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Encyclopedia > Kent
Kent
Invicta Flag of Kent
Image:EnglandKent.png
Geography
Status Ceremonial & (smaller) Non-metropolitan county
Region South East England
Area
- Total
- Admin. council
- Admin. area
Ranked 10th
3,736 km² (1,442.5 sq mi)
Ranked 10th
3,544 km² (1,368.3 sq mi)
Admin HQ Maidstone
ISO 3166-2 GB-KEN
ONS code 29
NUTS 3 UKJ42
Demographics
Population
- Total (2006 est.)
- Density
- Admin. council
- Admin. pop.
Ranked 7th
1,634,500
437/km² (1,131.8/sq mi)
Ranked 1st
1,382,800
Ethnicity 96.9% White
1.9% Asian
Politics
Kent County Council
http://www.kent.gov.uk/
Medway Council
http://www.medway.gov.uk/
Executive Conservative
Members of Parliament
Districts
Image:KentDistrictsNumbered.svg
  1. Sevenoaks
  2. Dartford
  3. Gravesham
  4. Tonbridge and Malling
  5. Medway (Unitary)
  6. Maidstone
  7. Tunbridge Wells
  8. Swale
  9. Ashford
  10. Canterbury
  11. Shepway
  12. Thanet
  13. Dover

Kent is a county in southeast England. It borders East Sussex, Surrey and Greater London and has a defined boundary with Essex in the middle of the River Thames estuary. The ceremonial county boundaries of Kent include the shire county of Kent and the unitary borough of Medway. Kent has a nominal border with France halfway through the Channel Tunnel. Maidstone is its county town and historically Rochester and Canterbury have been accorded city status though only the latter still holds it. Many things are named Kent: // Counties County of Kent, England Chatham-Kent, Ontario (formerly Kent County) Kent County, Delaware Kent County, Maryland Kent County, Michigan Kent County, New Brunswick Kent County, Rhode Island Kent County, Texas Universities Kent State University, Ohio, United States of America University of Kent at Canterbury... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... map of Kent within England File links The following pages link to this file: Kent Wikipedia talk:China-related topics notice board Categories: GFDL images ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... South East England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... Area is the measure of how much exposed area any two dimensional object has. ... This is a List of Ceremonial counties of England by Area. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... This is a List of Administrative shire counties of England by Area, that is to say Administrative counties with a two-tier County council structure, not including Administrative counties which are Unitary Authorities. ... For other uses, see Maidstone (disambiguation). ... The ISO 3166-2 codes for the United Kingdom correspond to the nations administrative divisions. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... The Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) is a geocode standard for referencing the administrative division of countries for statistical purposes. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This is a List of Ceremonial counties of England by Population - 2002 mid-year estimates from the Office for National Statistics, unrounded figures published by the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister in the Entitlement Notification Reports for Revenue Support Grants [1]. See also: List of Administrative shire counties of... This is a list of non-metropolitan counties of England by population. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... Julian William Hendy Brazier TD (born July 24, 1953) is a British politician. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Gregory Clark (born 1967, Middlesbrough, Cleveland} is the Conservative MP for Tunbridge Wells. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Paul Gordon Clark (born 29 April 1957, ) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Michael Cathel Fallon (born May 14, 1952, Scotland) is a British politician. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Roger James Gale (born 20 August 1943, Poole) is an English politician. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Damian Howard Green (born January 17, 1956) is an English Conservative Party (UK) politician, and Member of Parliament for Ashford (UK Parliament constituency) in Kent. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Adam James Harold Holloway (born July 29 1965 in Faversham) is a British politician and is the Conservative MP for Gravesham. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Rt Hon. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Dr Stephen John Ladyman (born November 6, 1952) is a British politician, and Labour Party member of Parliament for Thanet South. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Robert Graham Marshall-Andrews, known as Bob Marshall-Andrews, QC (born 10 April 1944) is an English politician and barrister. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Gwynfor Matthew Prosser (born 27 April 1943, Swansea) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Hugh Robertson (born 9 October 1962, Canterbury) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Jonathan Rowland Shaw (born 3 June 1966, Kent) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Right Honourable Sir John Stanley (born January 12, 1942) is a British politician, and Conservative Member of Parliament for Tonbridge and Malling. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Dr Howard Geoffrey Alvan Stoate (born 14 April 1954) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Ann Noreen Widdecombe (born 4 October 1947) is a British Conservative Party politician. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Derek Murray Wyatt (born 4 December 1949) is a British politician, and Labour Member of Parliament for Sittingbourne and Sheppey in Kent, first elected in 1997, having previously been a councillor in the London Borough of Haringey. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Sevenoaks is a local government district in Kent, England. ... Dartford is a local government district and borough in Kent, England. ... Gravesham is a local government district and borough in Kent, England. ... Tonbridge and Malling is a local government district and borough in the English county of Kent. ... Medway is the name given to a conurbation in the north of Kent, England. ... Maidstone is a local government district and borough in Kent, England. ... Tunbridge Wells is a local government district and borough in Kent, England. ... For other meanings of swale see Swale (disambiguation). ... Ashford Borough Councils Coat of Arms Ashford is a local government district and borough in Kent, England. ... The City of Canterbury is a local government district with city status in Kent, England. ... Shepway is a local government district in Kent, England. ... Thanet is a local government district of Kent, England which was formed under the Local Government Act 1972, and came into being on 1 April of 1974. ... Dover is a local government district in Kent, England. ... The traditional counties as usually portrayed. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... East Sussex is a county in South East England. ... This article is about the English county. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... For other meanings of Essex, see Essex (disambiguation). ... This article is about the River Thames in southern England. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Rio de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Kent County Council is the local authority for the county of Kent in south-east England, United Kingdom. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Medway is the name given to a conurbation in the north of Kent, England. ... The British terminal at Cheriton in west Folkestone, from the Pilgrims Way. ... For other uses, see Maidstone (disambiguation). ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... In English literary history, the name Rochester refers to John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester. ... Canterbury is a cathedral city in east Kent in South East England and is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primate of All England, head of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ...


Kent's location between London and the continent has led to its being a front line of several conflicts, including the Battle of Britain during World War II.East Kent was named Hell Fire Corner during the conflict. England has relied on the county's ports to provide warships through much of the past 800 years; the Cinque Ports in the 12th–14th centuries and Chatham Dockyard in the 16th–20th centuries were of particular importance to the country's security.France can be seen clearly in fine weather from the iconic White Cliffs of Dover Continental Europe, also referred to as mainland Europe or simply the Continent, is the continent of Europe, explicitly excluding European islands and, at times, peninsulas. ... This article is about military history. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... , Dover is a major channel port in the English county of Kent. ...


Due to its abundance of orchards and hop gardens, Kent is widely known as The Garden of England - an epithet often applied when marketing the county or its produce, although other regions have tried to lay claim to the title.[1][2] A community apple orchard originally planted for productive use during the 1920s, in Westcliff on Sea (Essex, England) An orchard is an intentional planting of trees or shrubs maintained for food production. ... Species Humulus lupulus L. Humulus japonicus Siebold & Zucc. ...


Major industries in the north-west of Kent have included cement, papermaking, and aircraft construction, but these are now in decline.South and East Kent rely on tourism and agriculture. For other uses, see Cement (disambiguation). ... The Diamond Sutra of the Chinese Tang Dynasty, the oldest dated printed book in the world, found at Dunhuang, from 868 AD. Papermaking is the process of making paper, a material which is ubiquitous today for writing and packaging. ... The aircraft industry is the industry supporting aviation by building aircraft and aircraft parts. ...

Contents

History

The Kent coat of arms
The Kent coat of arms
Main article: History of Kent

The area has been occupied since the Palaeolithic era, as attested by finds from the quarries at Swanscombe. The Medway megaliths were built during the Neolithic era. There is a rich sequence of Bronze Age, Iron Age, and Roman era occupation, as indicated by finds and features such as the Ringlemere gold cup and the Roman villas of the Darent valley.[3] Arms of Kent County Council. ... Arms of Kent County Council. ... Kent has been occupied since the Lower Palaeolithic as finds from the quarries at Swanscombe attest. ... The Paleolithic or Palaeolithic – lit. ... , Swanscombe is a village, part of the Borough of Dartford on the north Kent coast in England. ... The Medway megaliths or Medway tombs are names given to a group of Neolithic chambered long barrows and other megaliths located in the lower valley of the River Medway in the English county of Kent. ... An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The Ringlemere gold cup is a Bronze Age vessel found in 2001 by a metal detectorist in a field near Sandwich in the English county of Kent. ... The confluence of the River Darent (left) and the River Cray (right) on Crayford Marshes. ...


The modern name of Kent is derived from the Brythonic word Cantus meaning "rim" or "border". This describes the eastern part of the current county area as a border land or coastal district. Julius Caesar had described the area as Cantium, or home of the Cantiaci in 51 BC.[4] Brythonic is one of two major divisions of Insular Celtic languages (the other being Goidelic). ... For other uses, see Julius Caesar (disambiguation). ... The Cantiaci were one of the Celtic tribes living in the British Islands, previous to the Roman invasion of Britain. ...


The extreme west of the modern county was occupied by Iron Age tribes, known as the Regnenses. It is possible that another ethnic group occupied The Weald and East Kent. East Kent became a kingdom of the Jutes during the 5th century[5] and was known as Cantia from about 730 and as Cent in 835. The early medieval inhabitants of the county were known as the Cantwara, or Kent people. These people regarded the city of Canterbury as their capital.[6] The Regnenses or Regni is a British Celtic kingdom formed only after the Roman invasion of Britain, located in modern West Sussex. ... A weald once meant a dense forest, especially the famous great wood once stretching far beyond the ancient counties of Sussex and Kent, England, where this country of smaller woods is still called the Weald. ... For the coarse vegetable textile fiber, see Jute. ...


In 597, Pope Gregory I appointed Augustine as the first Archbishop of Canterbury. In the previous year, Augustine successfully converted the Pagan King Æthelberht of Kent to Christianity. The Diocese of Canterbury became Britain's first Episcopal See and has since remained Britain's centre of Christianity.[7] “Saint Gregory” redirects here. ... Augustine of Canterbury (birth unknown, died May 26, 604) was the first Archbishop of Canterbury, sent to Ethelbert of Kent, Bretwalda (ruler) of England by Pope Gregory the Great in 597. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Pagan may refer to: A believer in Paganism or Neopaganism Bagan, a city in Myanmar also known as Pagan Pagan (album), the 6th album by Celtic metal band Cruachan Pagan Island, of the Northern Mariana Islands Pagan Lorn, a metal band from Luxembourg, Europe (1994-1998) Pagans Mind, is... Ethelbert (or Æthelbert, or Aethelberht) (means roughly Magnificent Noble) (c. ... Arms of the Archbishop of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior bishop of the state Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion, outranking the other English archbishop, the Archbishop of York. ... A see (from the Latin word sedem, meaning seat) is the throne (cathedra) of a bishop. ...


In the early 11th century, the people of Kent adopted the motto Invicta, meaning "undefeated". This naming followed the invasion of Britain by William of Normandy. The Kent people's continued resistance against the Normans led to Kent's designation as a semi-autonomous County Palatine in 1067. Under the nominal rule of William's half-brother Odo of Bayeux, the county was granted similar powers to those granted in the areas bordering Wales and Scotland.[8] Invicta (meaning undefeated) is the motto of the county of Kent, England. ... William I ( 1027 – September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ... Norman conquests in red. ... A County palatine is an area ruled by an count palatine (or earl palatine); with special authority and autonomy from the rest of the kingdom. ... Odo of Bayeux (c. ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the country. ...


During the medieval and early modern period, Kent played a major role in several of England's most notable rebellions, including the Peasants' Revolt of 1381, led by Wat Tyler,[9] Jack Cade's Kent rebellion of 1450, and Wyatt's Rebellion of 1553 against Queen Mary I.[10] The end of the revolt: Wat Tyler killed by Walworth while Richard II watches, and a second image of Richard addressing the crowd The Peasants Revolt, Tyler’s Rebellion, or the Great Rising of 1381 was one of a number of popular revolts in late medieval Europe and is a... Wat Tylers Death Walter Tyler, commonly known as Wat Tyler (died June 15, 1381) was the leader of the English Peasants Revolt of 1381. ... Jack Cade (possibly named John Mortimer) was the leader of a popular revolt in the 1450 Kent rebellion which took place in the time of King Henry VI in England. ... Thomas Wyatt the younger (1521-11 April 1554) was a rebel leader during the reign of Queen Mary I of England. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ...


The Royal Navy first used the River Medway in 1547. By the reign of Elizabeth I (1558–1603) a small dockyard had been established at Chatham. By 1618, storehouses, a ropewalk, a drydock, and houses for officials had been built downstream from Chatham.[11] This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... Rivers in Kent, showing the Medway. ... Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603 ) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. ... , Chatham is a large English town that developed around an important naval dockyard on the east bank of the River Medway to the south-east of London in the county of Kent. ... A ropewalk is a long straight narrow lane, or a covered pathway, where long strands of material were laid before being twisted in to rope. ... U.S. Navy submarine USS Greeneville in dry dock following collision with a fishing boat. ...


By the 17th century, tensions between Britain and the powers of the Netherlands and France led to increasing military build-up in the county. Forts were built all along the coast following the raid on the Medway, a successful attack by the Dutch navy on the shipyards of the Medway towns in 1667.[12] This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Medway is the name given to a conurbation in the north of Kent, England. ...


The 18th century was dominated by wars with France, during which the Medway became the primary base for a fleet that could act along the Dutch and French coasts. When the theatre of operation moved to the Atlantic, this role was assumed by Portsmouth and Plymouth, with Chatham concentrating on shipbuilding and ship repair. As an indication of the area's military importance, the first Ordnance Survey map ever drawn was a one-inch map of Kent, published in 1801.[13] Many of the Georgian naval buildings during this time still stand. The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one_fifth of its surface. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city of Plymouth in England. ... Part of an Ordnance Survey map at 1 inch to the mile scale from 1945 Ordnance Survey (OS) is an executive agency of the United Kingdom government. ...


In the early 1800s, smugglers were very active on the Kent coastline. Gangs such as The Aldington Gang brought spirits, tobacco and salt to the county, and transported goods such as wool across the sea to France.[14] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Aldington was the stronghold of The Aldington Gang, a band of smugglers roaming the Romney Marshes and shores of Kent. ...


In 1881, the County of London was created and the townships of Deptford, Greenwich, Woolwich, Lee, Eltham, Charlton, Kidbrooke and Lewisham were transferred out of Kent. The County of London was an administrative county and ceremonial county of England from 1889 to 1965. ... This article is about the district in London. ... This article is about Greenwich in England. ... , Woolwich town hall dates from when this was a borough in its own right. ... Lee is a place in the London Borough of Lewisham in south-east London. ... Eltham is a place in the London Borough of Greenwich. ... Charlton is an area in south-east London, in the London Borough of Greenwich, located between Greenwich and Woolwich. ... Kidbrooke is a place in the London Borough of Greenwich. ... Lewisham is a district in south-east London, England and the principal settlement of the London Borough of Lewisham. ...


During World War II, much of the Battle of Britain was fought in the skies over the county. Between June 1944 and March 1945, over 10,000 V1 flying bombs, known as "Doodlebugs", were fired on London from bases in Northern France. Many were destroyed by aircraft, anti-aircraft guns, and barrage balloons, yet both London and Kent were hit by around 2,500 of these bombs. This article is about military history. ... The Vergeltungswaffe 1 Fi 103 / FZG-76 (V-1), known as the Flying bomb, Buzz bomb or Doodlebug, was the first modern guided missile used in wartime and the first cruise missile. ... US Marine Corps barrage balloon, Parris Island, May 1942 A barrage balloon is a large balloon tethered with metal cables, used to defend against bombardment by aircraft by damaging the aircraft on collision with the cables. ...


After the war, Kent's borders changed several more times. In 1965 the London boroughs of Bromley and Bexley were created from nine towns formerly in Kent.[15] In 1998, Rochester, Chatham, Gillingham, and Rainham left the administrative county of Kent to form the Unitary Authority of Medway. They have, however, remained in the ceremonial county of Kent.[16] During this reorganisation, through an administrative oversight, the city of Rochester lost its official city status.[17] The London Borough of Bromley is a London Borough of outer southeast London, England. ... The London Borough of Bexley is a London borough in south east Greater London which forms, with other boroughs, part of Outer London. ... , Rainham is a town near Gillingham in the county of Kent in South East England. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Medway is the name given to a conurbation in the north of Kent, England. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ...


Physical geography

Main article: Geography of Kent
'The White Cliffs of Dover'
'The White Cliffs of Dover'

Kent is the at the southeastern end of England. It borders the River Thames and the North Sea to the north, and the Straits of Dover and the English Channel to the south. France is 21 miles (34 km) across the Strait.[18] Geography of the county of Kent in South East England. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Albion White cliffs of Dover Categories: Cliffs ... File links The following pages link to this file: Albion White cliffs of Dover Categories: Cliffs ... This article is about the River Thames in southern England. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... The Strait of Dover (Fr. ... For the Thoroughbred racehorse of the same name, see English Channel (horse). ...


The major geographical features of the county are determined by a series of ridges and valleys running east-west across the county. These are the results of weathering to the Wealden dome, a dome across Kent and Sussex created by Alpine movements 10–20 million years ago. This dome consists of an upper layer of chalk above subsequent layers of upper greensand, upper clay, lower greensand, lower clay, and red sandstone. The ridges and valleys formed as the exposed clay eroded faster than the exposed chalk, greensand, or red sandstone. Weathering is the decomposition of rocks, soils and their minerals through direct contact with the Earths atmosphere. ... A weald once meant a dense forest, especially the famous great wood once stretching far beyond the ancient counties of Sussex and Kent, England, where this country of smaller woods is still called the Weald. ... Sussex is a historic county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex. ... The Alps from space The Alps cover a large area. ... The Needles, situated on the Isle Of Wight, are part of the extensive Southern England Chalk Formation. ... Greensand is an olive-green coloured sandstone rock which found in narrow bands, particularly associated with bands of chalk and clay in northern and western Europe. ... For other uses, see Clay (disambiguation). ... The New Red Sandstone is a chiefly-British geological term for the Triassic red beds that underlie the Jurassic Lias; the term distinguishes it from the Devonian Old Red Sandstone. ...

Geological map of southeast England, showing a concentric circular pattern formed by the weathering of the Wealden dome.
Geological map of southeast England, showing a concentric circular pattern formed by the weathering of the Wealden dome.

Sevenoaks, Maidstone, Ashford, and Folkestone are built on greensand,[19] while Tonbridge and Tunbridge Wells are built on red sandstone.[20] Dartford, Gravesend, the Medway towns, Sittingbourne, Faversham, Canterbury, Deal, and Dover are built on chalk.[19][20] The easterly section of the Wealden dome has been eroded away by the sea, and cliffs such as the white cliffs of Dover are present where a chalk ridge known as the North Downs meets the coast. Spanning Dover and Westerham is the Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.[21] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sevenoaks is a town in the Sevenoaks district of Kent in South East England and forms part of the London commuter belt. ... For other uses, see Maidstone (disambiguation). ... Ashford may mean the following places: In Australia: Ashford, New South Wales Ashford, South Australia Electoral district of Ashford - a state electoral district in South Australia In Canada: Ashford, Quebec In the Republic of Ireland: Ashford, County Wicklow In the United Kingdom: Ashford, North Devon Ashford, South Hams, Devon Ashford... , Folkestone (IPA: ) is a coastal resort town in the Shepway district of Kent, England. ... Tonbridge is a market town in the English county of Kent, with a population of 31,600 in 2001. ... Tunbridge Wells (officially Royal Tunbridge Wells) is a Wealden town in west Kent in England, just north of the border with East Sussex. ... Dartford is the principal town in the borough of Dartford. ... Gravesend can refer to: Gravesend, Kent, England Gravesend, New York, USA This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Sittingbourne is an industrial town about eight miles (12. ... Faversham is a town in Kent, England, in the district of Swale, roughly halfway between Sittingbourne and Canterbury. ... Canterbury is a cathedral city in east Kent in South East England and is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primate of All England, head of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Deal is a town in Kent, England. ... , Dover is a major channel port in the English county of Kent. ... The white cliffs of Dover The location and extent of the white cliffs of Dover. ... Geology of the South East, Chalk is light green (6) A cross-section , showing the Wealden Dome, and relating it to the towns of Kent The North Downs are a ridge of chalk hills located in south east England that stretch for 120 miles (190 km) from Hampshire through Surrey... Westerham is a scenic village which is now almost a town. ... Kent Downs is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) in Kent, England. ...


The Wealden dome is a Mesozoic structure lying on a Palaeozoic foundation, which usually creates the right conditions for coal formation. This is found in East Kent roughly between Deal, Canterbury, and Dover. The coal measures within the Westphalian Sandstone are deep (below 244 m – 396 m) and subject to flooding. They occur in two major troughs, which extend under the English Channel where similar coalfields are located.[22] The Mesozoic Era is one of three geologic eras of the Phanerozoic eon. ... The Palaeozoic is a major division of the geologic timescale, one of four geologic eras. ... A coal measure (stratigraphic unit) is the name given to any rock sequence that occurs in the upper part of the Carboniferous System in Europe. ...


Seismic activity has occasionally been recorded in Kent, though the epicentres were offshore. In 1382 and 1580 there were two earthquakes exceeding 6.0 on the Richter Scale. In 1776, 1950, and on 28 April 2007 there were earthquakes of around 4.3. The 2007 earthquake caused physical damage in Folkestone.[23] The epicenter or epicentre (ancient Greek: επίκεντρον) is the point on the Earths surface that is directly above or below the center of a localized explosive event or point of seismic energy release. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Landsat image of the earthquakes epicentre, based on USGS location data which was later revised. ...

Geological cross section of Kent, showing how it relates to major towns
Geological cross section of Kent, showing how it relates to major towns

The coastline of Kent is continuously changing, due to tectonic uplift and coastal erosion. Until about 960, the Isle of Thanet was an island, separated by the Wantsum channel, formed around a deposit of chalk; over time, the channels silted up with alluvium. Similarly Romney Marsh and Dungeness have been formed by accumulation of alluvium.[20] Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... A tectonic uplift is a geological process most often caused by plate tectonics which increases elevation. ... Many stretches of the coastline of East Anglia, England, are prone to high rates of erosion, as illustrated by this collapsed section of the cliffs at Hunstanton, Norfolk. ... The Isle of Thanet is an area of northeast Kent, England. ... The Wantsum Channel is the name given to a now silted-up watercourse in the English county of Kent. ... Alluvium (from the Latin, alluvius, from alluere, to wash against) is soil or sediments deposited by a river or other running water. ...


Kent's principal river, the River Medway, rises near Edenbridge and flows some 25 miles (40 km) eastwards to a point near Maidstone. Here it turns north and breaks through the North Downs at Rochester, then joins the River Thames as its final tributary near Sheerness.[24] The river is tidal as far as Allington lock, but in earlier times, cargo-carrying vessels reached as far upstream as Tonbridge.[24] The Medway has captured the head waters of other rivers such as the River Darent. Other rivers of Kent include the River Stour in the east. Edenbridge is a town in the Weald of Kent, England on the River Eden, near the spot where the borders of Kent, Surrey and Sussex meet. ... For other uses, see Maidstone (disambiguation). ... , Sheerness is a town located beside the mouth of the River Medway on the northwest corner of the Isle of Sheppey in north Kent, England. ... Allington is an almost entirely modern village situated on either side of the A20 road west of Maidstone in Kent. ... Tonbridge is a market town in the English county of Kent, with a population of 31,600 in 2001. ... The confluence of the River Darent (left) and the River Cray (right) on Crayford Marshes. ... There are four rivers draining the county of Kent. ... The River Stour is a river in Kent, England. ...


Demographics

Kent Compared
2001 UK census Kent South East England England
Total population 1,579,206 8,000,645 49,138,831
Foreign born 5.8% 8.1% 9.2%
White 96.5% 95.1% 90.9%
Asian 2.0% 2.7% 4.6%
Black 0.4% 0.7% 2.3%
Christian 74.6% 72.8% 72%
Muslim 0.6% 1.4% 3.1%
Sikh 0.7% 0.5% 0.7%

As of the 2001 UK census,[25] Kent, including Medway, had 1,579,206 residents and 646,308 households, of which 1,329,718 residents and 546,742 households were within the administrative boundaries. Of those households, 48.9% were married couples living together, 9.0% were co-habiting couples and 8.7% were lone parents; 28.0% of households consisted of individuals, 14.6% had someone of pensionable age living alone, and 30.4% included children aged under 16 or a person aged 16 to 18 who was in full-time education. For every 100 females, there were 93.9 males. UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... South East England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... This article is about a living arrangement. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The ethnicity of the Kent was 96.5% White, 0.9% mixed race, 0.3% Chinese, 1.7% other Asian and 0.4% Black. The place of birth for residents was 94.2% United Kingdom, 0.7% Republic of Ireland, 0.5% Germany, 0.9% other Western Europe countries, 0.3% Eastern Europe, 0.8% Africa, 0.6% Far East, 0.9% South Asia, 0.2% Middle East, 0.4% North America, 0.1% South America and 0.3% Oceania. Religion was recorded as 74.6% Christian, 0.7% Sikh, 0.6% Muslim, 0.4% Hindu, 0.2% Buddhist and 0.1% Jewish, while 15.2% were recorded as having no religion, 0.3% had an alternative religion, and 7.8% did not state their religion. A current understanding of Western Europe. ... Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium orange),members of the Warsaw pact (light orange), and other former Communist regimes not aligned with Moscow (lightest orange). ... The far east as a cultural block includes East Asia, Southeast Asia, Northeast Asia and South Asia. ... Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... For other uses, see Oceania (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Bhavna says there are 300 million gods in Hinduism. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ...


Government

Kent County Council (KCC) and its 12 district councils administer most of the county (3352 km²), while the Medway unitary authority administers the more densely populated remainder (192 km²). Together they have around 300 town and parish councils. Kent County Council's headquarters are in Maidstone,[26] while Medway's offices are in Strood and Gillingham. Kent County Council is the local authority for the county of Kent in south-east England, United Kingdom. ... There is no single system of local government in the United Kingdom. ... Medway is the name given to a conurbation in the north of Kent, England. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... In the United Kingdom, town councils are civil parish councils, where the civil parish is a town. ... Main articles: Local government in the United Kingdom, Parish and Civil parish In England parish councils were formed in 1894 to take over local oversight of social welfare and civic duties in towns and villages. ... For other uses, see Maidstone (disambiguation). ... Statistics Population: 33182 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TQ725695 Administration District: Medway Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Kent Historic county: Kent Services Police force: Kent Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South East Coast Post office and telephone Post town: ROCHESTER... , Gillingham is a town in Kent, England, forming part of the Medway conurbation; it is a constituent of Medway unitary authority. ...


As of the 2005 county council elections, Kent County Council was controlled by the Conservative Party;[27] 57 of the Council's 84 seats were held by the Conservatives, 21 by the Labour Party, 6 by the Liberal Democrats and 1 by an Independent.[28] As of the 2007 local elections, Medway Council was controlled by the Conservatives; 33 of the Council's 55 seats were held by the Conservatives, 13 by the Labour Party, 8 by the Liberal Democrats and 1 by an Independent.[29]. All of Kent's district councils were controlled by the Conservatives except for Ashford Borough Council, which was in no overall control.[30] Elections for local government were held in the United Kingdom on May 5, 2005 along with the 2005 general election. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Entrance to a polling station in the market town of Haverhill, Suffolk on 3 May 2007. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Ashford Borough Councils Coat of Arms Ashford is a local government district and borough in Kent, England. ... NOC can refer to: National Olympic Committee, a group eligible to enter athletes and teams into an Olympic Games. ...


At the national level, Kent is represented in Parliament by 17 MPs, 10 of whom are Conservative and 7 are Labour. Kent is in the European Parliament constituency of South East England, which elects ten members of the European Parliament.[31] Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... South East England is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... A Member of the European Parliament (English abbreviation MEP) is a member of the European Unions directly-elected legislative body, the European Parliament. ...


Economy

As of the 2001 UK census,[25] employment statistics for the residents in Kent, including Medway, were as follows: 41.1% in full-time employment, 12.4% in part-time employment, 9.1% self-employed, 2.9% unemployed, 2.3% students with jobs, 3.7% students without jobs, 12.3% retired, 7.3% looking after home or family, 4.3% permanently sick or disabled, and 2.7% economically inactive for other reasons. Of residents aged 16–74, 16% had a higher education qualification or the equivalent, compared to 20% nationwide.[25] UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ...

Converted oast houses at Frittenden.
Converted oast houses at Frittenden.

The average hours worked per week by residents of Kent were 43.1 for males and 30.9 for females. Their industry of employment was 17.3% retail, 12.4% manufacturing, 11.8% real estate, 10.3% health and social work, 8.9% construction, 8.2% transport and communications, 7.9% education, 6.0% public administration and defence, 5.6% finance, 4.8% other community and personal service activities, 4.1% hotels and restaurants, 1.6% agriculture, 0.8% energy and water supply, 0.2% mining, and 0.1% private households. This is higher than the whole of England for construction and transport/communications, and lower for manufacturing. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ...


Kent is sometimes known as the "Garden of England" for its abundance of orchards and hop gardens. Distinctive hop-drying buildings called oast houses are common in the countryside, although many have been converted into dwellings. Nearer to London, market gardens also flourish. Species Humulus lupulus L. Humulus japonicus Siebold & Zucc. ... Oast House in Tudeley, Kent, now in residential use An oast house is an example of vernacular architecture in England, especially Kent and Sussex. ...


However, in recent years, there has been a significant drop in agriculture, and industry and services are increasing their utilization of the area. This is illustrated by the following table of economic indicator gross value added (GVA) between 1995 and 2000 (figures are in millions of British Pounds Sterling). [32] The Gross value added is GDP - taxes on products + subsidies on products = GVA GVA + taxes on products - subsidies on products = GDP See also Measures of national income and output External links GVA - Gross Value Added ...

Year Regional GVA[A] Agriculture Industry[B] Services[C]
County of Kent (excluding Medway)
1995 12,369 379 3.1% 3,886 31.4% 8,104 65.5%
2000 15,259 259 1.7% 4,601 30.2% 10,399 68.1%
2003 18,126 287 1.6% 5,057 27.9% 12,783 70.5%
Medway
1995 1,823 21 3.1% 560 31.4% 1,243 68.2%
2000 2,348 8 1.7% 745 30.2% 1,595 67.9%
2003 2,671 10 1.6% 802 27.9% 1,859 69.6%
A  Components may not sum to totals due to rounding
B  includes energy and construction
C  includes financial intermediation services indirectly measured



North Kent is heavily industrialised with cement-making at Northfleet and Cuxton, brickmaking at Sittingbourne, shipbuilding on the Medway and Swale, engineering and aircraft design and construction at Rochester, chemicals at Dartford and papermaking at Swanley, and oil refining at Grain.[15] There are two nuclear power stations at Dungeness, although the older one, built in 1965, was closed at the end of 2006.[32] For other uses, see Cement (disambiguation). ... Location within the British Isles Northfleet as a name is derived from North creek (or inlet), and the settlement on the shore of the River Thames adjacent to Gravesend was known as Norfluet in the Domesday Book, and Northflet in 1201. ... adamsan 15:41, 19 October 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... See also Wikimedia Commons has multimedia related to: Bricks Masonry Brickwork Ceramics Fire brick In role-playing games, a brick is a character whose main useful skill is being able to take a great deal of damage (usually physical damage) and act as a shield for weaker allies. ... Men from Francisco de Orellanas expedition building a small brigantine, the San Pedro, to be used in the search for food Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ... The name The Swale refers to the strip of water separating North Kent from the Isle of Sheppey. ... Engineering is the discipline of acquiring and applying knowledge of design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... Six F-16 Fighting Falcons with the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds aerial demonstration team fly in delta formation in front of the Empire State Building. ... A chemical substance is any material substance used in or obtained by a process in chemistry: A chemical compound is a substance consisting of two or more chemical elements that are chemically combined in fixed proportions. ... The Diamond Sutra of the Chinese Tang Dynasty, the oldest dated printed book in the world, found at Dunhuang, from 868 AD. Papermaking is the process of making paper, a material which is ubiquitous today for writing and packaging. ... Swanley is a town and civil parish in the Sevenoaks District of Kent, England. ... View of Shell Oil Refinery in Martinez, California. ... Grain church The Isle of Grain, (OE Greon meaning gravel) is in north Kent, England at the eastern end of the Hoo peninsula. ... There are two nuclear power stations located near Dungeness in the south east of Kent, England. ... Dungeness is the headland of a shingle beach on the Romney Marsh in Kent, England. ...


Cement-making, papermaking, and coal-mining were important industries in Kent during the 19th and 20th century. Cement came to the fore in the 19th century when massive building projects were undertaken. The ready supply of chalk and huge pits between Stone and Gravesend bear testament to that industry. There were also other workings around Burham on the tidal Medway.[33] Stone, also known as Stone-next-Dartford is one of a string of villages lying along the Dartford to Gravesend road on the south bank of the River Thames in Kent, England. ... Gravesend is a town in northwest Kent, England, on the south bank of the Thames, opposite Tilbury in Essex. ... Burham is a village and civil parish in the Tonbridge and Malling district of Kent, England. ...


Kent's original paper mills stood on streams like the River Darent, tributaries of the River Medway, and on the River Stour. Two 18th century mills were on the River Len and at Tovil on the River Loose. In the late 19th century huge modern mills were built at Dartford and Northfleet on the River Thames and at Kemsley on The Swale. International Paper Companys Kraft paper mill in Georgetown, South Carolina. ... The confluence of the River Darent (left) and the River Cray (right) on Crayford Marshes. ... The River Stour is a river in Kent, England. ... There are four rivers draining the county of Kent. ... Tovil is a suburb of the town of Maidstone, the county town of Kent in the South East of England. ... Sittingbourne is an industrial town about eight miles (12. ...


From about 1900, several coal pits operated in East Kent. The Kent coalfield was mined during the 20th century at several collieries,[34] including Chislet, Tilmanstone, Betteshanger, and the Snowdown Colliery, which ran from 1908 to 1986.[35] The Kent coalfield was located in the easten part of the English county of Kent. ...


Arts

Kent has provided inspiration for several notable writers and artists. Canterbury's religious role gave rise to Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, a key development in the English language. The father of novelist Charles Dickens worked at the Chatham Dockyard; in many of his books, the celebrated novelist featured the scenery of Chatham, Rochester, and the Cliffe marshes.[36] The landscape painter J. M. W. Turner spent part of his childhood in the town of Margate in East Kent, and regularly returned to visit it throughout his life. The East Kent coast inspired many of his works, including some of his most famous seascapes.[37] During the late 1930s, Nobel Prize-awarded novelist William Golding worked as a teacher at Maidstone Grammar School, where he met his future wife Ann Brookfield.[37] Chaucer redirects here. ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... Cliffe-at-Hoo, known as Cliffe, is a village on the Hoo peninsula in Kent, England, reached from the Medway Towns by a three-mile journey along the B2000. ... Joseph Mallord William Turner (23 April 1775[1] – 19 December 1851) was an English Romantic landscape painter, watercolourist and printmaker, whose style can be said to have laid the foundation for Impressionism. ... Margate is a town in Thanet, Kent, England (population about 60,000). ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, are awarded for physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace. ... Sir William Gerald Golding (19 September 1911 – 19 June 1993) was a British novelist, poet and Nobel Prize for Literature laureate best known for his novel Lord of the Flies. ... Maidstone Grammar School is a secondary school located in Maidstone, United Kingdom. ...


Transport

Main article: Transport in Kent

Historical and current transport in the county of Kent in South East England. ...

Roads

The M2 and the Channel Tunnel rail-link crossing the Medway Valley, south of Rochester.
The M2 and the Channel Tunnel rail-link crossing the Medway Valley, south of Rochester.

With the Roman invasion, a road network was constructed to connect London to the Channel ports of Dover, Lympne and Richborough. The London–Dover road was Watling Street. These roads are now approximately the A2, B2068, A257, and the A28. The A2 runs through Dartford (A207), Gravesend, Rochester, Canterbury and Dover; the A20 through Eltham, Wrotham, Maidstone, Charing, Ashford. Hythe, Folkestone and Dover; the A21 through Bromley, Sevenoaks, Tonbridge, Tunbridge Wells and on to Hastings in East Sussex.[15] In the 1960s, two motorways were built; the M2 from Medway to Faversham, and the M20 from Swanley to Folkestone. Part of the M25 runs through Kent, from Westerham to the Kent and Essex tunnel at Dartford. The Dartford tunnel has been joined by the Queen Elizabeth II Bridge, together providing four lanes in each direction. The M26 motorway, built in 1980, provides a short link between the M25 at Sevenoaks and the M20 near Wrotham. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (2016 × 1512 pixel, file size: 723 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Attrib to Clem Rutter, Rochester,Kent. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (2016 × 1512 pixel, file size: 723 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Attrib to Clem Rutter, Rochester,Kent. ... The modern Watling Street crossing the Medway at Rochester near the Roman and Celt crossings Watling Street is the name given to an ancient trackway in England and Wales that was first used by the Celts mainly between the modern cities of Canterbury and St Albans. ... Not to be confused with A2 road (Northern Ireland). ... The A21 is a major road in England running from Lewisham in southeast London to Hastings, East Sussex. ... There are also M2 motorways in Northern Ireland and Australia The M2 motorway is a motorway in England. ... The M20 motorway is a major road in England. ... The M25 motorway looking south between junctions 14 and 15, near Heathrow Airport. ... , The Queen Elizabeth II Bridge The Dartford Crossing joins Dartford and Thurrock across the River Thames, to the east of London. ... , The Queen Elizabeth II Bridge The Dartford Crossing joins Dartford and Thurrock across the River Thames, to the east of London. ... The M26 motorway is a motorway in Kent, England. ... Sevenoaks is a town in the Sevenoaks district of Kent in South East England and forms part of the London commuter belt. ... Wrotham (pronounced ) is a village situated on the Pilgrims Way in Kent, at the foot of the North Downs. ...


Water

The medieval Cinque Ports, except for Dover, have all now silted up. The Medway Estuary has been an important port and naval base for 500 years. The River Medway is tidal up to Allington and navigable up to Tonbridge. Kent's two canals are the Royal Military Canal between Hythe and Rye, which still exists, and the Thames and Medway Canal between Strood and Gravesend. Built in 1824, it was purchased in 1846 by the railways, which partially backfilled it.[15] A container port is located at Ramsgate. Flag of the Cinque Ports Formally, in Kent and Sussex there are five Head Ports making up the Confederation of the Cinque Ports, often pronounced as the anglicised sink ports, and meaning five ports (cinque in French means five and ports is to be connected to the Italian word porto... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Rio de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... Allington is an almost entirely modern village situated on either side of the A20 road west of Maidstone in Kent. ... See also Ramsgate (disambiguation) for other places with this name. ...


Railways

A Eurostar train at km 48 on HS1, the Channel Tunnel Rail Link, near Strood
A Eurostar train at km 48 on HS1, the Channel Tunnel Rail Link, near Strood

The earliest locomotive-driven passenger-carrying railway in Britain was the Canterbury and Whitstable Railway which opened in 1830.[38] This and the London and Greenwich Railway later merged into South Eastern Railways (SER).[39] By the 1850s, SER's networks had expanded to Ashford, Ramsgate, Canterbury, Tunbridge Wells, and the Medway towns. SER's major London termini were London Bridge, Charing Cross, and Cannon Street. Kent also had a second major railway, the London, Chatham and Dover Railway (LCDR). Originally the East Kent Railway in 1858, it linked the northeast Kent coast with London terminals at Victoria and Blackfriars. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (2016 × 1512 pixel, file size: 834 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Attrib to Clem Rutter, Rochester,Kent. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (2016 × 1512 pixel, file size: 834 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Attrib to Clem Rutter, Rochester,Kent. ... A Eurostar on the CTRL going through the Medway Towns Eurostar is a train service connecting the UK with Paris (Gare du Nord), Lille and Brussels (Brussels South). ... A Eurostar train on the CTRL, near Ashford The Channel Tunnel Rail Link (CTRL) is a project to construct a 108 km (67 mile) high-speed railway line from London through Kent to the British end of the Channel Tunnel. ... Statistics Population: 33182 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TQ725695 Administration District: Medway Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Kent Historic county: Kent Services Police force: Kent Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South East Coast Post office and telephone Post town: ROCHESTER... The Canterbury and Whitstable Railway, sometimes referred to colloquially as the Crab and Winkle Line, opened in 1830 between Canterbury and Whitstable in the county of Kent, England. ... The London and Greenwich Railway (LGR) and the Canterbury and Whitstable Railway (CWR) in East Kent were the earliest railways to serve the then county of Kent: eventually both became parts of the South Eastern Railway (SER). ... The London and Greenwich Railway (LGR) and the Canterbury and Whitstable Railway (CWR) in East Kent were the earliest railways to serve the then county of Kent: eventually both became parts of the South Eastern Railway (SER). ... London Bridge station is a National Rail and London Underground station in the London Borough of Southwark, which occupies a large area on two levels, immediately south-east of London Bridge and 1. ... Charing Cross railway station. ... Cannon Street is a National Rail and London Underground station complex in the City of London, the financial district of London in England. ... Crest of the LCDR on the first Blackfriars Railway Bridge The London, Chatham and Dover Railway (LCDR) was a railway company that operated in south-eastern England between 1859 and 1923 before grouping with three other companies to form the Southern Railway. ... Description The East Kent Railway is a short heritage railway in Kent, England. ... Victoria station in London is a London Underground and National Rail station in the City of Westminster. ... Blackfriars Station has most of its platforms on a bridge over the river. ...


The two companies merged in 1899, forming the South Eastern and Chatham Railway (SECR). In the aftermath of World War I, the government's Railways Act 1921 grouped railway companies together; the SECR joined neighbouring London, Brighton and South Coast Railway (LBSCR) and London and South Western Railway (LSWR) to form the Southern Railway.[39] Britain's railways were nationalised in 1948, forming British Rail. The railways were privatised in 1996 and most Kent passenger services were franchised to Connex South Eastern.[40] Following financial difficulties, Connex lost the franchise and was replaced by Southeastern.[41] Coat of Arms. ... The Railways Act of 1921, also known as the Grouping Act, was an enactment by the British government of David Lloyd George intended to stem the losses being made by many of the countrys 120 railway companies, move the railways away from internal competition, and to retain some of... The LB&SCRs coat of arms, displayed above the entrance to Gipsy Hill railway station. ... Waterloo Station The London and South Western Railway (L&SWR) was a railway company in England from 1840 to 1923. ... A London and South Western Railway weight restriction sign on a bridge across the Tarka Trail (formerly the Barnstaple to Great Torrington railway) at Instow, North Devon. ... This article is about the defunct entity British Railways, which later traded as British Rail. The History of rail transport in Great Britain is covered in its own article. ... Franchising (from the French for honesty or freedom[1]) is a method of doing business wherein a franchisor licenses proven methods of doing business to a franchisee in exchange for a recurring payment, fees and a percentage of sales or profits. ... A Class 423 4Vep unit in Connex South Eastern livery at Waterloo East in February 2003. ... This article is about the company that began operations in April 2006. ...


The Channel Tunnel was completed in 1994 and connects to London Waterloo by a high speed link via Ashford International. In November 2007, the London terminus moved from Waterloo to St Pancras, and a new station, Ebbsfleet International, opened between Dartford and Gravesend, serving northern Kent.[42] .The high speed lines will be utilised to provide a faster train service to coastal towns like Ramsgate and Folkestone. The British terminal at Cheriton in west Folkestone, from the Pilgrims Way. ... For other uses, see Waterloo station (disambiguation). ... A Eurostar train on the CTRL, near Ashford The Channel Tunnel Rail Link (CTRL) is a project to construct a 108 km (67 mile) high-speed railway line from London through Kent to the British end of the Channel Tunnel. ... Ashford International railway station serves Ashford in Kent. ... St Pancras railway station is located in the St Pancras area of central London, between the new British Library building to the west and Kings Cross station to the east. ... Ebbsfleet International railway station is a new railway station in Ebbsfleet, in the borough of Dartford, Kent. ... Dartford is the principal town in the borough of Dartford. ... Gravesend can refer to: Gravesend, Kent, England Gravesend, New York, USA This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... See also Ramsgate (disambiguation) for other places with this name. ... , Folkestone (IPA: ) is a coastal resort town in the Shepway district of Kent, England. ...

Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway

In addition to the "mainline" railways, there are several light, heritage, and industrial railways in Kent. There are three heritage, standard gauge railways; Spa Valley Railway near Tunbridge Wells on the old Tunbridge Wells West branch, East Kent Railway on the old East Kent coalfield area and the Kent and East Sussex Railway on the Weald around Tenterden. In addition there is the 15 inch gauge, tourist-oriented Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway on the southeast Kent coast along the Dungeness peninsular. Finally, there is the 2 ft 6 in, industrial Sittingbourne & Kemsley Light Railway. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 685 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Northern Chief at New Romney copyright (c) Ben Vincer 2006,2007 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 685 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Northern Chief at New Romney copyright (c) Ben Vincer 2006,2007 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version... Jinty 47493. ... // Description The East Kent Railway (EKR) is a microscopic heritage railway in Kent, England. ... The Norwegian climbing into Tenterden Town Station The Kent and East Sussex Railway, shown with other railway lines in Kent and East Sussex. ... Two 15in trains Preparing train in Hythe The Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway is a 15 inch (380 mm) gauge heritage railway in Kent, England. ... The Sittingbourne & Kemsley Light Railway operates a 2ft (610mm) gauge railway line from Sittingbourne to the banks of the The Swale. ...


Air

A limited number of charter flights are provided by Kent's London Biggin Hill Airport, Kent International Airport at Manston, and London Ashford Airport at Lydd. However, most passengers across the South East use the larger Heathrow, Gatwick, Stanstead and Luton airports. In 2002, it was revealed that the government is considering building a new four-runway airport on the marshland near the village of Cliffe on the Hoo Peninsula, but this plan is being protested by cultural and environmental groups.[43] London Biggin Hill Airport (IATA: BQH, ICAO: EGKB), formerly RAF Biggin Hill, is an airport at Biggin Hill in London Borough of Bromley, England. ... Kent International Airport (IATA: MSE, ICAO: EGMH) is an airport in Kent, England. ... Manston is a place in the Thanet district of Kent. ... London Ashford Airport or Lydd Airport (IATA: LYX, ICAO: EGMD) is located 1. ... Arms of Lydd Town Council Lydd is a town in Kent, England, lyins on the Romney Marsh. ... Heathrow redirects here. ... Gatwick Airport (IATA: LGW, ICAO: EGKK) is Londons second largest airport and the second busiest airport in the United Kingdom after Heathrow. ... The lawn in front of Stansted Airport used to attract large numbers of people waiting for their flight during the summer. ... London Luton Airport (IATA: LTN, ICAO: EGGW) (previously called Luton International Airport)[3] is an international airport located on the edge of the town of Luton, Bedfordshire, England approximately north of London. ... Cliffe-at-Hoo, known as Cliffe, is a village on the Hoo peninsula in Kent, England, reached from the Medway Towns by a three-mile journey along the B2000. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Education

See also: List of schools in Kent

The county has three universities; Canterbury Christ Church University with campuses throughout East Kent, University of Kent, with campuses in Canterbury and Medway, and University of Greenwich, with sites at Woolwich, Eltham, London and Medway. Whereas much of the UK adopted a comprehensive education system in the 1970s, Kent County Council (KCC) and Medway Unitary Authority are among around fifteen[44] local authorities still providing wholly selective education through the eleven-plus high schools and grammar schools. Together, the two Kent authorities have 38 of the 164 grammar schools remaining in the UK.[45] List of primary schools, middle schools, secondary schools, special schools, further education colleges and universities in Kent, England. ... Canterbury Christ Church University is a new university based in Kent. ... East Kent and West Kent are one-time traditional subdivisions of the English county of Kent, kept alive by the Association of the Men of Kent and Kentish Men: an organisation formed in 1913. ... Affiliations University Alliance Association of Commonwealth Universities European University Association Website http://www. ... Statue of George II in the Grand Square of the University, with the dome above the Chapel entrance to the left. ... , Woolwich town hall dates from when this was a borough in its own right. ... Eltham is a place in the London Borough of Greenwich. ... A Comprehensive school is a type of school providing secondary level education in England and Wales. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Eleven Plus is an examination which was given to students in their last year of primary education in the United Kingdom under the Tripartite System. ... Secondary modern schools are a type of school in British educational systems, part of the Tripartite System. ... A grammar school is a school that may, depending on regional usage as exemplified below, provide either secondary education or, a much less common usage, primary education (also known as elementary). Grammar schools trace their origins back to medieval Europe, as schools in which university preparatory subjects, such as Latin...


KCC has the largest education department of any local authority in the UK,[46] providing school places for over 289,000 pupils.

Schools in Kent (data from 2000)[47]
LEA Nursery Primary Secondary
(High)
Secondary
(Grammar)
Special Pupil
Referral
Units
Independent City
Technology
College
Total
KCC 1 475 74 32 34 11 83 1 711
Medway 0 89 14 6 3 1 7 0 120

For the 2005-06 school year, KCC and Medway introduced a standardised school year, based on six terms, as recommended by the Local Government Association in its 2000 report, "The Rhythms of Schooling".[48] A special school is a school catering to students who have special educational needs (SEN), for example, because of learning difficulties or physical disabilities. ... A Pupil Referral Unit (PRU) is any centre maintained by an english Local Education Authority for children who are not able to attend a mainstream or special school. ... In England, City Technology Colleges (CTCs) are independent schools which charge no fees as their recurrent costs are paid by the DfES and businesses within the private sector. ... The Local Government Assocation is a body for advancing the interests of local authorities in the England and Wales. ...


Between September 2003 and August 2004, 70% of pupils in the Kent authority achieved Key Stage 2 Level 4 in mathematics, compared to 74% of pupils in England as a whole; 74% achieved Key Stage 2 Level 4 in English, compared to 78% nationally; 56% achieved five or more GCSE A*–C grades or the equivalent, compared to 54% nationally.[49] Key Stage 2 is the legal term for the four years of schooling in maintained schools in England and Wales normally known as Year 3, Year 4, Year 5 and Year 6, when pupils are aged between 7 and 11. ... GCSE is an acronym that can refer to: General Certificate of Secondary Education global common subexpression elimination - an optimisation technique used by some compilers This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


As of the 2001 census, Kent residents between the ages of 16 and 74 received their highest academic qualifications in the following proportions: 16.8% a higher education qualification or the equivalent, 8.0% two or more A-levels or the equivalent, 21.0% five or more GCSE grades A*–C or the equivalent, and 18.2% one or more GCSEs passes or the equivalent. Of the remaining portion, 28.3% had no qualifications and 7.7% had a qualification of an unknown level.[50] The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... The A-level, short for Advanced Level, is a General Certificate of Education qualification in the United Kingdom, usually taken by students during the optional final two years of secondary school (Years 12 & 13, commonly called the Sixth Form), or at a separate sixth form college or further education college...


See also

Kent Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the ceremonial county of Kent, England. ... // Ashford Ashford itself is unparished. ... A list of tourist attractions in the English county of Kent // Category: ... The following are lists of recreational walks in Kent, England. ... The Thames Gateway is an area of land stretching 40 miles eastwards from East London on both sides of the River Thames and the Thames Estuary. ... List of notable residents of the county of Kent in England. ... For the area of the same name, see Isle of Thanet. ...

References

  1. ^ Kent loses its Garden of England title to North Yorkshire The Guardian June 1, 2006
  2. ^ Garden of England title defended BBC 1 June 2006
  3. ^ Ashbee, Paul (2005). Kent in prehistoric times. Tempus. 
  4. ^ Glover, J.. Place names of Kent. 
  5. ^ Witney, K. P. (1982). The Kingdom of Kent. 
  6. ^ Victoria County History of Kent. KentArchaeology.org.uk (May 2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  7. ^ Archbishop of Canterbury. Spartacus.SchoolNet.co.uk. Retrieved on 2007-06-19.
  8. ^ David Bates (1975). The Character and Career of Odo, Bishop of Bayeux (1049/50-1097). Speculum. 
  9. ^ Peasants' Revolt. Britannia.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  10. ^ Sir Thomas WYATT, "The Younger". TudorPlace.com.ar. Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  11. ^ (2005) The Historic Dockyard Chatham — where legends were created. Jarrold Publishing. 
  12. ^ The Dutch In The Medway. DeRuyter.org. Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  13. ^ Oliver, Richard (1995). Ordnance Survey maps: a concise guide for historians 2nd Ed. Ordnance Survey. ISBN 1870598245. 
  14. ^ South-East England. Smuggler's Britain. Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  15. ^ a b c d Jessup, Frank W. (1966). Kent History Illustrated. Kent County Council. 
  16. ^ Medway. Communities and Local Government. Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  17. ^ Error costs Rochester city status. BBC News (2002-05-16). Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  18. ^ English Channel. Microsoft® Encarta® Online Encyclopedia 2007. Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  19. ^ a b (1992) Greensand Way in Kent. Kent Count Council. ISBN 1-873010-23-0. 
  20. ^ a b c Britain's Structure and Scenery, L.Dudley Stamp., Pub Sept 1946, Collins New Naturalist Series.
  21. ^ Kent Downs. KentDowns.org. Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  22. ^ Geology of Kent and Boulonnais. The Geology Shop (2000). Retrieved on 2007-04-21.
  23. ^ Quake causes Kent Families to flee Homes. The Guardian (2007-04-29). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  24. ^ a b Bowskill, Derek. Map Of The River Medway. 
  25. ^ a b c Neighbourhood Statistics. Statistics.gov.uk. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.
  26. ^ Council and democracy. Kent County Council. Retrieved on 2007-04-19.
  27. ^ 2005 - Election Results In Kent. Kent Liberal Democrat. Retrieved on 2007-04-03.
  28. ^ Councillors. Kent County Council. Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  29. ^ Democratically elected representatives in Medway. Medway Council. Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  30. ^ English Councils A-Z. BBC. Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  31. ^ UK MEPs. UK Office Of The European Parliament. Retrieved on 2007-04-03.
  32. ^ a b Regional Gross Value Added (PDF). Office for National Statistics. Retrieved on 2007-04-03.
  33. ^ The Chatham News Index (PDF). Parret & Neves (1996). Retrieved on 2007-04-19.
  34. ^ Coal fields Heritage Initiative. Dover Museum. Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  35. ^ Snowdown Colliery. FreeUK.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-19.
  36. ^ Charles Dickens. InfoBritain. Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  37. ^ a b The Turner Connection. TurnerContemporary.org. Retrieved on 2007-06-20.
  38. ^ The lost railway. BBC. Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  39. ^ a b History of the South Eastern & Chatham Railway. The South Eastern & Chatham Railway Society. Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  40. ^ Failed rail franchise 'needed time'. BBC (2003-11-13). Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  41. ^ Rail workers vote to hold strikes. BBC (2006-04-13). Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  42. ^ New station means Eurostar change. BBC (2006-09-12). Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  43. ^ Airport plan threatens Dickens' legacy. BBC (2006-09-12). Retrieved on 2007-06-20.
  44. ^ Call for end to selective education as 'grammar school areas' fail. The Independent (2007-01-20). Retrieved on 2007-05-14.
  45. ^ Grammar schools have expanded. BBC News (2004-03-26). Retrieved on 2007-04-03.
  46. ^ Kent's selective schools compared. BBC News (2003-01-17). Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  47. ^ Department for Education and Skills. Department for Education and Skills. Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  48. ^ Kent County Council. Kent County Council. Retrieved on 2007-04-03.
  49. ^ Key Figures for Education, Skills and Training. National Statistics. Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  50. ^ Qualifications and Students. National Statistics. Retrieved on 2007-04-20.

is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Professor David Bates is a British historian. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Kent County Council – local government website
  • Kent Wildlife Trust – the most active conservation trust in the county
  • Kent Online – a Kent Messenger Group website
  • Camelot Village – Kent heritage
  • Kent Downs – Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty website
  • Village Net – photographs and historic details of villages in Kent and East Sussex
  • historic-kent.co.uk – further information on villages throughout Kent.
  • BBC – origins of Kent placenames
  • Kent Coast in Pictures – photographs of the coastline of Kent.
  • Kent County Cricket Club
  • Heart of Kent – Official Tourist Guide
  • BBC feature on the Kent eleven-plus

Coordinates: 51.19° N 0.73° E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Kent: Information From Answers.com (3097 words)
Kent is a county in England, south-east of London.
Kent, because of its sobriquet "the Garden of England", might be regarded as a picturesque rural county, but farming is still an industry.
Kent is sometimes known as the Garden of England because of its agricultural influence, extensive orchards and hop-gardens.
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