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Encyclopedia > Killip class

The Killip classification is a classification system used in individuals with an acute myocardial infarction (heart attack), in order to risk stratify them. Individuals with a low Killip class are less likely to die within the first 30 days after their myocardial infarction than individuals with a high killip class.1 Acute myocardial infarction (AMI or MI), commonly known as a heart attack, is a disease state that occurs when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. ...


The killip classification

  • Killip class I includes individuals with no clinical signs of heart failure. Mortality rate = 6%.
  • Killip class II includes individuals with rales in the lungs, an S3 gallop, and elevated jugular venous pressure.2 Mortality rate = 17%.
  • Killip class III describes individuals with frank pulmonary edema. Mortality rate = 38%.
  • Killip class IV describes individuals in cardiogenic shock. Mortality rate = 81%

  Results from FactBites:
 
Killip class - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (151 words)
Individuals with a low Killip class are less likely to die within the first 30 days after their myocardial infarction than individuals with a high killip class.
Killip class III describes individuals with frank pulmonary edema.
Killip class IV describes individuals in cardiogenic shock.
Physical Examination in Acute Coronary Syndromes - June 1, 2004 - American Family Physician (552 words)
Killip class I patients were those without heart failure; class II patients had mild heart failure with rales involving one third or less of the posterior lung fields and systolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher.
Class IV patients were those in cardiogenic shock with any rales and systolic blood pressure less than 90 mm Hg, but because there were few of these patients, class III and class IV patients were combined for the purposes of this study.
Higher Killip classification was a powerful predictor of all-cause mortality: Killip class II was associated with an increase of more than threefold in 30-day mortality, and Killip class III or IV was associated with an increase of more than fivefold for the same period.
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