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Encyclopedia > Kentucky
Commonwealth of Kentucky
Flag of Kentucky Seal
Nickname(s): Bluegrass State
Motto(s): United we stand, divided we fall
Official language(s) English[1]
Capital Frankfort
Largest city Louisville
Area  Ranked 37th
 - Total 40,444 sq mi
(104,749 km²)
 - Width 140 miles (225 km)
 - Length 379 miles (610 km)
 - % water 1.7
 - Latitude 36° 30′ N to 39° 09′ N
 - Longitude 81° 58′ W to 89° 34′ W
Population  Ranked 26th
 - Total (2000) 4,173,405
 - Density 101.7/sq mi 
39.28/km² (23rd)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Black Mountain[2]
4,145 ft  (1,263 m)
 - Mean 755 ft  (230 m)
 - Lowest point Mississippi River[2]
257 ft  (78 m)
Admission to Union  June 1, 1792 (15th)
Governor Ernie Fletcher (R)
U.S. Senators Mitch McConnell (R)
Jim Bunning (R)
Congressional Delegation List
Time zones  
 - eastern half Eastern: UTC-5/DST-4
 - western half Central: UTC-6/DST-5
Abbreviations KY US-KY
Web site www.kentucky.gov

The Commonwealth of Kentucky (IPA: /kənˈtʌ.ki/) is a state located in the East Central United States of America. Kentucky is normally included in the group of Southern states (in particular the Upland South), but it is sometimes included, geographically and culturally, in the Midwest.[3][4] Kentucky is one of four U.S. states to be officially known as a commonwealth. Originally a part of Virginia, in 1792 it became the 15th state to join the Union. Kentucky is the 37th largest state in terms of land area, and ranks 26th in population. Image File history File links Flag_of_Kentucky. ... Image File history File links Kentucky_State_Seal. ... The flag of Kentucky consists of the Commonwealths seal on a navy blue field, surrounded by the words Commonwealth of Kentucky above and sprigs of goldenrod, the state flower, below. ... The Kentucky State Seal was adopted in December of 1792. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... The state motto of Kentucky, United we stand, divided we fall, was from a popular 1768 tune entitled the Liberty Song, by John Dickinson. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_KY.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kentucky ... // Although the United States currently has no official language, it is largely monolingual with English being the de facto national language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... Frankfort is the capital of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, a state of the United States of America. ... “Louisville” redirects here. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A kilometer (Commonwealth spelling: kilometre), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1,000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ... Map of states populations (2006) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2006, according to the 2005 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Black Mountain is the highest point in the state of Kentucky, USA, with a summit elevation of 4145 feet (1263 meters) above mean sea level. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Ernest Lee Fletcher (born November 12, 1952) has served as governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky since December 9, 2003. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Addison Mitchell Mitch McConnell, Jr. ... James Paul David Jim Bunning (born October 23, 1931 in Southgate, Kentucky) is an American politician who was a Hall of Fame pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1955 to 1971. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... These are tables of congressional delegations from Kentucky to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... “UTC” redirects here. ... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Standard Time Zone (CST) is a geographic region in the Americas that keeps time by subtracting six hours from UTC (UTC-6). ... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. states This is a list of traditional abbreviations for U.S. states and territorries, which were in wide use prior to the U.S. postal abbreviations. ... Kentucky may refer to: Kentucky the U.S. state Kentucky (movie) the 1938 film Kentucky is also a common Caribbean nickname for Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC). ... IPA may refer to: The International Phonetic Alphabet or India Pale Ale ... This chart shows concisely the most common way in which the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is applied to represent the English language. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Historic Southern United States. ... The Upland South does not correspond well to state lines, although the term Upper South is sometimes defined by states. ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Kentucky is known as the "Bluegrass State," a nickname based on the fact that bluegrass is present in many of the lawns and pastures throughout the state. It is a land with diverse environments and abundant resources, including the world's longest cave system, the most miles of navigable waterways and streams in the Lower 48 states, and the two largest man-made lakes east of the Mississippi River. It is also home to the highest per capita number of deer and turkey in the United States, and the nation's most productive coalfield. Kentucky is also known for thoroughbred horses, horse racing, bourbon distilleries, bluegrass music, automobile manufacturing (including the best selling car, truck, and SUV in the U.S. market), tobacco, and college basketball. Species About 500 species, including: Poa abbreviata - Short Bluegrass Poa alpigena - Northern Meadow-grass Poa alpina - Alpine Meadow-grass Poa alsodes - Grove Bluegrass Poa angustifolia - Narrow-leaved Meadow-grass Poa annua - Annual Meadow-grass Poa arachnifera - Texas Bluegrass Poa arctica - Arctic Meadow-grass Poa badensis Poa bulbosa - Bulbous Meadow-grass... The continental United States refers (except sometimes in U.S. federal law and regulations) to the largest part of the U.S. that is delimited by a continuous border. ... Binomial name Zimmermann, 1780 The White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), also known as the Virginia deer, or simply as the whitetail, is a medium-sized deer found throughout most of the continental United States, southern Canada, Mexico, Central America and northern portions of South America as far south as Peru. ... Wyoming coal mine Coal mining is the mining of coal. ... The Thoroughbred is a horse breed developed in 18th century England when English mares were bred with imported Arabian stallions to create a distance racer. ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... Bourbon bottle, 19th century Bourbon is an American form of whiskey made from (pursuant to U.S. trade law) at least 51% corn, or maize, (typically about 70%) with the remainder being wheat and/or rye, and malted barley. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music which has its own roots in Irish, Scottish and English traditional music. ... “Car” and “Cars” redirect here. ... The Toyota Camry is a mid-size sedan assembled by Toyota in Georgetown, Kentucky; Altona, Victoria, Guangzhou, China and the original factory in Toyota City, Japan. ... The F-Series is a series of full-size pickup trucks from Ford Motor Company sold for over 5 decades. ... The Ford Explorer is a mid-size sport utility vehicle sold in North America and built by the Ford Motor Company since 1990. ... College basketball most often refers to the American basketball competitive governance structure established by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA. Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ...

Contents

Origin of name

Narrow country roads bounded by stone and wood plank fences are a fixture in the Kentucky Bluegrass.
Narrow country roads bounded by stone and wood plank fences are a fixture in the Kentucky Bluegrass.

The origin of Kentucky's name (variously spelled Cane-tuck-ee, Cantucky, Kain-tuck-ee, and Kentuckee before its modern spelling was accepted)[5] has never been definitively identified, though some theories have been debunked. For example, Kentucky's name does not come from the combination of "cane" and "turkey"; and though it is the most popular belief, it is unlikely to mean "dark and bloody ground" because it isn't found in any known Indian language.[6] The most likely etymology is that it comes from an Iroquoian word for "meadow" or "prairie"[7][8] (c.f. Mohawk kenhtà:ke, Seneca këhta’keh).[9] Other possibilities also exist: the suggestion of early Kentucky pioneer George Rogers Clark that the name means "the river of blood",[5] a Wyandot name meaning "land of tomorrow", a Shawnee term possibly referring to the head of a river,[10] or an Algonquian word for a river bottom.[6] Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Bluegrass and rock fence of local limestone in central Kentucky. ... Indigenous languages of the Americas (or Amerindian Languages) are spoken by indigenous peoples from the southern tip of South America to Alaska and Greenland, encompassing the land masses which constitute the Americas. ... The Iroquoian languages are a Native American language family. ... Mohawk is a Native American language spoken by the Mohawk nation in the United States and Canada. ... Seneca is the language of the Seneca Native Band, one of the Six Nations of the Iroquois League. ... Clark as painted by Matthew Harris Jouett in 1825 George Rogers Clark (November 19, 1752 – February 13, 1818) was the preeminent American military leader on the northwestern frontier during the American Revolutionary War. ... Wyandot is the Iroquoian language traditionally spoken by the people known variously as Wyandot, Wendat, or Huron. ... Distribution of the Shawnee language around 1650 The Shawnee language is a Central Algonquian language spoken in parts of central and northeastern Oklahoma by only around 200 Shawnee, making it very endangered. ... The Algonquian languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (others are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California). ...


Geography

See also: List of Kentucky counties
Kentucky
Kentucky
Kentucky's regions (click on image for color coding information.)

Kentucky borders states of both the Midwest and the Southeast. West Virginia lies to the east, Virginia to the southeast, Tennessee to the south, Missouri to the west, Illinois and Indiana to the northwest, and Ohio to the north and northeast. Kentucky's northern border is formed by the Ohio River, its western border by the Mississippi River. Kentucky has 120 counties, the most numerous amount of counties of any state. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2122x1640, 1388 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kentucky ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2122x1640, 1388 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kentucky ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (824x364, 53 KB) Summary I created this image using Wikipedias map of Kentucky counties. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (824x364, 53 KB) Summary I created this image using Wikipedias map of Kentucky counties. ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Greater Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ...


Kentucky is the only U.S. state to have a non-contiguous part exist as an exclave surrounded by other states. Fulton County, in the far west corner of the state, includes a small part of land, Kentucky Bend, on the Mississippi River bordered by Missouri and accessible via Tennessee, created by the New Madrid Earthquake.[11] D is Bs exclave, but is not an enclave. ... Fulton County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... The Kentucky Bend, variously called the New Madrid Bend, Madrid Bend, Bessie Bend or Bubbleland is an exclave of Fulton County, Kentucky, in the United States. ... The New Madrid Earthquake, the largest earthquake ever recorded in the contiguous United States, occurred on February 7, 1812. ...


Kentucky can be divided into five primary regions: the Cumberland Plateau in the east, the north-central Bluegrass region, the south-central and western Pennyroyal Plateau, the Western Coal Fields and the far-west Jackson Purchase. The Bluegrass region is commonly divided into two regions, the Inner Bluegrass — the encircling 90 miles (145 km) around Lexington — and the Outer Bluegrass, the region that contains most of the Northern portion of the state, above the Knobs. Much of the outer Bluegrass is in the Eden Shale Hills area, made up of short, steep, and very narrow hills. The Cumberland Plateau includes much of eastern Kentucky and western West Virginia in the United States. ... Bluegrass and rock fence of local limestone in central Kentucky. ... The Pennyroyal Plateau, or, as its more commonly called in Kentucky, the Pennyrile, is a large area of the state that features rolling hills, caves, and karst topography in general. ... The Western Coal Fields of Kentucky compose an area in the west-central part of the state, bounded by the Dripping Springs Escarpment. ... The Jackson Purchase is a region in the state of Kentucky bounded by the Mississippi, Ohio, and Tennessee Rivers. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... The Knobs is a narrow, horseshoe shaped region consisting of many small, zig zag shaped ridges that separates the Bluegrass region and Pennyroyal region of Kentucky. ... Eden Shale Hills is a broad area of short, but very steep hills in the outer Bluegrass Region of Kentucky. ...


Kentucky has 120 counties, third in the U.S. behind Texas' 254 and Georgia's 159.[12] The original motivation for having so many counties was to ensure that residents in the days of poor roads and horseback travel could make a round trip from their home to the county seat and back in a single day.[13] Later, however, politics began to play a part, with citizens who disagreed with the present county government simply petitioning the state to create a new county. The 1891 Kentucky Constitution placed stricter limits on county creation, stipulating that a new county: Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... The Constitution of Kentucky is the document that governs the Commonwealth of Kentucky, United States. ...

  • must have a land area of at least 400 square miles (1,000 km²);
  • must have a population of at least 12,000 people;
  • must not by its creation reduce the land area of an existing county to less than 400 square miles (1,000 km²);
  • must not by its creation reduce the population of an existing county to less than 12,000 people;
  • must not create a county boundary line that passes within 10 miles (20 km) of an existing county seat.

These regulations have reined in the proliferation of counties in Kentucky. Since the 1891 Constitution, only McCreary County has been created.[14] Because today's largest county by area, Pike County, is 788 square miles (2,041 km²), it is now impossible to create a new county from a single existing county under the current constitution. Any county created in this manner will by necessity either be smaller than 400 square miles (1,000 km²) or reduce the land area of the old county to less than 400 square miles (1,000 km²). It is still theoretically possible to form a new county from portions of more than one existing county (McCreary County was created from portions of three counties), but the area and boundary restrictions would make this extremely difficult. McCreary County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Pike County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ...


Climate

Located within the southeastern interior portion of North America, Kentucky has a climate described as humid subtropical (indicating that all monthly average temperatures are above freezing). Monthly average temperatures in Kentucky range from a high in the high 80s and low 90s (30.9 °C) to a low in the high 30s to low 40s (-4.9 °C) and averages 46 inches (116.84 cm) of precipitation a year.[15] Kentucky experiences all four seasons, usually with striking variations in the severity of summer and winter from year to year. In fact, it is not unusual to see marked changes in temperature and weather conditions within the same day, leading many locals to observe, "If you don't like the weather, just wait a few hours and it will change."[16]

Event Death Toll
Louisville Tornado of 1890 est. 76–120+
April 3, 1974 Tornado Outbreak 72
March 1, 1997 Flooding 18

Major weather events that have affected Kentucky include: Memorial to the 1890 tornado, on Main Street in downtown Louisville; images of the destruction, furnished by The Filson Historical Society, ring the structure at pedestrian level The Mid-Mississippi Valley Tornado Outbreak was a major tornado outbreak occurring in the middle United States on March 27, 1890. ... 1Time from first tornado to last tornado 2Most severe tornado damage; see Fujita Scale The Super Outbreak is the largest tornado outbreak on record. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...

Monthly Normal High and Low Temperatures For Various Kentucky Cities
City Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Lexington 40/24 45/28 55/36 65/44 74/54 82/62 86/66 85/65 78/58 67/46 54/37 44/28
Louisville 41/25 47/28 57/37 67/46 75/56 83/65 87/70 86/68 79/61 68/48 56/39 45/30
Paducah 42/24 48/28 58/37 68/46 77/55 85/64 89/68 87/65 81/57 71/45 57/36 46/28
Pikeville 46/23 50/25 60/32 69/39 77/49 84/58 87/63 86/62 80/56 71/42 60/33 49/26
Ashland 42/19 47/21 57/29 68/37 77/47 84/56 88/61 87/59 80/52 69/40 57/31 46/23
[5]

Memorial to the 1890 tornado, on Main Street in downtown Louisville; images of the destruction, furnished by The Filson Historical Society, ring the structure at pedestrian level The Mid-Mississippi Valley Tornado Outbreak was a major tornado outbreak occurring in the middle United States on March 27, 1890. ... This article is the current U.S. Collaboration of the Week. ... 1Time from first tornado to last tornado 2Most severe tornado damage; see Fujita Scale The Super Outbreak is the largest tornado outbreak on record. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... 1Maximum snowfall or ice accretion The Blizzard of 2003, also known as the Presidents Day Storm of 2003, or Presidents Day Storm II, was a historical and record-breaking snowstorm on the East Coast of the United States and Canada, which lasted from February 14 to February 19, 2003. ...

Lakes and rivers

Lake Cumberland is the largest artificial lake, in terms of volume, east of the Mississippi River.

Kentucky’s 90,000 miles (140,000 km) of streams provides one of the most expansive and complex stream systems in the nation. Kentucky has both the largest artificial lake east of the Mississippi in water volume (Lake Cumberland) and surface area (Kentucky Lake). It is the only U.S. state to be bordered on three sides by rivers — the Mississippi River to the west, the Ohio River to the north, and the Big Sandy River and Tug Fork to the east.[17] Its major internal rivers include the Kentucky River, Tennessee River, Cumberland River, Green River, and Licking River. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Map of Lake Cumberland Aerial composite of Lake Cumberland Lake Cumberland is an artificial lake in South-Central Kentucky created by the construction of the Wolf Creek Dam in 1950 at a cost of $80. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Map of Lake Cumberland Aerial composite of Lake Cumberland Lake Cumberland is an artificial lake in South-Central Kentucky created by the construction of the Wolf Creek Dam in 1950 at a cost of $80. ... Kentucky Lake Kentucky Lake is an artificial lake located in Calloway, Lyon, Marshall, and Trigg counties in Kentucky, and extending into parts of Tennessee. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... Map of the watershed of the Big Sandy River, showing its main tributaries, Tug Fork to the east and Levisa Fork to the west. ... The Tug Fork River (also called simply the Tug Fork or the Tug Fork of the Big Sandy River) is a tributary of the Big Sandy River, 154 mi (248 km) long, in southwestern West Virginia, southwestern Virginia, and in eastern Kentucky in the United States. ... The Kentucky River is a tributary of the Ohio River, 259 mi (417 km) long, in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... A riverboat passing under the Henley Street Bridge on the Tennessee River. ... The Cumberland River is an important waterway in the southern United States. ... The Green River is a tributary of the Ohio River that rises in Lincoln County in south-central Kentucky. ... The mouth of the Licking River, where it joins the Ohio River The Licking River is a tributary of the Ohio River, approximately 320 mi (515 km) long in northeastern Kentucky in the United States. ...


Though it has only three major natural lakes,[18] the state is home to many artificial lakes. Kentucky also has more navigable miles of water than any other state in the union, other than Alaska.[19] A reservoir (French: réservoir) is an artificial lake created by flooding land behind a dam. ... Official language(s) None[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ...


Natural environment and conservation

Kentucky has an expansive park system which includes one national park, two National Recreation areas, two National Historic Parks, two national forests, 45 state parks, 37,696 acres (153 km²) of state forest, and 82 Wildlife Management Areas.


Kentucky has been part of two of the most successful wildlife reintroduction projects in United States history. In the winter of 1997, the state's eastern counties began to re-stock elk, which had been extinct from the area for over 150 years. As of 2006, the state's herd was estimated at 5,700 animals, the largest herd east of the Mississippi River.[20] For other uses, see Elk (disambiguation). ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ...


The state also stocked wild turkeys in the 1950s. Once extinct in the state, today Kentucky has more turkeys per capita than any other eastern state. Binomial name Meleagris gallopavo Linnaeus, 1758 For other uses, see Wild Turkey (disambiguation). ...


Top tourist attractions in Kentucky

Place Visitors per year
City of Louisville 7 million
Lake Cumberland 5 million[21]
Land Between the Lakes 4 million[22]
Mammoth Cave National Park 2 million[23]
Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area 2 million
Red River Gorge / Natural Bridge 1.5 million

“Louisville” redirects here. ... Map of Lake Cumberland Aerial composite of Lake Cumberland Lake Cumberland is an artificial lake in South-Central Kentucky created by the construction of the Wolf Creek Dam in 1950 at a cost of $80. ... Land Between the Lakes is a U.S. National Recreation Area located in Kentucky and Tennessee. ... Mammoth Cave National Park is a U.S. National Park in central Kentucky, encompassing portions of Mammoth Cave, the most elongated cave system known in the world. ... The Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area preserves the Big South Fork of the Cumberland River in northern Tennessee and southern Kentucky. ... Red River Gorge, Daniel Boone National Forest, Kentucky The Red River Gorge, located at , is a canyon system on the Red River in east-central Kentucky. ... Natural bridge from a distance. ...

Significant natural attractions

Daniel Boone Escorting Settlers through the Cumberland Gap (George Caleb Bingham, oil on canvas, 1851–52) Cumberland Gap (el. ... Appalachians in North Carolina The Appalachian Mountains (French: les Appalaches) are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... Cumberland Falls by day. ... Photograph of a Moonbow (Lunar Rainbow) A moonbow (also known as a lunar rainbow or white rainbow) is a rainbow that occurs at night. ... Mammoth Cave National Park is a U.S. National Park in central Kentucky, encompassing portions of Mammoth Cave, the most elongated cave system known in the world. ... Red River Gorge, Daniel Boone National Forest, Kentucky The Red River Gorge, located at , is a canyon system on the Red River in east-central Kentucky. ... The Daniel Boone National Forest is the only national forest completely within the boundary of Kentucky. ... Land Between the Lakes is a U.S. National Recreation Area located in Kentucky and Tennessee. ... Logo of the U.S. Forest Service. ... Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest is a 14,000 acre (57 km²) arboretum, forest, and nature preserve located in Clermont, Kentucky (south of Louisville, Kentucky, United States). ... Clermont is a USGS-designated populated place (one of 32) located in Bullitt County, Kentucky, south of Louisville. ... Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Site preserves two farm sites where Abraham Lincoln lived as a child. ... Hodgenville is a city in and the county seat of LaRue County, Fork of the Nolin River. ... The Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area preserves the Big South Fork of the Cumberland River in northern Tennessee and southern Kentucky. ... Whitley City is a census-designated place located in McCreary County, Kentucky. ... The Trail of Tears refers to the forced removal of the Cherokee American Indian tribe by the U.S. federal government, which resulted in the deaths of thousands of Cherokee Indians. ... Black Mountain is the highest point in the state of Kentucky, USA, with a summit elevation of 4145 feet (1263 meters) above mean sea level. ... Location in the state of Kentucky Formed 1819 Seat Harlan Area  - Total  - Water 1,212 km² (468 mi²) 2 km² (1 mi²) 0. ... Letcher County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Bad Branch Falls State Nature Preserve is a 2,639-acre nature preserve in Letcher County, Kentucky. ... Letcher County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... External links Jefferson Memorial Forest official site Categories: US geography stubs | Forests | Louisville, Kentucky ... “Louisville” redirects here. ... The Knobs is a narrow, horseshoe shaped region consisting of many small, zig zag shaped ridges that separates the Bluegrass region and Pennyroyal region of Kentucky. ... Green River Lake State Park is a park located near Campbellsville, Kentucky in Taylor County. ... Taylor County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Map of Lake Cumberland Aerial composite of Lake Cumberland Lake Cumberland is an artificial lake in South-Central Kentucky created by the construction of the Wolf Creek Dam in 1950 at a cost of $80. ... South Central Kentucky South Central Kentucky is a cultural region of 22 Kentucky counties located roughly between I-65 in the Bowling Green area and I-75 around the London area, but within three counties of the Tennessee border and south of the Golden Triangle (the areas around Louisville, Lexington...

History

Daniel Boone Escorting Settlers through the Cumberland Gap (George Caleb Bingham, oil on canvas, 1851–52).
Daniel Boone Escorting Settlers through the Cumberland Gap (George Caleb Bingham, oil on canvas, 1851–52).
Both Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis were born in Kentucky.
Both Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis were born in Kentucky.
Main article: History of Kentucky
See also: Kentucky in the American Civil War, Kentucky Historical Society, and Hatfield-McCoy feud

Although inhabited by Native Americans in prehistoric times, when explorers and settlers began entering Kentucky in the mid-1700s, there were no major Native American settlements in the region.[29] Instead, the country was used as hunting grounds by Shawnees from the north and Cherokees from the south. Much of what is now Kentucky was purchased from Native Americans in the treaties of Fort Stanwix (1768) and Sycamore Shoals (1775).[30] Thereafter, Kentucky grew rapidly as the first settlements west of the Appalachian Mountains were founded, with settlers (primarily from Virginia, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania) entering the region via the Cumberland Gap and the Ohio River. The most famous of these early explorers and settlers was Daniel Boone, traditionally considered one of the founders of the state.[31] Shawnees north of the Ohio River, however, were unhappy about the settlement of Kentucky, and allied themselves with the British in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783).[32] Kentucky was a battleground during the war; the Battle of Blue Licks, one of the last major battles of the Revolution, was fought in Kentucky.[33] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (826x605, 52 KB) Summary Daniel Boone Escorting Settlers through the Cumberland Gap, George Caleb Bingham, oil on canvas, 1851–52 Licensing The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (826x605, 52 KB) Summary Daniel Boone Escorting Settlers through the Cumberland Gap, George Caleb Bingham, oil on canvas, 1851–52 Licensing The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and... This 1820 oil painting by Chester Harding is the only portrait of Daniel Boone made from life. ... Daniel Boone Escorting Settlers through the Cumberland Gap (George Caleb Bingham, oil on canvas, 1851–52) Cumberland Gap (el. ... Fur traders on Missouri River, c. ... Image File history File links Lincoln_and_Davis_Statue. ... Image File history File links Lincoln_and_Davis_Statue. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jefferson Davis (disambiguation). ... The history of Kentucky spans hundreds of years, and has been influenced by the states diverse geography and central location. ... Kentucky was a border state of key importance in the American Civil War. ... The Kentucky Historical Society is an agency of the Kentucky Commerce Cabinet dedicated to the preservation of Kentucky history. ... The Hatfield clan in 1897. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... For other uses, see Cherokee (disambiguation). ... Two different treaties between Native Americans and European-Americans were signed at Fort Stanwix, which was located near present-day Rome, New York. ... Transylvania was a short-lived colony primarily in what is now the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Appalachians in North Carolina The Appalachian Mountains (French: les Appalaches) are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Daniel Boone Escorting Settlers through the Cumberland Gap (George Caleb Bingham, oil on canvas, 1851–52) Cumberland Gap (el. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... This 1820 oil painting by Chester Harding is the only portrait of Daniel Boone made from life. ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Combatants Kentucky militia (United States) Great Britain, American Indians Commanders John Todd † Stephen Trigg † Daniel Boone William Caldwell Alexander McKee Simon Girty Strength 182 militiamen 50 rangers 300 natives Casualties 72 killed, 11 captured about 11 killed The Battle of Blue Licks was fought on August 19, 1782, and was...


After the American Revolution, the counties of Virginia beyond the Appalachian Mountains became known as Kentucky County.[34] Eventually, the residents of Kentucky County petitioned for a separation from Virginia. Ten constitutional conventions were held in the Constitution Square Courthouse in Danville between 1784 and 1792. In 1790, Kentucky's delegates accepted Virginia's terms of separation, and a state constitution was drafted at the final convention in April 1792. On June 1, 1792, Kentucky became the fifteenth state to be admitted to the union and Isaac Shelby, a military veteran from Virginia, was elected the first Governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.[35] This article is about the U.S. state. ... Appalachians in North Carolina The Appalachian Mountains (French: les Appalaches) are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ... Kentucky County was formed in Virginia in 1776. ... Danville is a city in Boyle County, Kentucky, United States. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Isaac Shelby (December 11, 1750 – July 18, 1826) was an American soldier and the first and fifth Governor of Kentucky, serving from 1792 to 1796 and from 1812 to 1816. ...


Kentucky was a border state during the American Civil War.[36] Although frequently described as never having seceded, a group of Kentucky soldiers stationed at Russellville did pass an Ordinance of Secession under the moniker "Convention of the People of Kentucky" on November 20, 1861,[37] establishing a Confederate government for the state with its capital in Bowling Green.[38] Though Kentucky was represented by the central star on the Confederate battle flag.[39] the legitimacy of the Russellville Convention may well be questioned. Only a year earlier, philosopher Karl Marx wrote in a letter to Friedrich Engels that the result of a vote deciding how Kentucky would be represented at a convention of the border states was "100,000 for the Union ticket, only a few thousand for secession."[40] Kentucky officially remained "neutral" throughout the war due to Union sympathies of many of the Commonwealth's citizens. Even today, however, Confederate Memorial Day is observed by some in Kentucky on Jefferson Davis' birthday, June 3.[41] In this map:  Union states  Union territories  Kansas, which entered the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  Union border states that permitted slavery  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories The term border states refers to the five slave states of Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Russellville is a city located in Logan County, Kentucky. ... The Ordinance of Secession was the document drafted and ratified in 1860 and 1861 by the seceding states that officially declared their secession from the United States of America. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... Location of Bowling Green within Warren County in Kentucky. ... The Confederate States of America used several flags during its existence from 1861 to 1865. ... The Russellville Convention was a sovereignty convention held by secessionists on November 18 through 20, 1861 in Russellville, Kentucky after the state government formally declared neutrality in the American Civil War. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Friedrich Engels (November 28, 1820 – August 5, 1895) was a German social scientist and philosopher, who developed communist theory alongside his better-known collaborator, Karl Marx, co-authoring The Communist Manifesto (1848). ... In this map:  Union states  Union territories  Kansas, which entered the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  Union border states that permitted slavery  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories The term border states refers to the five slave states of Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri... Confederate Memorial Day, also known as Confederate Decoration Day (Tennessee) and Confederate Heroes Day (Texas), is a holiday in parts of the United States. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Designed by the Washington Monument's architect Robert Mills in 1845, the U.S. Marine Hospital in Louisville is considered the best remaining antebellum hospital in the United States
Designed by the Washington Monument's architect Robert Mills in 1845, the U.S. Marine Hospital in Louisville is considered the best remaining antebellum hospital in the United States

On January 30, 1900, Governor William Goebel was mortally wounded by an assailant while in the process of contesting the election of 1899, initially assumed to be won by William S. Taylor. For several months, J. C. W. Beckham, Goebel's running mate, and Taylor fought over who was the real governor until the Supreme Court of the United States decided in May that Beckham was the rightful governor. Taylor fled to Indiana and was later indicted as a co-conspirator in Goebel's assassination. Goebel remains the only governor of a U.S. state to have been assassinated while in office.[42] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 482 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by uploader, all rights released I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 482 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by uploader, all rights released I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Washington Monument at dusk For other Washington Monuments, see Washington Monuments (world). ... Robert Mills (1781 - 1855) is sometimes called the first native born American to become a professional architect; Charles Bulfinch perhaps has a clearer claim to this honor. ... The United States Marine Hospital in Louisville, Kentucky, USA, is considered the best remaining antebellum hospital in the United States. ... Antebellum is a Latin word meaning before war(ante means before and bellum is war). ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... William J. Goebel (January 4, 1856 – February 3, 1900)[3] was a controversial American politician who served as Governor of Kentucky for a few days in 1900 before being assassinated. ... William Sylvester Taylor (1853-1928) was the Governor of Kentucky from December 1899 until January 1900. ... John Crepps Wickliffe Beckham (August 5, 1869 - January 9, 1940) served as both Governor of Kentucky and in the United States Senate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ...


Law and government

Government

Kentucky is one of only five states that elects its state officials in odd numbered years (The others are Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Virginia). Kentucky holds elections for these offices every 4 years in the years preceding Presidential election years. Thus, the last year when Kentucky elected a Governor was 2003; the next gubernatorial election will occur in 2007, with future gubernatorial elections to take place in 2011, 2015, 2019, etc. This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... “NJ” redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


State government

Kentucky's legislative branch consists of a bicameral body known as the Kentucky General Assembly. The Senate is considered the upper house. It has 38 members, and is led by the President of the Senate, currently Republican David L. Williams. The House of Representatives has 100 members, and is led by the Speaker of the House, currently Democrat Jody Richards. Image File history File linksMetadata KY_State_Capitol. ... Image File history File linksMetadata KY_State_Capitol. ... The new, permenant Kentucky State Capitol building The Kentucky State Capitol is located in Frankfort and is the seat of the three branches (executive, legislative, judicial) of the state government of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Frankfort is the capital of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, a state of the United States of America. ... Image:WashingtonDC Capitol USA2. ... The Kentucky State Capitol Building in Frankfort, KY The Kentucky General Assembly, also called the Kentucky Legislature, is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... The Kentucky Senate is the upper house of the Kentucky General Assembly. ... For the demesne in The Keys to the Kingdom series, see The House An upper house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the lower house. ... The President of the Senate is the title often given to the presiding officer, or chairman, of a senate. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... David L. Williams (May 28, 1953 - ) is President of the Kentucky Senate. ... Kentucky House of Representatives is the lower house of the Kentucky General Assembly, the state legislature of Kentucky. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Jody Richards (born February 20, 1938) is a politician from Bowling Green, Kentucky. ...


The executive branch is headed by the governor and lieutenant governor. Under the current Kentucky Constitution, the lieutenant governor assumes the duties of the governor only if the governor is incapacitated. (Prior to 1992, the lieutenant governor assumed power any time the governor was out of the state.) The governor and lieutenant governor usually run on a single ticket (also per a 1992 constitutional amendment), and are elected to four-year terms. Currently, the governor and lieutenant governor are Republicans Ernie Fletcher and Steve Pence, respectively. This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Kentucky ... The office of Lieutentant Governor of Kentucky has existed under the last three of Kentuckys four constitutions, beginning in 1797. ... The Constitution of Kentucky is the document that governs the Commonwealth of Kentucky, United States. ... The office of Lieutentant Governor of Kentucky has existed under the last three of Kentuckys four constitutions, beginning in 1797. ... The office of Lieutentant Governor of Kentucky has existed under the last three of Kentuckys four constitutions, beginning in 1797. ... The office of Lieutentant Governor of Kentucky has existed under the last three of Kentuckys four constitutions, beginning in 1797. ... The office of Lieutentant Governor of Kentucky has existed under the last three of Kentuckys four constitutions, beginning in 1797. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Ernest Lee Fletcher (born November 12, 1952) has served as governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky since December 9, 2003. ... Stephen B. Pence (born in Louisville, Kentucky on December 22, 1953) is Lieutenant Governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. ...


The judicial branch of Kentucky is made up of courts of limited jurisdiction called District Courts; courts of general jurisdiction called Circuit Courts; an intermediate appellate court, the Kentucky Court of Appeals; and a court of last resort, the Kentucky Supreme Court. Unlike federal judges, who are usually appointed, justices serving on Kentucky state courts are chosen by the state's populace in non-partisan elections. The Kentucky Court of Appeals is the lower of Kentuckys two appellate courts, under the Kentucky Supreme Court. ... The Kentucky Supreme Court was created by a 1975 constitutional amendment. ...


The state's chief prosecutor, law enforcement officer, and law officer is the attorney general. The attorney general is elected to a four-year term and may serve two consecutive terms under the current Kentucky Constitution. Currently, the Kentucky attorney general is Democrat Greg Stumbo. Attorney General of Kentucky is the chief law officer in the state of Kentucky. ... Attorney General of Kentucky is the chief law officer in the state of Kentucky. ... The Constitution of Kentucky is the document that governs the Commonwealth of Kentucky, United States. ... Attorney General of Kentucky is the chief law officer in the state of Kentucky. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Gregory D. Greg Stumbo is the Democratic Attorney General of the Commonwealth of Kentucky (2003 – present). ...


Federal representation

A map showing Kentucky's six congressional districts
A map showing Kentucky's six congressional districts

Kentucky's two Senators are Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and Jim Bunning, both Republicans. The state is divided into six Congressional Districts, represented by Republicans Ed Whitfield (1st), Ron Lewis (2nd), Geoff Davis (4th), and Hal Rogers (5th), and Democrats John Yarmuth (3rd) and Ben Chandler (6th). This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The state of Kentucky is currently divided into six Congressional districts. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Senate Majority and Minority Leaders (also called Senate Floor Leaders) are two... Addison Mitchell Mitch McConnell, Jr. ... James Paul David Jim Bunning (born October 23, 1931 in Southgate, Kentucky) is an American politician who was a Hall of Fame pitcher in Major League Baseball from 1955 to 1971. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... The state of Kentucky is currently divided into six Congressional districts. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Wayne Edward Ed Whitfield (born May 25, 1943) has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1995, representing the 1st District of Kentucky, which includes much of the western part of the state, including Fort Campbell. ... Map United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 1 is a district of the United States Congress in Western Kentucky. ... Ron Lewis (born September 14, 1946), an American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1994, representing the 2nd Congressional District of Kentucky. ... Map United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 2 is a district of the United States Congress in Western-central Kentucky. ... Geoffrey Geoff Davis (born October 26, 1958) is an American politician from the state of Kentucky, who was elected to the United States House of Representatives as a Republican from Kentuckys 4th congressional district with 54% of the vote on November 2, 2004. ... Map United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 4 is a district of the United States Congress in northern Kentucky. ... Harold Dallas Hal Rogers (born December 31, 1937), American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1981, representing the 5th District of Kentucky. ... Map United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 5 is a district of the United States Congress in eastern Kentucky. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... John Yarmuth (born November 4, 1947) is the congressman for Kentuckys 3rd congressional district. ... Map United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 3 is a district of the United States Congress centered in the city of Louisville, Kentucky, and encompassing nearly the whole of Jefferson County, Kentucky. ... Rep. ... Map United States House of Representatives, Kentucky District 6 is a district of the United States Congress in central Kentucky. ...


Judicially, Kentucky is split into two Federal court districts: the Kentucky Eastern District and the Kentucky Western District. Appeals are heard in the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals based in Cincinnati, Ohio. The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky is the Federal district court whose jurisdiction comprises the following Kentucky counties: Anderson, Bath, Bell, Boone, Bourbon, Boyd, Boyle, Bracken, Breathitt, Campbell, Carroll, Carter, Clark, Clay, Elliott, Estill, Fayette, Fleming, Floyd, Franklin, Gallatin, Garrard, Grant, Greenup, Harlan, Harrison, Henry... The United States District Court for the Western District of Kentucky is the federal district court whose jurisdiction includes the following Kentucky counties: Adair, Allen, Ballard, Barren, Breckinridge, Bullitt, Butler, Caldwell, Calloway, Carlisle, Casey, Christian, Clinton, Crittenden, Cumberland, Daviess, Edmonson, Fulton, Graves, Grayson, Green, Hancock, Hardin, Hart, Henderson, Hickman, Hopkins... The United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts: Western and Eastern Districts of Kentucky Western and Eastern Districts of Michigan Northern and Southern Districts of Ohio Western, Middle, and Eastern Districts of Tennessee... “Cincinnati” redirects here. ...


Political leanings

Where politics are concerned, Kentucky historically has been very hard fought and leaned slightly toward the Democratic Party, although it was never included among the "Solid South." In 2006, 57.05% of the state's voters were officially registered as Democrats, 36.55% registered Republican, and 6.39% registered with some other political party.[43] Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The phrase Solid South describes the electoral support of the Southern United States for Democratic Party candidates for almost a century after the Reconstruction era, 1876-1964. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... “Political Parties” redirects here. ...


Kentucky has voted Republican in five of the last seven presidential elections but has supported the Democratic candidates of the South. The Commonwealth supported Democrats Jimmy Carter in 1976, and Bill Clinton in 1992 and 1996, but Republican George W. Bush in 2000 and 2004. Bush won the state's 8 electoral votes overwhelmingly in 2004 by a margin of 20 percentage points and 59.6% of the vote.[44] Historic Southern United States. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Law

Kentucky's body of laws, known as the Kentucky Revised Statutes (KRS), were enacted in 1942 to better organize and clarify the whole of Kentucky law.[45] The statutes are enforced by local police, sheriffs, and sheriff's deputies. Unless they have completed a police academy elsewhere, these officers are required to complete training at the Kentucky Department of Criminal Justice Training Center on the campus of Eastern Kentucky University.[46] Additionally, in 1948, the Kentucky General Assembly established the Kentucky State Police, making it the 38th state to create a force whose jurisdiction extends throughout the given state.[47] Kentucky Revised Statutes (KRS) is the name given to the body of laws which govern the Commonwealth of Kentucky, United States. ... Look up Sheriff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Police Academy is a long-running series of comedy films, the first six of which were made in the 1980s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Kentucky State Capitol Building in Frankfort, KY The Kentucky General Assembly, also called the Kentucky Legislature, is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... The Kentucky State Police is the full service state police agency for the Commonwealth of Kentucky. ...


Kentucky is one of 38 states in the United States that sanctions the death penalty for certain crimes. Criminals convicted after March 31, 1998 are always executed by lethal injection; those convicted before this date may opt for the electric chair.[48] Only two people have been executed in Kentucky since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstituted the practice in 1976. The most notable execution in Kentucky, however, was that of Rainey Bethea on August 14, 1936. Bethea was publicly hanged in Owensboro for the rape and murder of Lischia Edwards.[49] Irregularities with the execution led to this becoming the last public execution in the United States.[50] Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the execution and euthanasia method. ... The electric chair is an execution method in which the person being put to death is strapped to a chair and electrocuted through electrodes placed on the body. ... Since the reinstation of capital punishment in the United States in 1976, two people have been executed in Kentucky. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... Rainey Bethea (October 16, 1909 – 14 August 1936) was the last person to be publicly executed in the United States. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Owensboro is the third largest city in Kentucky and the county seat of Daviess County. ...


Kentucky has been on the front lines of the debate over displaying the Ten Commandments on public property. In the 2005 case of McCreary County v. ACLU of Kentucky, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the decision of the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals that a display of the Ten Commandments in the Whitley City courthouse of McCreary County was unconstitutional.[51] Later that year, Judge Richard Fred Suhrheinrich, writing for the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in the case of ACLU of Kentucky v. Mercer County, wrote that a display including the Mayflower Compact, the Declaration of Independence, the Ten Commandments, the Magna Carta, The Star-Spangled Banner, and the national motto could be erected in the Mercer County courthouse.[52] This article is about a list of ten religious commandments. ... McCreary County v. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... The United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts: Western and Eastern Districts of Kentucky Western and Eastern Districts of Michigan Northern and Southern Districts of Ohio Western, Middle, and Eastern Districts of Tennessee... This article is about a list of ten religious commandments. ... Whitley City is a census-designated place located in McCreary County, Kentucky. ... McCreary County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... The Honorable Richard Fred Suhrheinrich (born 1936) is a judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit serving in Lansing, Michigan. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts: Western and Eastern Districts of Kentucky Western and Eastern Districts of Michigan Northern and Southern Districts of Ohio Western, Middle, and Eastern Districts of Tennessee... The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is a major American non-profit organization whose stated mission is to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to every person in this country by the Constitution and laws of the United States.[1] It works through litigation, legislation, and community... Mercer County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... This bas-relief depicting the signing of the Mayflower Compact is on Bradford Street in Provincetown directly below the Pilgrim Monument. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies were independent of Great Britain. ... This article is about a list of ten religious commandments. ... Magna Carta Magna Carta (Latin for Great Charter, literally Great Paper), also called Magna Carta Libertatum (Great Charter of Freedoms), is an English charter originally issued in 1215. ... The Star-Spangled Banner is the national anthem of the United States, with lyrics written in 1814 by Francis Scott Key. ... For other uses, see In God We Trust (disambiguation). ... Mercer County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ...


Demographics

Kentucky Population Density Map.
Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1790 73,677
1800 220,955 199.9%
1810 406,511 84.0%
1820 564,317 38.8%
1830 687,917 21.9%
1840 779,828 13.4%
1850 982,405 26.0%
1860 1,155,684 17.6%
1870 1,321,011 14.3%
1880 1,648,690 24.8%
1890 1,858,635 12.7%
1900 2,147,174 15.5%
1910 2,289,905 6.6%
1920 2,416,630 5.5%
1930 2,614,589 8.2%
1940 2,845,627 8.8%
1950 2,944,806 3.5%
1960 3,038,156 3.2%
1970 3,218,706 5.9%
1980 3,660,777 13.7%
1990 3,685,296 0.7%
2000 4,041,769 9.7%
Est. 2006 4,206,074 4.1%
http://ukcc.uky.edu/~census/21109.txt

As of July 1, 2006, Kentucky has an estimated population of 4,206,074, which is an increase of 33,466, or 0.8%, from the prior year and an increase of 164,586, or 4.1%, since the year 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 77,156 people (that is 287,222 births minus 210,066 deaths) and an increase due to net migration of 59,604 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 27,435 people, and migration within the country produced a net increase of 32,169 people. As of 2004, Kentucky's population included about 95,000 foreign-born (2.3%). Image File history File links Kentucky_population_map. ... Image File history File links Kentucky_population_map. ... The United States Census of 1790 was the first Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1800 was the second Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1810 was the third Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1820 was the fourth Census conducted in the United States. ... The United States Census of 1830 was the fifth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Sixth Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 — an increase of 32. ... The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twetieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,542,199, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Since 1900, rural Kentucky counties have experienced a net loss of over 1 million people, while urban areas have experienced a slight net gain in population.[53]


The center of population of Kentucky is located in Washington County, in the city of Willisburg.[54] Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... Washington County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Willisburg is a city located in Washington County, Kentucky. ...


Race and ancestry

The five largest ancestries in the commonwealth are: American (20.9%) (Mostly of British ancestry), German (12.7%), Irish (10.5%) (Most actually of Scots-Irish descent), English (9.7%), African American (7.8%). Only eight Kentucky counties have a majority ancestry listed that is not 'American', those being Christian and Fulton, which where African American is the largest reported ancestry, and the state's most urban counties of Jefferson, Oldham, Fayette, Boone, Kenton, and Campbell, where German is the largest reported ancestry.[55] Scots-Irish (formerly Scotch-Irish) is a term used to describe inhabitants of the USA and Canada of Scots-Irish (particularly Ulster-Scots) descent, who formed distinctive communities and had distinctive social characteristics. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


African Americans, who made up one-fourth of Kentucky's population prior to the Civil War, declined in number as many moved to the industrial North in the Great Migration. Today 44.2% of Kentucky's African American population is in Jefferson County and 52% are in the Louisville Metro Area. Other areas with high concentrations include Christian County and the city of Paducah, the Bluegrass, and the city of Lexington. Many mining communities in far Southeastern Kentucky also have populations between five and 10 percent African American. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The states in blue had the ten largest net gains of African-Americans during the Great Migration, while the states in red had the ten largest net losses[1]. The Great Migration was the movement of over 1 million[1] African Americans out of the rural Southern United States from... Christian County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Paducah is a city in McCracken County, Kentucky at the confluence of the Tennessee River and the Ohio River. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ...

Demographics of Kentucky (csv)
By race White Black AIAN Asian NHPI
AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native   -   NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander
2000 (total population) 91.53% 7.76% 0.61% 0.92% 0.08%
2000 (Hispanic only) 1.35% 0.10% 0.04% 0.02% 0.01%
2005 (total population) 91.27% 7.98% 0.58% 1.10% 0.08%
2005 (Hispanic only) 1.80% 0.12% 0.04% 0.03% 0.01%
Growth 2000-2005 (total population) 2.97% 6.16% -2.21% 23.46% 9.78%
Growth 2000-2005 (non-Hispanic only) 2.44% 5.94% -3.28% 23.07% 7.98%
Growth 2000-2005 (Hispanic only) 37.97% 22.34% 13.51% 38.48% 19.80%

It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ...

Religion

Lexington Theological Seminary (then College of the Bible), 1904.

In 2000, The Association of Religion Data Archives reported[56] that of Kentucky's 4,041,769 residents: Image File history File links CollegeoftheBible-LexKY.JPG‎ College of the Bible (now Lexington Theological Seminary), Photo from: Brown, John T., Churches of Christ, Louisville, KY: John P. Morton and Company, 1904 (also see Text and Photos hosted at Memorial Univeristy). ... Image File history File links CollegeoftheBible-LexKY.JPG‎ College of the Bible (now Lexington Theological Seminary), Photo from: Brown, John T., Churches of Christ, Louisville, KY: John P. Morton and Company, 1904 (also see Text and Photos hosted at Memorial Univeristy). ...

Today Kentucky is home to several seminaries. Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville is the principal seminary for the Southern Baptist Convention. Louisville is also the home of the Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary. Lexington has two seminaries, Lexington Theological Seminary, and the Baptist Seminary of Kentucky. Asbury Theological Seminary is located in nearby Wilmore. In addition to seminaries, there are several colleges affiliated with denominations. Transylvania in Lexington is affiliated with the Disciples of Christ. In Louisville, Bellarmine and Spalding are affiliated with the Roman Catholic Church. Louisville is also home to the headquarters of the Presbyterian Church (USA) and their printing press. Louisville is also home to a sizable Jewish population. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The word evangelicalism often refers to... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based Christian denomination consisting of numerous agencies and agencies including six seminaries, two mission boards and a variety of other organizations such as: the Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist Church, which can act for the SBC ad interim between annual... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The Independent... Alternate meanings: see Church of Christ (disambiguation). ... “Catholic Church” redirects here. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      In the United States, the mainline... The United Methodist Church is the largest Methodist denomination. ... The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), often abbreviated as the Disciples of Christ or Christian Church, is a denomination of Christian Restorationism that grew out of the Restoration Movement founded by Thomas Campbell and Alexander Campbell of Pennsylvania and West Virginia (then Virginia) and Barton W. Stone of Kentucky. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “Louisville” redirects here. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based Christian denomination consisting of numerous agencies and agencies including six seminaries, two mission boards and a variety of other organizations such as: the Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist Church, which can act for the SBC ad interim between annual... one of ten seminaries in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), is distinguished by its nationally recognized field education and marriage and family therapy programs, its focus on nurturing faith development within congregations, communities and families, the scholarship and church service among its faculty, and a commitment to training women... Lexington Theological Seminary Lexington Theological Seminary is an accredited graduate theological institution located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Asbury Theological Seminary was founded in Wilmore, Kentucky in 1923 by its first president, Henry Clay Morrison. ... Wilmore is a city located in Jessamine County, Kentucky. ... Transylvania University is a private liberal arts college related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) located in Lexington, Kentucky, with approximately 1,100 students. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), often abbreviated as the Disciples of Christ or Christian Church, is a denomination of Christian Restorationism that grew out of the Restoration Movement founded by Thomas Campbell and Alexander Campbell of Pennsylvania and West Virginia (then Virginia) and Barton W. Stone of Kentucky. ... Bellarmine University is a Roman Catholic liberal arts university located in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Spalding University is a private, non-profit career university in Louisville, Kentucky. ... “Catholic Church” redirects here. ... Emblem of the PC(USA) The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or PC(USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ...


Religious movements

Religious movements were important in the early history of Kentucky. Perhaps the most famous event was the interdenominational revival in August 1801 at the Cane Ridge Meeting house in Bourbon County. As part of what is now known as the "Western Revival", thousands began meeting around a Presbyterian communion service on August 6, 1801, and ended six days later on August 12, 1801 when both humans and horses ran out of food.[57] Some claim that the Cane Ridge revival was propagated from an earlier camp meeting at Red River Meeting House in Logan County.[58] Cane Ridge, Kentucky, was the site, in 1801, of a large camp meeting which drew thousands of people and had a lasting influence as one of the landmark events of the Second Great Awakening. ... Bourbon County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Presbyterianism is a tradition shared by a number of Christian denominations which is most prevalent within the Reformed branch of Protestant Western Christianity. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Cane Ridge, Kentucky, was the site, in 1801, of a large camp meeting which drew thousands of people and had a lasting influence as one of the landmark events of the Second Great Awakening. ... A watercolor painting of a camp meeting circa 1839 (New Bedford Whaling Museum). ... The Red River Meeting House was the site of the first religious camp meeting in the United States and the start of the Second Great Awakening in June 1800. ... Logan County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ...


Economy

The best selling car in the United States, the Toyota Camry, is manufactured in Georgetown, Kentucky.
The best selling car in the United States, the Toyota Camry, is manufactured in Georgetown, Kentucky.
The best selling truck in the United States, the Ford F-Series, is manufactured in Louisville, Kentucky.
The best selling truck in the United States, the Ford F-Series, is manufactured in Louisville, Kentucky.

The total gross state product for 2005 was US$140.4 billion, 27th in the nation. Its per-capita personal income was US$28,513, 43rd in the nation.[59] Kentucky's agricultural outputs are horses, cattle, tobacco, dairy products, hogs, soybeans, and corn. Its industrial outputs are transportation equipment, chemical products, electric equipment, machinery, food processing, tobacco products, coal, and tourism. The Eastern Kentucky Coal Fields are recognized as being among the most productive in the nation. Download high resolution version (1106x1105, 298 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1176x597, 90 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Toyota Camry Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1176x597, 90 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Toyota Camry Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... The Toyota Camry is a mid-size sedan assembled by Toyota in Georgetown, Kentucky; Altona, Victoria, Guangzhou, China and the original factory in Toyota City, Japan. ... Georgetown is a city in Scott County, Kentucky, United States. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 520 pixelsFull resolution (2136 × 1388 pixel, file size: 234 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 520 pixelsFull resolution (2136 × 1388 pixel, file size: 234 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The F-Series is a series of full-size pickup trucks from Ford Motor Company sold for over 5 decades. ... “Louisville” redirects here. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... Dairy products are generally defined as foodstuffs produced from milk. ... Hog is a domestic or feral adult swine. ... Binomial name (L.) Merr. ... This article is about the maize plant. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... “Tourist” redirects here. ... The Eastern Mountain Coal Fields is a region in Kentucky. ...


Kentucky ranks 4th among U.S. states in the number of automobiles and trucks assembled.[60] The Chevrolet Corvette, Cadillac XLR, Ford Explorer, Ford Super Duty trucks, Toyota Camry, Toyota Avalon, and Toyota Solara are assembled in Kentucky. The Chevrolet Corvette is a sports car that has been manufactured by Chevrolet since 1953. ... XLR shown with the top up The XLR is a luxury roadster sold by the Cadillac division of General Motors and is assembled in Bowling Green, Kentucky. ... The Ford Explorer is a mid-size sport utility vehicle sold in North America and built by the Ford Motor Company since 1990. ... The Toyota Camry is a mid-size sedan assembled by Toyota in Georgetown, Kentucky; Altona, Victoria, Guangzhou, China and the original factory in Toyota City, Japan. ... The Toyota Avalon is a full-size car produced by Toyota in the United States. ... Late-model Toyota Camry (left) and Ford Excursion (right) The Toyota Camry is a large family car manufactured by Toyota in Georgetown, Kentucky, USA; Australia; and Japan. ...


Unlike many bordering states which developed a widespread industrial economy, much of rural Kentucky has maintained a farm based economy, with cattle, corn, and soybeans being the main crops. The area immediately outside Lexington is also the leading region for breeding Thoroughbred racing horses, due to the high calcium content in the soil. Despite being the 14th smallest state in terms of land area, Kentucky still ranks 5th in the total number of farms, with more farms per square mile than any other U.S. state.[61] The average farm size in Kentucky is only 153 acres (0.6 km²).[62] For the processor with the same codename , see Athlon. ... For other uses, see Calcium (disambiguation). ...


Kentucky ranks 5th nationally in goat farming, 8th in beef cattle production[63] , and 14th in corn production.[64]


State taxes

There are 5 income tax brackets, ranging from 2% to 6% of personal income.[65] The sales tax rate in Kentucky is 6%.[66] Kentucky has a broadly based classified property tax system. All classes of property, unless exempted by the Constitution, are taxed by the state, although at widely varying rates.[67] Many of these classes are exempted from taxation by local government. Of the classes that are subject to local taxation, three have special rates set by the General Assembly, one by the Kentucky Supreme Court and the remaining classes are subject to the full local rate, which includes the tax rate set by the local taxing bodies plus all voted levies. Real property is assessed on 100% of the fair market value and property taxes are due by December 31. Once the primary source of state and local government revenue, property taxes now account for only about 6% of the Kentucky's annual General Fund revenues.[68] Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... Property tax, millage tax is an ad valorem tax that an owner of real estate or other property pays on the value of the property being taxed. ... The Kentucky State Capitol Building in Frankfort, KY The Kentucky General Assembly, also called the Kentucky Legislature, is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... The Kentucky Supreme Court was created by a 1975 constitutional amendment. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Until January 1, 2006, Kentucky imposed a tax on intangible personal property held by a taxpayer on January 1 of each year. The Kentucky intangible tax was repealed under House Bill 272.[69] Intangible property consisted of any property or investment which represents evidence of value or the right to value. Some types of intangible property included: bonds, notes, retail repurchase agreements, accounts receivable, trusts, enforceable contracts sale of real estate (land contracts), money in hand, money in safe deposit boxes, annuities, interests in estates, loans to stockholders, and commercial paper. is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


"Unbridled Spirit"

To boost Kentucky’s image, give it a consistent reach, and help Kentucky stand out from the crowd" the Fletcher administration launched a comprehensive branding campaign with the hope of making its $12 - $14 million advertising budget more effective. The "Unbridled Spirit" brand was the result of a $500,000 contract with New West, a Kentucky-based public relations, advertising and marketing firm to develop a viable brand and tag line. The administration has been aggressively marketing the brand in both the public and private sectors. The "Welcome to Kentucky" signs at border areas have Unbridled Spirit's symbol on them. For other uses, see Brand (disambiguation). ...


The previous campaign was neither a failure nor a success. Kentucky's "It's that friendly" slogan hoped to draw more people into the state based of the idea of southern hospitality. Though most Kentuckians liked the slogan, as it embraced southern values, it was also not an image that encouraged tourism as much as initially hoped for. Therefore it was necessary to reconfigure a slogan to embrace Kentucky as a whole while also encouraging more people to visit the Bluegrass.[70]


Transportation

Roads

Kentucky Route 80 is the longest route in Kentucky, pictured here west of Somerset.
Kentucky Route 80 is the longest route in Kentucky, pictured here west of Somerset.
See also: List of Kentucky State Highways

Kentucky is served by five major interstate highways (I-75, I-71, I-64, I-65, I-24), nine parkways, and three bypasses and spurs. The parkways were originally toll roads, but on November 22, 2006, Governor Ernie Fletcher ended the toll charges on the William H. Natcher Parkway and the Audubon Parkway, the last two parkways in Kentucky to charge tolls for access.[71] The related toll booths have been demolished.[72] Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Cities/towns: Bowling Green Columbia Columbus Edmonton Glasgow Hopkinsville London Mayfield Murray Russell Springs Russellville Somerset Prev Next ← KY 79 KY 81 → Kentucky Route 80, also known as KY 80, originates on the states western border at Columbus, Kentucky in Hickman County, and stretches across the southern portion of... Somerset is a city located in Pulaski County, Kentucky. ... // Summary The Kentucky Revised Statue 177. ... Interstate Highways in the 48 contiguous states. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... INTERSTATE JUNCTIONS JUNCTION EXIT # I-64 KY 1 I-75 KY 77 OH 1 I-70 OH 106 OH 107 I-76 OH 209 I-80 OH 233 I-90 OH 247 Legend BROWSE STATE HWYS Prev Next {{{browse}}} Interstate 71 is an Interstate Highway in the Southeastern and Midwestern... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 64 Interstate 64 (abbreviated I-64) is an Interstate Highway in the eastern United States. ... Interstate 65 (abbreviated I-65) is an Interstate Highway in the United States. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 24 Interstate 24 (abbreviated I-24) is an interstate highway in the eastern United States. ... Harden Parkway in Salinas, CA. For other uses, see Parkway (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ernest Lee Fletcher (born November 12, 1952) has served as governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky since December 9, 2003. ... The Wiliam H. Natcher Parkway, formerly the Green River Parkway, is a limited-access toll road from Bowling Green, Kentucky to Owensboro, Kentucky. ... Shield which marks The Audubon Parkway The Audubon Parkway is a four-lane controlled-access toll road connecting the cities of Henderson and Owensboro, Kentucky. ... A toll road, turnpike or tollpike is a road on which a toll authority collects a fee for use. ...


Ending the tolls some seven months ahead of schedule was generally agreed to have been a positive economic development for transportation in Kentucky. In June 2007, a law went into effect raising the speed limit on rural portions of Kentucky Interstates from 65 to 70 miles per hour, with signs expected to be changed by mid-July.[73] Miles per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of international miles covered per hour. ...


Rails

High Bridge over the Kentucky River was the tallest rail bridge in the world when it was completed in 1877.
High Bridge over the Kentucky River was the tallest rail bridge in the world when it was completed in 1877.
See also: List of Kentucky railroads

Amtrak, the national passenger rail system, provides service to Ashland, South Portsmouth and Fulton, Kentucky. The Cardinal, Trains 50 and 51, is the line that offers Amtrak service to Ashland and South Portsmouth. Amtrak Trains 58 and 59, the City of New Orleans serves Fulton. The Northern Kentucky area, is served by the Cardinal at the Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal. The Museum Center is just across the Ohio River in Cincinnati. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 481 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Picture of High Bridge. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 481 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Picture of High Bridge. ... High Bridge High Bridge is a currently used railroad bridge over the large palisades of the Kentucky River between Jessamine County, Kentucky and Mercer County, Kentucky. ... The Kentucky River is a tributary of the Ohio River, 259 mi (417 km) long, in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Current common carriers Amtrak (AMTK) Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway (BNSF) CSX Transportation (CSXT) Fredonia Valley railroad (FVRR) Kentucky and Tennessee Railway (KT) KWT Railroad (KWT) Louisville and Indiana Railroad (LIRC) Norfolk Southern (NS) Paducah and Louisville Railway (PAL) R. J. Corman Railroad Central Kentucky Lines (RJCC) Soo Line (SOO... Other information Passengers (2006) 2,880 21% Code AKY The Ashland (Amtrak station) is in a former Chesapeake & Ohio Railway freight house, located at 99 15th Street in Ashland, Kentucky 41101. ... Other information Code SPM Traffic Passengers (2006) 873 19% South Portsmouth-South Shore (Amtrak station) is located at Main Street and US 23 in South Shore, Kentucky. ... The Fulton (Amtrak station) is located in Fulton, Kentucky at 21 Newton Road. ... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... Motto: A proud past. ... South Shore is a city located in Greenup County, Kentucky. ... Fulton is a city in Fulton County, Kentucky, United States. ... The Cardinal is a passenger train route operated by Amtrak in the Midwestern and Northeastern United States. ... Amtraks City of New Orleans stops at the Memphis, Tennessee station in 2005. ... The term Northern Kentucky generally refers to the three northernmost counties in Kentucky. ... The Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal, originally Cincinnati Union Terminal, is a passenger railroad station in the Queensgate neighborhood of Cincinnati, Ohio, United States. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... Cincinnati, Ohio viewed from the SW, across the Ohio River from Kentucky. ...


As of 2004, there were approximately 2,640 miles (4,250.4 km) of railways in Kentucky, with about 65% of those being operated by CSX Transportation. Coal was by far the most common cargo, accounting for 76% of cargo loaded and 61% of cargo delivered.[74] CSX Transportation (AAR reporting marks CSXT) is a Class I railroad in the United States, owned by the CSX Corporation. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ...


Bardstown features a tourist attraction known as My Old Kentucky Dinner Train. Run along a 20 mile (30 km) stretch of rail purchased from CSX in 1987, guests are served a four-course meal as they make a two-and-a-half hour round-trip between Bardstown and Limestone Springs.[75] The Kentucky Railway Museum is located in nearby New Haven.[76] Bardstown is a city located in Nelson County, Kentucky. ... CSX Transportation (AAR reporting marks CSXT) is a Class I railroad in the United States, owned by the CSX Corporation. ... Bardstown is a city located in Nelson County, Kentucky. ... The Kentucky Railway Museum, located in New Haven, Kentucky, is a non-profit heritage railway and museum for the purpose of education of the public regarding the history and heritage of Kentuckys railroads and the people who built them. ... New Haven is a city located in Nelson County, Kentucky. ...


Other areas in Kentucky are reclaiming old railways in rail trail projects. One such project is Louisville's Big Four Bridge. If completed, the Big Four Bridge rail trail will contain the second longest pedestrian-only bridge in the world.[77] The longest pedestrian-only bridge is also found in Kentucky — the Newport Southbank Bridge, popularly known as the "Purple People Bridge", connecting Newport to Cincinnati, Ohio.[78] Rail trails are former railway lines that have been converted to paths designed for pedestrian, bicycle, skating, equestrian, and/or light motorized traffic. ... The Big Four Bridge is an abandoned railroad bridge that crosses the Ohio River, connecting Louisville, Kentucky and Jeffersonville, Indiana. ... The Big Four Bridge is an abandoned railroad bridge that crosses the Ohio River, connecting Louisville, Kentucky and Jeffersonville, Indiana. ... Rail trails are former railway lines that have been converted to paths designed for pedestrian, bicycle, skating, equestrian, and/or light motorized traffic. ... The Newport Southbank Bridge (popularly known as the Purple People Bridge) stretches 2,670 feet over the Ohio River, connecting Newport, Kentucky to downtown Cincinnati, Ohio. ... The Campbell County Courthouse in Newport, Kentucky Newport is a city in Campbell County, Kentucky, USA, at the confluence of the Ohio and Licking Rivers. ... “Cincinnati” redirects here. ...


Air

See also: List of airports in Kentucky

Kentucky's primary airports include Louisville International Airport (Standiford Field), Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport, and Blue Grass Airport. Louisville International Airport is home to UPS's Worldport, its international air-sorting hub.[79] There are also a number of regional airports scattered across the state. List of airports in Kentucky (U.S. state), grouped by type and sorted by location. ... Louisville International Airport (IATA: SDF, ICAO: KSDF) is a public airport centrally located in the city of Louisville in Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA. The airport covers 1,200 acres and has three runways. ... Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (IATA: CVG, ICAO: KCVG) is located in Hebron, Boone County, Kentucky, United States and serves the Greater Cincinnati metropolitan area. ... Blue Grass Airport (IATA: LEX, ICAO: KLEX, FAA LID: LEX) is a public airport located four miles (6 km) west of the central business district of Lexington, a city in Fayette County, Kentucky, United States. ... United Parcel Service, Inc. ... UPS Worldport Air Hub at Louisville International Airport Worldport is the worldwide air hub for UPS (United Parcel Service) located at the Louisville International Airport in Louisville, Kentucky. ...


On August 27, 2006, Kentucky's Blue Grass Airport in Lexington was the site of a crash that killed 47 passengers and 2 crew members aboard a Bombardier Canadair Regional Jet designated Comair Flight 5191.[80] The lone survivor was the flight's first officer, James Polehinke, who doctors determined to be brain damaged and unable to recall the crash at all.[81] The NTSB's report has not yet been released, but reports state that the air traffic controller on duty at the time of the crash was working on approximately two hours of sleep[82] with outdated charts of the airport.[83] According to FAA rules, should have been working alongside another controller, which he was not.[84] is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Blue Grass Airport (IATA: LEX, ICAO: KLEX, FAA LID: LEX) is a public airport located four miles (6 km) west of the central business district of Lexington, a city in Fayette County, Kentucky, United States. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... The Bombardier Canadair Regional Jet (CRJ) is a regional airliner manufactured by Bombardier based on the Canadair Challenger business jet. ... Comair Flight 5191 was a domestic U.S. flight from Lexington, Kentucky, to Atlanta, Georgia, operated on behalf of Delta Connection by Comair. ... In commercial aviation, the first officer is the second pilot of an aircraft. ... Seal of the National Transportation Safety Board The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is a U.S. government independent organization responsible for investigation of accidents involving aviation, highway, marine, pipelines and railroads in the United States. ... “FAA” redirects here. ...


Water

A barge hauling coal in the Louisville and Portland Canal, the only man made section of the Ohio River
A barge hauling coal in the Louisville and Portland Canal, the only man made section of the Ohio River

Being bounded by the two largest rivers in North America, water transportation has historically played a major role in Kentucky's economy. Most barge traffic on Kentucky waterways consists of coal that is shipped from both the Eastern and Western Coalfields, about half of which is used locally to power many power plants located directly off the Ohio River, with the rest being exported to other countries, most notably Japan. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 452 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by uploader, all rights released I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 452 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by uploader, all rights released I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the... The McAlpine Locks and Dam refers to the series of locks and the hydroelectric dam in Louisville, Kentucky at the Falls of the Ohio. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ...


Many of the largest ports in the United States are located in or adjacent to Kentucky, including

  • Huntington-Ashland, largest inland port and 7th largest overall
  • Cincinnati-Northern Kentucky, 5th largest inland port and 43rd overall
  • Louisville-Southern Indiana, 7th largest inland port and 55th overall

As a state, Kentucky ranks 10th overall in port tonage.[85][86]


The only natural obstacle along the entire length of the Ohio River was the Falls of the Ohio, located just west of Downtown Louisville.
The Falls of the Ohio National Wildlife Conservation Area is a national, bi-state area on the Ohio River near Louisville, Kentucky in the United States, administered by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. ... The Louisville Skyline Downtown Louisville is the largest central business district in the state of Kentucky and the urban hub of the Louisville, Kentucky Metropolitan Area. ...


Counties

See also: List of counties in Kentucky and Fiscal Court

Kentucky is subdivided into 120 counties, the largest being Pike County, Kentucky at 787.6 square miles, and the most populous being Jefferson County, Kentucky (the county containing the Louisville metropolitan area) with 693,604 residents as of 2000.[87] Map of Kentuckys counties This is a list of the one hundred and twenty counties in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... The Fiscal Court, under the Kentucky Constitution of 1891,[1] is the name given to the county legislature and governing body of each of the counties in Kentucky. ... United States of America, showing states, divided into counties. ... Pike County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... This article is about the unit of measure. ... Jefferson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... For other places with the same name, see Louisville (disambiguation). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...


County government, under the Kentucky Constitution of 1891, is vested in a County Judge (later renamed County Judge/Executive), who serves as the executive head of the county, and a legislature called a Fiscal Court. Despite the unusual name, the Fiscal Court no longer has judicial functions. The Constitution of Kentucky is the document that governs the Commonwealth of Kentucky, United States. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A County Judge/Executive (or simply, Judge/Executive, and often spelled Judge-Executive) is an elected official in the U.S. state of Kentucky who is the head of the executive branch of a government in a county. ... A legislature is a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... The Fiscal Court, under the Kentucky Constitution of 1891,[1] is the name given to the county legislature and governing body of each of the counties in Kentucky. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      In the law, the judiciary or judicial system is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ...


Cities and towns

15 Largest Cities[88][89] 2006 Population
Louisville 554,496
Lexington 270,789
Owensboro 55,525
Bowling Green 53,176
Covington 42,797
Richmond 31,431
Henderson 27,915
Hopkinsville 27,415
Frankfort 27,077
Florence 26,929
Jeffersontown 25,907
Paducah 25,661
Nicholasville 24,791
Elizabethtown 23,406
Ashland 21,570
See also: List of cities in Kentucky

The Greater Louisville Metro Area holds a very disproportionate share of Kentucky's population, growth and wealth, and is by definition Kentucky's primate city. The city has a 2006 estimated population of 554,496, while the Louisville Combined Statistical Area (CSA) has a population of 1,356,798; including 1,003,025 in Kentucky, which is nearly 1/4 of the state's population. Since 2000 over 1/3 of the state's population growth has occurred in the Louisville CSA. In addition, seven of the 15 wealthiest counties in the state are located in the Louisville CSA.[90] “Louisville” redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... Owensboro is the third largest city in Kentucky and the county seat of Daviess County. ... Location of Bowling Green within Warren County in Kentucky. ... Downtown Covington has many wooded streets and historic buildings Covington is a city in Kenton County, Kentucky, United States. ... Richmond is the 6th largest city in Kentucky and the county seat of Madison County. ... Henderson is a city located in Henderson County, along the Ohio River in Western Kentucky. ... Hopkinsville is a city in Christian County, Kentucky, United States. ... Frankfort is the capital of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, a state of the United States of America. ... Florence is a city located in Boone County, Kentucky. ... Jeffersontown is a former city located in Jefferson County, Kentucky. ... Paducah is a city in McCracken County, Kentucky at the confluence of the Tennessee River and the Ohio River. ... Nicholasville is a city located in Jessamine County, Kentucky. ... Elizabethtown is a city in Hardin County, Kentucky, United States. ... Motto: A proud past. ... The following is the list of incorporated cities in Kentucky arranged in alphabetical order. ... “Louisville” redirects here. ... A primate city is a major city that works as the financial, political, and population center of a country and is not rivaled in any of these aspects by any other city in that country. ... The Louisville-Elizabethtown-Scottsburg, KY-IN CSA The Louisville-Elizabethtown-Scottsburg, KY-IN Combined Statistical Area is the 31st largest Combined Statistical Area (CSA) of the United States. ...


The second largest city is Lexington with a 2006 census estimated population of 270,789 and its CSA having a population of 645,006. The Northern Kentucky area (the seven Kentucky counties in the Cincinnati CSA) had an estimated population of 408,783 in 2006. The metropolitan areas of Louisville, Lexington, and Northern Kentucky have a combined population of 2,169,394 as of 2006, which is 51.5% of the state's total population. The Lexington-Fayette-Frankfort-Richmond, KY Combined Statistical Area is the 76th largest Combined Statistical Area (CSA) of the United States. ... The term Northern Kentucky generally refers to the three northernmost counties in Kentucky. ... Cincinnati, Ohio viewed from the SW, across the Ohio River from Kentucky. ...


The two other fast growing urban areas in Kentucky are the Bowling Green area and the "Tri Cities Region" of southeastern Kentucky, comprised of Somerset, London, and Corbin. Location of Bowling Green within Warren County in Kentucky. ... Somerset is a city in Pulaski County, Kentucky, United States. ... London is a city in Laurel County, Kentucky, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 5,692 (5,757 in 1990). ... Corbin is a city in Whitley and Knox counties in southeastern Kentucky. ...


Although only one town in the "Tri Cities", namely Somerset, currently has more than 10,000 people, the area has been experiencing heightened population and job growth since the 1990s. Growth has been especially rapid in Laurel County, which outgrew areas such as Scott and Jessamine counties around Lexington or Shelby and Nelson Counties around Louisville. London is currently on pace to double its population in the 2000s from 5,692 in 2000 to 10,879 in 2010. London also landed a Wal-Mart distribution center in 1997, bringing thousands of jobs to the community. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ...


In northeast Kentucky, the greater Ashland area is an important transportation and manufacturing center. Iron and petroleum production, as well as the transport of coal by rail and barge, have been historical pillars of the region's economy. Due to a decline in the area's industrial base, Ashland has seen a sizable reduction in its population since 1990. The population of the area has since stabilized, however, with the medical service industry taking a greater role in the local economy. The Ashland area, including the Kentucky counties of Boyd and Greenup, is a part of the Huntington-Ashland, WV-KY-OH, Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). As of the 2000 census, the MSA had a population of 288,649. About 20,000 of those people reside within the city limits of Ashland. Motto: A proud past. ... For other uses, see Iron (disambiguation). ... Pumpjack pumping an oil well near Lubbock, Texas Ignacy Łukasiewicz - inventor of the refining of kerosene from crude oil. ... Self propelled barge carrying bulk crushed stone A barge is a flat-bottomed boat, built mainly for river and canal transport of heavy goods. ... Boyd County Courthouse, Catlettsburg, Kentucky Boyd County is located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Greenup County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Huntington is a city located in the U.S. State of West Virginia along the Ohio River. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Greater Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas, which are organized around county boundaries. ...

Education

The University of Louisville is one of Kentucky's premier universities.
Main article: Education in Kentucky
See also: List of colleges and universities in Kentucky, List of high schools in Kentucky, and List of school districts in Kentucky

Kentucky maintains eight public four-year colleges and universities. The two major research institutions are the University of Kentucky, which is the land grant system, and the University of Louisville. Both combine for over 99% of endowment in the system and rank first or second in academic rankings and average ACT scores in the state system. The other six colleges in the state system are regional universities. Image File history File linksMetadata Picture_1067. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Picture_1067. ... The University of Louisville (also known as U of L) is a public, state-supported university located in Louisville, Kentucky, United States. ... Education in Kentucky includes elementary school (kindergarten through fifth grade in most areas), middle school (or junior high, sixth grade through eighth grade in most locations), high school (ninth through twelfth grade in most locations), and postsecondary institutions. ... The following is a list of colleges and universities in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... // This is a list of high schools in the state of Kentucky. ... List of school districts in Kentucky In Kentucky, there are two types of public school districts. ... The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... The University of Louisville (also known as U of L) is a public, state-supported university located in Louisville, Kentucky, United States. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ...


The state's sixteen public two-year colleges have been governed by the Kentucky Community and Technical College System since the passage of the Postsecondary Education Improvement Act of 1997, commonly referred to as House Bill 1.[91] Prior to the passage of House Bill 1, most of these colleges were under the control of the University of Kentucky. (KCTCS)Founded in 1997 by former Kentucky Governor Paul Patton to replace the University of Kentuckys Community College System, the system connects the states two-year colleges to make education readily available to Kentucky, and allows transfer of credits toward public universities for 4-year degrees. ... The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ...


Berea College, located at the extreme southern edge of the Bluegrass below the Cumberland Plateau, was the first coeducational college in the South to admit both black and white students, doing so from its very establishment in 1855.[92] This policy was successfully challenged in the United State Supreme Court in the case of Berea College v. Kentucky in 1908.[93] This decision effectively segregated Berea until the landmark Brown v. Board of Education in 1954. Berea College is a small liberal arts work college in Berea, Kentucky, south of Lexington, Kentucky with a full-time enrollment of 1514 students. ... Historic Southern United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... Berea College v. ... Holding Segregation of students in public schools violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, because separate facilities are inherently unequal. ...


Kentucky has been the site of much educational reform over the past two decades. In 1989, the Kentucky Supreme Court ruled that the state's education system was unconstitutional.[94] The response of the General Assembly was passage of the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) the following year. Years later, Kentucky has shown progress, but most agree that further reform is needed.[95] The Kentucky Supreme Court was created by a 1975 constitutional amendment. ... The Kentucky State Capitol Building in Frankfort, KY The Kentucky General Assembly, also called the Kentucky Legislature, is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ...


Culture

Old Louisville is the largest Victorian Historic neighborhood in the United States.
Old Louisville is the largest Victorian Historic neighborhood in the United States.
See also: Theater in Kentucky

Although Kentucky's culture is generally considered to be Southern, it is unique and also influenced by the Midwest and Appalachia. The state is known for bourbon and whiskey distiling, horse racing, and gambling. Kentucky is more similar to the Upper South in terms of ancestry which is predominantly American.[96] Neveretheless, during the 19th century, the state Kentucky did receive a substantial number of German and Irish immigrants, who settled primarily in the Midwest. Only Maryland, Delaware, West Virginia, and Oklahoma, all also border states, have higher German ancestry percentages than Kentucky among Census-defined Southern states.[97] Kentucky was a slave state, and blacks once comprised over one-quarter of its population. However, it lacked the cotton plantation system and never had the same high percentage of African Americans as most other slave states. With less than 8% of its current population being black, Kentucky is rarely included in modern-day definitions of the Black Belt, despite a relatively significant rural African American population in the Central and Western areas of the state.[98][99][100] Kentucky adopted the Jim Crow system of racial segregation in most public spheres after the Civil War, but the state never disenfranchised African American citizens to the level of the Deep South states, and it peacefully integrated its schools after the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education verdict, later adopting the first state civil rights act in the South in 1966.[101] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1458x1011, 342 KB)[edit] Summary I took this picture in September 2006. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1458x1011, 342 KB)[edit] Summary I took this picture in September 2006. ... Old Louisville is well known for its elaborate late-19th century Victorian homes Old Louisville is a historic preservation district and neighborhood in central Louisville, Kentucky, USA . ... Theater in Kentucky Theater venues in Kentucky include: In Louisville The Kentucky Center, the largest performing arts center in Kentucky The Kentucky Shakespeare Festival, presenting free Shakespeare performances every summer in Louisvilles Central Park Actors Theatre of Louisville The Louisville Palace The Kentucky Theater In Lexington The Kentucky Theatre... Modern definition The states in dark red are almost always included in modern day definitions of the South, while those in medium red are usually included. ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... It has been suggested that Poverty in Appalachia be merged into this article or section. ... Bourbon bottle, 19th century Bourbon is an American form of whiskey made from (pursuant to U.S. trade law) at least 51% corn, or maize, (typically about 70%) with the remainder being wheat and/or rye, and malted barley. ... Whisky (or whiskey) is an alcoholic beverage distilled from grain, often including malt, which has then been aged in wooden barrels. ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... Caravaggio, The Cardsharps, c. ... The Upland South is defined by landform, history, and culture, and does not correspond well to state lines. ... The free and slave states as of 1861, with free states in blue and slave states in red. ... A sugarcane plantation at Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, 2005 A plantation is a large tract of monoculture, as a tree plantation, a cotton plantation, a tea plantation or a tobacco plantation. ... For other uses, see Black Belt. ... This box:      The Jim Crow Laws were state and local laws enacted in the Southern and border states of the United States and enforced between 1876 and 1965. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ...


The biggest day in horse racing, the Kentucky Derby, is preceded by the two-week Kentucky Derby Festival[102] in Louisville. Louisville also plays host to the Kentucky State Fair,[103] the Kentucky Shakespeare Festival,[104] and Southern gospel's annual highlight, the National Quartet Convention.[105] Owensboro, Kentucky's third largest city, gives credence to its nickname of "Barbecue Capital of the World" by hosting the annual International Bar-B-Q Festival.[106] Bowling Green, Kentucky's fifth largest city and home to the only assembly plant in the world that manufactures the Chevrolet Corvette,[107] opened the National Corvette Museum in 1994.[108] The Kentucky Derby is a Grade I stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, held annually in Louisville, Kentucky, on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ... The 2006 Kentucky Derby Festival poster. ... The Kentucky State Fair is the state fair of Kentucky, located at 937 Phillips Lane in Louisville. ... The Kentucky Shakespeare Festival is a cultural event which features free Shakespeare performances every summer in Central Park in Old Louisville (in Louisville, Kentucky). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The National Quartet Convention is an annual gathering of Southern Gospel quartets and musicians. ... Owensboro is the third largest city in Kentucky and the county seat of Daviess County. ... The logo of the International Bar-B-Q Festival The International Bar-B-Q Festival is an event held in Owensboro, Kentucky every second weekend in May[1] since 1979. ... Location of Bowling Green within Warren County in Kentucky. ... The Bowling Green Assembly Plant is a General Motors automobile factory in Bowling Green, Kentucky. ... The Chevrolet Corvette is a sports car that has been manufactured by Chevrolet since 1953. ... Artistic view of the museum with logo. ...


Old Louisville, the largest historic preservation district in the United States featuring Victorian architecture and the third largest overall,[109] hosts the St. James Court Art Show, the largest outdoor art show in the United States.[110] The neighborhood was also home to the Southern Exposition (1883–1887), which featured the first public display of Thomas Edison's light bulb,[111] and was the setting of Alice Hegan Rice's novel, Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch and Fontaine Fox's comic strip, the "Toonerville Trolley.[112] Old Louisville is well known for its elaborate late-19th century Victorian homes Old Louisville is a historic preservation district and neighborhood in central Louisville, Kentucky, USA . ... Historic preservation, heritage management, or heritage conservation is the theory and practice of creatively maintaining the historic built environment and controlling the landscape component of which it is an integral part. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... Each year, 600 artisans display their wares at the festival. ... Portion of advertisement for 1884 Southern Exposition The Southern Exposition was a five-year series of Worlds Fairs held in the city of Louisville, Kentucky from 1883 to 1887 in what is now Louisvilles Old Louisville neighborhood. ... “Edison” redirects here. ... The light bulb is one of the most significant inventions in the history of the human race, illuminating the darkness of the evening and bringing light indoors at all times in order focus on the task at hand. ... Alice Hegan Rice (January 11, 1870 – February 10, 1942) was an American novelist. ... Mrs. ... Fontaine Talbot Fox Jr. ... A Toonerville Folks strip from 1917 Toonerville Folks (sometimes known as Toonerville Trolley) was a comic strip by Fontaine Fox which ran from 1908 to 1955. ...


The more rural communities are not without traditions of their own, however. Hodgenville, the birthplace of Abraham Lincoln, hosts the annual Lincoln Days Celebration, and will also host the kick-off for the National Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Celebration in February 2008. Bardstown celebrates its heritage as a major bourbon-producing region with the Kentucky Bourbon Festival.[113] (Legend holds that Baptist minister Elijah Craig invented bourbon with his black slave in Georgetown, but some dispute this claim.)[114] Glasgow mimics Glasgow, Scotland by hosting its own version of the Highland Games,[115] and Sturgis hosts "Little Sturgis", a mini version of Sturgis, South Dakota's annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally.[116] The residents of tiny Benton even pay tribute to their favorite tuber, the sweet potato, by hosting Tater Day.[117] Residents of Clarkson in Grayson County celebrate their city's ties to the honey industry by celebrating the Clarkson Honeyfest.[118] The Clarkson Honeyfest is held the last Thursday, Friday and Saturday in September, and is the "Official State Honey Festival of Kentucky." Hodgenville is a city in and the county seat of LaRue County, Fork of the Nolin River. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Bardstown is a city located in Nelson County, Kentucky. ... Lawn of the festival The Kentucky Bourbon Festival is an annual weekend in Bardstown, Kentucky, United States, dedicated to celebrating the history and art of distilling bourbon whiskey. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Elijah Craig (1738 (?) – May 18, 1808) was a Baptist minister from Kentucky, who is remembered chiefly for being an important figure in the invention of bourbon whiskey. ... Georgetown is a city in Scott County, Kentucky, United States. ... Glasgow is a city located in Barren County, Kentucky. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Opening ceremonies of 2004 Canmore Highland games Highland games are events held throughout the year in Scotland and other countries as a way of celebrating Scottish and Celtic culture and heritage, especially that of the Scottish Highlands. ... Sturgis is a city located in Union County, Kentucky. ... Sturgis is a city in Meade County, South Dakota, USA. The population was 6,442 at the 2000 census. ... Motorcycles lined up on Main Street during Bike Week, Sturgis, South Dakota. ... Benton is a city located in Marshall County, Kentucky. ... Binomial name L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Tater Day is a small festival in Benton, Kentucky held on the first Monday in April. ... Clarkson is a city located in Grayson County, Kentucky. ... Grayson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ...


Music

Main article: Music of Kentucky
See also: Category:Kentucky musicians

The breadth of music in Kentucky is indeed wide, stretching from the Purchase to the eastern mountains. Contemporary Christian music star Steven Curtis Chapman is a Paducah native, and Rock and Roll Hall of Famers The Everly Brothers are closely connected with Muhlenberg County, where older brother Don was born. Kentucky was also home to Mildred and Patty Hill, the Louisville sisters credited with composing the tune to the ditty Happy Birthday to You; Loretta Lynn (Johnson County), and Billy Ray Cyrus (Flatwoods). However, its depth lies in its signature sound — Bluegrass music. Bill Monroe, "The Father of Bluegrass", was born in the small Ohio County town of Rosine, while Ricky Skaggs, Keith Whitley, David "Stringbean" Akeman, Louis Marshall "Grandpa" Jones, Sonny and Bobby Osborne, and Sam Bush (who has been compared to Monroe) all hail from Kentucky. The International Bluegrass Music Museum is located in Owensboro,[119] while the annual Festival of the Bluegrass is held in Lexington.[120] The Music of Kentucky is heavily centered on Appalachian folk music and its descendants, especially in eastern Kentucky. ... Contemporary Christian Music (or CCM; also by its religious neutral term Inspirational music) is a genre of popular music which is lyrically focused on matters concerned with the Christian faith. ... Steven Curtis Chapman (born November 21, 1962 in Paducah, Kentucky, USA) is a contemporary Christian musician who has won five Grammy awards and more Gospel Music Association awards than any other artist in history. ... Paducah is a city in McCracken County, Kentucky at the confluence of the Tennessee River and the Ohio River. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... Phil (left) and Don in 1962 The Everly Brothers, (Don Everly, born Isaac Donald Everly February 1, 1937, Brownie, Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, Phil Everly, born Phillip Everly, January 19, 1939, Chicago, Illinois) are male siblings who were top-selling country-influenced rock and roll performers, best known for their steel... Muhlenberg County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Patty Smith Hill (27 March 1868 in Anchorage, Kentucky-25 May, 1946 in New York, New York) was an American nursery school and kindergarten teacher. ... “Louisville” redirects here. ... For the birthday song by The Beatles, see Birthday (song). ... Loretta Lynn (born Loretta Webb April 14, 1934) is an American country singer-songwriter and was one of the leading country female vocalists during the 1960s and 1970s and overall is revered as a country icon. ... Johnson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Billy Ray Cyrus (born August 25, 1961) is an American country singer and film and television actor, who is best known for his hit single Achy Breaky Heart (1992). ... Flatwoods is a city located in Greenup County, Kentucky. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music which has its own roots in Irish, Scottish and English traditional music. ... For the retired NBC News correspondent of the same name, see Bill Monroe (journalist). ... Ohio County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Rosine, Kentucky is a town in Ohio County, Kentucky. ... Ricky Skaggs, April 1988 Ricky Skaggs1st off Skaggs was known to hate everyone he met. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... David Akeman (June 17, 1915 - November 11, 1973) was an American country music banjo player and comedy musician best known for his role on the hit television show, Hee Haw. ... Grandpa Jones Grandpa Jones (October 20, 1913 – February 19, 1998) was an American banjo player and old time country and gospel music singer. ... Bobby Osborne is a bluegrass musician known for his mandolin playing and high lead vocals. ... Sam Bush Sam Bush (b. ... The International Bluegrass Music Museum is the only museum of its kind in the world with interactive exhibits, tours that include live instrument demonstrations as well as their own festival June 22- June 25, 2006 called ROMP(River Of Music Party). ... Owensboro is the third largest city in Kentucky and the county seat of Daviess County. ... The Festival of the Bluegrass, located in Lexington, Kentucky, is the oldest bluegrass music festival in the bluegrass region of Kentucky. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ...


Kentucky is also home to famed jazz musician and pioneer, Lionel Hampton (although this has been disputed in recent years).[121] Blues legend W.C. Handy and R&B singer Wilson Pickett also spent considerable time in Kentucky. The pop bands Midnight Star and Nappy Roots were both formed in Kentucky, as were country acts The Kentucky Headhunters and Montgomery Gentry, as well as Dove Award-winning Christian groups Audio Adrenaline (rock) and Bride (metal). For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Lionel Hampton with George W. Bush Lionel Leo Hampton (April 20, 1908, Louisville, Kentucky – August 31, 2002 New York City), was a jazz bandleader and percussionist. ... “Blues music” redirects here. ... W.C. Handy photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1941 William Christopher Handy (November 16, 1873 - March 28, 1958) was an African American blues composer, often known as The Father of the Blues. ... For other uses, see Rhythm and blues (disambiguation). ... Wilson Pickett (March 18, 1941 – January 19, 2006) was an American R&B/Rock and Roll and soul singer. ... Midnight Star was a synth-funk group that a string of R&B hits in the 80s. ... Nappy Roots are an American hip hop sextet that originated in Kentucky in 1995, best known for their hit 2002 single Awnaw. Their music can be categorized as alternative Southern rap. ... The Kentucky Headhunters created a hybrid of honky-tonk, blues and Southern rock that appealed to fans of both rock and country music. ... Montgomery Gentry is an American country music duo, founded in the 1990s, consisting of Eddie Montgomery (born Gerald Edward Montgomery in Danville, Kentucky on September 30, 1963) and Troy Gentry (born Troy Lee Gentry in Lexington, Kentucky on April 5, 1967). ... The GMA Music Awards, formerly the Dove Awards, were created in 1969 by the Gospel Music Association to honor the outstanding achievements in contemporary Christian and gospel music. ... Audio Adrenaline was a Grammy Award Winning Christian rock band formed in the early 1990s at Kentucky Christian College in Grayson, Kentucky, USA. Along with dc Talk, Newsboys and Jars of Clay, they quickly became one of the most successful Christian pop-rock bands of the 90s. ... Bride in a recent interview Bride is a Christian metal/rock band formed in the 80s, by brothers Dale and Troy Thompson. ...


Cuisine

Main article: Cuisine of Kentucky

Kentucky's cuisine, like much of the state's culture, is unique and is considered to blend elements of both the South and Midwest, given its location between the two regions.[122][123] One original Kentucky dish is called the Hot Brown, a layered dish normally in this order: bread, tomatoes, turkey, bacon, and topped with melted cheese. It was developed at the Brown Hotel in Louisville.[124] The Pendennis Club in Louisville is the Birthplace of the drink The Old Fashioned. Throughout most of the states history before the discovery of coal deposits, Kentucky relied upon the subsistence farming of corn, beans and pigs. ... Kentucky cuisine Throughout most of the states history before the discovery of coal deposits, Kentucky relied upon the subsistence farming of corn, beans and pigs. ... A Hot Brown is a hot sandwich originally created at the Brown Hotel (now Camberley-Brown Hotel) in Louisville, Kentucky by Fred K. Schmidt in 1926. ... The Brown Hotel (formerly the Camberley Brown Hotel) is a historic 16-story hotel in downtown Louisville, Kentucky, located on the corner of Fourth and Broadway. ... “Louisville” redirects here. ... The original clubhouse in 1906 The Pendennis Club is a private social club in Louisville, Kentucky. ... The Old Fashioned is a cocktail, possibly the first drink to be called a cocktail. ...


Sports

Kentucky's Churchill Downs hosts the Kentucky Derby.
Kentucky's Churchill Downs hosts the Kentucky Derby.
Main article: Sports in Kentucky

Kentucky boasts no major league sports teams, but several minor league teams call it home. Professional teams in nearby cities, however, have strong fan support depending on the part of the state, with Nashville teams having strong fan support in South Central and most of Western Kentucky, Nashville and St. Louis teams competing for loyalties in the Purchase, Indianapolis and Chicago teams predominating in the Louisville area, and Cincinnati teams having strong support in Central and Eastern Kentucky. The northern part of the state lies across the Ohio River from Cincinnati, which is home to a National Football League team, the Bengals, and a Major League Baseball team, the Reds. It is not uncommon for fans to park in the city of Newport and use the Newport Southbank Pedestrian Bridge, locally known as the "Purple People Bridge," to walk to these games in Cincinnati. Many restaurants and stores in Newport rely on business from these fans. Also, Georgetown College in Georgetown is the location for the Bengals' summer training camp.[125] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 455 KB) Summary Churchill Downs in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 455 KB) Summary Churchill Downs in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Composite image of Churchill Downs on Derby Day, 1901 Churchill Downs, located on Central Avenue in Louisville, Kentucky, is a thoroughbred racetrack most famous for hosting the Kentucky Derby. ... The Kentucky Derby is a Grade I stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, held annually in Louisville, Kentucky, on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ... // Despite the national stereotype that Kentucky is a die hard basketball state, at the high school level the state produces many times over more top nationally ranked football players than basketball. ... “Nashville” redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... The Jackson Purchase is a region in the state of Kentucky bounded by the Mississippi, Ohio, and Tennessee Rivers. ... “Indianapolis” redirects here. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... “Louisville” redirects here. ... “Cincinnati” redirects here. ... The term Northern Kentucky generally refers to the three northernmost counties in Kentucky. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... NFL redirects here. ... City Cincinnati, Ohio Team colors Black, Orange and White Head Coach Marvin Lewis Owner Mike Brown Mascot Who Dey League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1968-1969) Western Division (1968-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC Central (1970-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Other nicknames The Redlegs, The Big Red Machine... The Campbell County Courthouse in Newport, Kentucky Newport is a city in Campbell County, Kentucky, USA, at the confluence of the Ohio and Licking Rivers. ... The Newport Southbank Bridge (popularly known as the Purple People Bridge) stretches 2,670 feet over the Ohio River, connecting Newport, Kentucky to downtown Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Note: Georgetown University is a separate and unaffiliated institution located in Washington, DC. Georgetown College is a small, private liberal arts college located in Georgetown, Kentucky. ... Georgetown is a city in Scott County, Kentucky, United States. ...


As in many states, especially those without major league professional sport teams, college athletics are very important. This is especially true of the state's three Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) programs, including the Kentucky Wildcats, the Western Kentucky University Hilltoppers, and the Louisville Cardinals. The Wildcats, Hilltoppers, and Cardinals are among the most tradition-rich college basketball teams in the United States, combining for nine championships and 22 NCAA Final Fours; and all three are on the lists of total all-time wins, wins per season, and average wins per season. Louisville has also stepped onto the football scene in recent years, with eight straight bowl games, including the 2007 Orange Bowl. Western Kentucky, the 2002 national champion in Division I-AA football (now Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS), is currently transitioning to Division I FBS football. Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Kentucky Wildcats are the mens and womens athletic teams representing the University of Kentucky (UK), a founding member of the Southeastern Conference. ... Western Kentucky University (WKU) is a public university in Bowling Green, Kentucky. ... For University of Louisvilles independent weekly student newspaper, see The Louisville Cardinal. ... The Orange Bowl is an annual college football game that is usually played on January 1 in the Miami, Florida metro area, in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ...


State symbols

Main article: List of Kentucky state insignia
See also: Flag of Kentucky and Seal of Kentucky
Insignia Symbol Binomial nomenclature Year Adopted[126]
Official State Bird Cardinal Cardinalis cardinalis 1926
Official State Butterfly Viceroy Butterfly Limenitis archippus 1990
Official State Dance Clogging 2001
Official State Beverage Milk 2005
Official State Fish Kentucky Spotted Bass Micropterus punctulatus 2005
Official State Fossil Brachiopod undetermined 1985
Official State Flower Goldenrod Soldiago gigantea 1926
Official State Fruit Blackberry Rubus allegheniensis 2004
Official State Gemstone Freshwater Pearl 1986
State Grass Kentucky Bluegrass Poa pratensis Traditional
Official State Latin Motto "Deo gratiam habeamus"

("With gratitude to God") The following is a list of insignia of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... The flag of Kentucky consists of the Commonwealths seal on a navy blue field, surrounded by the words Commonwealth of Kentucky above and sprigs of goldenrod, the state flower, below. ... The Kentucky State Seal was adopted in December of 1792. ... These are lists of U.S. state insignia as designated by tradition or the respective state legislatures: List of U.S. state amphibians List of U.S. state birds List of U.S. state butterflies List of U.S. state colors List of U.S. state dances List of U... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Cardinalis cardinalis (Linnaeus, 1758) The Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a member of the cardinal family of birds in North America. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into List of U.S. state insects. ... Binomial name Limenitis archippus Cramer, 1775 The Viceroy butterfly (Limenitis archippus) is a North American butterfly with a range from the Northwest Territories along the eastern edges of the Cascade Range and Sierra Nevada mountains, southwards into central Mexico. ... This is a list of official U.S. state dances:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Clogging is a traditional type of percussive folk dance which is associated with a number of different regions across the world. ... This is a list of official state beverages:[1] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... A glass of cows milk. ... This is a list of official U.S. state fish: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Binomial name Micropterus punctulatus (Rafinesque, 1819) The spotted bass (Micropterus punctulatus) is a species of freshwater fish in the sunfish family (Centrarchidae) of order Perciformes. ... Though every state in the United States has a State Bird and a State Flower, not every state in the United States has a State Fossil. ... Subphyla and classes See Classification Brachiopods (from Latin brachium, arm + New Latin -poda, foot) are a phylum of animals. ... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: List of U.S. state trees Lists of U.S. state insignia ^ State Flower of Alabama. ... Species See text. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into List of U.S. state foods. ... This article is about the wireless e-mail device. ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... For other uses, see Pearl (disambiguation). ... This is a list of official U.S. state grass: This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. ... Binomial name Poa pratensis L. Smooth Meadow-grass (Poa pratensis) is a species of grass native to Europe, Asia and northern Africa. ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ...

2002
Official State Horse Thoroughbred Equus caballus 1996
Official State Mineral Coal 1998
Official State Outdoor Musical "The Stephen Foster Story" (now called "Stephen Foster - The Musical") 2002
Official State Instrument Appalachian Dulcimer 2001
State Nickname "The Bluegrass State" Traditional
Official State Rock Kentucky Agate 2000
Official State Slogan "Kentucky: Unbridled Spirit" 2004[127]
Official State Soil Crider Soil Series 1990
Official State Tree Tulip Poplar Liriodendron tulipifera 1994
Official Wild Animal Game Species Gray Squirrel Sciurus carolinensis 1968
Official State Song "My Old Kentucky Home"

(revised version) A state mammal is the official or representative animal of a U.S. state. ... For the processor with the same codename , see Athlon. ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... Coal Coal (IPA: ) is a fossil fuel formed in swamp ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... For other persons named Stephen Foster, see Stephen Foster (disambiguation). ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... Two Appalachian dulcimers The Appalachian dulcimer is a fretted string instrument of the zither family, typically with three or four strings, although contemporary versions of the instrument can have as many as twelve strings and six courses. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... // Not every state has an official state mineral, rock, stone or gemstone. ... For other uses, see Agate (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Loess field in Germany Surface-water-gley developed in glacial till, Northern Ireland Technically, soil forms the pedosphere: the interface between the lithosphere (rocky part of the planet) and the biosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere. ... This List of U.S. state trees includes official trees of the following states and U.S. possessions: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia National Grove of State Trees External link USDA list of state trees and flowers Categories: | | ... Species Liriodendron chinense (Hemsl. ... A state mammal is the official or representative animal of a U.S. state. ... Gray squirrel is the common name for two species of squirrel native to North America: The Eastern Gray Squirrel (also introduced elsewhere) The Western Gray Squirrel. ... Forty-nine states of the United States (all except New Jersey) have one or more state songs, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... My Old Kentucky Home (also titled My Old Kentucky Home, Good-Night!) is the state song of Kentucky. ...

1986
Official State Silverware Pattern Old Kentucky Blue Grass:

The Georgetown Pattern

1996
Official State Music Bluegrass music 2007[128]

Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music which has its own roots in Irish, Scottish and English traditional music. ...

Official state places and events

Unless otherwise specified, all state symbol information is taken from Kentucky State Symbols. Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest is a 14,000 acre (57 km²) arboretum, forest, and nature preserve located in Clermont, Kentucky (south of Louisville, Kentucky, United States). ... The University of Kentucky Arboretum (40 hectares or 100 acres) is located in Lexington, Kentucky, USA, and open to the public dawn to dusk every day of the year. ... The Louisville Science Center, previously known as the Louisville Museum of Science and Natural History, is Kentuckys largest hands-on science museum. ... Clarkson is a city located in Grayson County, Kentucky. ... The Colosseum in Rome, Italy. ... Iroquois Park is a 739-acre municipal park in Louisville, Kentucky, United States. ... “Louisville” redirects here. ... Tug of war Tug of war, also known as rope pulling, is a sport that directly pits two teams against each other in a test of strength. ... Fordsville is a city located in Ohio County, Kentucky. ... A covered bridge is a bridge, often single-lane, with enclosed sides and a roof. ... Fleming County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... A covered bridge is a bridge, often single-lane, with enclosed sides and a roof. ... Franklin County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... One of the last mainline steam locomotives built in the UK: British Railways Standard Class 9F 2-10-0 no. ... The Kentucky Railway Museum, located in New Haven, Kentucky, is a non-profit heritage railway and museum for the purpose of education of the public regarding the history and heritage of Kentuckys railroads and the people who built them. ... New Haven is a city located in Nelson County, Kentucky. ... A Pipe band is a traditional Scottish musical group consisting of bagpipes and drums. ... Bourbon bottle, 19th century Bourbon is an American form of whiskey made from (pursuant to U.S. trade law) at least 51% corn, or maize, (typically about 70%) with the remainder being wheat and/or rye, and malted barley. ... Lawn of the festival The Kentucky Bourbon Festival is an annual weekend in Bardstown, Kentucky, United States, dedicated to celebrating the history and art of distilling bourbon whiskey. ... Bardstown is a city located in Nelson County, Kentucky. ...


Gallery

See also

Kentucky Portal

Download high resolution version (1106x1105, 298 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... It has been suggested that Poverty in Appalachia be merged into this article or section. ... BluegrassReport. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... A political blog is a common type of blog that comments on politics. ... The United States Census Bureau has defined 6 Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs),[1] 9 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs),[2] and 17 Micropolitan Statistical Areas (μSAs)[3] in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. ... There have been 8 Naval ships named for Kentucky or cities in Kentucky: USS Kentucky (BB-6), a Kearsarge class battleship, sailed with the Great White Fleet. ... The following list contains persons of note who were born, raised, or spent significant portions of their lives in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Scouting in Kentucky has a long history, from the 1910s to the present day, serving thousands of youth in programs that suit the environment in which they live. ...

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  78. ^ Crowley, Patrick (April 23, 2003). Meet the Purple People Bridge. Cincinnati Enquirer. Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
  79. ^ Fast Facts. Louisville International Airport. Retrieved on 2007-09-11.
  80. ^ Crash Kills 49
  81. ^ Comair Crash Survivor Leaves Hospital. CBS. Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
  82. ^ NTSB: LEX Controller Had Two Hours Of Sleep Prior To Accident Shift. Aero-News.Net. Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
  83. ^ Pilots' charts of airport were out of date. Retrieved on 2007-05-01. Pilots' charts of airport were out of date
  84. ^ Ahlers, Michael (August 30, 2006). FAA: Tower staffing during plane crash violated rules. CNN. Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
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  88. ^ Census Population Estimates for 2006 - Annual Estimates of the Population for Incorporated Places Over 100,000. US Census. Retrieved on 2007-07-01.
  89. ^ Census Population Estimates for 2006 - Annual Estimates of the Population for Incorporated Places in Kentucky. US Census. Retrieved on 2007-07-01.
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  91. ^ Postsecondary Education Improvement Act of 1997. State of Kentucky. Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
  92. ^ Berea College:Learning, Labor, and Service. Diversity Web. Retrieved on 2007-05-01. Berea College: Learning, Labor, and Service
  93. ^ Berea College v. Kentucky
  94. ^ A Guide to the Kentucky Education Reform Act of 1990. Education Resources Information Center. Retrieved on 2007-05-01.[Abstract of A Guide to the Kentucky Education Reform Act of 1990 - provided by Education Resources Information Center (ERIC)]
  95. ^ Roeder, Phillip. Education Reform and Equitable Excellence: The Kentucky Experiment. Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
  96. ^ Brittingham, Angela & de la Cruz, G. Patricia (June 2004). Ancestry 2000: Census 2000 Brief (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 28 June 2007.
  97. ^ 2000 Census: Percent Reporting Any German Ancestry. Retrieved on 2007-07-20.
  98. ^ Beale, Calvin (21 July 2004). High Poverty in the Rural U.S. and South: Progress and Persistence in the 1990s (PowerPoint). Retrieved on 28 June 2007.
  99. ^ Womack, Veronica L. (23 July 2004). The American Black Belt Region: A Forgotten Place (PowerPoint). Retrieved on 28 June 2007.
  100. ^ Unknown. Identifying the "Black Belt" of Cash-Crop Production (JPEG Image). Bowdoin College. Retrieved on 28 June 2007.
  101. ^ Civil Rights and Women’s Rights. Retrieved on 2007-07-20.
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  103. ^ Kentucky State Fair. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  104. ^ Kentucky Shakespeare Festival Home Page. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  105. ^ National Quartet Convention Home Page. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  106. ^ Home Page of the International Barbecue Festival. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  107. ^ National Corvette Museum press release. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  108. ^ National Corvette Museum Home Page. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  109. ^ Stately Mansions Grace Old Louisville. Atlanta Journal Constitution. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  110. ^ St. James Court Art Show Home Page. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  111. ^ The Heart Line. Kentucky Commission on Community Volunteerism and Service. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  112. ^ Old Louisville and Literature. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  113. ^ Kentucky Bourbon Festival Home Page. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  114. ^ How Bourbon Whiskey Really Got Its Famous Name. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  115. ^ Glasgow, Kentucky Highland Games Home Page. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  116. ^ Little Sturgis Rally Home Page. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  117. ^ Tater Day Festival A Local Legacy. Retrieved on 2006-12-25.
  118. ^ Clarkson Honeyfest home page. Retrieved on 2007-05-12.
  119. ^ International Bluegrass Music Museum. Retrieved on 2006-11-30.
  120. ^ Festival of the Bluegrass Home Page. Retrieved on 2006-11-30.
  121. ^ Voce, Steve (2002-09-02). Obituary: Lionel Hampton. The Independent. Retrieved on 2007-06-03.
  122. ^ http://southernfood.about.com/od/southernregionalfood/Southern_Recipes_and_Regional_Specialties.htm
  123. ^ http://www.iicaculinary.com/iica-ye2-sem1.htm#ac303
  124. ^ Hot Brown Recipe. Brown Hotel. Retrieved on 2006-12-18.
  125. ^ About the camp. BengalsCamp.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-18.
  126. ^ Kentucky's State Symbols. Kentucky Department of Libraries and Archives. Retrieved on 2006-12-18.
  127. ^ Unbridled Spirit Information. Kentucky.gov (2006-11-20). Retrieved on 2006-12-18.
  128. ^ HB71: An act designating bluegrass music as the official state music of Kentucky (DOC). Legislative Research Commission. Retrieved on 2007-06-26.
  129. ^ KRS 2.099 - State Honey Festival (PDF). Kentucky General Assembly. Retrieved on 2006-12-18.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline for Web content. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Kentucky Educational Television network is Kentuckys statewide public television network. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... Thomas Dionysius Clark (July 14, 1903 - June 28, 2005) was perhaps Kentuckys most notable historian. ... Frankfort is the capital of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, a state of the United States of America. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Thomas Dionysius Clark (July 14, 1903 - June 28, 2005) was perhaps Kentuckys most notable historian. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... Thomas Dionysius Clark (July 14, 1903 - June 28, 2005) was perhaps Kentuckys most notable historian. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 30 is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Kentucky State Capitol Building in Frankfort, KY The Kentucky General Assembly, also called the Kentucky Legislature, is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Kentucky Historical Society is an agency of the Kentucky Commerce Cabinet dedicated to the preservation of Kentucky history. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “NPR” redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... “Cornell” redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... April 30 is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: Stub | Newspapers in Kentucky | Louisville, Kentucky ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper in Atlanta, Georgia, USA and its suburbs. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Brown Hotel (formerly the Camberley Brown Hotel) is a historic 16-story hotel in downtown Louisville, Kentucky, located on the corner of Fourth and Broadway. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Kentucky State Capitol Building in Frankfort, KY The Kentucky General Assembly, also called the Kentucky Legislature, is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

Politics

  • Miller, Penny M. Kentucky Politics & Government: Do We Stand United? (1994)
  • Jewell, Malcolm E. and Everett W. Cunningham, Kentucky Politics (1968)

History

Surveys and reference

  • Bodley, Temple and Samuel M. Wilson. History of Kentucky 4 vols. (1928).
  • Caudill, Harry M., Night Comes to the Cumberlands (1963). ISBN 0-316-13212-8
  • Channing, Steven. Kentucky: A Bicentennial History (1977).
  • Clark, Thomas Dionysius. A History of Kentucky (many editions, 1937–1992).
  • Collins, Lewis. History of Kentucky (1880).
  • Harrison, Lowell H. and James C. Klotter. A New History of Kentucky (1997).
  • Kleber, John E. et al The Kentucky Encyclopedia (1992), standard reference history.
  • Klotter, James C. Our Kentucky: A Study of the Bluegrass State (2000), high school text
  • Lucas, Marion Brunson and Wright, George C. A History of Blacks in Kentucky 2 vols. (1992).
  • Notable Kentucky African Americans http://www.uky.edu/Subject/aakyall.html
  • Share, Allen J. Cities in the Commonwealth: Two Centuries of Urban Life in Kentucky (1982).
  • Wallis, Frederick A. and Hambleton Tapp. A Sesqui-Centennial History of Kentucky 4 vols. (1945).
  • Ward, William S., A Literary History of Kentucky (1988) (ISBN 0-87049-578-X).
  • WPA, Kentucky: A Guide to the Bluegrass State (1939), classic guide.
  • Yater, George H. (1987). Two Hundred Years at the Fall of the Ohio: A History of Louisville and Jefferson County, 2nd edition, Filson Club, Incorporated. ISBN 0-9601072-3-1. 

Harry M. Caudill (b. ... The Filson Historical Society building in Old Louisville The Filson Historical Society (originally named the Filson Club) is a historical society in Louisville, Kentucky. ...

Specialized scholarly studies

  • Bakeless, John. Daniel Boone, Master of the Wilderness (1989)
  • Blakey, George T. Hard Times and New Deal in Kentucky, 1929–1939 (1986)
  • Coulter, E. Merton. The Civil War and Readjustment in Kentucky (1926)
  • Davis, Alice. "Heroes: Kentucky's Artists from Statehood to the New Millennium" (2004)
  • Ellis, William E. The Kentucky River (2000).
  • Faragher, John Mack. Daniel Boone (1993)
  • Fenton, John H. Politics in the Border States: A Study of the Patterns of Political Organization, and Political Change, Common to the Border States: Maryland, West Virginia, Kentucky, and Missouri (1957)
  • Ireland, Robert M. The County in Kentucky History (1976)
  • Klotter, James C.; Lowell Harrison, James Ramage, Charles Roland, Richard Taylor, Bryan S. Bush, Tom Fugate, Dixie Hibbs, Lisa Matthews, Robert C. Moody, Marshall Myers, Stuart Sanders and Stephen McBride (2005). in Jerlene Rose: Kentucky's Civil War 1861–1865. Back Home In Kentucky Inc. ISBN 0-9769231-1-4. 
  • Klotter, James C. Kentucky: Portrait in Paradox, 1900–1950 (1992)
  • Pearce, John Ed. Divide and Dissent: Kentucky Politics, 1930–1963 (1987)
  • Remini, Robert V. Henry Clay: Statesman for the Union (1991).
  • Sonne, Niels Henry. Liberal Kentucky, 1780–1828 (1939)
  • Tapp, Hambleton and James C Klotter. Kentucky Decades of Discord, 1865–1900 (1977)
  • Townsend, William H. Lincoln and the Bluegrass: Slavery and Civil War in Kentucky (1955)
  • Waldrep, Christopher Night Riders: Defending Community in the Black Patch, 1890–1915 (1993) tobacco wars

External links

Find more information on Kentucky by searching Wikipedia's sister projects
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Learning resources from Wikiversity
  • Kentucky Department of Tourism
  • Kentucky.gov: My New Kentucky Home
  • The Kentucky Highlands Project
  • USGS real-time, geographic, and other scientific resources of Kentucky
  • Kentucky State Facts
  • Kentucky: Unbridled Spirit
  • Kentucky Virtual Library
  • "Science In Your Backyard: Kentucky" U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey, July 3, 2006, retrieved November 4, 2006
  • U.S. Census Bureau Kentucky QuickFacts
  • Interactive Kentucky for Kids


Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Preceded by
Vermont
List of U.S. states by date of statehood
Admitted on June 1, 1792 (15th)
Succeeded by
Tennessee

Coordinates: 37.5° N 85° W This article is about the U.S. state. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



  Results from FactBites:
 
Homepage | www.kentucky.com (0 words)
Kentucky Coach Rich Brooks finally had a season opener he could smile about.
After losing to archrival Louisville the first four years of the Brooks regime, the Wildcats pounded on another in-state foe, Eastern Kentucky, 50-10 at Commonwealth Stadium last night.
Kentucky American customers used 48.266 million gallons between midnight Wednesday night and midnight Thursday night.
Kentucky Maps - Perry-Castañeda Map Collection - UT Library Online (443 words)
Kentucky (reference map) JPEG format (240K) Shaded relief map with state boundaries, forest cover, place names, major highways.
Kentucky (reference map) PDF format (242K) Shaded relief map with state boundaries, forest cover, place names, major highways.
Kentucky (reference map) JPEG format (196K) Shaded relief map with state boundaries, forest cover, place names, major highways.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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