northeast, and Austria to the north. ... Source: Sodipodis Clipart Gallery. ... Large flag of Sweden Image originally derived from the public domain flags of the CIA World Factbook. ... Union Flag / Union Jack: Flag of the United Kingdom For more information, see Court of the Lord Lyon, Flags. ...



The Nordic Council and the Nordic Council of Ministers is a cooperation forum for the governments of the Nordic countries. ... This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... The Kingdom of Denmark is geographically the smallest Nordic country and is part of the European Union. ... The Republic of Finland (Finnish: Suomen tasavalta, Swedish: Republiken Finland) is a Nordic country in northeastern Europe, bordered by the Baltic Sea to the southwest, the Gulf of Finland to the southeast and the Gulf of Bothnia to the west. ... Iceland - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... The Kingdom of Norway is a Nordic country on the western portion of the Scandinavian Peninsula, bordering Sweden, Finland and Russia, with territorial waters bordering Danish and British waters. ... National motto: ? Official language Swedish Capital Mariehamn Governor Peter Lindbäck Premier Roger Nordlund Total Area  - Land  - Water 6,784 km² 1,527 km² 5,258 km² Population  - Total (2002)  - Density 26,257 17. ... Motto: None Official language Faroese Capital Tórshavn Monarch Margrethe II Prime Minister Jóannes Eidesgaard Area  - Total  - % water World ranking: 189th 1,399 km² — Population  - Total (2004)  - Density World ranking: 211th 48,228 33. ... Greenland (Greenlandic: Kalaallit Nunaat, The Land of the Greenlanders (Kalaallit); Danish: Grønland) is a self-governed Danish territory and an Arctic island nation located in North America with shores on the North Atlantic Ocean and the Arctic Ocean. ...

Countries in Europe
Albania | Andorra | Armenia1 | Austria | Azerbaijan1 | Belarus | Belgium | Bosnia and Herzegovina | Bulgaria | Croatia | Cyprus2 | Czech Republic | Denmark | Estonia | Finland | France | Germany | Greece | Hungary | Iceland | Ireland | Italy | Latvia | Liechtenstein | Lithuania | Luxembourg | Republic of Macedonia | Malta | Moldova | Monaco | The Netherlands | Norway | Poland | Portugal | Romania | Russia1 | San Marino | Serbia and Montenegro | Slovakia | Slovenia | Spain | Sweden | Switzerland | Turkey1 | Ukraine | United Kingdom | Vatican City (Holy See)
Dependencies: Akrotiri and Dhekelia2 | Faroe Islands | Gibraltar | Guernsey | Jan Mayen | Jersey | Isle of Man | Svalbard
1. Country partly in Asia. 2. Usually assigned to Asia geographically, but nonetheless often thought of as European for cultural and historical reasons.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Kingdom of Sweden - definition of Kingdom of Sweden in Encyclopedia (2283 words)
Sweden subsequently broke away in 1521, when Gustav Eriksson Vasa, known as king Gustav I of Sweden from 1523, re-established separation of the Swedish Crown from the union.
In the south of Sweden leaf-bearing trees are prolific, in the north pines and hardy birches dominate the landscape.
In underground circles, Sweden is known for a large number of death metal and fl metal acts, often viewed as pioneering or at the forefront of the scene.
Sweden-Norway - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (346 words)
The Kingdom of Sweden-Norway is a term sometimes, but erroneously, used to refer to the kingdoms of Sweden and Norway between 1814 and 1905, when they were united under one monarch in a personal union, following the Convention of Moss, on August 14, and the Norwegian constitutional revision of November 4.
Sweden and Norway had previously been united under the same crown on two occasions, from 1319 to 1343, and briefly from 1449 to 1450 in opposition to Christian of Oldenburg who by the Danes was elected king of the Kalmar Union.
Both parliaments revoked the Act of Union October 16, and the deposed king Oscar II of Sweden renounced his claim to the Norwegian throne and recognized Norway as an independent kingdom on October 26.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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