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Encyclopedia > Ketchup
The largest distributor of ketchup in the world is the H. J. Heinz Company.
The largest distributor of ketchup in the world is the H. J. Heinz Company.

Ketchup (or less commonly catsup), also known as Tomato Ketchup, Tomato Sauce, Red Sauce, Tommy Sauce, Tommy K, or Dead Horse,[1] is a condiment, usually made from tomatoes. The ingredients in a typical modern ketchup are tomato concentrate, spirit vinegar, corn syrup or other sugar, salt, spice and herb extracts (including celery), spice and garlic powder[2]. Allspice, cloves, cinnamon, onion, and other vegetables may be included. Download high resolution version (768x1024, 214 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Ketchup Categories: Sauces ... Download high resolution version (768x1024, 214 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Ketchup Categories: Sauces ... H. J. Heinz Company (NYSE: HNZ), commonly known as Heinz, famous for its 57 Varieties slogan, is a processed food product company with its headquarters in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in the United States of America. ... Cockney rhyming slang is a form of English slang which originated in the East End of London. ... Salt, sugar and pepper are the most essential condiments in Western cuisine. ... For other uses, see Tomato (disambiguation). ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Tate & Lyle brand Corn Syrup being moved by tank car Corn syrup is a syrup, made using corn (maize) starch as a [feedstock], and composed mainly of [glucose]. A series of two [enzyme|enzymatic] reactions are used to convert the corn starch to corn syrup. ... This article is about sugar as food and as an important and widely-traded commodity. ... Edible salt is mostly sodium chloride (NaCl). ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... Binomial name (L.) Merr. ... Binomial name (L.) Merrill & Perry A single dried clove flower bud Cloves (Syzygium aromaticum, syn. ... Binomial name J.Presl Cassia (Chinese cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... For other uses, see Onion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Vegetable (disambiguation). ...


Ketchup started out as a general term for sauce, typically made of mushrooms or fish brine with herbs and spices. Some popular early main ingredients included blueberry, anchovy, oyster, lobster, walnut, kidney bean, cucumber, cranberry, lemon, celery and grape. Mushroom ketchup is still available in some countries, such as the UK.Banana ketchup is popular in the Philippines. For other uses, see Sauce (disambiguation). ... Basidiocarps (mushrooms) of the fungus Leucocoprinus sp. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... In cooking, brining is a process similar to marination in which meat is soaked in a salt solution (the brine) before cooking. ... For other uses, see Herb (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Spice (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Blueberry (disambiguation). ... Genera Amazonsprattus Anchoa Anchovia Anchoviella Cetengraulis Coilia Encrasicholina Engraulis Jurengraulis Lycengraulis Lycothrissa Papuengraulis Pterengraulis Setipinna Stolephorus Thryssa The anchovies are a family (Engraulidae) of small, common salt-water fish. ... For other uses, see Oyster (disambiguation). ... Subfamilies and Genera Neophoberinae Acanthacaris Thymopinae Nephropsis Nephropides Thymops Thymopsis Nephropinae Homarus Nephrops Homarinus Metanephrops Eunephrops Thymopides Clawed lobsters comprise a family (Nephropidae, sometimes also Homaridae) of large marine crustaceans. ... For other uses, see Walnut (disambiguation). ... Dry kidney beans The kidney bean is a medium-sized variety of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) with dark red skin. ... This article is about the fruit. ... “Cranberries” redirects here. ... This article is about the fruit. ... Binomial name L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... This article is about the fruits of the genus Vitis. ... Banana Ketchup is made in the Philippines from bananas, mashed, with sugar, vinegar, and spices and red food coloring. ...


Ketchup is often used with French fries (or "chips" in the UK), hamburgers, sandwiches and grilled or fried meat. Ketchup with mayonnaise forms the base of Thousand Island dressing and fry sauce. Ketchup is also typically used as a base for barbecue sauce, especially in the Southern United States. Chips redirects here. ... For the song by The Smashing Pumpkins, see Mayonaise (song). ... Thousand Island dressing, pink in color, is a variety of salad dressing, a variant of Russian dressing, commonly made of mayonnaise, ketchup, and a mixture of finely chopped vegetables, most often pickles, onions, bell peppers, and/or green olives; chopped hard-boiled egg is also common. ... Fry sauce is a condiment common in Utah. ... The St. ... Historic Southern United States. ...

Contents

History

A bottle of Geo. Watkins mushroom ketchup.
A bottle of Geo. Watkins mushroom ketchup.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 331 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (584 × 1058 pixel, file size: 146 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A bottle of Geo. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 331 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (584 × 1058 pixel, file size: 146 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A bottle of Geo. ...

Origins

Ketchup-like sauces originated in Asia as a fish sauce, long before anyone outside the Americas had ever seen a tomato. The word "ketchup" comes from the Malay/ Indonesian word kichap or kechap (e.g., kecap manis — Dutch spelling kitjap manis) which itself was derived from the Chinese ke'tsiap. English and Dutch sailors brought the Asian styled ketchup to Europe, where many flavourings, such as mushrooms, anchovies and nuts, were added to the basic fish sauce. Ketchup, as it is eaten today, first appeared in American cookbooks during the early 19th century. For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... Fish sauce is a condiment derived from fish that have been allowed to ferment. ... For other uses, see Tomato (disambiguation). ... Soy sauce (US) or soya sauce is a fermented sauce made from soybeans (soya beans), roasted grain, water and salt. ...


Tomato ketchup

By 1801 a recipe for tomato ketchup was printed in an American cookbook, the Sugar House Book.[3] In 1824 a ketchup recipe appeared in The Virginia Housewife, an influential 19th-century cookbook written by Mary Randolph, Thomas Jefferson's cousin. The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ...


As the century progressed, tomato ketchup began its ascent in popularity in the United States, influenced by the American enthusiasm for tomatoes. Tomato ketchup was sold locally by farmers. A man named Jonas Yerks (or Yerkes) is believed to have been the first man to make tomato ketchup a national phenomenon. By 1837 he had produced and distributed the condiment nationally. Shortly, other companies followed suit. F. & J. Heinz launched their tomato ketchup in 1876. H. J. Heinz Company (NYSE: HNZ), commonly known as Heinz, famous for its 57 Varieties slogan, is a processed food product company with its headquarters in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in the United States of America. ...


Heinz tomato ketchup was advertised: "Blessed relief for Mother and the other women in the household!"


The Webster's Dictionary of 1913 defined "catchup" as a "table sauce made from mushrooms, tomatoes, walnuts, etc. [Written also ketchup]." 1888 advertisement for Websters Dictionary Websters Dictionary is the common title given to English language dictionaries in the United States, derived from American lexicographer Noah Webster. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Modern ketchup emerged in the early years of the 20th century, out of a debate over the use of sodium benzoate as a preservative in condiments. Harvey W. Wiley, the "father" of the Food and Drug Administration in the U.S., challenged the safety of benzoate. In response, entrepreneurs, particularly Henry J. Heinz, pursued an alternative recipe that eliminated the need for that preservative. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Sodium benzoate (E211), also called benzoate of soda, has chemical formula C6H5COONa. ... Harvey Washington Wiley Harvey Washington Wiley (October 30, 1844, Kent, Indiana - June 30, 1930, Washington, D.C.) was a noted chemist involved with the passage of the landmark Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906. ... FDA redirects here. ... Henry J. Heinz Henry John Heinz (October 11, 1844–May 14, 1919) was a United States businessman. ...


Prior to Heinz (and his fellow innovators), commercial tomato ketchups of that time were watery and thin, in part due to the use of unripe tomatoes, which were low in pectin. They were also less vinegary than modern ketchups; by pickling ripe tomatoes, the need for benzoate was eliminated without spoilage or degradation in flavor. But the changes driven by the desire to eliminate benzoate also produced changes that some experts (such as Andrew F. Smith[4]) believe were key to the establishment of tomato ketchup as the dominant American condiment. Pectin, a white to light brown powder, is a heterosaccharide derived from the cell wall of higher terrestrial plants. ... Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... For other uses, see Pickle. ...

Ketchup is commonly used on hamburgers
Ketchup is commonly used on hamburgers

Until Heinz, most commercial ketchups appealed to two of the basic tastes: bitterness and saltiness. But the switch to ripe tomatoes and more tomato solids added umami, and the major increase in the concentration of vinegar added sourness and pungency to the range of sensations experienced during its consumption. And because the elimination of benzoate was accompanied by a doubling of ketchup's sweetness, a balanced stimulation of all five types of taste sensations resulted.[citation needed] This article is about the food item. ... Taste (or, more formally, gustation) is a form of direct chemoreception and is one of the traditional five senses. ... Taste (or, more formally, gustation) is a form of direct chemoreception and is one of the traditional five senses. ... Taste (or, more formally, gustation) is a form of direct chemoreception and is one of the traditional five senses. ... Taste (or, more formally, gustation) is a form of direct chemoreception and is one of the traditional five senses. ... Taste (or, more formally, gustation) is a form of direct chemoreception and is one of the traditional five senses. ... Look up Pungency in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Taste (or, more formally, gustation) is a form of direct chemoreception and is one of the traditional five senses. ...


In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration has prohibited the use of the word "ketchup" on product labels unless the product conforms to a set of strict guidelines. Despite the more general origins of the word, all products marketed as ketchup in the United States must be thickened only with tomato solids, and the viscosity of the sauce must be within a very narrow range. The nutrient content of the sauce is also tightly regulated. FDA redirects here. ... A nutrient is a substance used in an organisms metabolism which must be taken in from the environment. ...


In the past, ketchup was produced from fresh tomatoes after harvesting. Vacuum evaporation made it possible to turn tomatoes into a very thick tomato paste that is easy to store at room temperature. This enables a factory to produce ketchup throughout the year. Vacuum evaporation is the process of dropping the pressure in a container until waters boiling point is reached at room temperature. ... Tomato paste is a thick paste made from ripened tomatos with skin and seeds removed. ... For other uses, see Room temperature (disambiguation). ...


Later innovations

The thixotropic properties of ketchup make it difficult to pour from a glass bottle unless it has previously been shaken vigorously. The introduction of PET squeeze bottles in the 1980s[citation needed] made it easier to get the ketchup out. Thixotropy is the property of some non-newtonian pseudoplastic fluids to show a time dependant change in viscosity; the longer the fluid undergoes shear, the lower its viscosity. ... PETE redirects here. ... Composite body, painted, and glazed bottle. ...


In October, 2000, Heinz introduced colored ketchup products, which eventually included green, purple, pink, orange, teal, and blue.[5] These popular products were made by adding food coloring to the traditional ketchup. These products (as of January 2006) have been discontinued.[6] Food coloring spreading on a thin water film. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Nutrition

The following table compares the nutritional value of ketchup with raw ripe tomatoes and salsa, based on information from the USDA Food Nutrient Database.[7] Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... USDA redirects here. ...

Nutrient
(per 100 g)
Ketchup Low sodium
Ketchup
Tomatoes,
year-round
USDA commodity
salsa
La Victoria
Salsa Brava, Hot
Energy 100 kcal
419 kJ
104 kcal
435 kJ
18 kcal
75 kJ
36 kcal
150 kJ
40 kcal
170 kJ
Water 68.33 g 66.58 g 94.50 g 89.70 g 88.67 g
Protein 1.74 g 1.52 g 0.88 g 1.50 g 1.36 g
Fats 0.49 g 0.36 g 0.20 g 0.20 g 1.11 g
Carbohydrates 25.78 g 27.28g 3.92 g 7.00 g 6.16 g
Sodium 1110 mg 20 mg 5 mg 430 mg 648 mg
Vitamin C 15.1 mg 15.1 mg 12.7 mg 4 mg 7.2 mg
Lycopene 17.0 mg 19.0 mg 2.6 mg n/a n/a

Ketchup packets from fast-food restaurants: For sodium in the diet, see Salt. ... Etymology: French calorie, from Latin calor (heat), from calere (to be warm). ... This article is about the properties of water. ... BIC pen cap, about 1 gram. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin showing coloured alpha helices. ... Fats is the plural for fat, a generic term for a class of lipids in biochemistry. ... Carbohydrates (literally hydrates of carbon) are chemical compounds that act as the primary biological means of storing or consuming energy, other forms being fat and protein. ... For sodium in the diet, see Salt. ... The milligram (symbol mg) is an SI unit of mass. ... This article is about the nutrient. ... Lycopene is a bright red carotenoid pigment, a phytochemical found in tomatoes and other red fruits. ... A fast-food restaurant is a restaurant characterized both by food which is supplied quickly after ordering, and by minimal service. ...

Restaurant Packet
size
Energy Sodium Carbo-
hydrates
Arby's 9 g 10 kcal (42 kJ) 100 mg 2 g
Burger King 10 g 10 kcal (42 kJ) 127 mg 3 g
Jack in the Box 9 g 10 kcal (42 kJ) 105 mg 2 g
McDonald's[8] 10 g 15 kcal (63 kJ) 110 mg 3 g

Ketchup has been shown to provide significant health benefits but many argue that these benefits are counterbalanced by the food's salt and sugar content. Ketchup has been found to be a beneficial source of lycopene, an antioxidant which may help prevent some forms of cancer. This is particularly true of the organic brands of ketchup. In fact, organic brands were found to contain three times as much lycopene as non-organic brands.[9] Ketchup, much like marinara sauce and other cooked tomato foods, yields higher levels of lycopene per serving because cooking makes lycopene in tomatoes more bio-available. Arbys is a fast food restaurant chain in the United States and Canada that is a wholly owned subsidiary of Triarc. ... Burger King (NYSE: BKC), often abbreviated to BK, is a global chain of hamburger fast food restaurants. ... A jack-in-the-box is a childrens toy that outwardly consists of a box with a crank. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... Lycopene is a bright red carotenoid pigment, a phytochemical found in tomatoes and other red fruits. ... Tomato sauce is a condiment made with tomatoes, and sometimes also ham, onions, basil, salt, oil, garlic and various spices. ...

Ketchup on a hot dog

Image File history File links Ketchuponahotdog. ... Image File history File links Ketchuponahotdog. ...

Viscosity

Ketchup (the tomato variety) is a thixotropic substance, which often results in difficulties of removing it from a glass bottle. Often a glass bottle will appear to be blocked. The "common" method (inverting the bottle and hitting the bottom with the heel of the hand) will cause the ketchup to begin flowing over itself. Because the ketchup is a thixotropic fluid and has a non linear stress strain curve it will flow over itself better than any other surface. So once it begins to flow it will pick up speed, and this is why a whole lot of ketchup comes out at a time. Some people, seeking to avoid this problem, remove the product with the aid of a butter knife thrust into the opening. But this technique is generally slow and inefficient, and can potentially contaminate the ketchup. Thixotropy is the property of some non-newtonian pseudoplastic fluids to show a time dependant change in viscosity; the longer the fluid undergoes shear, the lower its viscosity. ...


There is a better technique that avoids both the thixotropic effect and the need for an inefficient tool. Known widely among caterers, it involves inverting the bottle and forcefully tapping its upper neck with two fingers (index and middle finger together). Specifically, with the Heinz Ketchup product, one taps the 57 circle on the neck. This helps the ketchup flow by applying correct G-forces.[10] Another solution to this problem appeared with the introduction of plastic squeeze bottles. More recently, Heinz and others have introduced an "upside-down" bottle, which further remedies the problem by keeping the remaining ketchup at the mouth of the bottle. These bottles are also fitted with a control valve in the nozzle designed to eliminate the build-up of ketchup in the cap after use. Catering is the business of providing food service at a remote site. ... The term g force or gee force refers to the symbol g, the force of acceleration due to gravity at the earths surface. ...


Etymology

Early uses in English

The word entered the English language in England during the late seventeenth century, appearing in print as catchup and later as ketchup. The following is a list of early quotations collected by the Oxford English Dictionary. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of...

  • 1690, B. E., A New Dictionary of the Terms Ancient and Modern of the Canting Crew
    • Catchup: a high East-India Sauce.
  • 1711, Charles Lockyer, An Account of the Trade in India 128
    • Soy comes in Tubbs from Jappan, and the best Ketchup from Tonquin; yet good of both sorts are made and sold very cheap in China.
  • 1730, Jonathan Swift, A Panegyrick on the Dean Wks. 1755 IV. I. 142
    • And, for our home-bred British cheer, Botargo, catsup, and caveer.
  • 1748, Sarah Harrison, The Housekeeper's Pocket-Book and Compleat Family Cook. i. (ed. 4) 2,
    • I therefore advise you to lay in a Store of Spices, ... neither ought you to be without ... Kitchup, or Mushroom Juice.
  • 1751, Mrs. Hannah Glasse, Cookery Bk. 309
    • It will taste like foreign Catchup.
  • 1817, George Gordon Byron, Beppo viii,
    • Buy in gross ... Ketchup, Soy, Chili~vinegar, and Harvey.
  • 1832, Vegetable Substances Used for the Food of Man 333
    • One ... application of mushrooms is ... converting them into the sauce called Catsup.
  • 1840, Charles Dickens, Barnaby Rudge (1849) 91/1
    • Some lamb chops (breaded, with plenty of ketchup).
  • 1845, Eliza Acton, Modern Cookery v. (1850) 136 (L.)
    • Walnut catsup.
  • 1862, Macmillan's Magazine. Oct. 466
    • He found in mothery catsup a number of yellowish globular bodies.
  • 1874, Mordecai C. Cooke, Fungi; Their Nature, Influence and Uses 89
    • One important use to which several ... fungi can be applied, is the manufacture of ketchup.

The spelling catsup seems to have appeared first from the pen of Jonathan Swift, in 1730. Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ... 1711 (MDCCXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events Pope Clement XII elected September 17 - Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed III (1703-1730) to Mahmud I (1730-1754) Anna Ivanova (Anna I of Russia) became czarina Births April 16 - Henry Clinton, British general (d. ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and... Year 1748 (MDCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events Adam Smith is appointed professor of logic at the University of Glasgow March 25 - For the last time, New Years Day is legally on March 25 in England and Wales. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Lord Byron, English poet Lord Byron (1803), as painted by Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, (January 22, 1788 – April 19, 1824) was the most widely read English language poet of his day. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Dickens redirects here. ... Barnaby Rudge: A Tale of the Riots of Eighty is a historical novel by the author Charles Dickens. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Elizabeth Eliza Acton (April 17, 1799-February 13, 1859) was an English cook who produced one of the countrys first cookbooks aimed at the domestic reader, Modern Cookery for Private Families. ... This article is about 1862 . ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and...


China connection

The theory of the word's origin says that it derives from one of two words from the Fujian region of coastal southern China: "kôe-chiap" (in the Xiamen accent) or "kê-chiap" (in the Zhangzhou accent). Both of these words come from the Amoy dialect of China, where it meant the brine of pickled fish or shellfish.[11] Ketchup entered the English language from the Malay word "kichap" or "kechap" (spelled "ketjap" by the Dutch), which came from the Chinese in the first place (see: Penang Hokkien). The Malay word means "taste." And in sometime in the late 17th century, the name and some samples might have arrived in England where it appeared in print as "catchup" in 1690 and then as "ketchup" in 1711. These names stuck with the British, who quickly appropriated them for their own pickled condiments of anchovies or oysters.   (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Fu-chien; Postal map spelling: Fukien, Foukien; local transliteration Hokkien from Min Nan Hok-kiàn) is one of the provinces on the southeast coast of the Peoples Republic of China. ... A view of the Xiamen University campus Xiamen (Simplified Chinese: 厦门; Traditional Chinese: 廈門; Hanyu Pinyin: ) is a coastal sub-provincial city in southeastern Fujian province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Zhangzhou (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a prefecture-level city in southern Fujian province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Amoy (Xiamen) is a language/dialect which originally comes from Southern Fujian, in the area centered around the city of Xiamen. ... Penang Hokkien is a local variant of Minnan (Southern Min) spoken in Penang, Malaysia. ...


The exact Chinese characters used to represent the word kôe-chiap have been disputed, with two primary theories as to the word's original Chinese orthography: Japanese name Kanji: Hiragana: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Vietnamese name Quốc ngữ: Hán tá»±: A Chinese character or Han character (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a logogram used in writing Chinese, Japanese, rarely Korean, and formerly Vietnamese. ...


Tomato sauce

The word "ketchup" derives from a Chinese word composed of two characters (茄汁), which means "tomato sauce". The first character (), meaning "eggplant," is also a shortened form of "tomato" ( in Mandarin and Cantonese or 茄 in Taiwanese). The second character () means "juice" or "sauce." Pronunciations of this word vary by region, but their similarities to the English "ketchup" can be noticed. Aubergine redirects here. ... Map of eastern China and Taiwan, showing the historic distribution of Mandarin Chinese in light brown. ... Standard Cantonese is a variant, and is generally considered the prestige dialect of Cantonese Chinese. ... For other uses, see Formosan languages, Taiwanese Mandarin, and Languages of Taiwan. ...

茄汁
Language Pronunciation (IPA) Other transcriptions
Cantonese khe tsɐp Jyutping ke2 zap1
Taiwanese gjo ʑiap POJ kiô-chiap

Standard Cantonese is a variant, and is generally considered the prestige dialect of Cantonese Chinese. ... Jyutping (sometimes spelled Jyutpin) is a romanization system for Standard Cantonese developed by the Linguistic Society of Hong Kong (LSHK) in 1993. ... For other uses, see Formosan languages, Taiwanese Mandarin, and Languages of Taiwan. ... Taiwanese (Chinese: 台語, 台灣話 or 福佬話; Taiwanese Pe̍h-oē-jī: Tâi-oân-oē or Hō-ló-oē; Hanyu Pinyin: Táiyǔ or Táiwānhuà) is the primary spoken language of 70% of the Taiwanese population. ...

Fish sauce

The second theory states that "ketchup" derives from an Amoy word of two characters (鮭汁) meaning "fish sauce". The first character literally means "salmon" but can mean just "fish" in general. The second character is the same as in the above-mentioned theory. Amoy (Xiamen) is a language/dialect which originally comes from Southern Fujian, in the area centered around the city of Xiamen. ... For other uses, see Salmon (disambiguation). ...

鮭汁
Language Pronunciation (IPA) Other transcriptions
Cantonese kwɐi tsɐp Jyutping gwai1 zap1
Taiwanese kue ʑiap POJ kôe chiap

Merriam-Webster also states that "ketchup" derives from a word meaning "fish sauce", but identifies the source language as Malay. [12] Standard Cantonese is a variant, and is generally considered the prestige dialect of Cantonese Chinese. ... Jyutping (sometimes spelled Jyutpin) is a romanization system for Standard Cantonese developed by the Linguistic Society of Hong Kong (LSHK) in 1993. ... For other uses, see Formosan languages, Taiwanese Mandarin, and Languages of Taiwan. ... Taiwanese (Chinese: 台語, 台灣話 or 福佬話; Taiwanese Pe̍h-oē-jī: Tâi-oân-oē or Hō-ló-oē; Hanyu Pinyin: Táiyǔ or Táiwānhuà) is the primary spoken language of 70% of the Taiwanese population. ... Merriam-Webster, originally known as the G. & C. Merriam Company of Springfield, Massachusetts, is a United States company that publishes reference books, especially dictionaries that are descendants of Noah Websters An American Dictionary of the English Language (1828). ... Not to be confused with the Malayalam language, spoken in India. ...


U.S. politics

In 1981, Congress ordered the United States Department of Agriculture to issue new standards for federally financed school lunch programs, which would enable schools to economize; one of the USDA's proposals was to classify ketchup as a vegetable. The suggestion was widely ridiculed and the proposal was dropped.[13] AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... USDA redirects here. ... For other uses, see Vegetable (disambiguation). ...


In 2004, presidential challenger John Kerry's ties to H. J. Heinz Company through his wife, Teresa Heinz, led some supporters of George W. Bush to create an alternative called W Ketchup so as not to add to his opponent's campaign coffers, even though Kerry adhered to strict funding rules and separated his wife's personal fortune from any campaign funds.[14] Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... H. J. Heinz Company (NYSE: HNZ), commonly known as Heinz, famous for its 57 Varieties slogan, is a processed food product company with its headquarters in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in the United States of America. ... Teresa Heinz, 2004. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... W Ketchup is a brand of ketchup made in the United States. ...


Ketchup and catsup

Confusion between these two names has provided fodder for comedy:

  • In one episode of The Simpsons, Mr. Burns cannot decide between ketchup and catsup. In another, Homer calls Bart to ask the difference between ketchup and catsup, and claims 'they' will cut his head off if Bart doesn't tell him.
  • In an episode of King of the Hill, Hank tells Bobby that a restaurant has "seven kinds of ketchup, and three kinds of catsup"; later Bobby asks "can someone pass the catsup?".
  • In an episode of Corner Gas Lacy thinks Oscar has Functional illiteracy because he argues with himself about the difference between ketchup and catsup.
  • In an episode of The King of Queens, Arthur asks Doug to pass him "the catsup", while Doug looks in confusion at a bottle clearly marked 'Ketchup'. Doug eventually makes Arthur admit that it is called ketchup.
  • The online game Kingdom of Loathing and the Homestar Runner toon Where's The Cheat? both feature "ketchup" or "catsup" as separate items.
  • Garrison Keillor's radio show A Prairie Home Companion regularly features advertisements for a product called "catchup" (a compromise between "ketchup" and "catsup").

Simpsons redirects here. ... Mr. ... This article is about the television program. ... Corner Gas is an award-winning Canadian situation comedy which has aired on CTV and The Comedy Network since 2004. ... Functional illiteracy refers to the inability of an individual to use reading, writing, and computational skills efficiently in everyday life situations. ... The King of Queens is an Emmy nominated, American comedy series that ran for nine seasons, from 1998 until 2007. ... Kingdom of Loathing (KoL) is a humorous, browser-based, multiplayer role playing game designed and operated by Asymmetric Publications, including creator Zack Jick Johnson and writer Josh Mr. ... Homestar Runner is a Flash animated Internet cartoon. ... This article is about the radio show. ...

See also

Banana Ketchup is made in the Philippines from bananas, mashed, with sugar, vinegar, and spices and red food coloring. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Ketchup alongside French fried potatoes The ketchup as a vegetable controversy or ketchupgate refers to a proposed United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Drug Administration directive, early in the administration of Ronald Reagan, that would have reclassified ketchup and pickle relish from condiments to a vegetable, allowing public... For other uses, see Mustard. ... Tomato paste is a thick paste made from ripened tomatos with skin and seeds removed. ... Tomato purée is a processed food product, usually consisting of only tomatoes, but can also be found in pre-seasoned form. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

References

  1. ^ Australian slang: Raw Prawns and Dead Horse - Fun Facts, Questions, Answers, Information. Retrieved on 2007-11-17.
  2. ^ Statements by H. J. Heinz Company and its subsidiaries, including labels of Heinz Tomato Ketchup
  3. ^ Taken from "The Sugar House Book", 1801.
    1. Get [the tomatoes] quite ripe on a dry day, squeeze them with your hands till reduced to a pulp, then put half a pound of fine salt to one hundred tomatoes, and boil them for two hours.
    2. Stir them to prevent burning.
    3. While hot press them through a fine sieve, with a silver spoon till nought but the skin remains, then add a little mace, 3 nutmegs, allspice, cloves, cinnamon, ginger, and pepper to taste.
    4. Boil over a slow fire till quite thick, stir all the time.
    5. Bottle when cold.
    6. One hundred tomatoes will make four or five bottles and keep good for two or three years."'
    The salt in this recipe, which served as a preservative, yields an extremely salty taste. This recipe is important because tomato was not widely accepted by people in North America in the early 1800s. Many believed it was poisonous.
  4. ^ Andrew F. Smith (2001). The Tomato in America: Early History, Culture, and Cookery. University of Illinois Press. ISBN 978-0-252-07009-9. 
  5. ^ Associated Press. "Heinz unveils new blue ketchup", April 7, 2003. 
  6. ^ Heinz - Consumer FAQs
  7. ^ USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference. USDA. Retrieved on 2007-12-03.
  8. ^ McDonald's USA Nutrition Facts for Popular Menu Items
  9. ^ Ishida B, Chapman M (2004). "A comparison of carotenoid content and total antioxidant activity in catsup from several commercial sources in the United States.". J Agric Food Chem 52 (26): 8017-20. PMID 15612790. 
  10. ^ How to pour Ketchup (Catsup). Full technical explanation. (English). Retrieved on 2007-12-30.
  11. ^ In the Chinese Amoy dialect, "kôe-chiap" (Xiamen accented Amoy) or "kê-chiap" (probably Penang Hokkien, which is based on Zhangzhou accented Amoy) signifies "brine of pickled fish or shell-fish" (The Oxford English Dictionary, Douglas Chinese Dict. 46/1, 242/1).
  12. ^ www.merriam-webster.com - Entry for ketchup
  13. ^ Did the Reagan-era USDA really classify ketchup as a vegetable?. The Straight Dope.
  14. ^ Oliver Conway. "Republicans launch 'W ketchup'", BBC NEWS, July 10, 2004. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Edible salt is a mineral, one of the few rocks people eat. ... A typical household colander A colander (sometimes spelled pink leotard) is a type of sieve used in cooking for separating liquids and solids. ... This article is about the chemical element. ... For other uses, see Spoon (disambiguation). ... Species About 100 species, including: Myristica argentea Myristica fragrans Myristica malabarica The nutmegs Myristica are a genus of evergreen trees indigenous to tropical southeast Asia and Australasia. ... For other uses, see Nutmeg (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (L.) Merr. ... Binomial name (L.) Merrill & Perry A single dried clove flower bud Cloves (Syzygium aromaticum, syn. ... Binomial name J.Presl Cassia (Chinese cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... Binomial name Zingiber officinale Rosc. ... Binomial name L.[1] Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The U.S. Department of Agriculture, also called the Agriculture Department, or USDA, is a Cabinet department of the United States Federal Government. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Amoy (Xiamen) is a language/dialect which originally comes from Southern Fujian, in the area centered around the city of Xiamen. ... A view of the Xiamen University campus Xiamen (Simplified Chinese: 厦门; Traditional Chinese: 廈門; Hanyu Pinyin: ) is a coastal sub-provincial city in southeastern Fujian province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Amoy (Xiamen) is a language/dialect which originally comes from Southern Fujian, in the area centered around the city of Xiamen. ... Penang Hokkien is a local variant of Minnan (Southern Min) spoken in Penang, Malaysia. ... Zhangzhou (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a prefecture-level city in southern Fujian province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Amoy (Xiamen) is a language/dialect which originally comes from Southern Fujian, in the area centered around the city of Xiamen. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Ketchup

Other non-commercial recipes

  • How To Make Ketchup At Home
  • A vegetarian low-salt, low-sugar formula taken from The Wild Vegetarian Cookbook
  • Recipe for Yellow Curry Ketchup

  Results from FactBites:
 
gladwell dot com - the ketchup conundrum (4878 words)
Tomato ketchup is a nineteenth-century creation—the union of the English tradition of fruit and vegetable sauces and the growing American infatuation with the tomato.
The dominant nineteenth-century ketchups were thin and watery, in part because they were made from unripe tomatoes, which are low in the complex carbohydrates known as pectin, which add body to a sauce.
After breaking the ketchup down into its component parts, the testers assessed the critical dimension of "amplitude," the word sensory experts use to describe flavors that are well blended and balanced, that "bloom" in the mouth.
Ketchup - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2098 words)
Ketchup (or less commonly catsup) is a popular condiment, usually made with ripened tomatoes.
Ketchup is often used for French fries ("chips" in Commonwealth Nations), sandwiches and grilled/fried meats.
Ketchup (the tomato variety) is a thixotropic substance, which often results in difficulties of removing it from a glass bottle.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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