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Encyclopedia > Khufu
Khufu
Cheops
Ivory statuette of Khufu in the Cairo Museum
Ivory statuette of Khufu in the Cairo Museum
Pharaoh of Egypt
Reign 2589–2566 BC[1] (23 years in Manetho),  4th Dynasty
Predecessor Sneferu
Successor Djedefra
Consort(s) Meritates, Henutsen, plus two other queens whose names are not known[1]
Children Djedefra, Kawab, Khafre, Djedefhor, Banefre, Khufukaef, Hetepheres II, Meresankh II, Khamerernebty[1]
Father Sneferu
Mother Hetepheres I
Died 2566 BC
Monuments Great Pyramid of Giza, Khufu ship

Khufu (in Greek known as Χέωψ, Cheops; pronounced /ˈkiɑps/) was a Pharaoh of Ancient Egypt's Old Kingdom. He reigned from around 2589 to 2566 B.C.E. Khufu was the second pharaoh of the Fourth Dynasty. He is generally accepted as being the builder of the Great Pyramid of Giza, the only one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World still standing. The name Khufu can refer to: Khufu (pharaoh), an Egyptian pharaoh Khufu (cipher), a block cipher. ... The name Cheops can refer to: Cheops, an Egyptian pharaoh, called Khufu in Egytian. ... Image File history File links Khufu. ... Main entrance of the Egyptian Museum The Museum of Egyptian Antiquities, known commonly as the Egyptian Museum, in Cairo, Egypt, is home to the most extensive collection of pharaonic antiquities in the world. ... For other uses, see Pharaoh (disambiguation). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Fourth dynasty of Egypt was the second of the four dynasties considered forming the Old Kingdom. ... Sneferu He of Beauty[1] Horus name Neb-maat[2] Nebty name Neb-maat-nebty[2] Golden Horus Bik-nub[2] Consort(s) Hetepheres I Issues Khufu Father Huni Mother Meresankh I Died 2589 BC Major Monuments Bent Pyramid, Red Pyramid Sneferu, also spelt as Snefru or Snofru (in Greek... Djedef-re[1] Enduring like Re Nomen Consort(s) Hetepheres II, Khentet-en-ka Issues Setka, Neferhetepes, Baka, Hernet Father Khufu Died 2558 BC Burial Pyramid complex at Abu Roash Major Monuments Pyramid complex at Abu Roash The Egyptian pharaoh Djedefra (or Radjedef) was the successor and son of Khufu. ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... The royal titulary or royal protocol of an Egyptian Pharaoh is the standard naming convention taken by the kings of Ancient Egypt. ... Djedef-re[1] Enduring like Re Nomen Consort(s) Hetepheres II, Khentet-en-ka Issues Setka, Neferhetepes, Baka, Hernet Father Khufu Died 2558 BC Burial Pyramid complex at Abu Roash Major Monuments Pyramid complex at Abu Roash The Egyptian pharaoh Djedefra (or Radjedef) was the successor and son of Khufu. ... The name Khafre can refer to: The Pharaoh Khafra, also known as Chephren. ... Hetepheres II must have been one of the longest living members of the royal family of the Fourth dynasty of Egypt. ... Sneferu He of Beauty[1] Horus name Neb-maat[2] Nebty name Neb-maat-nebty[2] Golden Horus Bik-nub[2] Consort(s) Hetepheres I Issues Khufu Father Huni Mother Meresankh I Died 2589 BC Major Monuments Bent Pyramid, Red Pyramid Sneferu, also spelt as Snefru or Snofru (in Greek... Queen Hetepheres I was the sister and wife of the Egyptian Pharaoh Snofru, and the mother of Khufu, and is thought to have been the daughter of Huni. ... The Great Pyramid of Giza is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza Necropolis bordering what is now Cairo, Egypt in Africa, and is the only remaining member of the Seven Wonders of the World. ... The reconstructed Solar barge of Khufu The Khufu ship is an intact full-size vessel from Ancient Egypt that was sealed into a pit in the Giza pyramid complex at the foot of the Great Pyramid of Giza around 2,500 BC. The ship was almost certainly built for Khufu... For other uses, see Pharaoh (disambiguation). ... The pyramids are the most recognizable symbols of the civilization of ancient Egypt. ... The Old Kingdom is the name commonly given to that period in the 3rd millennium BC when Egypt attained its first continuous peak of civilization in complexity and achievement – this was the first of three so-called Kingdom periods, which mark the high points of civilization in the lower Nile... The Fourth dynasty of Egypt was the second of the four dynasties considered forming the Old Kingdom. ... The Great Pyramid of Giza is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza Necropolis bordering what is now Cairo, Egypt in Africa, and is the only remaining member of the Seven Wonders of the World. ... For other uses, see Wonders of the World (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Life

Khufu was the son of King Sneferu and Queen Hetepheres. Unlike his father, Khufu is remembered as a cruel and ruthless pharaoh in later folklore. Khufu had nine sons, one of whom, Djedefra, was his immediate successor. He also had fifteen daughters, one of whom would later become Queen Hetepheres II. Sneferu He of Beauty[1] Horus name Neb-maat[2] Nebty name Neb-maat-nebty[2] Golden Horus Bik-nub[2] Consort(s) Hetepheres I Issues Khufu Father Huni Mother Meresankh I Died 2589 BC Major Monuments Bent Pyramid, Red Pyramid Sneferu, also spelt as Snefru or Snofru (in Greek... Hetepheres II must have been one of the longest living members of the royal family of the Fourth dynasty of Egypt. ... Djedef-re[1] Enduring like Re Nomen Consort(s) Hetepheres II, Khentet-en-ka Issues Setka, Neferhetepes, Baka, Hernet Father Khufu Died 2558 BC Burial Pyramid complex at Abu Roash Major Monuments Pyramid complex at Abu Roash The Egyptian pharaoh Djedefra (or Radjedef) was the successor and son of Khufu. ... Cleopatra is one of the most well-known queens regnant A queen regnant (plural queens regnant) is a woman monarch possessing and exercising all of the monarchal powers of a king, in contrast with a queen consort, who is the wife of a reigning king, and in and of her... Hetepheres II must have been one of the longest living members of the royal family of the Fourth dynasty of Egypt. ...


Khufu came to his throne in his twenties, and reigned for about 23 years, which is the number ascribed to him by the Turin King List. Other sources from much later periods suggest a significantly longer reign: Manetho gives him a reign of 65 years, and Herodotus states that he reigned fifty years. Since 2000, two dates have been discovered from his reign. An inscription containing his highest regnal year, the "Year of the 17th Count of Khufu", first mentioned by Flinders Petrie in an 1883 book and then lost to historians, was rediscovered by Zahi Hawass in 2001 in one of the relieving chambers within this king's pyramid. Secondly, in 2003, the "Year after the 13th cattle count" of Khufu was found on a rock inscription at the Dakhla Oasis in the Sahara.[3] See this photo which contains Khufu's name enclosed in a serekh and the aforementioned date.[1] The Turin King List also known as the Turin Royal Canon, is a unique papyrus, written in hieratic, currently in the Museo Egizio (Egyptian Museum) at Turin, to which it owes its modern name. ... Manetho, also known as Manethon of Sebennytos, was an Egyptian historian and priest from Sebennytos who lived during the Ptolematic era, circa 3rd century BC. Manetho recorded Aegyptiaca (History of Egypt). ... Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: Hēródotos Halikarnāsseús) was a Greek historian who lived in the 5th century BC (c. ... Regnal year: the year of the reign of a sovereign. ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Dr. Zahi Hawass signs an autograph (Aug. ... This article is about the year. ... ... Horus and the serekh The serekh is a stylised rectangle which contained the Horus name of ancient Egyptian Pharaohs (they had five regal names each). ...


He started building his pyramid at Giza, the first to be built in this place.[4] Based on inscriptional evidence, it is also likely that he led military expeditions into the Sinai, Nubia and Libya.[5] Gizeh is also a popular brand in Germany of cigarette rolling papers; see Mascotte (rolling papers). ...


The Westcar Papyrus, which was written well after his reign during the Middle Kingdom or later, depicts the pharaoh being told magical tales by his sons Khafra and Djedefra. This story cycle depicts Khufu as mean and cruel, and is ultimately frustrated in his attempts to ensure that his dynasty survives past his two sons. Whether or not this story cycle is true is unknown, But Khufu's negative reputation lasted at least until the time of Herodotus, who was told further stories of that king's cruelty to his people and to his own family[6] in order to ensure the construction of his pyramid. What is known for certain is that his funerary cult lasted until the 26th Dynasty, which was one of the last native-Egyptian royal dynasties, almost 2,000 years after his death. Westcar Papyrus is a document about Khufu, a 4th-Dynasty Egyptian leader, and contains a cycle of five stories about marvels performed by priests. ... The Middle Kingdom is: a old name for China a period in the History of Ancient Egypt, the Middle Kingdom of Egypt This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Pyramid of Khafra and the Great Sphinx of Giza Portrait of Khafra, originally found at Mit Rahina, now residing in the Egyptian Museum, in Cairo. ... Djedef-re[1] Enduring like Re Nomen Consort(s) Hetepheres II, Khentet-en-ka Issues Setka, Neferhetepes, Baka, Hernet Father Khufu Died 2558 BC Burial Pyramid complex at Abu Roash Major Monuments Pyramid complex at Abu Roash The Egyptian pharaoh Djedefra (or Radjedef) was the successor and son of Khufu. ... Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: Hēródotos Halikarnāsseús) was a Greek historian who lived in the 5th century BC (c. ... The Saite or Twenty-sixth Dynasty of Egypt was the last native dynasty to rule Egypt before the Persian conquest (although others followed), and had its capital at Sais. ...


Funerary monuments

Picture of the Great Pyramid.
Picture of the Great Pyramid.
Fragmentary miniature head made of limestone, believed to represent Khufu, that wears the white crown of Upper Egypt

Most likenesses of Khufu are lost to history. Only one miniature statuette has been fully attributed to this pharaoh. Since he is credited with building the single largest building of ancient times, it is ironic that the only positively identified royal sculpture of his is also the smallest that has ever been found: a 7.6cm (3 inch) ivory statue that bears his name. It was discovered not at Giza, but in a temple in Abydos during an excavation by William Matthew Flinders Petrie in 1903. Originally this piece was found without the head, but bearing the pharaoh's name. Realizing the importance of this discovery, Petrie halted all further excavation on the site until the head was found three weeks later after an intensive sieving of the sand from the area where the base had been discovered.[7] This piece is now on display in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. In more recent years two other likenesses have been tentatively identified as being that of Khufu, based largely on stylistic similarities to the piece discovered by Petrie. One is a colossal head made of red granite of a king wearing the white crown of Upper Egypt that resides in the Brooklyn Museum, and the other a fragmentary miniature head made of limestone that also wears the white crown of Upper Egypt, which can be found in the Staatliche Sammlung für Ägyptische Kunst in Munich.[8] Image File history File links Pyramide_Kheops. ... Image File history File links Pyramide_Kheops. ... Temple of Hephaestus, an Doric Greek temple in Athens with the original entrance facing east, 449 BC (western face depicted) For other uses, see Temple (disambiguation). ... Abydos (Arabic: أبيدوس, Greek Αβυδος), one of the most ancient cities of Upper Egypt, is about 11 km (6 miles) west of the Nile at latitude 26° 10 N. The Egyptian name was Abdju (technically, 3bdw, hieroglyphs shown to the right), the hill of the symbol or reliquary, in which the sacred... Sir William Matthew Flinders Petrie Sir William Matthew Flinders Petrie (3 June 1853 – 28 July 1942) was an English Egyptologist and a pioneer of systematic methodology in archaeology. ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Main entrance of the Egyptian Museum The Museum of Egyptian Antiquities, known commonly as the Egyptian Museum, in Cairo, Egypt, is home to the most extensive collection of pharaonic antiquities in the world. ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... Map of Upper and Lower Egypt Ancient Egypt was divided into two kingdoms, known as Upper and Lower Egypt. ... The Brooklyn Museum, located at 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, New York, is the second largest art museum in New York City, and one of the largest in the United States. ... The Kunstareal (art area) is a museum quarter in the city centre of Munich, Germany. ... For other uses, see Munich (disambiguation). ...


An empty sarcophagus is located in the King's Chamber inside the pyramid though it is unclear if it had ever been used for such a purpose as burial. While his mummy has never been recovered, his impressive and well preserved solar barge--or Khufu ship--was discovered buried in a pit at the foot of his great pyramid at Giza in 1954 by Egyptian archaeologists. It has been reassembled and placed in a museum for public viewing. The Etruscan Sarcophagus of the Spouses, at the National Etruscan Museum. ... For other uses, see Mummy (disambiguation). ... The reconstructed Solar barge of Khufu The Khufu ship is an intact full-size vessel from Ancient Egypt that was sealed into a pit in the Giza pyramid complex at the foot of the Great Pyramid of Giza around 2,500 BC. The ship was almost certainly built for Khufu...

So-called "Ring of Cheops", which bears the cartouche of Khufu and was once thought to have belonged to him. It is now thought to have belonged to a priest in the cult that deified Khufu at Giza. Late Period, Dynasty XXV or XXVII.
So-called "Ring of Cheops", which bears the cartouche of Khufu and was once thought to have belonged to him. It is now thought to have belonged to a priest in the cult that deified Khufu at Giza. Late Period, Dynasty XXV or XXVII.

While pyramid construction had been solely for the reigning pharaoh prior to Khufu, his reign saw the construction of several minor pyramid structures that are believed to have been intended for other members of his royal household, amounting to a royal cemetery. Three small pyramids to the east of Khufu's pyramid are tentatively thought to belong to two of his wives, and the third has been ascribed to Khufu's mother Hetepheres I, whose funerary equipment was found relatively intact in a shaft tomb nearby. A series of mastabas were created adjacent to the small pyramids, and tombs have been found in this "cemetery". The closest tombs to Khufu's were those belonging to Prince Kawab and Khufuhaf and their respective wives. Next closest are the tombs of Prince Minkhaf and Queens Hetepheres II, and those of Meresank II and Meresank III.[9] When the largest of these tombs (Tomb G7510) was excavated in 1927, it was found to contain a bust of Prince Ankhhaf, which can now be seen in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... ôľĎÚ The Late Period of Egypt refers to the last flowering of native Egyptian rulers after the Third Intermediate Period, and before the Persian conquests. ... Queen Hetepheres I was the sister and wife of the Egyptian Pharaoh Snofru, and the mother of Khufu, and is thought to have been the daughter of Huni. ... A mastaba was a flat-roofed, mud brick, rectangular building with inward sloping sides that marked the burial site of many eminent Egyptians of Egypts ancient period. ... Hetepheres II must have been one of the longest living members of the royal family of the Fourth dynasty of Egypt. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bust of Prince Ankhhaf, now at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Prince Ankhhaf was likely the son of the Egyptian fourth dynasty pharaoh Sneferu, younger brother to the pharaoh Khufu, and served as vizier and overseer of works to Khafre. ... Paul Gauguin, Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? (Doù venons-nous? Que faisons-nous? Où allons-nous?) (1897). ...


Cultural depictions

Nobel Laureate Naguib Mahfouz's first novel Khufu's Wisdom (ABATH AL-AQDAR|Mockery of the Fates (1939)) dealt with Khufu, his son Khafra and the succession of Djedef-ra. This article is about the Egyptian novelist. ...

  • Mockery of the Fates (1939) عبث الأقدار
  • The Heroes graphic novel History of a Secret depicts Khufu as having the superhuman ability of levitation.[10]
  • The Golden Age version of the DC Comics superhero Hawkman is a reincarnation of Khufu.

Heroes is an American science fiction serial drama television series created by Tim Kring, which premiered on NBC on September 25, 2006. ... For other uses, see Levitation (disambiguation). ... Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c Clayton, Peter A. 'Chronicle of the Pharaohs. p42. Thames and Hudson, London, 2006. ISBN 978-0-500-28628-9
  2. ^ King Kheops accessed November 18, 2006
  3. ^ R. Kuper and F. Forster, "Khufu's 'mefat' expeditions into the Libyan Desert", Egyptian Archaeology 23, Autumn 2003, pp 25-28
  4. ^ Figures: King Khufu (BBC). Accessed April 8.
  5. ^ Guardian's Egypt: The Pharaoh Khufu
  6. ^ One story is that he forced his own daughter into prostitution to obtain money for the work. Supposedly, she also required a block of stone, to be used in building her own pyramid. Gonick, Larry (1990). The Cartoon History of the Universe. Garden City: Doubleday, pg 130. ISBN 0385265204. 
  7. ^ Kevin Jackson and Jonathan Stamp, Building the Great Pyramid (Firefly Books, 2003) ISBN 1-55297-719-6
  8. ^ Egyptian Art in the Age of the Pyramids (New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1999), pp. 194 and 219.
  9. ^ Aidan Dodson, "An Eternal Harem. Part One: In the Beginning", KMT, Summer 2004, pp. 47-55.
  10. ^ O'Hara, John; Carri Wagner. History of a Secret (PDF), Aspen MLT Inc., 6. Retrieved on 2008-02-05. 

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Freeman, Charles. The Legacy of Ancient Egypt. Ed. John D. Ray. Spain: Fournier Artes Graficos S.Z. Vitoria, 1997. 22.

External links

Preceded by
Sneferu
Pharaoh of Egypt
Fourth Dynasty
Succeeded by
Djedefra

There have been varying scientific theories regarding Egyptian pyramid construction techniques. ... The Fourth Dynasty succession is unclear. ... The reconstructed Solar barge of Khufu The Khufu ship is an intact full-size vessel from Ancient Egypt that was sealed into a pit in the Giza pyramid complex at the foot of the Great Pyramid of Giza around 2,500 BC. The ship was almost certainly built for Khufu... Sneferu He of Beauty[1] Horus name Neb-maat[2] Nebty name Neb-maat-nebty[2] Golden Horus Bik-nub[2] Consort(s) Hetepheres I Issues Khufu Father Huni Mother Meresankh I Died 2589 BC Major Monuments Bent Pyramid, Red Pyramid Sneferu, also spelt as Snefru or Snofru (in Greek... For other uses, see Pharaoh (disambiguation). ... The Fourth dynasty of Egypt was the second of the four dynasties considered forming the Old Kingdom. ... Djedef-re[1] Enduring like Re Nomen Consort(s) Hetepheres II, Khentet-en-ka Issues Setka, Neferhetepes, Baka, Hernet Father Khufu Died 2558 BC Burial Pyramid complex at Abu Roash Major Monuments Pyramid complex at Abu Roash The Egyptian pharaoh Djedefra (or Radjedef) was the successor and son of Khufu. ... ... The Early Dynastic Period of Egypt is taken to include the First and Second Dynasties, lasting from 2920 BC, following the Protodynastic Period of Egypt, until 2575 BC, or the beginning of the Old Kingdom. ... Narmer was an Egyptian Pharaoh who ruled in the 31st century BC. Thought to be the successor to the predynastic Scorpion and/or Ka, he is considered by some to be the founder of the First dynasty, and therefore the first king of all Egypt. ... Hor-Aha was the 2nd Pharaoh of the 1st dynasty of Ancient Egypt. ... Djer is the second or third [1] [2]Egyptian king of the first dynasty. ... Khasekhemwy (? -2686 BC; sometimes spelled Khasekhemui) was the 5th and final Pharaoh of the 2nd dynasty of Egypt. ... Image File history File links Ankh. ... The Old Kingdom is the name commonly given to that period in the 3rd millennium BC when Egypt attained its first continuous peak of civilization in complexity and achievement – this was the first of three so-called Kingdom periods, which mark the high points of civilization in the lower Nile... Netjerikhet Consort(s) Inetkawes, Hetephernebti Unknown Father Khasekhemwy? Mother Nimaethap? Major Monuments Pyramid of Djoser Netjerikhet Djoser (Turin King List Dsr-it; Manetho Tosarthros) is the best-known pharaoh of the Third dynasty of Egypt, for commissioning the official Imhotep to build his Step Pyramid at Saqqara. ... Sneferu He of Beauty[1] Horus name Neb-maat[2] Nebty name Neb-maat-nebty[2] Golden Horus Bik-nub[2] Consort(s) Hetepheres I Issues Khufu Father Huni Mother Meresankh I Died 2589 BC Major Monuments Bent Pyramid, Red Pyramid Sneferu, also spelt as Snefru or Snofru (in Greek... The Pyramid of Khafra and the Great Sphinx of Giza Portrait of Khafra, originally found at Mit Rahina, now residing in the Egyptian Museum, in Cairo. ... Men-kau-re[1] Eternal like the Souls of Re Nomen Consort(s) Khamerernebty II Issues Khuenre, Shepseskaf, Khentkawes Father Khafre Mother Khamaerernebty I Died 2504 BC Burial Pyramid at Giza Major Monuments Pyramid at Giza Menkaura (or Men-Kau-Re; Mycerinus in Latin; Mykerinos in Greek) was a pharaoh... Father Userkaf(?) Mother Khentkaus I Died 2475 BC Major Monuments Pyramid at Abusir Sahure was the second king of ancient Egypts 5th Dynasty. ... nomen or birth name Pepi II (c. ... The Middle Kingdom is the period in the history of ancient Egypt stretching from the establishment of the Eleventh Dynasty to the end of the Fourteenth Dynasty, roughly between 2030 BC and 1640 BC. The period comprises two phases, the 11th Dynasty, which ruled from Thebes and the 12th Dynasty... nomen or birth name Nebhotepre Mentuhotep II (2046-1995 BCE) was a Pharaoh of the 11th dynasty, the son of Intef III of Egypt and a minor queen called Iah. ... nomen or birth name Amenemhat I was the first ruler of the Twelfth Dynasty (the dynasty debated to be the beginning of the Middle Kingdom of Egypt). ... Kheperkare The Ka of Re is created Nomen Senusret Man of Wosret Horus name Ankh mesut Living of births Nebty name Ankh mesut Living of births Golden Horus Ankh mesut Living of births Consort(s) Neferu III Issue Ameny, Amenemhat-ankh, Itakayt, Sebat, Neferusobek, Neferuptah Father Amenemhat I Mother Neferitatenen... Khakhaure (The king of the two lands, The kas of Ra have appeared) Nomen Senusret (The son of Ra, man of the strong one) Horus name Netcher Kheperu (Horus, divine of form) Nebty name Netcher Mesut (The two ladies, divine of birth) Golden Horus Kheper (The golden Horus has... ny m3ˁt rˁ (Nimaatre)[1] Belonging to the truth of Re Nomen Amenemhat[1] Amun is in front Horus name Wahankh[1] Long of life Nebty name Itjijautawy[1] Who comes to the inheritance of the two lands Golden Horus ˁ3 ba(u) (Aabaw)[1] Great of power Issues... Sobek-kare Sobek is the Ka of Re Nomen Sobekneferu The beauties of Sobek Horus name Meritra Beloved of Re Nebty name Satsekhem Nebettawy Daughter of the powerful one, Mistress of the two lands Golden Horus Djedetkhau Established of crowns Died 1802 BC Sobekneferu (sometimes written Nefrusobek) was an Egyptian... The Second Intermediate Period marks a period when Ancient Egypt once again fell into disarray between the end of the Middle Kingdom, and the start of the New Kingdom. ... Khendjer was an Egyptian king (throne name: Userkare) of the 13th Dynasty. ... nomen or birth name King Neferhotep I was an Egyptian king of the Thirteenth Dynasty. ... Statue of Sobekhotep IV. (Louvre) birth name: Sobekhotep throne name: Khaneferre Egyptian king of the 13th Dynasty. ... Apepi I, (also Auserre Apepi or Apophis) was a ruler of Lower Egypt during the Fifteenth dynasty and the end of the Second Intermediate Period. ... Relief of Sekhemre Wadjkhau Sobekemsaf at the Temple of Monthu (Medamud) Sobekemsaf II Sekhemrewadjkhaw was a pharaoh of Egypt during the 17th Dynasty. ... nomen or birth name Kamose was the last king of the Theban Seventeenth Dynasty. ... The maximum territorial extent of Egypt (XVth century BC) The New Kingdom, sometimes referred to as the Egyptian Empire, is the period in ancient Egyptian history between the 16th century BC and the 11th century BC, covering the Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Dynasties of Egypt. ... Nebpehtire[4] The Lord of Strength is Re Nomen Ahmose[3] The Moon is Born Horus name Aakheperu[5] Great of Developments[6] Nebty name Tutmesut[5] Perfect of Birth[6] Golden Horus Tjestawy[5] He who Knots Together the Two Lands[6] Consort(s) Ahmose-Nefertari Gods Wife... Maatkare[1] Truth is the Ka of Re Nomen Khnumt-Amun Hatshepsut[1] Joined with Amun, Foremost of Noble Ladies Horus name Wesretkau [1] Mighty of Kas Nebty name Wadjrenput[1] Flourishing of years Golden Horus Netjeretkhau[1] Divine of appearance Consort(s) Thutmose II Issue Neferure Father Thutmose I... Menkheperre Lasting is the Manifestation of Re[1] Nomen Thutmose Neferkheperu Thoth is born, beautiful of forms Horus name Kanakht Khaemwaset Mighty Bull, Arising in Thebes Nebty name Wahnesytmireempet Enduring in kingship like Re in heaven Golden Horus Sekhempahtydsejerkhaw Powerful of strength, holy of diadems Consort(s) Hatshepsut-Meryetre, Nebtu... Nebmaatre The Lord of Truth is Re[2] Nomen Amenhotep Hekawaset Amun is Satisfied, Ruler of Thebes[1] Horus name Kanakht Emkhaimaat The strong bull, appearing in truth Nebty name Semenhepusegerehtawy One establishing laws, pacifying the two lands Golden Horus Aakhepesh-husetiu Great of valour, smiting the Asiatics Consort(s... For other uses, see Akhenaten (disambiguation). ... King Tut redirects here. ... Menmaatre Eternal is the Strength of Re[1] Nomen Seti Merenptah He of the god Seth, beloved of Ptah[2] Horus name Kanakht Khaemwaset-Seankhtawy Nebty name Wehemmesut Sekhemkhepesh Derpedjetpesdjet Golden Horus Wehemkhau Weserpedjutemtawnebu[3] Consort(s) Queen Tuya Issue Tia, Amennefernebes, Ramesses II, Henutmire (?) Father Ramesses I Mother Sitre... Nomen: Ramesses meryamun Ramesses (Re has fashioned him), beloved of Amun. ... Nomen: Ramesse Hekaiunu Ra bore him, Ruler of Heliopolis Consort(s) Iset Ta-Hemdjert, Tiye Children Ramesses IV, Ramesses VI, Ramesses VIII, Amun-her-khepeshef, Khaemwaset, Meryamun, Meryatum, Montuherkhopshef, Pentawere, Duatentopet (?) Father Setnakht Mother Tiy-Merenese Died 1155 BC Burial KV11 Monuments Medinet Habu Usimare Ramesses III (also written Ramses... Gold burial mask of King Psusennes I, discovered 1940 by Pierre Montet. ... Nomen: Shoshenq Hedjkheperre Setepenre Shoshenq I (Egyptian Å¡Å¡nq), also known as Shishak, Sheshonk or Sheshonq I (for discussion of the spelling, see Shoshenq), was a Meshwesh Libyan king of Egypt and founder of the Twenty-second Dynasty. ... Piye, whose name was once transliterated as Py(ankh)i. ... Taharqa (also spelled Tirhakah, Taharka, Manethos Tarakos) was king of Egypt, and a member of the Nubian or Twenty-fifth dynasty of Egypt, whose reign is usually dated 690 BC to 664 BC. He was also the son of Piye, the Nubian king of Napata who had first conquered... Wahibre Nomen Psamtik Horus name Aaib Nebty name Neba Golden Horus Qenu Issues Nitocris I Died 610 BC Burial Sais Psammetichus, or Psamtik I, was the first of three kings of the Saite, or Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt. ... Nomen: Necho Horus name: Maaib Nebty name: Maakheru Golden Horus: Merynetjeru Consort(s) Khedebarbenet Died 595 BC Necho II (sometimes Nekau) was a king of the Twenty-sixth dynasty of Egypt (610 BC - 595 BC), and the son of Psammetichus I by his Great Royal Wife Mehtenweskhet. ... Nectanabo Kheperkara (or more properly Nekhtnebef) was a pharaoh of the Thirtieth dynasty of Egypt. ... Ptolemy I Soter (Greek: , Ptolemaios Soter, i. ... Cleopatra redirects here. ... Ptolemy XIII (lived 62 BC/61 BC -January 13? 47 BC, reigned 51 BC - January 13?, 47 BC) was one of the last members of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt. ... Tetisheri was the matriarch of the Egyptian royal family of the late 17th Dynasty and early 18th Dynasty. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Queen Ahmose-Nefertari of Egypt was the sister-wife of Egypts Pharaoh King Ahmose I. She had two children-Amenhotep I and Aahhotep II, who wed each other and had the Princess Aahmes. ... Queen Ahmose was the mother of Hatshepsut of Egypt. ... Tiye. ... The iconic bust of Nefertiti, part of the Ägyptisches Museum Berlin collection, currently on display in the Altes Museum. ... Tutankhamen receives flowers from Ankhesenamun Ankhesenamun (b. ... A picture of Nefertari taken in her Abu Simbel temple. ... Bust of Mark Antony Marcus Antonius (Latin: M·ANTONIVS·M·F·M·N[1]) ( January 14 83 BC – August 1, 30 BC), known in English as Mark Antony, was a Roman politician and general. ... This article is about the ancient Egyptian official. ... Weni the Elder was a court official of the 6th dynasty of Ancient Egypt. ... Ahmose, son of Ebana served in the Egyptian military under the pharaohs Tao II Seqenenre, Ahmose I, Amenhotep I, and Thutmose I. His autobiography has survived intact on the wall of his tomb and has proven a valuable source of information on the late 17th Dynasty and the early 18th... Ineofficial of the 18th Dynasty, responsible for major constructions un Egypt| Thutmose II]], Hatshepsut, and Thutmose III. Ineni came from an aristocratic family and likely began his career as an architect under Amenhotep I. Amenhotep I commissioned Ineni to expand the Temple of Karnak. ... Senemut was an 18th dynasty Ancient Egyptian architect and government official. ... Rekhmire was an 18th dynasty official, serving as Governor of the Town (Thebes) and Vizier during the reigns of Tuthmosis III and Amenhotep II. He is noted for constructing a lavishly decorated tomb for himself in the Valley of the Nobles, containing lively, well preserved scenes of daily life during... Yuya (sometimes Iouiya) also known as Yaa, Ya, Yiya, Yayi, Yu, Yuyu, Yaya, Yiay, Yia, Yuy[1] was a powerful Egyptian courtier of the Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt (circa 1390 BC). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Maya (Egyptian official). ... Yuny was an official through the reign of Ramesses II, in the 19th Dynasty, serving as chief scribe of the court, the overseer of priests, and royal steward. ... Chancellor Bay on the door jamb of the Amada temple, Nubia, shown adoring the cartouch of Siptah Chancellor Bay was an important non-Egyptian official who rose to prominence and high office under Seti II Userkheperure Setepenre and later became an influential powerbroker in the closing stages of the 19th... Manetho, also known as Manethon of Sebennytos, was an Egyptian historian and priest from Sebennytos who lived during the Ptolematic era, circa 3rd century BC. Manetho recorded Aegyptiaca (History of Egypt). ... Pothinus (early 1st Century BC - 48 or 47 BC) was regent for Pharaoh Ptolemy XIII of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Ancient Egypt. ...


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Guardian's Egypt - The Pharaoh Khufu (594 words)
He was rumored in later times to have been prone to enjoying the fantastic stories of the reigns of his predecessors, as well as tales of magic and the mystical.
Khufu had several sons and his immediate successor was his son Djedefre (Radjedef).
A remaining son of Khufu - Khafre, was to join his father building his pyramid at the higher spot in on the Giza plateau.
Z. PROUNTZOPOULOU - KHUFU'S PYRAMID (2734 words)
The queen's chamber was meant to hold Khufu's funeral objects and not to be the burial chamber for a queen.
The Queen's chamber was meant to hold Khufu's funerary object and not to be the burial chamber for a queen.
Khufu's mummy and all of his funerary goods for the next life were probably taken out of the pyramid by ancient tomb robbers.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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