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Encyclopedia > King of the Romans

King of the Romans (Latin: Rex Romanorum) was a title used by the rulers of the Holy Roman Empire before their coronation by the Pope, and later also by the heir designate of the Empire. Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The following list of German monarchs is one of several Wikipedia lists of incumbents. ... The Holy Roman Empire and from the 16th century on also The Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation was a political conglomeration of lands in Central Europe in the Middle Ages and the early modern period. ... The coronation of Empress Farah, of Iran in 1967. ... The Pope (from Greek: pappas, father; from Latin: papa, Papa, father) is the head of the Roman Catholic Church. ...

Contents


Origin

The Holy Roman Empire was based on the kingdom of Germany and the King had to go to Rome to be crowned Emperor by the Pope. Before that he did not use the title of Emperor but that of a King. The wording of this title was not fixed, as the King was sometimes called Rex Francorum (King of the Franks), Rex Teutonicorum (King of the Germans) or merely Rex (King).


The title Rex Romanorum was used occasionally by the Ottonian rulers and especially by Emperor Henry II to highlight the Roman nature of their Empire, which was contested by the Byzantine Emperors. Ottonian dynasty is a name sometimes given to a ruling dynasty of German kings, sometimes regarded as the first dynasty of the Holy Roman Empire, (though Charlemagne is commonly viewed as the original founder. ... Saint Henry II of Germany (972 – 13 July 1024), was the fifth and last Holy Roman Emperor of the Saxon or Ottonian dynasty. ... Byzantine Empire (Greek: Βυζαντινή Αυτοκρατορία) is the term conventionally used since the 19th century to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ...


Rex Romanorum became the standard title under the Salian King Henry IV during the Investiture Controversy. Pope Gregory VII insisted on using the title Rex Teutonicorum to counter Henry's imperial claims. As King, Henry was the Imperator futurus but at that point he had not been crowned Emperor. In reaction to Gregory's usage, Henry made Rex Romanorum his standard title until he was crowned Emperor in 1084. The Salian Dynasty of the Holy Roman Empire was founded by Conrad II (c. ... HEINRIC·IMP[ERATOR], Emperor Henry Henry IV (November 11, 1050 – August 7, 1106) was King of Germany (Holy Roman Empire) from 1056 and Emperor from 1084, until his abdication in 1105. ... The Investiture Controversy was the most significant conflict between secular and religious powers in medieval Europe. ... YOU ARE NOT LOGGED IN. YOUR COMPUTER WILL SHUT DOWN IN 5 SECONDS. PLEASE STAND BY. ... Events Saint Bruno founds the Carthusian Order of monks Kyanzittha begins his reign in Myanmar. ...


Henry's successors imitated this practice, being called Rex Romanorum before and Imperator Romanorum after their Roman coronation.


Title of the Heir designate

Royal succession in the Holy Roman Empire always was a difficult issue, since the Empire was a elective monarchy. However, once a ruler had been crowned Emperor, he could pursue the election of his heir as King, who would then succeed him after his death. This junior King, who usually did not participate in the rule, bore the title of a "King of the Romans". This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


This practice was continued even after 1556, when the rulers of the Holy Roman Empire did no longer seek a coronation by the Pope and instead dubbed themselves Emperor-elects. Despite this lack of a coronation, the respective Emperor-elects' sons were elected during their fathers' lifetime in 1653, and in 1764. Events January 16 - Abdication of Emperor Charles V. His son, Philip II becomes King of Spain, while his brother Ferdinand becomes Holy Roman Emperor January 23 - The Shaanxi earthquake, the deadliest earthquake in history, occurs with its epicenter in Shaanxi province, China. ... Ferdinand IV (September 8, 1633 - July 9, 1654) was King of the Romans, of Hungary, and of Bohemia. ... Holy Roman Emperor Joseph II Joseph II (March 13, 1741 – February 20, 1790) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1765 to 1790. ...


Trivia

"Hablando del rey de Roma" (literally "speaking of the king of Rome") is a colloquial expression in Spanish equivalent to the English-language saying "Speak of the devil", referring to someone who has entered a room or conversation in which said person was already the topic.


Other usages

This or similar titles were also used by:

The Roman Kingdom (Latin: Regenum Romanum) was the monarchal government for the city of Rome and its territories from its founding in 753 BC by Romulus until the expulsion of Lucius Tarquinius Superbus in 510 BC and the establishment of the Roman Republic. ... Romulus may refer to any of these articles: Romulus is a mythical founder of Rome, brother of Remus. ... The captured Syagrius is brought before Alaric II who orders him sent to Clovis I Syagrius (died 487) was the son of Aegidius, the last Roman magister militum per Gallias, who had preserved a rump state around Soissons after the collapse of central rule in the western empire. ... Map of Gaul circa 58 BC Gaul (Latin Gallia, Greek Galatia) was the region of Western Europe occupied by present day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... // Overview Events Romulus Augustus, Last Western Roman Emperor 410: Rome sacked by Visigoths 452: Pope Leo I allegedly meets personally with Attila the Hun and convinces him not to sack Rome 439: Vandals conquer Carthage At some point after 440, the Anglo-Saxons settle in Britain. ... Napoleon II (March 20, 1811 – July 22, 1832), Duke of Reichstadt, was the son of Napoleon Bonaparte, and briefly the second Emperor of the French. ... Napoleon I of France, by Jacques-Louis David. ...

References

This article uses material translated from the corresponding article in the German-language wikipedia, which, in turn, cites a source that contains further references:

  • H. Beumann: Rex Romanorum, in: Lexikon des Mittelalters (Dictionary of the Middle Ages, 9 vols., Munich-Zurich 1980-98), vol. 7, col. 777 f.

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
King of the Romans - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (525 words)
King of the Romans (Latin: Rex Romanorum) was a title used by the rulers of the Holy Roman Empire before their coronation by the Pope, and later also by the heir designate of the Empire.
The Holy Roman Empire was based on the kingdom of Germany and the King had to go to Rome to be crowned Emperor by the Pope.
This junior King, who usually did not participate in the rule, bore the title of a "King of the Romans".
Incubus Designs - Serim Ral Home Page (1383 words)
Roman law was a complex body of precedents and opinions, which were finally codified in the 6th century as the Justinian Code.
Rather than restoring their inept king, the citizens replaced the monarchy with two elected consuls, generals whose primary task it was to lead Rome's armies, and a Senate to serve as an advisory body.
Roman Legionnaire: The core of the Roman legion consisted of heavily armored infantry.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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