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Encyclopedia > Khosrow II
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Khosrau II, Parvez ("the Victorious"), king of Persia, son of Hormizd IV, grandson of Khosrau I, 590 - 628. The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... Hormizd IV, son of Khosrau I, reigned as king of Persia from 578 to 590. ... Khosrau I, the Blessed (Anushirvan), (531 - 579) was the favourite son and successor of Kavadh I, and the most famous of the Sassanid kings. ... Events September 3 - St. ... Events Khusro II of Persia overthrown Pippin of Landen becomes Mayor of the Palace Brahmagupta writes the Brahmasphutasiddhanta Births Deaths Empress Suiko of Japan Theodelinda, queen of the Lombards Categories: 628 ...


He was raised to the throne by the magnates who had rebelled against Hormizd IV till 590, and soon after his father was blinded and killed. But at the same time the general Bahram Chobin had proclaimed himself king, and Khosrau II was not able to maintain himself.


The war with the Romans, which had begun in 571, had not yet come to an end. Khosrau fled to Syria, and persuaded the emperor Maurice to send help. Many leading men and part of the troops acknowledged Khosrau, and in 591 he was brought back to Ctesiphon. Bahram Chobin was beaten and fled to the Turkics, among whom he was murdered. Peace with Rome was then concluded. The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centred at its capital in Constantinople. ... Events The Monophysites again reject the Council of Chalcedon, causing another schism. ... A solidus of Maurices reign Flavius Mauricius Tiberius Augustus or Maurice I (539 - November, 602) was the emperor of the Byzantine Empire from 582 to 602. ... Taq-i-Kasra, Ctesiphon, today. ... The Turkic people are any of various peoples whose members speak languages in the Turkic family of languages. ...


Maurice made no use of his advantage; he merely restored the former frontier and abolished the subsidies which had formerly been paid to the Persians. Khosrau II was much inferior to his grandfather. He was haughty and cruel, rapacious and given to luxury; he was neither a general nor an administrator. At the beginning of his reign he favoured the Christians; but when in 602 Maurice had been murdered by Phocas, he began war with Rome to avenge his death. His armies plundered Syria and Asia Minor, and in 608 advanced to Chalcedon. General is a military rank used by nearly every country in the world. ... A bureaucrat is a member of a bureaucracy, usually within an institution of the government. ... As a noun, Christian is an appellation and moniker deriving from the appellation Christ, which many people associate exclusively with Jesus of Nazareth. ... Events Phocas kills Byzantine Emperor Maurice I and makes himself emperor Beginning of a series of wars between the Byzantine Empire and the Sassanids Births Muawiyah, founder of the Umayyad Dynasty of caliphs (approximate date) Xuanzang, famous Chinese Buddhist monk. ... Phocas on a contemporary coin Flavius Phocas Augustus, Eastern Roman Emperor (reigned 602-610), is perhaps one of the most maligned figures to have held the Imperial title in the long history of Rome and Byzantium. ... Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to the Asian portion of Turkey. ... Events September 15 - Boniface IV becomes pope. ... Chalcedon (Χαλκεδον, sometimes transliterated by purists as Chalkedon) was an ancient maritime town of Bithynia, in Asia Minor, almost directly opposite Byzantium, south of Scutari (modern Ãœsküdar). ...


In 613 and 614 Damascus and Jerusalem were taken by the general Shahrbaraz, and the Holy cross was carried away in triumph. Soon after, even Egypt was conquered. The Romans could offer but little resistance, as they were torn by internal dissensions, and pressed by the Avars and Slavs. At last, in 622, the emperor Heraclius (who had succeeded Phocas in 610) was able to take the field. In 624 he advanced into northern Media, where he destroyed the great fire-temple of Gandzak (Gazaca); in 626 he fought in Lazistan (Colchis), while Shahrbaraz advanced to Chalcedon, and tried in vain, united with the Avars, to conquer Constantinople. Events Clotaire II reunites the Frankish kingdoms by ordering the murder of Sigebert II. Saint Columbanus founds the monastery of Bobbio in northern Italy. ... Events The Persian Empire under general Shahrbaraz captures and sacks Jerusalem; the Church of the Holy Sepulchre is damaged by fire and the True Cross is captured. ... Damascus by night, pictured from Jabal Qasioun; the green spots are minarets Damascus (Arabic officially دمشق Dimashq, colloquially ash-Sham الشام) is the capital city of Syria and is the oldest inhabited city in the world. ... Jerusalem (31° 46′ N, 35° 14′ E; Hebrew:   יְרוּשָׁלַיִם [?]; Yerushalayim; Arabic:   القُدس[?] al-Quds; see also names of Jerusalem) is an ancient Middle Eastern city of key importance to the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. ... Shahrbaraz (? - June 9, 630 was a general for the Persian army under Khosrau II of Persia. ... The Eurasian Avars were a nomadic people of Eurasia who migrated into central and eastern Europe in the 6th century. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... Events Hegira - Muhammad and his followers withdraw from Mecca to Medina - starting year of the Islamic calendar. ... Flavius Heraclius Augustus (c. ... Phocas on a contemporary coin Flavius Phocas Augustus, Eastern Roman Emperor (reigned 602-610), is perhaps one of the most maligned figures to have held the Imperial title in the long history of Rome and Byzantium. ... Events October 4 - Heraclius arrives by ship from Africa at Constantinople, overthrows Byzantine Emperor Phocas and becomes Emperor. ... Events Justus becomes Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Ganja (Azeri: GÉ™ncÉ™) is Azerbaijans second largest city. ... Events July 2 - In the early morning, Li Shimin, the future Emperor Tang Taizong of China, eliminated two of his brothers, Li Yuanji and the crown prince Li Jiancheng in a coup détat at the Xuanwu Gate in Changan. ... Colchis, or Aea-Colchis (Georgian form - Kolkheti), in ancient geography district of Asia Minor, at the eastern extremity of the Black Sea, bounded on the N. by the Caucasus. ... Jump to: navigation, search Map of Constantinople. ...


In 627 Heraclius defeated the Persian army at the Battle of Nineveh and advanced towards Ctesiphon. Khosrau fled from his favourite residence, Dastagei (near Baghdad), without offering resistance; and as his despotism and indolence had roused opposition everywhere, his eldest son Kavadh II, whom Khosrau had imprisoned, was set free by some of the leading men and proclaimed king. Four days afterwards, Khosrau was murdered in his palace (February 628). Meanwhile, Heraclius returned in triumph to Constantinople, in 629 the Cross was given back to him and Egypt evacuated, while the Persian empire, from the apparent greatness which it had reached ten years ago, sank into hopeless anarchy. Events April 11 - Paulinus, a Roman missionary, baptizes King Edwin of Deira December 12 - Battle of Nineveh: Byzantine Emperor Heraclius defeats the Persians Births Deaths November 10 - Justus, Archbishop of Canterbury Categories: 627 ... The Battle of Nineveh was the climactic battle of the last of the wars between the Eastern Roman Empire and the Sassanid Persian Empire, in 627. ... Taq-i-Kasra, Ctesiphon, today. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Kavadh II Sheroe (Siroes), king of Persia, son of Khosrau II, was raised to the throne in opposition to his father in February 628, after the great victories of the emperor Heraclius. ... February is the second month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events Khusro II of Persia overthrown Pippin of Landen becomes Mayor of the Palace Brahmagupta writes the Brahmasphutasiddhanta Births Deaths Empress Suiko of Japan Theodelinda, queen of the Lombards Categories: 628 ... Events Jerusalem reconquered by Byzantine Empire from the Persian Empire (September). ...


This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, which is in the public domain. Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) represents the sum of human knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century; indeed, it was advertised as such. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...




Preceded by:
Hormizd IV
Sassanid Ruler
590628
Succeeded by:
Kavadh II


Hormizd IV, son of Khosrau I, reigned as king of Persia from 578 to 590. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Sassanid Empire at its greatest extent Official language Pahlavi (Middle Persian) State Religion Zoroastrianism Capital Ctesiphon Sovereigns Shahanshah of the Iran (Eranshahr) First Ruler Ardashir I Last Ruler Yazdegerd III Establishment 224 AD Dissolution 651 AD Part of the History of Iran The Sassanid dynasty... Events September 3 - St. ... Events Khusro II of Persia overthrown Pippin of Landen becomes Mayor of the Palace Brahmagupta writes the Brahmasphutasiddhanta Births Deaths Empress Suiko of Japan Theodelinda, queen of the Lombards Categories: 628 ... Kavadh II Sheroe (Siroes), king of Persia, son of Khosrau II, was raised to the throne in opposition to his father in February 628, after the great victories of the emperor Heraclius. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
History of Iran: The Reforms of Khosrow Anushirvan (The Immortal Soul) (6062 words)
Khosrow had failed but whether he sought a scapegoat in Shahrbaraz,who revolted, or whether a large conspiracy dethroned the ruler, the king was imprisoned and killed with the connivance of his son Shiroe at the end of February 628.
For example, the throne of Khosrow II was famous in legend for its luxury and the rock carving of a hunting scene of the king at Taq-e Bustan indicates the sumptuousness of even such a mundane affair.
One mistake of Khosrow II, which was to have future consequences, was the imprisonment and execution of Nu'man III, king of the Lakhmids of al-Hira about 600, presumably because of the failure of the Arab king to support Khosrow on his flight to the Byzantines.
Persian History- Iranian History (1201 words)
Khosrow II came close to achieving the Sassanian dream of restoring the Achaemenid boundaries when Jerusalem fell to him and constantinople was under his siege.
The splendour of Khosrow's palace at Cetesiphon (Tag-i Kasra) is legendary.
Khosrow II or Khosrow Parviz as he is known had over extended his army and over taxed the people to the point that, when the Byzantine Emperor Heraclius (610-41) AD in a tactical move abandoned his besieged capital and sailed up the Black Sea to attack Iran from the rear, there was no resistance.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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