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Encyclopedia > Kingdom Come (comic book)
Kingdom Come

Cover to Absolute Kingdom Come (2006)
Publisher DC Comics
Format miniseries
Publication dates May 1996 – August 1996
Number of issues 4
Main character(s) Superman
Batman
Wonder Woman
The Spectre
Norman McCay
Creative team
Writer(s) Mark Waid
Artist(s) Alex Ross

Kingdom Come was a four-issue comic book limited series published in 1996 by DC Comics. It was written by Mark Waid and painted in gouache by Alex Ross, who also developed the concept from an original idea. Set some 20 years into the future of the current DC Universe, it deals with a growing conflict between "traditional" superheroes, such as Superman, Wonder Woman, and the Justice League, and a growing population of largely amoral and dangerously irresponsible new vigilantes. Between these two groups is Batman and his assembled team, who attempt to contain the escalating disaster, foil the machinations of Lex Luthor, and prevent a world-ending superhuman war. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x792, 243 KB) Summary the cover to absolute kingdom come by alex ross from newsarama. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... Norman McCay is a priest and the witness to the almost Biblical events in the Elseworlds story Kingdom Come. ... Mark Waid (born March 21, 1962 in Hueytown, Alabama) is an American comic book writer. ... Nelson Alexander Alex Ross (born January 22, 1970) is an American comic book painter, illustrator and plotter, acclaimed for the photorealism of his work. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Mark Waid (born March 21, 1962 in Hueytown, Alabama) is an American comic book writer. ... Corridor in the Asylum, black chalk and gouache on pink paper by Van Gogh Gouache (from the Italian guazzo, water paint, splash) or Bodycolour (or Bodycolor, the terms preferred by Art historians) is a type of paint consisting of pigment suspended in water. ... Nelson Alexander Alex Ross (born January 22, 1970) is an American comic book painter, illustrator and plotter, acclaimed for the photorealism of his work. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and a prominent member of Supermans rogues gallery. ...


The series draws heavily on biblical apocalyptic imagery, especially that of the Book of Revelation. For the eschatological beliefs of various religions, see End Times. ... Visions of John of Patmos, as depicted in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. ...

Contents

Background

When comic book artist Alex Ross was working on Marvels, published in 1994, he decided to create a similar "grand opus" about characters from DC Comics. Ross wrote a 40-page handwritten outline of what would become Kingdom Come and pitched the idea to James Dale Robinson. Ross sought for Kingdom Come to be similar to Alan Moore's Watchmen (1986-1987), and thought that Robinson's talent was akin to Moore's. Ultimately, Ross teamed with writer Mark Waid, who was recommended by DC editors due to his strong familiarity with the history of DC superheroes.[1] Nelson Alexander Alex Ross (born January 22, 1970) is an American comic book painter, illustrator and plotter, acclaimed for the photorealism of his work. ... Marvels #1. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... James Dale Robinson, usually referred to as just James Robinson, is a British writer of comic books and screenplays and known for his interest in old collectibles and memorabilia. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Watchman. ... Mark Waid (born March 21, 1962 in Hueytown, Alabama) is an American comic book writer. ...


Plot

Impending disaster

The story is set roughly a generation after the current DC universe. Ten years prior to the start of the story, the Joker massacres the staff of the Daily Planet, killing (among others) Jimmy Olsen, Perry White and Lois Lane. As he arrives for his trial, he is killed by a new superhero named Magog. Magog is acquitted for his cold-blooded act and Superman is appalled by the public embracing a killer as a hero. Already disheartened at the death of Lois Lane, Kal-El abandons his life as Superman, retreating to his Fortress of Solitude where he will spend the next decade, failing to realize his importance as a constant inspiration/role model to other heroes. Other heroes, equally disturbed at the public's overwhelmingly positive reaction to Magog's actions, withdraw from the world at large, leaving a power vacuum that is soon filled by the new generation of "heroes" Magog represents. The Joker redirects here. ... The Daily Planet is a fictional broadsheet newspaper that appears in Superman stories published by DC Comics. ... James Bartholomew Jimmy Olsen is a fictional character, a photojournalist who appears in DC Comics’ Superman stories. ... Perry White is a fictional character who appears in the Superman comics, and is the editor-in-chief of the Metropolis newspaper the Daily Planet. ... For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ... Magog action figure from DC Direct. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... The Fortress of Solitude is the occasional headquarters of Superman in DC Comics. ...


Without the moral compass provided by Superman and his generation, there is little or no distinction between 'heroes' and 'villains'. Metahumans battle openly in the streets without true cause, or concern for collateral damage or innocent passers-by. Average humans, demoralized by the loss of their true heroes, the disregard that the new generation shows for them, and their inability to do anything about the state of affairs created by these metahumans, have fallen into a societal depression. Efforts that celebrate human achievement, like professional sports, the Olympics, and Nobel Prizes, have been abandoned. Olympic Games Summer Olympic Games Medal count Winter Olympic Games Medal count Olympic sports Medal counts Participating NOCs Olympic symbols Olympics WikiProject Olympics Portal Athens 2004 • Beijing 2008 Torino 2006 • Vancouver 2010 ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, is awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace. ...


Certain heroes like the Flash, Hawkman, Green Lantern and Batman have remained active, although their methods have changed dramatically, all of them becoming more distant from humanity. Hawkman, now an anthropomorphized hawk, has become an eco-terrorist. Batman, now an old man who relies on a metal exo-suit to support his broken body, enforces the rule of law in Gotham City with an army of remotely controlled bat-like androids. The Flash has become permanently hyper-accelerated, patrolling Keystone city at speeds so fast that he seems to be everywhere at once, but can no longer be seen or heard by human beings. Green Lantern lives alone in a huge orbiting space station, ready to defend the Earth against an extraterrestrial threat that may never appear. The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... The term eco-terrorism is a neologism which has been used to describe acts of violence (as in violence against property), sabotage and/or property damage which are ostensibly motivated by concern for the natural environment. ... U.S. Army conceptual mockup of an exoskeleton-equipped soldier. ...


The narrator and point of view character of the story is a minister named Norman McCay. McCay is a longtime friend of Wesley Dodds, the original Sandman, now infirm and bedridden. The nightmares that once aided Dodds' crimefighting have become disturbing, apocalyptic visions. McCay, like Dodds' doctors, attribute the visions to senility. When Dodds passes away, his visions are transferred to McCay. Already suffering from a crisis of faith, McCay is convinced he has finally gone insane when the Spectre appears to him. The Spectre, still hosted by Jim Corrigan, but no longer in touch with his humanity, recruits McKay to bear witness, and help him determine the innocent from the wicked and ultimately to pass judgment on the approaching superhuman apocalypse. The Narrator is the entity within a story that tells the story to the reader. ... In most Protestant churches, a minister is a member of the ordained clergy who leads a congregation; such a person may also be called a Pastor, Preacher, or Elder. ... Norman McCay is a priest and the witness to the almost Biblical events in the Elseworlds story Kingdom Come. ... The Sandman, alias Wesley Dodds, is a fictional masked crimefighter in the DC Comics universe. ... Look up Apocalypse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... For the graphic novel character Jimmy Corrigan by Chris Ware see Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth. ...

Promotional art for Kingdom Come. Clockwise from top: The Ray, Red Robin, Superman, Wonder Woman, Hawkman, Power Woman, Rev. Norman McCay and the Spectre (in background), Green Lantern

The dark state of the world comes to a head when the Justice Battalion, led by Magog, attacks the Parasite with excessive and unnecessary force — they refuse his offers to surrender and deny his pleas for mercy. Parasite panics and tears open Captain Atom, releasing his nuclear energies and irradiating the entire state of Kansas and parts of the surrounding states, taking out a large portion of America's food production. Download high resolution version (447x683, 52 KB)Page from Kingdom Come by Alex Ross. ... Download high resolution version (447x683, 52 KB)Page from Kingdom Come by Alex Ross. ... The Parasite is a fictional character and supervillain who appears in Superman stories published by DC Comics. ... Captain Atom is a fictional comic book superhero. ... Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ...


Second coming of Superman

Coaxed by Wonder Woman, Superman decides to return to Metropolis and re-form the Justice League following the Kansas disaster. The yellow aspects of his costume replaced by black as a badge of mourning for those lost in the Kansas disaster, Superman intends to enforce morality upon the runaway metahumanity by offering them a choice: join his League and abide by a code of ethics, or be made a prisoner by it. He manages to collect former heroes (including Green Lantern, the Flash, Hawkman, and Dick Grayson, now known as Red Robin, among others) and reformed "new heroes," such as Avia (Mr. Miracle and Big Barda's daughter), but Batman, one of the most prominent of the old guard, refuses to join Superman's crusade. Batman believes Superman's idealist notions are outdated and that his interference will only exacerbate the problem. He interprets Superman's plan as an example of the strong exerting their will upon the weak, something to which he will not be a party. He instead begins to organize a third group of heroes, made up largely of non-powered heroes like Green Arrow and the Blue Beetle, as well as second and third generation heroes like Jade, daughter of the first Green Lantern, and Zatara, son of Zatanna and grandson of the first generation hero whose name he shares. For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ... Morality (from the Latin manner, character, proper behaviour) has three principal meanings. ... Metahuman is a term to describe superhumans in the DC Universe. ... Robin is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Robin is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Mister Miracle is a DC Comics superhero created by Jack Kirby, originally as part of The Fourth World series of titles. ... Big Barda is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Blue Beetle is the name of three fictional comic book superheroes. ... Jade is the codename of Jennie-Lynn Hayden, a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... Giovanni Zatara is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Zatanna Zatara is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ...


Lex Luthor is still alive and well, and has organized Mankind Liberation Front. The MLF is primarily a group of Silver Age Justice League villains, including Batman foes Catwoman and the Riddler; Vandal Savage; King, leader of the Royal Flush Gang, as well as third generation villains like Ra's al Ghul's successor, Ibn al Xu'ffasch, who is Bruce Wayne and Talia al Ghul's son, although their relationship is understandably strained. The MLF work to wrest control of the world away from the heroes. Luthor's group also have an ace in the hole, a man the Spectre calls "the captain of the lightning and the thunder." Luthor captured Captain Marvel years earlier, and has been controlling him through the use of worms that affect Marvel's brain. The worms play upon the psychological dichotomy of the teen Batson inhabiting the adult body of the world's mightiest mortal, Captain Marvel, and resemble Mr. Mind, Marvel's nemesis. Batman and his group ally themselves with Luthor's group, to better protect mankind during the impending metahuman war. Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and a prominent member of Supermans rogues gallery. ... This article is about the supervillainess. ... The Riddler, (Edward E. Nigma, also spelled Nygma by some writers), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... Vandal Savage is a fictional character and supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... The Royal Flush Gang are fictional characters in DC comics. ... Ras al Ghul, sometimes written Rās al Ghūl (Arabic: رأس الغول), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... Ibn al Xuffasch (Arabic: إبن الخفّاش; literally Son of the Bat) is a character in the Batman comic book series who is the biological son of Batman and Talia al Ghul. ... For other uses, see Batman (disambiguation). ... Talia al Ghul is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, the now-estranged daughter of the supervillain Ras al Ghul, and a love interest of Batman. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Prominent members of the Monster Society Of Evil. ...


Superman's Justice League gathers more captives than converts, and his requests to build a prison safely away from humanity are refused by both Aquaman, who wants no part of the coming war to reach his undersea kingdom and Orion, who has wrested control of Apokolis from his father Darkseid, and sees the inherent flaws and inevitable collapse in Superman's plan. Superman and the League end up building the Gulag, a massive penal colony in the Kansas wastelands; security for the Gulag is designed by Scott Free, the universe's ultimate escape artist. The prison is filled to capacity almost as soon as it is built. Superman designates Captain Comet as warden and works to persuade the inmates that their methods are wrong-headed and dangerous, but his entreaties fall upon deaf ears. With hostile hero-villains like 666, Kabuki Kommando, and Von Bach locked up together, pressure builds. Meanwhile, Superman, urged on by Wonder Woman, reacts with increasing inflexibility towards the inappropriate behavior of the metahuman community. He learns that Wonder Woman's ardent militant stance may be influenced by her recent exile from Paradise Island: in the eyes of the Amazons, her mission to bring peace to the outside world has failed. Aquaman is a fictional character, superhero in DC Comics. ... Gulag ( , Russian: ) was the government body responsible for administering prison camps across the former Soviet Union. ... Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... Captain Comet (Adam Blake) is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero created by writer John Broome and artist Carmine Infantino. ... The Amazons (in Greek, ) were a mythical ancient nation of all-female warriors. ...


Pact

Batman and his cadre of heroes turn the tables on Luthor and the MLF. Luthor has revealed his plan to exacerbate the conflict between the League and the inmates by pitting Captain Marvel against the League, the Gulag and Superman: the ensuing chaos will afford Luthor an opportunity to seize power. Assisted by the Martian Manhunter, Batman discovers that an adult Billy Batson is under the villains' control. Batson, who becomes Captain Marvel when he utters the word "Shazam!", is the one being capable of matching Superman's power. This article is about the DC Comics character. ...


When the Gulag's inmates riot, killing Captain Comet, Batman's forces ambush Luthor and his conspirators. Batman is unable to restrain the brain-washed Batson, who transforms into Marvel and flies to Kansas. He opens the Gulag and unleashes chaos.

Superman and Captain Marvel face off in Kingdom Come.

After Captain Comet's murder, Wonder Woman convinces the members of the League to use deadly force to deal with the inmates of the Gulag; Superman still objects. The Justice League clash with the bloodthirsty inmates, and Superman finds Batman and forces him to recognize that they may very well be facing the end of the world. Superman knows that Batman will act, because his entire crime-fighting life is based upon the desire to prevent the loss of human life. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 392 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (398 × 609 pixel, file size: 46 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The battle is joined between Superman and Captain Marvel in Kingdom Come. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 392 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (398 × 609 pixel, file size: 46 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The battle is joined between Superman and Captain Marvel in Kingdom Come. ...


Upon arriving at the Gulag, Superman and Captain Marvel battle, The Spectre and Norman look on. Although Batman's forces join the fray, aiding Superman's League in quelling the riot, he also works to restrain Superman from imposing narrow rules upon all metahumans. Batman, wearing an armored battle suit with the power of flight, comes into direct conflict with Wonder Woman.


As the conditions worsen, the United Nations Secretary General Wyrmwood authorizes the deployment of three tactical nuclear warheads, hardened against certain metahuman powers. While this action will destroy hero and villain alike, the UN feels it has no choice in the matter: if mankind is to survive, metahumanity must be destroyed. UN and U.N. redirect here. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 kilometers (11 mi) above the hypocenter A nuclear weapon derives its destructive force from nuclear reactions of fusion or fission. ...


Armageddon

An armored Batman and Wonder Woman clash in the middle of the warzone, taking to the skies, where they see the incoming Blackhawk fighter-bombers delivering the nuclear bombs. They manage to stop two of them, but the third slips past and drops its payload. Captain Marvel continues to batter Superman by using his magic lightning bolt over and over, but dodging before it hits, leaving Superman to bear the brunt of a magical lightning strike. However, as Marvel says the name again, Superman grabs him and the lightning finds its mark; Marvel turns back into Billy Batson. Holding Batson's mouth shut, Superman tells Batson that he is going to stop the remaining bomb, and Batson must make an important choice: either stop Superman and allow the warhead to kill all the metahumans, or let Superman stop the bomb and allow the metahumans' war to engulf the world. Superman tells Batson he must be the one to make this decision, as he is the only one who lives in both worlds, that of normal humans (as Batson) and the metahuman community (as Marvel). Blackhawk #12 (Autumn, 1946), Quality Comics. ...


Superman releases him and flies off to stop the incoming bomb. Batson, his mind now clear of Luthor and Mr. Mind's influence, says the name, turns into Marvel, flies past Superman, and takes hold of the bomb, having found a third option. Marvel shouts "Shazam!" three more times in rapid succession, and the lightning sets off the bomb prematurely, killing Marvel in the process.


Despite Marvel's sacrifice, most of the metahumans are obliterated in the explosion, although some survive beneath a force field generated by Green Lantern and his daughter Jade, and others are teleported away at the last second by Fate. Superman, though outside the force field, is virtually untouched. His uniform torn and blackened by the lightning and the nuclear explosion, his eyes glowing red with restrained heat vision, he rises from the ashes looking more villain than hero. Enraged at the tremendous loss of life, he flies to the UN Building and threatens to bring it down atop the delegates as punishment for killing all his friends--not realizing there were survivors at this point--and reacting in such a fearful and cowardly way to the metahuman war. The surviving metahumans arrive, but Norman McCay is the one who talks him down, pointing out how his appearance and behavior are exactly the sort of reasons that normal humans fear the super-powered. Chastised and ashamed, Superman immediately ceases his rampage. He is handed Captain Marvel's cape, the only remnant of the hero, and tells the UN representatives that they will use his wisdom to guide, rather than lead, humankind. Superman ties Captain Marvel's cape to a flagpole and raises it among the flags of the member nations of the UN, suggesting that this role of guidance would be more political and global in nature than the classic crime-busting vigilantism of the past. Jade is the codename of Jennie-Lynn Hayden, a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... For other uses, see Vigilante (disambiguation). ...


Epilogue

In the aftermath of the metahuman civil war, the heroes actively strive to become fully integrated members of the communities they had previously tried to distance themselves from. Masks are abandoned. Wonder Woman's exile from Paradise Island ends, and she becomes an ambassador for super-humanity, taking the survivors of the Gulag to Paradise Island for rehabilitation. An ambassador, rarely embassador, is a diplomatic official accredited to a foreign sovereign or government, or to an international organization, to serve as the official representative of his or her own country. ...


Batman abandons his crusade and becomes a healer, opening his mansion as a hospital to care for those wounded by the destruction of Kansas and the ensuing violence. He also reconciles with both Dick Grayson/Red Robin, and his son Ibn al Xu'ffasch. Superman lashes himself to a giant plow and begins the arduous task of restoring the Midwestern farmlands, devastated by nuclear explosions. He even comes to terms with his past as Clark Kent by accepting a pair of glasses from Wonder Woman, and shares a kiss with her before she returns to Paradise Island. It is a fitting parallel to the end of the generational conflict that started the war, as both men have come full circle in their lives and adopted the vocations of their fathers; Thomas Wayne, the doctor, and Jonathan Kent, the farmer. Thomas Wayne is a fictional character of the Batman series of comic books. ... Martha Clark Kent and Jonathan Kent, also known as Ma and Pa Kent, are fictional characters published by DC Comics. ...


Green Lantern represents superhumanity on the UN Security Council. He no longer dons his green armor, but can still use the green lantern energy. A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ...


The former leaders of the MLF are orderlies in Batman's hospital, wearing inhibitor collars which keep them under control. Luthor is reduced to emptying bedpans, and is taunted by Batman over his defeat. A bedpan is a toileting facility, usually consisting of a metal, glass, or plastic receptacle for urinary and fecal discharge. ...


Norman McCay resumes pastorship of his congregation, preaching a message of hope for humanity. Among the congregation is Jim Corrigan, the Spectre's human host. In the novelization, Clark Kent attends a sermon as well.


Collected edition additional scene

The final scene in the collected edition features Clark Kent, Diana, and Bruce Wayne meeting for a meal at Planet Krypton, a theme restaurant based upon the golden age of superheroes. Now a couple, Clark and Diana intend to inform Bruce they are expecting a child, but Bruce deduces the news before they can tell him. Diana manages to surprise Bruce by asking him to serve as godfather and mentor to the child, whom Bruce rightly describes as potentially the most powerful child in the world. (He accepts.) As they exit the restaurant, they pass a display case featuring the Sandman's effects on one wall and framed copies of Whiz Comics #1, the first appearance of Captain Marvel, and More Fun Comics #1, the first comic printed by DC on the other. Bruce gazes thoughtfully at the two, as he exits the restaurant with Clark and Diana to begin a new era. A godparent, in many denominations of Christianity, is someone who sponsors a childs baptism. ...


Characters

Superman's Justice League

Many of the members of the re-formed Justice League are either old characters in new forms or brand new adoptions of old names. Partial list:

  • Superman: The leader of the League and a graying Man of Steel that is growing uneasy with the role of being a world leader during a time of extreme tension. Due to a lifetime of absorbing yellow-solar radiation, he is more powerful than ever, and is even immune to kryptonite.
  • Wonder Woman: Superman's lieutenant is being slowly consumed by an inner rage directed at the state of the world and her exile from Paradise Island. Her fellow Amazons have deemed her mission to bring peace to 'man's world' a failure. At the conclusion, she is restored her royal station as Princess, but eschews the ambassadorial role of "Wonder Woman", leaving it to other Amazons. (In the novelization, Cressida becomes the new Wonder Woman.)
  • Red Robin: Dick Grayson, the first Robin, has replaced Batman on the Justice League.
  • Flash: After melding with the Speed Force, the Flash's molecules have become unstable and as a result, he is constantly in motion. Waid later confirmed this Flash to be Wally West in The Kingdom.
  • Green Lantern: Ending his vigil among the stars, Alan Scott returns to Earth and joins Superman's crusade. He needs no power ring, having incorporated the lantern that fueled the ring into his armor. At the conclusion, he becomes a UN charter member under the nation of "New Oa".
  • Hawkman: Now a literal 'hawk-man', Carter has become a guardian of nature. In the novelization, he is killed in the nuclear blast.
  • Donna Troy: Seen wearing Amazon robes, it is possible the former Wonder Girl may have replaced her sister/mentor Wonder Woman as Paradise Island's ambassador to the world. She has also aged considerably compared to Diana: going slightly grey and putting on weight. In the novelization, she is killed in the nuclear blast.
  • Red Arrow: The former Speedy and Arsenal is now following in the footsteps of his mentor, the Green Arrow, down to a mustache, goatee and exact copy of Green Arrow's costume, but in red. In the novelization, he is killed in the nuclear blast.
  • Aquaman: Garth, the former Aqualad, now the inheritor of his mentor's mantle as Aquaman. He wears a variation of his 'Aqualad' costume, but sports a beard and long pants. In the novelization, he is killed in the nuclear blast.
  • King Marvel and Lady Marvel are now married and have a superpowered son named The Whiz, who is also a member of this League.
  • Aleea Strange: Adam Strange's daughter, who has taken up her father's mantle.
  • Power Woman: The former Power Girl. In the novelization, she is killed in the nuclear blast.
  • Robotman: The former Cyborg.
  • Red Tornado: A heavily armed Mathilda Hunkel.
  • Human Bomb: A explosion causing metahuman.
  • Midnight: The ghost of Mid-Nite, appearing in the form of a smoke-cloud.
  • Captain Comet: He is chosen by Superman to be warden of the Gulag. He is killed in a prison riot, and according to the novelization, it is by Von Bach.
  • Bulletman and Bulletgirl: The successors of the original golden age duo.
  • Brainiac's Daughter: Brainiac's offspring and the ancestor of Brainiac 5.
  • Red Tornado A new Red Tornado.
  • Starman: The former Star Boy.
  • Golden Guardian: The second clone of Jim Harper, who took up his predecessor's role.
  • Hourman: The successors of the first two Hourmen, not having his predecessor's time limit
  • Sandman: Formerly Sandy, the Golden Boy, then Sand, he's taken up the mantle of Sandman after his mentor, Wesley Dodds, died.
  • Living Doll: The daughter of Doll Man and Doll Girl.
  • Tornado: The ghost of Tornado Champion.
  • Avia: The daughter of Mister Miracle and Big Barda. In the novelization, she and her parents survive through a boom tube, thanks to her father's uncanny foresight.
  • Atom Smasher: The godson of Atom.
  • Ray: Son of the first Ray. He is responsible for removing the radiation from Kansas, twice.
  • Power Man: An android programmed by Superman.
  • Phoebus: Earth's newest fire elemental after Firestorm.

Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Themyscirian Amazons Art by Phil Jimenez Themyscira is a fictional island nation in the DC Comics universe. ... Robin is a fictional character published by DC Comics. ... For the science fiction author, see Wallace West. ... Bart Allen surrounded By the Speed Force after absorbing it. ... For the science fiction author, see Wallace West. ... The Kingdom was the title for a two issue miniseries published by DC Comics in 1999, and the story title of a story which extended into one-shot books entitled Gog, The Kingdom: Kid Flash, The Kingdom: Nightstar, The Kingdom: Offspring, The Kingdom: Planet Krypton, and The Kingdom: Son of... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ... For other uses of Oa and oa, see OA. Oa is a fictional planet located at the center of the DC Comics Universe. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Donna Troy is a fictional character, a superheroine in the DC Universe. ... This article is about the superhero Wonder Girl. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Roy Harper is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Tempest is a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... Tempest is a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... CM3 redirects here. ... Mary Marvel is a fictional character, a superhero derived from the DC Comics (formerly Fawcett Comics) character Captain Marvel. ... Adam Strange is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... Power Girl (real name Kara Zor-L, also known as Karen Starr) is a DC Comics superhero, making her first appearance in All Star Comics #58 (January/February 1976). ... This article is about the Teen Titans member. ... The first comic book character called Red Tornado is a fictional character, a superheroine in the DC Comics universe, debuting during the Golden Age of Comic Books. ... The Human Bomb is a fictional superhero from the Golden Age of Comic Books. ... Doctor Mid-Nite is a DC Comics superhero. ... Captain Comet (Adam Blake) is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero created by writer John Broome and artist Carmine Infantino. ... A German Supervillian of the future from the series, Kingdom Come by Alex Ross and Mark Waid. ... Bulletman was a Fawcett Comics superhero created by Bill Parker and Jon Smalle for Nickel Comics #1 in May, 1940. ... Brainiac is a fictional character, a DC Comics supervillain and frequent opponent of Superman. ... Brainiac 5 (Querl Dox) is a fictional character who exists in the future of the DC Comics universe. ... Cyclone (alias Maxine Hunkel) is a fictional superheroine in the DC Comics universe. ... Star Boy (Thom Kallor) is a member of the Legion of Super-Heroes. ... The Guardian (Jim Harper) is a DC Comics costumed hero. ... Hourman (spelled Hour-Man in his earliest appearances) is the name of three different fictional DC Comics superheroes the first of whom was created by Ken Fitch and Bernard Bailey in Adventure Comics #48 (April 1940), during the Golden Age of Comic Books. ... Sanderson Sandy Hawkins, formerly known as Sandy the Golden Boy, now known as Sand, is a fictional character, superhero in the DC Comics universe created by Mort Weisinger and Paul Norris. ... Doll Man is a fictional superhero from the Golden Age of Comics, originally published by Quality Comics and currently part of the DC Comics universe of characters. ... Feature Comics #77 (April, 1944), Quality Comics Doll Man is a fictional superhero from the Golden Age of Comics, originally published by Quality Comics and currently part of the DC Comics universe of characters. ... Red Tornado is a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ... Mister Miracle is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... Big Barda is a fictional superhero published by DC Comics. ... Boomtube is an extra dimensional portal used by residents of New Genesis and Apokolips in DC Comics. ... Albert Rothstein (known by the aliases Nuklon and Atom Smasher -- sometimes spelled Atom-Smasher) is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Al Pratt is a character in the DC Comics Universe, the original hero to fight crime as the Atom. ... The Ray is the name of three fictional characters, all superheroes in the DC Comics universe. ... Superman Robots were fictional robots from the DC Comics Universe. ... This article is about the Ronnie Raymond/Martin Stein version of Firestorm. ...

Batman's "Outsiders"

Batman has formed a group of metahumans, similar to his Outsiders many of which are second-generation heroes, to combat the Justice League and the Mankind Liberation Front. Playing upon the generational differences between the heroes, five of his heroes are the children of the original Teen Titans, while the Titans have all sided with Superman. Partial list: The Outsiders are fictional characters, a DC Comics superhero group. ... Teen Titans redirects here. ...

  • Batman: Since his real identity was made public, the Batman no longer hides behind the carefree appearance of Bruce Wayne. In fact, he is referred to as "The Batman" even in civilian guise and does not bother with the cape and cowl until the final battle. No longer the example of human perfection, he now requires an exoskeleton to move and utilizes robots and a battle suit to continue his war on crime. His distrust of both Superman and Luthor leads him to form the Outsiders. He objects to both the League and the MLF's plans for making a better world, feeling mankind should be able to make its own decisions and mistakes.
  • Ibn al Xu'ffasch: The son of Batman and Talia al Ghul, the heir to Ra's al Ghul's criminal organization, and used as a mole to infiltrate Luthor's MLF. His role is not fully revealed until the third issue (p. 144 in the graphic novel), when he is standing among the Outsiders just before Zatara teleports Batman to the Batcave.
  • Oliver Queen: One of Batman's partners, he has married his long-time love Dinah Lance, Black Canary, and the two have a daughter, Olivia Queen, who also operates as Black Canary. According to the novel, he was killed in the nuclear blast. His skeleton can be seen on page 187, directly to the left of Superman, still cradling his wife.
  • Dinah Queen: One of Batman's operatives, she now wields a bow like her husband Green Arrow. She was among the fatalities in the Gulag battle, with one panel showing Green Arrow holding her body in his arms after she was accidentally shot in the head by the metahuman Trix. In the novelization, she dies in Queen's arms during the blast.
  • Blue Beetle: Ted Kord, one of Batman's operatives, who now wears a Blue Beetle armored battle suit powered by the mystical scarab that gave the first Blue Beetle his powers. Kord is also killed in the nuclear blast.
  • J'onn J'onzz: Once the Martian Manhunter, he has become a shell of his former self and can no longer control his powers. He tried to touch all humanity's mind at once and could not handle the torrents of hate, love, anger, sadness and joy. A shattered spirit, he maintains a permanently non-corporeal human form at all times now and does not participate in any super heroics until Batman persuades him to help one last time. His body - in his classic costume - is seen lying on the ground during the final battle at the Gulag.
  • Kid Flash is the daughter of Wally West. According to the novel, she was among those killed by the nuclear blast. However, she appears in The Kingdom, as well as in The Flash (in the "Chain Lightning" arc) due to Hypertime.
  • Darkstar: Son of Donna Troy, who has taken her place as Earth's Darkstar.
  • Obsidian: Son of Alan Scott and brother to Jennie-Lynn Hayden. He manipulates shadows and darkness. His appearance resembles that of The Shadow.
  • Tula: A sea-faring malcontent. Daughter of Aquaman and Deep Blue. In the novelization, she is killed in the nuclear blast.
  • Steel: After Superman went into seclusion, Steel switched his devotion to Batman. He now wields an iron bat-shaped battle axe.
  • Wildcat: A man-panther with the spirit of the first (presumably Ted Grant).
  • Zatara: The son of the late Zatanna and John Constantine, and grandson of Giovanni Zatara. Besides being a magician, he's inherited his father's ability to see the dead. According to the novel, he was so horrified by the nuclear blast that he was unable to use his magic to escape.
  • Nightstar: The daughter of Dick Grayson and Starfire. She has inherited her mother's powers and abilities, but decides not to join her father in the Justice League. Effectively Batman's adoptive granddaughter, she becomes close to his natural son Ibn al Xu'ffasch.
  • Menagerie: Formerly Beast Boy, whose power is now limited to imaginary creatures.
  • Nucloid: A elastic superhero with a nuclear core.
  • Huntress: An African superheroine based on Paula Brooks.
  • Cossack: A member of The Batmen Of Many Nations, the Champion of Russia.
  • Ace: An alien Bat-Hound, the giant winged steed of the Fourth World Batwoman.
  • Batwoman: A Batman admirer from the Fourth World.
  • Samurai: A member of The Batmen Of Many Nations, the Champion of Japan.
  • Dragon: A member of The Batmen Of Many Nations, the Champion of China.
  • Creeper: Though he has aged, he is still the insane screwball he was when he was young. In the novelization, he switches sides several times during the Gulag battle, and is killed in the nuclear blast.
  • Lightning: The daughter of Black Lightning.
  • Condor: The last Black Condor
  • Ralph Dibny: The former Elongated Man, Ralph is contorted out of shape.
  • Spy Master: A independent agent, in a post Cold War era.
  • Phantom Lady: A literal phantom of the original version.
  • Red Hood: The daughter of Red Arrow and mercenary Cheshire.
  • Fate: Nabu is able to channel his consciousness through the Helm and Cloak without the need for a host body.
  • Green Lantern: Jade took up the mantle of Green Lantern after Kyle Rayner.
  • Mr. Scarlet: A bright red devil of a man known for hanging out at Titans Tower bar with Matrix, the new Joker's Daughter, and the new Thunder.
  • Bat-Knights: Batman's robotic guardians of Gotham City.

Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... The Outsiders are fictional characters, a DC Comics superhero group. ... Ibn al Xuffasch (Arabic: إبن الخفّاش; literally Son of the Bat) is a character in the Batman comic book series who is the biological son of Batman and Talia al Ghul. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Talia al Ghul is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, the now-estranged daughter of the supervillain Ras al Ghul, and a love interest of Batman. ... Ras al Ghul, sometimes written Rās al Ghūl (Arabic: رأس الغول), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... Giovanni Zatara is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... Blue Beetle is Theodore (or Edward) Ted Kord, a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Kid Flash (Iris West) is a superheroine in an alternate future of the DC Comics universe She was constantly annoyed by that her father, who had almost completely given up his life to patrol Keystone City non-stop, never made time for her, although he did make time for her... Hypertime is a fictional concept presented in the 1998 comic book series The Kingdom, both a catch-all explanation for any continuity discrepancies in DC Universe stories and a variation or superset of the Multiverse that existed before Crisis on Infinite Earths. ... Darkstars Issue 1 A fictional intergalactic squadron of cosmic cops that no one had heard of before 1992 in DC Comics. ... Obsidian is a fictional character who has been both a superhero and supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... Aquagirl is the name of several fictional characters who were superheros from DC Comics. ... Steel is a name used by several fictional characters owned and published by DC Comics. ... Wildcat is the name of four DC Comics characters, three of them superheroes. ... Zatanna Zatara is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... John Constantine (born May 10, 1953 in Liverpool, England) is the fictional protagonist of the comic series Hellblazer. ... Giovanni Zatara is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Nightstar is a fictional character, the daughter of Red Robin (Dick Grayson, also known as Nightwing, the first Robin) and Starfire from the Kingdom Come and The Kingdom comic book miniseries by DC Comics. ... Starfire is the name of three superheroes who have appeared in comic books published by DC Comics. ... Ibn al Xuffasch (Arabic: إبن الخفّاش; literally Son of the Bat) is a character in the Batman comic book series who is the biological son of Batman and Talia al Ghul. ... Beast Boy (real name Garfield Mark Gar Logan) is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, a shapeshifting superhero who is a former member of the Doom Patrol and member of the Teen Titans. ... The Huntress is a superheroine from DC Comics. ... Paula Brooks is a fictional comic book character published by DC Comics. ... The Batmen of All Nations were a group of superheroes which were inspired by Batman to fight crime in their countries. ... The comic book character Ace the Bat-Hound was the canine crime-fighting partner of Batman and Robin in DC Comics of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Batwoman (originally referred to as the Bat-Woman) is a fictional character, a female counterpart to DC Comics popular superhero Batman. ... Samurai is a fictional superhero in the Super Friends cartoons created by Hanna-Barbera. ... The Creeper (Jack Ryder) is a DC Comics superhero created by Steve Ditko. ... Thunder is the name of three superheroes in the DC Comics Universe. ... For references to Black Lightning in the work of William Golding, see Pincher Martin. ... Black Condor is the name of three DC Comics superheroes who have all been members of the Freedom Fighters. ... The Elongated Man is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC universe. ... Spy Smasher (real name Alan Armstrong) is a DC Comics superhero, formerly owned by Fawcett Comics. ... For other uses, see Phantom Lady (disambiguation). ... Red Hood is a fictional character and title in the DC Universe. ... Cheshire, real name Jade Nguyen, is a DC Comics villain, one of the worlds top assassins and mercenaries. ... Doctor Fate is a DC Comics superhero and wizard, best known as a member of the Justice Society of America. ... Jade is the codename of Jennie-Lynn Hayden, a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... Mr. ...

Luthor's Mankind Liberation Front

Since Superman's departure ten years ago, Luthor and the MLF have been conducting events behind the scenes in an attempt to destroy metahumans and rule the world at last.

  • Lex Luthor: The MLF's leader. Goes into mad fits whenever mention is made of Superman.
  • Captain Marvel: Luthor's brainwashed houseboy and the last step in his plan for destroying Superman and the League.
  • Vandal Savage: The only willing member of the MLF with any powers to speak of: immortality.
  • Catwoman: The only female member of the MLF.
  • Riddler: There only as a courtesy to Catwoman (they seem to be in a relationship) and tends to get under Luthor's skin.
  • Kobra: A cult leader.
  • King of the Royal Flush Gang: The MLF's newest member, and, like Savage, is also immortal.
  • Red, White, and Blue: Three heavily armed terrorists. They are actually androids under Luthor's control who are used as spies in the Gulag.

Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and a prominent member of Supermans rogues gallery. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Vandal Savage is a fictional character and supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... This article is about the supervillainess. ... The Riddler, (Edward E. Nigma, also spelled Nygma by some writers), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... Kobra is a DC Comics supervillain. ... The Royal Flush Gang are fictional characters in DC comics. ...

Rogue metahumans

The superheroes of the future have virtually no regard for human life. Many of them were killed in the Gulag battle, but most have already made their mark in the world as monsters. Listed below are the major, supporting, or otherwise notable characters.

  • Magog: Ironically referred to as the new 'Man of Tomorrow'. His first act as a hero (shown in a flashback sequence) was the very public killing of the Joker. The Joker had been arrested for the murder of 92 men and one woman (Lois Lane being the woman) at the Daily Planet, but was expected to be ruled criminally insane, and thus not responsible. When the Joker was being led in to the courthouse for his competency hearing, Magog ran in and blasted a hole through his chest, killing him instantly. Magog then surrendered to Superman. Put on trial for murder, with Superman testifying for the prosecution, Magog was acquitted. Superman, appalled at the seeming endorsement of lethal vigilantism, went into self-imposed exile. Magog and the composite Metal Men hero Alloy were the only survivors of the Justice Battalion, and at least partially responsible for the destruction of Kansas, for which Magog later seeks forgiveness. At the end of Kingdom Come, Magog lives on Paradise Island, and is seen disciplining Swastika, having finally seen the need for self restraint. In the novelization, he matures to the point of becoming a Dean of Students there.
  • Von Bach: A Yugoslavian would-be dictator who speaks in German. He was imprisoned in the Gulag for killing opponents who had already surrendered. After being humiliated by Captain Comet during his incarceration, he made Comet the first fatality of the prison riot by breaking his neck. He was then killed by Wonder Woman during the Gulag battle to stop him from killing Zatara. Von Bach is modeled after Milan Fras, the singer of Laibach.
  • 666: A gothic looking man/machine hybrid with little respect for the heroes of the past and is one of the major prisoners inside of the gulag. 666 battles other metahumans not for justice, but for sport. Visually based on Brian Azzarello. In the novelization, he is killed in the nuclear blast.
  • Joker's Daughter/Harlequin: A riot girl and one of the many followers of the Joker's style. This one has no relation to the other four Harlequins, Duela Dent, or Harley Quinn. She was one of the survivors of the Gulag Battle. After the battle, she lived on Paradise Island with most of the other survivors, and appeared to have tattooed a tear shape under her left eye. Modeled after Scary Godmother writer Jill Thompson. She survives the nuclear blast, protected by Green Lantern, and is last seen at Paradise Island.
  • Thunder: A new Johnny Thunder with the mischievous spirit of Thunderbolt, he was one of the survivors of the Gulag battle. Can shoot lightning from his fingers. His eyes glow continuously. He survives, and is last seen on Paradise Island.
  • Catwoman: The armored metahuman successor to Selina Kyle, this one might be more feline than the original.
  • Manotaur: A minotaur-like metahuman. In the novelization, he, too, becomes a teacher at Paradise Island, a fitting fate for "one whose ancestors bedevilled the Amazons long ago."
  • The Americommando and the Minutemen: A group of savage patriots who started killing the huddled masses of immigrants near the Statue of Liberty. The Minutemen were controlled by the mysterious Brain Trust.
  • Trix (after Matrix): a morphing biomechanism. Near the end of the series, she accidentally shoots Dinah Lance (Black Canary) in the head during the Gulag riot. She survives, and is last seen on Paradise Island..
  • Captain Atom: A member of Magog's Justice Battalion. His death/detonation at the hands of the villain Parasite, and the irradiation of Kansas this caused, is what causes Superman to return to action.
  • Judomaster: A member of Magog's Justice Battalion. She was apparently killed with the other members when Captain Atom was killed.
  • Mr. Terrific: The successor of Mister Terrific with oversized guns, shoulder pads, and other military accoutrements. He still sported the "Fair Play" logo, but has since lost sight of its true and original meanings. In the novelization, he is killed in the nuclear blast.
  • Alloy: The combined form of the Metal Men, a member of Magog's Justice Battalion. He protects Magog from being killed in Captain Atom's detonation, but his fate is unknown. According to the novelization, white hot shards of him are found on the scene, so it is presumed he died in the process.
  • Stars: an African-American street kid wearing a leather jacket with an American flag bandana, and a T-shirt with an inverted American flag, using the cosmic rod in conjunction with the cosmic converter belt.
  • Stripes: Equipped with various military acoutrements such as automatic weaponry, knives and kevlar padding.
  • Thunderbolt: A member of Magog's Justice Battalion, killed when Captain Atom explodes.
  • Peacemaker: a member of Magog's Justice Battalion, he wears an outfit reminiscent of Boba Fett's. He perishes when Captain Atom detonates.
  • Demon Damsel: Would-be Legionnaire.
  • Nightshade: a member of Magog's Justice Battalion who dies when Captain Atom explodes.
  • Blue Devil: A winged, indigo-skinned demon from Hell.
  • King Crimson: Gigantic, red-skinned demon with a Sun symbol on its chest.
  • Vigilante: A half-man, half-robot cowboy with a machine gun arm.
  • Tokyo Rose: A Japanese martial arts assassin. In the novelization, she survives the nuclear blast when she is saved by Magog.

Magog action figure from DC Direct. ... The Joker redirects here. ... For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ... The Daily Planet is a fictional broadsheet newspaper that appears in Superman stories published by DC Comics. ... Brian Azzarello (born in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American comic book writer. ... For the Jokers sidekick, see Harley Quinn Harlequin is the name of four clown-themed DC Comics characters. ... The Joker redirects here. ... For the Jokers sidekick, see Harley Quinn Harlequin is the name of four clown-themed DC Comics characters. ... Duela Dent is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Harley Quinn (real name Dr. Harleen Quinzel) is a fictional character, a supervillainess, in the animated series Batman: The Animated Series, later adapted into DC Comics Batman comic books. ... Cover to The Mystery Date Scary Godmother is a successful childrens book and comic book series created by artist Jill Thompson and published by Sirius Entertainment in 1997. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the supervillainess. ... Matrix is a superhero, best known as the second Supergirl, published by DC Comics. ... Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... Captain Atom is a fictional comic book superhero. ... A Charlton Comics super hero created in 1965 by writer Joe Gill & artist Frank McLaughlin in Special War Series #4 Cover. ... Mister Terrific is the name of two different superheroes in the DC Comics universe. ... Metal Men are a team of robot superheroes created by writer Robert Kanigher, pencilled by Ross Andru and inked by Mike Esposito for DC Comics in 1962. ... Star-Spangled Kid is the name of several fictional superheroes in the DC Comics universe. ... Stripesy is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Peter Cannon, Thunderbolt is a fictional character originally owned by Charlton Comics and later acquired by DC Comics. ... The Peacemaker is the name of a series of superheroes originally owned by Charlton Comics and later acquired by DC Comics. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nightshade (Eve Eden) is a fictional character, a superheroine who was owned and published by Charlton Comics and was later acquired by DC Comics. ... Blue Devil is a superhero featured in material published by DC Comics. ... The Crimson Avenger is the name of three separate fictional characters, superheroes who exist in the DC Comics universe. ... Vigilante is the name used by several fictional characters appearing in DC Comics. ...

Others

  • Arthur Curry: Arthur has given up the mantle of Aquaman and dedicated himself fully to his role as monarch of Atlantis. He is approached by Wonder Woman to use the oceans as the location of the Gulag, but refuses to accept anymore of the surface-world's problems despite his support of Garth's new role as Aquaman.
  • Orion: Orion appears in the collected edition of KC, in pages Ross added to the collection. Orion has killed his father Darkseid and taken his place as ruler of Apokolips. He attempted to bring democracy to Apokolips, but was unanimously elected by the fearful slave-minded lowlies. In the novelization, Orion hints that he recruited Jimmy Carter, Desmond Tutu and Mikhail Gorbachev to help him run a fair election, but failed.
  • Deadman: He has lost or foregone his normal appearance, and appears as a skeleton wearing his Deadman uniform. He is never identified as "Deadman", and simply introduces himself as "Boston". In the novelization, he explains why none of the Quintessence (comprised of Shazam, Ganthet, The Phantom Stranger, Zeus, Highfather and Spectre) will get involved - the situation almost always turns for the worse, using Zeus' intervention with Troy as an example. (Spectre posits that the Quintessence meet to prevent one another from intervening.)
  • Spectre: The Spectre takes Norman McCay through the events of a possible future, his aim to determine who is responsible for an impending apocalyptic event. However, his "faculties are not what they once were," and he needs a human perspective to properly judge events. In conversation with McCay, Deadman mentions that Spectre had become further and further removed from humanity over time. The Spectre is convinced by McCay to try to see things through the perspective of his human host, and, as Jim Corrigan, he can be seen in the congregation of McCay's church at the end of the story, as well as at the Planet Krypton restaurant, visibly upset the dish named after him, "the Spectre Platter", is a mild concoction of spinach and cottage cheese.

Aquaman is a fictional character, superhero in DC Comics. ... For other uses, see Atlantis (disambiguation). ... Orion is a fictional deity published by DC Comics. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... In the DC Comics fictional shared Universe, Apokolips was the planet ruled by Darkseid, established in Jack Kirbys Fourth World series. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Desmond Mpilo Tutu (born 7 October 1931) is a South African cleric and activist who rose to worldwide fame during the 1980s as an opponent of apartheid. ... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev[1] (Russian: , IPA: ; born 2 March 1931) is a Russian politician. ... For other uses, see Deadman (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Shazam (disambiguation) Shazam is a comic book character created by Bill Parker and C.C. Beck for Fawcett Comics. ... Ganthet is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... The Phantom Stranger is a fictional character of unspecified paranormal origins who battles mysterious and occult forces in various titles published by DC Comics. ... Highfather is a fictional comic book character. ... For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... For the graphic novel character Jimmy Corrigan by Chris Ware see Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth. ... Binomial name Spinacia oleracea L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... A tub of cottage cheese Cottage cheese comes from chickens and is a cheese curd product with a mild flavor. ...

Appearances in mainstream continuity

The Kingdom

Main article: The Kingdom (comics)

Due to the popularity of the series, Mark Waid and Alex Ross began to plot a sequel and prequel. Alex Ross' concept of Gog, mentor of Magog, is an alien from the original "super world" that split to create Apokolips and New Genesis. Because he came from a super planet, Gog is twice as large as a normal human. Waid and Ross disagreed on several concepts and Ross decided to leave the project.[2] The Kingdom was the title for a two issue miniseries published by DC Comics in 1999, and the story title of a story which extended into one-shot books entitled Gog, The Kingdom: Kid Flash, The Kingdom: Nightstar, The Kingdom: Offspring, The Kingdom: Planet Krypton, and The Kingdom: Son of... Gog is a supervillain that repeatedly kills Superman throughout a timeline in the DC comics story The Kingdom, which is the sequel to Kingdom Come. ... In the DC Comics fictional shared Universe, Apokolips was the planet ruled by Darkseid, established in Jack Kirbys Fourth World series. ... In comic books, New Genesis was the home-planet of the New Gods from Jack Kirbys Fourth World metaseries. ...


Without Ross' involvement, Waid continued the story in New Year's Evil: Gog. The Kingdom soon followed, featuring a two-part series, and several one-shots focusing on specific characters. The series was used to present Grant Morrison's hypertime concept. Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ... Hypertime is a fictional concept presented in the 1998 comic book series The Kingdom, both a catch-all explanation for any continuity discrepancies in DC Universe stories and a variation or superset of the Multiverse that existed before Crisis on Infinite Earths. ...


"Thy Kingdom Come"

The Kingdom Come Superman on the cover of Justice Society of America #10. Art by Alex Ross.

The final issue of 52 reveals that Earth-22 is the designation of the Kingdom Come alternate universe. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... Nelson Alexander Alex Ross (born January 22, 1970) is an American comic book painter, illustrator and plotter, acclaimed for the photorealism of his work. ... 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ...


In Justice Society of America, a new Starman appears wearing a costume identical to that of his Kingdom Come counterpart. Due to a time-machine error, Starman traveled to Earth-22 before arriving in the present time-stream. Star Boy is the name of several comic book characters owned by DC Comics. ...


The "Thy Kingdom Come" story arc of the JSA title features the involvement of Alex Ross, as well as the appearance of the Kingdom Come Superman. Barring additional story information for the moment, it appears as if the events of the final issue of the original mini-series take place concurrently with the "present-day" events of "New Earth" at the time of publication of the JSA story arc.


Mainstream continuity

Since the publication of Kingdom Come, elements from the series have migrated into the DC Universe, and the earth of Kingdom Come was identified as Earth-22 in 52 Week 52. A depiction of several alternate Earths within the Multiverse and the different variations of the Flash inhabiting each Earth. ... 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ...

  • Alloy: During the DC One Million crossover event, The Metal Men combined into Alloy, their Kingdom Come version.
  • Aquaman: In Aquaman: Sword of Atlantis #40, the mantle of Aquaman is passed down to a youth named Arthur Curry, who has no relationship to the original Aquaman, Orin.
  • Atom Smasher: Albert Rothstein (the former Nuklon) became Atom Smasher, donning a similar (yet not identical) suit to that worn by Kingdom Come's Atom Smasher.
  • Captain Atom: He appeared in his Kingdom Come costume in the Captain Atom: Armageddon miniseries. He had briefly appeared in the costume when he was a member of the Super Buddies, and the design was mocked.
  • Cyborg: For a brief time, Cyborg inhabited the Omegadrome armor and adopted the appearance of his Kingdom Come counterpart.
  • Red Tornado: Alex Ross based his design for Maxine Hunkel, aka Cyclone, on the Kingdom Come Red Tornado, retroactively making them one and the same.
  • Nabu: During Infinite Crisis, Doctor Fate looked similar to his Kingdom Come incarnation.
  • 'Hawkman: Kingdom Comes Hawkman inspired a change in the appearance of the Hawkman-related character Northwind.
  • Ibn al Xu'ffasch: In the "Titans Tomorrow" alternate timeline, Ibn al Xu'ffasch's gravemarker appears in the cemetery where Arkahm Asylum once stood. On the same timeline, Arkham Asylum is destroyed by the Joker's Daughter.
  • 'J. J. Thunder: He briefly looked similar to Kingdom Comes Thunder, (bald and with glowing eyes), during a storyline in which he was possessed.
  • Joker/Jimmy Olsen: A promotional image to DC's Countdown series displays The Joker wearing a button reading: "Jimmy Olsen Must Die." In Kingdom Come the Joker murdered Olsen.
  • Judomaster: A female Judomaster appeared in Birds of Prey #100.
  • Kid Flash: In Justice League of America #10, Wally, Linda, Iris, and Jai West have returned to the mainstream DC Universe. Iris and Jai have aged into young children.
  • Offspring: The son of Plastic Man has appeared in Teen Titans and 52.
  • Phoebus: In Justice Society of America (vol.3) #2, White Dragon's outfit bears a loose resemblance to Phoebus' costume.
  • Red Robin: Red Robin makes an appearance in a promotional image for DC's weekly series Countdown. DC Executive Editor Dan Didio has stated in his column, "DC Nation" #68 which ran in the issues released by DC the week of July 4, 2007, that Jason Todd will become Red Robin during Countdown.
  • Roy Harper: Roy Harper (formerly Speedy and Arsenal) is now known as Red Arrow, the name he went by in Kingdom Come.
  • Sandman: Sand has taken up the mantle of Sandman in Justice Society of America (vol. 3) #1.
  • Starman: The character appearing in Justice Society of America is from the Kingdom Come universe. (He was the Star Boy of the Legion of Super-Heroes, a connection explored more fully in James Robinson's Starman series.) The mentally unstable Starman was sent to New Earth with six other Legionnaires.
  • Superman: A promotional image for Final Countdown depicts the Superman of the Kingdom Come universe with two other Supermen. His right hand glows, and bears an atomic symbol.
  • Swastika: Kingdom Come villain Swastika appears in Justice Society of America (vol. 3).
  • Trix: In Justice Society of America #10, the Kingdom Come Superman saves a girl from committing suicide. The girl is wearing a shirt that says "Trix".
  • Von Bach: Rebel, who fights Damage in Justice Society of America (vol. 3) #1, is based on Von Bach.
  • Wildcat: In Justice Society of America (vol. 3) #3, Ted Grant's son Tom transforms into a werecat identical to the Kingdom Come Wildcat.
  • Zatara: Zatara II served as the inspiration for Zachary Zatara who appears in Teen Titans.

However, several events in the DC universe are not in line with the future depicted in Kingdom Come : DC One Million was a crossover event published by DC Comics in 1998. ... Metal Men are a team of robot superheroes created by writer Robert Kanigher, pencilled by Ross Andru and inked by Mike Esposito for DC Comics in 1962. ... Aquaman is a fictional character, superhero in DC Comics. ... Albert Rothstein (known by the aliases Nuklon and Atom Smasher -- sometimes spelled Atom-Smasher) is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Captain Atom is a fictional comic book superhero. ... The Super Buddies are a team of comic book superheroes in the DC Comics universe who appeared in the six-issue Formerly Known as the Justice League miniseries in 2003, and its 2005 sequel, I Cant Believe Its Not the Justice League (published in JLA Classified). ... This article is about the Teen Titans member. ... Cyclone (alias Maxine Hunkel) is a fictional superheroine in the DC Comics universe. ... Doctor Fate is a DC Comics superhero and wizard, best known as a member of the Justice Society of America. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Northwind is a fictional avian human hybrid published by DC Comics. ... Titans Tomorrow is a storyline of a possible alternate future in the DC Comics Universe, from Teen Titans (vol. ... Look up joker in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... James Bartholomew Jimmy Olsen is a fictional character, a photojournalist who appears in DC Comics’ Superman stories. ... A Charlton Comics super hero created in 1965 by writer Joe Gill & artist Frank McLaughlin in Special War Series #4 Cover. ... For other meanings of the term, see Birds of Prey (disambiguation). ... Kid Flash is the name of three fictional characters, all superheroes, in the DC Comics universe. ... Cover to Offspring #1 (February 1999). ... Plastic Man (Patrick Eel OBrian) is a fictional comic-book superhero originally published by Quality Comics and later acquired by DC Comics. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Countdown is a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 9, 2007, directly following the conclusion of the last issue of 52. ... Roy Harper is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Starman is a name used by several different fictional DC Comics superheroes, most prominently Ted Knight and his son Jack. ... Star Boy (Thom Kallor) is a member of the Legion of Super-Heroes. ... Zachary Zatara is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ...

  • Blue Beetle: Blue Beetle (Ted Kord) is dead, shot by Maxwell Lord. However, An preview sequence of Booster Gold featured Booster Gold along Blue Beetle (both Dan Garrett and Jamie Reyes) and Rip Hunter traveled back in time averting Ted's death might make it otherwise.
  • Ibn al Xu'ffasch: On New Earth, Bruce Wayne's son is known as Damien Wayne.
  • Jade: Jade died during the Rann-Thanagar War, (although it was revealed that Donna Troy was supposed to die instead of her).
  • Jim Corrigan: He gives up the mantle of the host for The Spectre years prior to Infinite Crisis.
  • Orin: In World War III, Orin becomes the Dweller of the Depths and passes the mantle of Aquaman to a youth named Arthur Curry. Orin is later killed in Aquaman: Sword of Atlantis #50.
  • Sandman (Wesley Dodds): This golden age character remains dead, as documented in JSA Secret Files #1.

Blue Beetle is Theodore (or Edward) Ted Kord, a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ... Maxwell Lord is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Booster Gold is a fictional character, a superhero in publications from DC Comics. ... Rip Hunter is a DC Comics character who first appeared in Showcase #20 (May 1959), then his own series which ran for 29 issues (1961-65). ... Ibn al Xuffasch (Arabic: إبن الخفّاش; literally Son of the Bat) is a character in the Batman comic book series who is the biological son of Batman and Talia al Ghul. ... Damian Wayne is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe. ... Rann-Thanagar War #1; cover by Ivan Reis and Marc Campos. ... For the graphic novel character Jimmy Corrigan by Chris Ware see Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth. ... Cover to The Spectre #31, November 1989. ... This article is about the DC Comics sagas of the same name. ... The Sandman, alias Wesley Dodds, is a fictional masked crimefighter in the DC Comics universe. ...

Trivia

  • On page 17, panel 4, there is an advertisement for a book called "Under the Hood" by Hollis Mason. This is a reference to Alan Moore's Watchmen, as Mason was the name of the first Nite-Owl and published an autobiography of the same name.
  • Another Watchmen reference can be seen on page 84, panel 2, where Rorschach can be seen in the background.
  • In the same scene, The Village People can be seen in the background of one panel in super-hero garb.
  • On page 116, panel one, two characters from "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" can be seen.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Watchman. ... Village People were a disco band of the late 1970s. ...

Collections

The original trade paperback collected the entire series along with twelve additional pages by Ross, including the epilogue. Promotional artwork and sketches of the major characters were also included.


A hardback edition added a second volume to the text, containing sketches and developmental artwork from Ross, showing the development of the character designs and the storyline.


Elliot S. Maggin wrote the novelization which was published by Warner Aspect. It fleshes out characters such as Magog, the world leaders, and the Batman/Ib'n connection. The book contains four new color pages by Ross, as well as four black and white sketches of the major players. Elliot S! Maggin is an American writer. ...


A 1998 special from Wizard magazine contained the original proposal for the series by Ross, providing notes on what was changed and why. Ross' comments on The Kingdom were also included.


DC released a Absolute Kingdom Come hardcover in 2006. It collected the entire series in a wider page format, along with interviews with Waid and Ross, character artwork, sketches and a complete annotation for the series. DC Comics Absolute Editions are a series of archival quality printings of graphic novels published by DC Comics and Wildstorm Productions. ...


DC also released an audio dramatization of the series featuring the voice talent of Mike Mearian, Don Peoples, Garet Scott, John Cunningham, Kent Broadhurst, Jeff David, Chuck Cooper, Harry Goz, Barbara Rosenblat, Craig Zakarian, Mike Arkin, Bob Lydiard, Peter Newman, Birgit Darby, Mark Finley, Igot Goldin, Macintyre Dixon, and Chloe Patellis, along with the guest voices of Dennis O'Neil, Mark Waid, Mike Carlin, Dan Raspler, Charles Kochman, Peter Tomasi, Greg Ross, Janet Harney, Elisabeth Vincentelli.


Toys

DC Direct (The exclusive collectibles division of DC Comics) has produced 3 waves of action figures based on Kingdom Come's artwork. The first wave of figures included Superman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern and Hawkman. The second wave included Batman, Red Robin, Captain Marvel and Kid Flash. The last wave included Magog, Flash, Armored Wonder Woman and Deadman. An exclusive figure of Red Arrow was released through ToyFare magazine. DC Direct also released several other characters through their Elseworlds toylines. These figures included The Spectre, Norman McCay, Jade, Nightstar, Aquaman and Blue Beetle. DC Direct[1] is the exclusive collectibles division of DC Comics, the Time Warner subsidiary that publishes comic books and licenses characters such as Superman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, Flash, Batman, Batgirl and Hawkgirl. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Allan Scott. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... This article is about the DC Comics hero and former sidekick of Batman. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Kid Flash (Iris West) is a superheroine in an alternate future of the DC Comics universe She was constantly annoyed by that her father, who had almost completely given up his life to patrol Keystone City non-stop, never made time for her, although he did make time for her... Magog action figure from DC Direct. ... The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Deadman (disambiguation). ... Roy Harper is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... ToyFare is a magainze published by Wizard Entertainment. ... DC Direct[1] is the exclusive collectibles division of DC Comics, the Time Warner subsidiary that publishes comic books and licenses characters such as Superman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, Flash, Batman, Batgirl and Hawkgirl. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... Norman McCay is a priest and the witness to the almost Biblical events in the Elseworlds story Kingdom Come. ... Jade is the codename of Jennie-Lynn Hayden, a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... Nightstar is a fictional character, the daughter of Red Robin (Dick Grayson, also known as Nightwing, the first Robin) and Starfire from the Kingdom Come and The Kingdom comic book miniseries by DC Comics. ... Aquaman is a fictional character, superhero in DC Comics. ... Blue Beetle is the name of three fictional comic book superheroes. ...


See also

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Kingdom Come
  • The Kingdom - a sequel set in a continuity similar to that of Kingdom Come.
  • Norman McCay -The human witness to the events

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Kingdom is a two-issue comic book limited series and crossover event published by DC Comics in 1999, written by Mark Waid and drawn by Ariel Olivetti/Mike Zeck. ... Norman McCay is a priest and the witness to the almost Biblical events in the Elseworlds story Kingdom Come. ...

Other Versions

A roster of Kingdom Come characters make cameo appearances in Justice League Adventures #20. The Psycho Pirate hallucinates battles with three various superhero teams, including one containing Supergirl, Kid Flash, Red Arrow, Jade and Red Robin as they appeared in Kingdom Come. [3] The Psycho-Pirate is the name of two DC comics supervillains, dating back to the Golden Age of Comics. ...


References

  1. ^ Alex Ross. "ALEX ROSS: INSIDE THE ARTIST'S GALLERY", Wizard Entertainment, 2006-05-10. Retrieved on 2007-08-03. 
  2. ^ Mythology: The DC Comics Art of Alex Ross
  3. ^ Psycho Pirate comic page

 
 

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