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Encyclopedia > Kiev culture

The Kiev culture is an archaeological culture dating from about the third to fifth centuries AD, named after Kiev, the capital of Ukraine. It is widely considered to be the first identifiable Slavic archaeological culture. It is contemporaneous to (and located mostly just to the north of) the Chernyakhov culture, which corresponds to the multi-ethnic Gothic kingdom that was established in south-western Ukraine in the second century and ended by the invasion of the Huns in late fourth century. The Gothic historian Jordanes mentions the subjugation of the Slavic people by the Goths in The origin and deeds of the Goths: the location of the Kiev culture (which in places overlaps with the Chernyakhovo culture) matches his text well. In archaeology, culture refers to either of two separate but allied concepts: An archaeological culture is a pattern of similar artefacts and features found within a specific area over a limited period of time. ... A monument to St. ... Slav, Slavic or Slavonic can refer to: Slavic peoples Slavic languages Slavic mythology Church Slavonic language Old Church Slavonic language Slav, a former Jewish settlement in the Gaza Strip. ... The Chernyakhov culture (3rd century - 5th century) was a material culture, the distribution of which corresponded roughly to the Ukraine and parts of Belarus. ... Invasion of the Goths: a late 19th century painting by O. Fritsche portrays the Goths as cavalrymen. ... The Huns were a confederation of Eurasian nomadic tribes, who appeared in Europe in the 4th century. ... The Origin and Deeds of the Goths (Latin: De origine actibusque Getarum), commonly referred to as Getica, was written by Jordanes, probably in Constantinople, and was published in AD 551. ...


Settlements are found mostly along river banks, frequently either on high cliffs or right by the edge of rivers. The dwellings are overwhelmingly of the semi-subterranean type (common also in later Slavic cultures and similar to earlier Germanic and Celtic types of dwellings), often square (about four by four meters), with an open hearth in a corner. Most villages consist of just a handful of dwellings. There is very little evidence of the division of labor, although in one case a village belonging to the Kiev culture was preparing thin strips of antlers to be further reworked into the well-known Gothic antler combs, in a nearby Chernyakhov culture village.


The Kiev culture ends its existence with the invasion of the Huns, and after a turbulent period in European history, its descendants—the Slavic Prague-Korchak, Penkovo and Kolochino cultures—are re-established in the sixth century in Eastern Europe. There is, however, a substantial disagreement in the scientific community over the identity of the Kiev culture's predecessors, with some historians and archaelogists tracing it directly from the Milograd culture, others, from the Chernoles culture (the Scythian farmers of Herodotus) through the Zarubintsy culture, still others (mostly Polish) through the Przeworsk culture and the Zarubintsy culture. The Chernoles culture is an iron age archaeological unit dating ca. ... Bust of Herodotus at Naples Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: Ήροδοτος, Herodotos) was a historian who lived in the 5th century BC (484 BC-ca. ... The Zarubintsy culture was one of the major archaeological cultures which flourished in the area north of the Black Sea along the upper Dnieper and Pripyat Rivers, stretching west towards the Vistula Basin from the 3rd or 2nd centuries BC until the 2nd century AD. It was identified ca 1899... The green area is the Przeworsk culture in the first half of the 3rd century. ... The Zarubintsy culture was one of the major archaeological cultures which flourished in the area north of the Black Sea along the upper Dnieper and Pripyat Rivers, stretching west towards the Vistula Basin from the 3rd or 2nd centuries BC until the 2nd century AD. It was identified ca 1899...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Kiev - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4497 words)
The city is adjoined by the mouth of the Desna River and the Kiev Reservoir in the north, and the Kaniv Reservoir in the south.
Kiev is one of the most ancient and important cities of the region, the center of the Rus' civilization, survivor of numerous wars, purges, and genocides.
As of the All-Ukrainian Census conducted in 2001, the population of Kiev is 2,611,000.
Kiev culture - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (297 words)
It is contemporaneous to (and located mostly just to the north of) the Chernyakhov culture, which corresponds to the multi-ethnic Gothic kingdom, Oium, that was established in south-western Ukraine in the second century and ended by the invasion of the Huns in late fourth century.
There is very little evidence of the division of labor, although in one case a village belonging to the Kiev culture was preparing thin strips of antlers to be further reworked into the well-known Gothic antler combs, in a nearby Chernyakhov culture village.
The Kiev culture ends its existence with the invasion of the Huns, and after a turbulent period in European history, its descendants—the Slavic Prague-Korchak, Penkovo and Kolochino cultures—are re-established in the sixth century in Eastern Europe.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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