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Encyclopedia > Keratosis pilaris
Keratosis pilaris
Classification and external resources
ICD-9 757.39
OMIM 604093
DiseasesDB 32387
MedlinePlus 001462
eMedicine ped/1246  derm/211

Keratosis pilaris (KP, also follicular keratosis) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloquially referred to as "chicken skin" as well as "meat bumps". It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne. The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... The following is a list of codes for International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. ... The Mendelian Inheritance in Man project is a database that catalogues all the known diseases with a genetic component, and - when possible - links them to the relevant genes in the human genome. ... The Disease Bold textDatabase is a free website that provides information about the relationships between medical conditions, symptoms, and medications. ... MedlinePlus (medlineplus. ... eMedicine is an online clinical medical knowledge base that was founded in 1996. ... This article is about the general scientific term. ... A hair follicle is part of the skin that grows hair by packing old cells together. ... In humans the thigh is the area between the pelvis and buttocks and the knee. ... Diagram of an insect leg A leg is the part of an animals body that supports the rest of the animal above the ground and is used for locomotion. ... Flank is a word which might mean any of several different things: A flank is the side of either a horse or a military unit. ... Bottom commonly refers to the human buttocks but also has other uses. ... In Botany, glabrous is used to describe something as smooth or having no hair or similar growth (see indumentum). ... The face is the front part of the head and includes the hair, forehead, eyebrow, eyes, nose, ears, cheeks, mouth, lips, philtrum, teeth, skin, and chin. ... Grant Salzl has a huge nose full of acne. ...

Contents

Classification

Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe. A separate article is about the punk band called The Adolescents. ...


There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including: keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks) and related disorders.


Many people with keratosis pilaris do not know they have it (if the condition is mild). While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, it is often confused with acne. Goose bumps on a human Goose bumps, also called goose pimples, goose flesh, chill bumps, chicken skin, or the medical term cutis anserina, are the bumps on a persons skin at the base of body hairs which involuntarily develop when a person is cold or experiences strong emotions such...


Symptoms and signs

Keratosis pilaris occurs as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture. Not to be confused with kerogen or carotene. ... A hair follicle is part of the skin that grows hair by packing old cells together. ... Hyperkeratinization is a disorder of the cells lining the inside of a hair follicle. ... Goose bumps on a human Goose bumps, also called goose pimples, goose flesh, chill bumps, chicken skin, or the medical term cutis anserina, are the bumps on a persons skin at the base of body hairs which involuntarily develop when a person is cold or experiences strong emotions such...


Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring. Ingrown hair is a condition where the hair curls back or grows sideways into the skin. ...


Treatment

There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris; however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Some treatments are largely symptomatic and may need repeating. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, Retin A and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Also, beta hydroxy acids can help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the lactic acid—a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk.[citation needed] Sunlight may also be helpful but increases risk of skin cancer. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower.[citation needed] Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Retin-A is a trademarked brand name for Tretinoin, a retinoic acid cream used to treat acne; it is claimed that it stimulates skin cell turnover and smoothes wrinkles. ... α-Hydroxy acids (AHAs) are a class of chemical compounds that consist of a carboxylic acid substituted with a hydroxy group on the adjacent carbon. ... Urea is an organic compound with the chemical formula (NH2)2CO. Urea is also known by the International Nonproprietary Name (rINN) carbamide, as established by the World Health Organization. ... Milk Baths are just like regular baths, only with an addition of milk and often other scents such as lavender, honey, and essential oils. ... For the production of milk by mammals, see Lactation. ... α-Hydroxy Acids (AHAs) are naturally occurring carboxylic acids which are well-known for their use in the cosmetics industry. ... A glass of cows milk. ... Prism splitting light High Resolution Solar Spectrum Sunlight in the broad sense is the total spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation given off by the Sun. ... Skin cancer is a malignant growth on the skin which can have many causes. ... Coconut oil, also known as coconut butter, is a tropical oil extracted from copra (the dried inner flesh of coconuts) with many applications. ...


References

External links

  • HelpForKP.com - (Keratosis Pilaris Help) - Provides information on what keratosis pilaris is, treatment options, and discussion forum.
  • KeratosisPilaris.org - (Keratosis Pilaris Community Forums) - Largest Keratosis Pilaris Community that provides information, treatment discussions and support.
A congenital disorder is a medical condition or defect that is present at or before birth (for example, congenital heart disease). ... An integument is an outer protective covering such as the feathers or skin of an animal or rind or shell. ... // Q00-Q99 - Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities (Q00-Q07) Congenital malformations of the nervous system (Q00) Anencephaly and similar malformations (Q01) Encephalocele (Q02) Microcephaly (Q03) Congenital hydrocephalus (Q04) Other congenital malformations of brain (Q05) Spina bifida (Q06) Other congenital malformations of spinal cord (Q07) Other congenital malformations of nervous... Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, also known as bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma or simply bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma is a rare skin disease in the ichthyosis family affecting around 1 in 250,000 people. ... Harlequin-type ichthyosis (also harlequin ichthyosis, ichthyosis congenita, or keratosis diffusa fetalis), a skin disease, is the most severe form of congenital ichthyosis, characterized by a thickening of the keratin layer in fetal human skin. ... Ichthyosis lammellaris, also known as (recessive) lamellar ichthyosis and nonbullous congenital ichthyosis, is a rare inherited skin disorder, affecting less than 1 person in 300,000. ... Ichthyosis vulgaris is a skin disorder causing dry, scaly skin. ... X-linked ichthyosis is an inborn error of metabolism characterized by a deficiency in microsomal sulfatase. ... Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is a disorder resulting from mutations in the genes encoding keratin 5 or 14. ... Epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica or Dystrophic EB (DEB) forms which can lead to scarring occur in a deeper tissue level; the sub-lamina densa region (the beneath the lamina densa) within the upper dermis. ... Dermatology is a branch of medicine dealing with the skin, its structure, functions, and diseases (from Greek derma, skin), as well as its appendages (nails, hair, sweat glands). ... Azskeptic 17:34, 10 July 2007 (UTC) Lymphedema, also spelled lymphoedema, also known as lymphatic obstruction, is a condition of localized fluid retention caused by a compromised lymphatic system. ... In medicine, mastocytosis is a group of rare disorders of both children and adults caused by the presence of too many mast cells (mastocytes) in a persons body. ... Meleda disease is a palmoplantar keratoderma with a prevalence of 1 in 100,000. ... Naegeli syndrome (Naegeli-Franceschetti-Jadassohn syndrome) is a rare autosomal dominant form of ectodermal dysplasia, characterized by reticular skin pigmentation, diminished function of the sweat glands, the absence of teeth and hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles. ... Urticaria Pigmentosa is the most common form of cutaneous mastocytosis. ... Incontinentia pigmenti (IP) is a disorder that affects the skin, hair, teeth, and nails. ... Michael Berryman. ... Hay-Wells Syndrome (HWS), also known as the ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting (AEC) syndrome, is one of at least 150 known types of ectodermal dysplasia. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... A port-wine stain or naevus flammeus is a vascular birthmark consisting of superficial and deep dilated capillaries in the skin which produce a reddish to purplish discoloration of the skin. ... Cutis laxa (also called elastolysis) is a group of rare connective tissue disorders in which the skin becomes inelastic and hangs loosely in folds. ... Dariers disease is a genetic disorder discovered by French dermatologist Ferdinand-Jean Darier. ... Category: ... Bloom syndrome is a rare inherited disorder characterized by a high frequency of breaks and rearrangements in an affected persons chromosomes, discovered and first described by dermatologist Dr. David Bloom in 1954. ... Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome is a hereditary benign skin condition originally described by Rothmund in 1868; Thomson published further descriptions in 1936. ... Xeroderma pigmentosum, or XP, is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder of DNA repair in which the bodys normal ability to remove damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) light is deficient. ... Nail diseases are in a separate category from diseases of the skin. ... Leukonychia (or Leuconychia) is a medical term for white discoloration appearing on nails. ... Accessory breasts, also known as polymastia, supernumerary breasts, or mammae erraticae, is the condition of having an additional breast. ... A supernumerary nipple (also known as a third nipple, accessory nipple, polythelia or polymastia) is an additional nipple occurring in mammals, including humans. ... Micromastia is the scientific term for a condition commonly known as small breasts in women. ... Monilethrix is an autosomal dominant hair disease that results in short, fragile, broken hair that appears beaded. ... Sabinas brittle hair syndrome, also called brittle hair-mental deficit syndrome is a hereditary disease. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Keratosis pilaris - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (394 words)
Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloqually referred to as "chicken skin".
Keratosis pilaris tends to occur as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates around hair follicles (process known as hyperkeratinization).
Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.
Keratosis Pilaris Treatment - BIOSKINCARE (1481 words)
Keratosis pilaris is a very common genetic follicular disorder manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloqually referred to as "chicken skin" or "goose bumps".
Keratosis pilaris tends to occur as excess keratin, a natural fibrous protein in the skin found normally in human hair, nails and callus, accumulates around hair follicles (process known as hyperkeratinization).
Keratosis pilaris is a condition of the skin in which the hair follicles become plugged with hair and with dead cells from the outermost layer of skin as the skin renews itself.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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