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Encyclopedia > Kilometre per second

kilometre per second is an SI derived unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector), signified by the symbol km/s or km s-1. It is equal to 1,000 m/s.


1 km/s is about the top speed of a sub-orbital spacecraft.


A typical value for the specific impulse of current rockets is 4.5 km/s.


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Kilometre at AllExperts (372 words)
A corresponding unit of area is the square kilometre and a corresponding unit of volume is the cubic kilometre.
In English, the word "kilometre" is often pronounced with the stress on the second syllable, unlike other SI units (such as kilogram) where the stress is placed on the first syllable.
Virtually all countries of the world utilise the kilometre as a standard measure of distance, particularly on road network signage to indicate distances to cities, towns, villages and suburbs etc. The USA is gradually kilometerising its road signage in many states.
Metre per second - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (214 words)
Metre per second (U.S. spelling: meter per second) is an SI derived unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector quantity which specifies both magnitude and a specific direction), defined by distance in metres divided by time in seconds.
Astronomical measurements sometimes list velocities in terms of kilometres per second, where a kilometre per second is equivalent to 1 000 metres per second.
Although m/s is considered as a derived unit, it could be viewed as more fundamental than the metre, since the latter is defined through the speed of light in the vacuum, taken to be exactly 299792458 m/s by definition, which then gives the metre using the definition of one second.
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