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Encyclopedia > Kilometre
1 kilometre =
SI units
1000 m 1×106 mm
US customary / Imperial units
3280 ft 0.621 mi

A kilometre (American spelling: kilometer, symbol km) is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one thousand metres, the current SI base unit of length. It can be written in scientific notations as 1×10³ m (engineering notation) or 1 E+3 m (exponential notation) — both meaning 1,000 × 1 m. “SI” redirects here. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... U.S. customary units, also known in the United States as English units[1] (but see English unit) or standard units, are units of measurement that are currently used in the USA, in some cases alongside units from SI (the International System of Units — the modern metric system). ... The Imperial units are an irregularly standardized system of units that have been used in the United Kingdom and its former colonies, including the Commonwealth countries. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... KM, Km, or km may stand for: Khmer language (ISO 639 alpha-2, km) Kilometre Kinemantra Meditation Knowledge management KM programming language KM Culture, Korean Movie Maker. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... The former Weights and Measures office in Middlesex, England. ... For other uses of this word, see Length (disambiguation). ... The International System of Units (symbol: SI) (for the French phrase Syst me International dUnit s) is the most widely used system of units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... “SI” redirects here. ... The SI system of units defines seven SI base units: physical units defined by an operational definition. ... Scientific notation, also known as standard form, is a notation for writing numbers that is often used by scientists and mathematicians to make it easier to write large and small numbers. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude this page lists lengths between 1 km and 10 km (103 and 104 m). ...


nanometre <<< micrometre <<< millimetre < centimetre < decimetre < metre < decametre < hectometre < kilometre <<< megametre A nanometre (American spelling: nanometer, symbol nm) is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one thousand-millionth of a metre, which is the current SI base unit of length. ... A micrometre (American spelling: micrometer, symbol µm) is an SI unit of length equal to one millionth of a metre, or about a tenth of the diameter of a droplet of mist or fog. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... A centimetre (American spelling centimeter, symbol cm) is a unit of length that is equal to one hundredth of a metre, the current SI base unit of length. ... A decimetre is a measurement of length, measuring 10 centimetres or one-tenth of a metre millimetre << centimetre << decimetre << metre << kilometre ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A decametre (American spelling: decameter) (symbol: dam) is a measurement of distance equal to ten metres. ... A hectometre (American spelling: hectometer, symbol hm) is a somewhat uncommonly used unit of length in the metric system, equal to one hundred metres, the current SI base unit of length. ... A megametre (American spelling: megameter, symbol: Mm) is a unit of length equal to 106 metres (from the Greek words megas = big and metro = count/measure). ...


A corresponding unit of area is the square kilometre and a corresponding unit of volume is the cubic kilometre. This article is about the physical quantity. ... The volume of a solid object is the three-dimensional concept of how much space it occupies, often quantified numerically. ...


Although, in English, metric units of measurement are usually pronounced with the stress on the first syllable, as in /ˈkɪl.əˌmiː.tə(r)/, pronunciation of the word "kilometre" with the stress on the second syllable /kɪˈlɒm.ə.tə(r)/ is in common usage (see List of words of disputed pronunciation). The latter pronunciation follows the stress pattern used for the names of measuring instruments, such as barometer, thermometer, tachometer and speedometer. This stress pattern is not commonly used for other metric measurements such as millimetre or centimetre. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... A barometer is an instrument used to measure atmospheric pressure. ... It has been suggested that List of temperature sensors be merged into this article or section. ... Tachometer showing engine RPM (revolutions per minute), and a redline from 6000 and 7000 RPM. A tachometer is an instrument that measures the speed of rotation of a shaft or disk, as in a motor or other machine. ... Speedometer gauge on a car, showing the speed of the vehicle in miles and kilometres per hour on the out– and inside respectively. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... A centimetre (American spelling centimeter, symbol cm) is a unit of length that is equal to one hundredth of a metre, the current SI base unit of length. ...


Slang terms for kilometre include "klick" (sometimes spelled "click" or "klik") and "kay" (or "k"). These non-standard terms can also refer to kilometres per hour, which itself is abbreviated as km/h, km h-1, km·h-1 or, informally, kph. Slang is the use of highly informal words and expressions that are not considered standard in the speakers dialect or language. ... Klick (sometimes spelled click) is a common military term meaning kilometre (or sometimes kilometres per hour). ... Kilometre per hour (American spelling: kilometer per hour) is a unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector). ... Kilometre per hour (American spelling: kilometer per hour) is a unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector). ...


"Kilometrage" may be used in the same way as "mileage". Fuel economy in automobiles is the amount of fuel required to move the automobile over a given distance. ...

Contents

Equivalence to other units of length

1 kilometre is equal to:

  • 1,000 metres (1 metre is equal to 0.001 kilometres)
  • about 0.621 statute miles (1 statute mile is equal to 1.609344 kilometres)
  • about 1,094 international yards (1 international yard is equal to 0.0009144 kilometres)
  • about 3,281 feet (1 foot is equal to 0.0003048 kilometres)

This article is about the unit of length. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... A yard (abbreviation: yd) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...

International usage

Virtually all countries of the world use the kilometre as a standard measure of distance, particularly on road network signage to indicate distances to cities, towns, villages and suburbs etc. The only states to use the mile are United States of America, the United Kingdom, Liberia, and Burma (Myanmar).


Although the UK has officially adopted the metric system, there is no intention to replace the mile on road signs in the near future, owing to the British public's attachment to traditional imperial units of distance, i.e., miles, yards and inches. As of Tuesday, September 11, 2007, the EU has allowed Britain to continue using the imperial systems. The EU commissioner Günter Verheugen said: "There is not now and never will be any requirement to drop imperial measurements." Günter Verheugen (born 28 April 1944 in Bad Kreuznach, Rhineland-Palatinate) is a German politician, currently serving as European Commissioner for Enterprise and Industry. ...


In the US, proposals to introduce metric signs on the federally owned interstate highways met with overwhelming public opposition.[citation needed] The National Highway System Designation Act of 1995 prohibits the use of federal-aid highway funds to convert existing signs or purchase new signs with metric units. [1] However, the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices since 2000 published in both metric and American Customary Units. (See also Metrication in the United States.) The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) is a document issued by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT) to specify the standards by which traffic signs, road markings (see lane), and signals are designed, installed, and used. ... This label, on a bottle of Head & Shoulders shampoo, illustrates the conflicted state of U.S. metrication in the early 21st century. ...


Unicode symbols

For the purposes of compatibility with Chinese, Japanese and Korean (CJK) characters, Unicode has symbols for: CJK is a collective term for Chinese, Japanese, and Korean, which comprise the main East Asian languages. ... The Unicode Standard, Version 5. ...

They are useful only with East Asian fixed-width CJK fonts, because they are equal in size to one Chinese character.[citation needed] Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A cubic kilometre (symbol km³) is an SI derived unit of volume. ... CJK is a collective term for Chinese, Japanese, and Korean, which comprise the main East Asian languages. ... Japanese name Kanji: Kana: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Vietnamese name Quoc Ngu: Hantu: A Chinese character (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) is a logogram used in writing Chinese, Japanese, sometimes Korean, and formerly Vietnamese. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Kilometre - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (285 words)
A kilometre (American spelling: kilometer), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure).
Like the kilometre, all units of length in the metric system are based on the metre, by adding an SI prefix that stands for a power of ten, such as hecto for one hundred to form hectometre (= 0.1 kilometre) or mega for one million to form megametre (= 1,000 kilometre).
Unicode has symbols for "km" (㎞), for square kilometre (㎢) and for cubic kilometre (㎦); however, they are useful only in CJK texts, where they are equal in size to one Chinese character.
Square kilometre - Simple English Wikipedia (107 words)
A square kilometre (sometimes written km²) is based on the SI unit of measurement of area, the square metre.
It is the area inside a square that has each side equal to 1 kilometre (1000 metres).
One square kilometre is just less than 0.39 square miles.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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