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Encyclopedia > King consort

King consort is a title given in some monarchies to the husband of a queen regnant. Nowadays, it is a symbolic title only, the sole constitutional function of the holder being similar to a queen consort, namely to produce an heir to the throne. Spain, Portugal, England and Scotland have all had kings consort; however, since the rank of king normally outranks that of queen, in most monarchies the queen's husband is given the title of prince or prince consort instead, as in the case of Prince Albert, Queen Victoria's husband. In Denmark and the Netherlands, the queen's husband is made a prince. In England, Mary I's husband, the future Philip II of Spain, was named King Consort; however, no English, Scottish or subsequent British queen regnant's husband has been granted the title. (The husband of Mary II, William III, was named co-sovereign with his wife and he was thus not king consort.) For related meanings see also Monarch (disambiguation) A monarchy, (from the Greek monos archein, meaning one ruler) is a form of government that has a monarch as Head of State. ... Matrimony redirects here. ... Cleopatra is one of the most well-known queens regnant A queen regnant (plural queens regnant) is a woman monarch possessing and exercising all of the monarchal powers of a king, in contrast with a queen consort, who is the wife of a reigning king, and in and of her... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see inheritance (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Motto Latin: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) (Scots: Wha daur meddle wi me) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the... Louis XIV, king of France and Navarre (Painting by Hyacinthe Rigaud, 1701). ... Louis XIV, king of France and Navarre (Painting by Hyacinthe Rigaud, 1701). ... The term prince, from the Latin root princeps, is used for a member of the highest ranks of the aristocracy or the nobility. ... A prince consort, generally speaking, is the husband of a Queen regnant, unless he himself is a king. ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha Prince Albert piercing Prince Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence Prince Albert of Monaco Prince Albert, Saskatchewan Prince Albert National Park, Canada Prince Albert in a Can This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... Philip II (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples from 1554 until 1598, king consort of England (as husband of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, Lord of the Seventeen Provinces (holding various titles for the individual territories... Mary II (30 April 1662–28 December 1694) reigned as Queen of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689, and as Queen of Scots (as Mary II of Scotland) from 11 April 1689 until her death. ... William III (14 November 1650 – 8 March 1702) was the Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28 June 1672, King of England and King of Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scots (under the name William II) from...


Except for earlier, the husband of an heiress became the possessor of her lands (and titles) jure uxoris, "in right of his wife". In the Middle Ages, this was invariably true even for queens regnant and princesses regnant. Accordingly, the husband of the reigning female monarch became monarch, and from this the denotation "King Consort" is a consequence. In some cases, the king thus ascended, remained king even after the death of the wife, and in some cases left the kingdom to their own heirs who were not issue of the wife in question (cf Władysław II Jagiełło of Poland, ascended as husband of Queen Jadwiga). In the event of a divorce between a reigning female monarch and her husband, the husband would remain the monarch and the wife would lose her status. One example of this is when Marie of Boulogne and Matthew I of Boulogne were divorced in 1170. Marie ceased to be Countess, while Matthew I continued to reign until 1173. Wladislaus II on Jan Matejkos painting Jagello redirects here. ... This article is about the 14th-century queen and saint. ... Marie of Boulogne was the Countess of Boulogne from 1159 to 1170. ...


Later, the woman remained the monarch, but the husband had some power, usually as co-regent. For example, Maria Theresa of Austria was queen regnant of Hungary and Bohemia, but her husband Francis was king consort. Not to be confused with Maria Theresa of Austria (1816-1867). ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ... Francis I Silver coin of Francis I, dated 1754. ...


Queen Mary I, queen regnant of England (reigned 1553 - 1558), accordingly styled her husband Philip King of England and that was recognized in the administration of the realm, where the dating went "Mary & Philip"; Philip was also King of Naples, and later in his own right King Philip II of Spain (reigned 1556 - 1598) and King Philip I of Portugal (reigned 1580 - 1598). Philip lost his English title when his wife died. Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Philip II (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples from 1554 until 1598, king consort of England (as husband of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, Lord of the Seventeen Provinces (holding various titles for the individual territories...


Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots (reigned 1542-1567), married Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, the eldest son of the Earl and Countess of Lennox in July 1565. Darnley was a grandson of King Henry VII of England and Mary's first cousin, and he was considered to have a strong claim to the Scottish throne. On the evening before their marriage, Mary proclaimed Darnley "King of Scots", a title that she could not legally grant him without the consent of Parliament, but which was never formally challenged. However, this title did not grant him any automatic right of rule or of succession to the throne if Mary should die. For that to happen, it was necessary that Mary should grant him the Crown Matrimonial of Scotland. In 1558, the Crown Matrimonial had been granted to her short-lived first husband, Francis II, King of France, with the consent of the Scottish Parliament, which meant that if Mary had died before Francis, Francis would have also become the king of Scotland and Scotland might well have become permanently subject to the French Crown. Mary's marriage to Darnley rapidly became unhappy, and despite Darnley's constant demands for the Crown Matrimonial, Mary never gave it to him. If she had, Darnley would have inherited the throne of Scotland if Mary (and their children, if any) had predeceased him. Under that scenario, if Darnley had then remarried and had children with his new queen, he would have started a new dynastic line and those children also would have been the legitimate heirs to the Scottish throne. (However, Darnley and Mary did have one son, who outlived both parents and became James VI of Scotland and later James I of England and Ireland, the heir not only of his mother Mary but also of Elizabeth I, Queen of England.) Mary, Queen of Scots is the name of: Mary I of Scotland, the former queen of France and Scotland executed by her cousin Elizabeth I of England Mary, Queen of Scots (movie), a 1971 film about that queen starring Vanessa Redgrave Mary, Queen of Scots (1969 book), a 1969 book... Henry Stuart can refer to one of several members of the Royal House of Stuart Henry Frederick Stuart, cr Prince of Wales in 1603. ... Henry Stewart (or Stuart, which was the style adopted by his father, and thence perpetuated as the House of Stuart), 1st Duke of Albany (7 December 1545 – 9 or 10 February 1567), commonly known as Lord Darnley, King Consort of Scotland, was the first-cousin and second husband of Mary... Lennox is an historic mormaerdom, earldom and then dukedom, in Stirling, Scotland. ... The Tudor Rose: a combination of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor, was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... The Crown Matrimonial is a legal concept and title used in some monarchical countries that gives the monarchs spouse the right to inherit the crown after the monarchs death, regardless of whether the spouse is in the direct line of succession. ... See the appropriate page for Francis II of the Holy Roman Empire François II of France Francis II of the Two Sicilies This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... James VI and I King of England, Scotland and Ireland James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603 ) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. ...


In Portugal, there were specific conditions to a male consort could be a Consort King: to bear a royal heir. It happened twice, first in the late 18th Century, when the Queen Maria I of Portugal, who started reigning in 1777, gave to his husband (and oncle) not only the title of Consort King but he also got a ordinal as he reigned as Peter III, together with his wife (and niece). Maria I of Portugal (pron. ... Ordinal numbers or regnal numbers are used to distinguish between persons with the same name who held the same office. ... Pedro III, King-consort of Portugal (pron. ...


In 1836, Queen Maria II of Portugal married his second husband, Ferdinand of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, a direct cousin of Prince Albert. Ferdinand got the title of Consort King the next year (in 1837), as soon as their first child was born, and he reigned as Ferdinand II, together with his wife. Queen Maria's first husband, Auguste of Beauharnais, was only consort Prince, because he died before he could bear a royal heir). Maria II, Queen of Portugal, (pron. ... Ferdinand of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (October 29, 1816 - December 15, 1885) was king consort to Maria II of Portugal from their marriage in 1836 to her death in 1853. ... Auguste (Charles Eugène Napoléon) de Beauharnais, 2nd Duke of Leuchtenberg (9 December 1810 - 28 March 1835) was the first Prince consort of Maria II of Portugal. ...


Victoria of the United Kingdom (reigned 1837 - 1901) wanted to make her husband Albert king consort. But the British government refused to introduce a bill allowing it, as Albert was a foreigner. She instead gave him the title of Prince Consort in 1857. Queen Victoria redirects here. ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (Francis Charles Augustus Albert Emmanuel, of the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha branch of the House of Wettin) (26 August 1819 - 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ...


In the United Kingdom, there is no automatic right of the consort of a queen to receive any title, as with any husband of a suo jure peeress. Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom (reigned 1952 - ) did not create her husband Philip, Duke of Edinburgh a Prince of the United Kingdom until 1957, five years after her accession. He has never been formally designated Prince Consort or King Consort. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of Latin phrases (P–Z). ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... HRH The Duke of Edinburgh His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (Philip Mountbatten), styled HRH The Duke of Edinburgh (born June 10, 1921), is the consort of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. ... This is a list of British princes from the accession of King George I in 1714. ...


See also

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A princess consort is the female equivalent to a prince consort. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
King consort - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (538 words)
King consort is a title given in some monarchies to the husband of a Queen regnant.
Accordingly, the husband of the reigning female monarch became monarch, and from this the denotation "King Consort" is a consequence.
In some cases, the king thus ascended, remained king even after the death of the wife, and in some cases left the kingdom to their own heirs who were not issue of the wife in question (cf Władysław II Jagiełło of Poland, ascended as husband of Queen Jadwiga).
Prince consort - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (286 words)
A prince consort, generally speaking, is the husband of a Queen regnant, unless he himself is a king.
Current examples include the Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (husband of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom), and Prince Henrik of Denmark (husband of Queen Margrethe II of Denmark).
It is also not fully clear what would happen to the prince consort's title in the event that he were to outlive his wife, as this seems to have rarely occurred in the recorded annals of monarchy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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