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Encyclopedia > Kensington Palace

Coordinates: 51°30′19″N, 0°11′18″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Kensington Palace Park
Kensington Palace Park

Kensington Palace is a royal residence set in Kensington Gardens in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London, England. It has been a residence of the British Royal Family since the 17th century. Today it is the official residence of The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester; the Duke and Duchess of Kent; and Prince and Princess Michael of Kent. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 592 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The content of this image was reviewed by Samulili and afterwards uploaded by FlickrLickr. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 592 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The content of this image was reviewed by Samulili and afterwards uploaded by FlickrLickr. ... See also Kensington Gardens, South Australia, a suburb of Adelaide, Australia Kensington Gardens, once the private gardens of Kensington Palace, is one of the Royal Parks of London, lying immediately to the west of Hyde Park. ... The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea (often abbreviated to RBKC) is a London borough in the west side of central London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony The British Royal Family is shared between the Commonwealth Realms; this article focuses on the perspective of United Kingdom. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester KG GCVO (Richard Alexander Walter George Windsor; born 26 August 1944) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandson of King George V. He has been Duke of Gloucester since his fathers death in 1974. ... The Duchess of Gloucester (born 20 June 1946), is a member of the British Royal Family, the wife of Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester, a grandchild of King George V. The Duchess of Gloucester, with her husband, undertakes royal duties on behalf of the Dukes cousin, Queen Elizabeth II... Field Marshal Prince Edward, Duke of Kent (Edward George Nicholas Patrick Paul; born 9 October 1935) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandchild of George V. He has held the title of Duke of Kent since 1942. ... The Duchess of Kent (Katharine Lucy Mary; born Worsley, 22 February 1933) is a member of the British Royal Family, the wife of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, a grandson of King George V and cousin of Queen Elizabeth II. The Duchess of Kent gained attention for her conversion to... Prince Michael of Kent, GCVO (Michael George Charles Franklin Windsor; born 4 July 1942) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandson of King George V and Queen Mary. ... Princess Michael of Kent (née Baroness Marie-Christine Agnes Hedwig Ida von Reibnitz, 15 January 1945), is a member of the British Royal Family. ...


At the moment, Kensington Palace hosts the exhibition "Diana, Princess of Wales by Mario Testino", open to the public since late November 2005.


History

The original early 17th-century building was constructed in the village of Kensington as Nottingham House for the Earl of Nottingham. It was acquired from his heir, who was Secretary of State to William III in 1689, because the King wanted a residence near London but away from the smoky air of the capital because he was asthmatic. Kensington was at that time a village location outside London, but more accessible than Hampton Court, a water journey on the Thames. A private road was laid out from the Palace to Hyde Park Corner, broad enough for several carriages to travel abreast, part of which survives today as Rotten Row. The palace was improved and extended by Sir Christopher Wren with pavilions attached to each corner of the central block, for it now needed paired Royal Apartments approached by the Great Stairs, a council chamber, and the Chapel Royal. Then, when Wren re-oriented the house to face west, he built north and south wings to flank the approach, made into a proper cour d'honneur, entered through an archway surmounted by a clock tower. Nevertheless, as a private domestic retreat, it was referred to as Kensington House, rather than 'Palace'. The walled kitchen gardens at Kensington House supplied fruits and vegetables for the Court of St. James's. Earl of Nottingham is a title in the peerage of England, created in 1681 for Heneage Finch, who had served as Lord Chancellor. ... William III of England (The Hague, 14 November 1650 – Kensington Palace, 8 March 1702; also known as William II of Scotland and William III of Orange) was a Dutch aristocrat and a Protestant Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28... Events Louis XIV of France passed the Code Noir, allowing the full use of slaves in the French colonies. ... The clock tower straddles the entrance between the inner and outer courts Hampton Court Palace is a former royal place on the north bank of the River Thames in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames about 12 miles (19 km) southwest and upstream of Central London, nowadays open to... Hyde Park Corner is a place in London, England, at the south-east corner of Hyde Park. ... Rotten Row from Hyde Park Corner Rotten Row is a broad track running along the south side of Hyde Park in London, leading from Hyde Park Corner to the west. ... Sir Christopher Wren, (20 October 1632–25 February 1723) was a 17th century English designer, astronomer, geometrician, and the greatest English architect of his time. ... Blenheim Palace, The Cour dHonneur is the large central court formed by the secondary wings containing kitchens and domestic offices flanking the Corps de logis Versailles: Louis Le Vau opened up the interior court to create the expansive entrance cour dhonneur, later copied all over Europe Cour d... The Court of St Jamess is the popular name of the royal court of the United Kingdom. ...

Kensington Palace south front with its parterres, engraved by Jan Kip, 1724.
Kensington Palace south front with its parterres, engraved by Jan Kip, 1724.

For seventy years Kensington Palace was the favored residence of British monarchs, although the official seat of the Court was and remains at St. James's which has not been the actual royal residence in London since the 17th century. Queen Mary died of smallpox in Kensington Palace in 1694. In 1702 William suffered a fall from a horse at Hampton Court and was brought to Kensington Palace, where he shortly died. After William III's death the palace became the residence of Queen Anne. Sir John Vanbrugh designed the Orangery for her in 1704 and a magnificent Baroque parterre 30 acre (121,000 m²) garden was laid out by Henry Wise, whose nursery was nearby at Brompton (illustration, left). Image File history File links Kensington_Palace_from_the_south_by_Kip_(1724). ... Image File history File links Kensington_Palace_from_the_south_by_Kip_(1724). ... A parterre is a formal garden construction on a level surface consisting of planting beds, edged in stone or tightly clipped hedging and gravel paths arranged to form a pleasing pattern. ... Hampton Court, from Kip and Knyffs Britannia illustrata, 1708 The inexorably linked careers of Jan Kip and Leonard Knyff trace a specialty of engraved views of English country houses, represented in minute detail from the birds-eye view that was a long-established pictorial convention for topography. ... St Jamess Palace and The Mall by Jan Kip, 1715. ... Mary II (30 April 1662–28 December 1694) reigned as Queen of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689, and as Queen of Scots (as Mary II of Scotland) from 11 April 1689 until her death. ... The clock tower straddles the entrance between the inner and outer courts Hampton Court Palace is a former royal place on the north bank of the River Thames in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames about 12 miles (19 km) southwest and upstream of Central London, nowadays open to... Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714) became Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland on 8 March 1702, succeeding William III. Her Roman Catholic father, James II and VII, was forcibly deposed in 1688; her brother-in-law and her sister then became joint monarchs as William III and Mary... Sir John Vanbrugh in Godfrey Knellers Kit-cat portrait, considered one of Knellers finest portraits. ... Orangery in Kuskovo, Moscow (1760s). ... A parterre is a formal garden construction on a level surface consisting of planting beds, edged in stone or tightly clipped hedging and gravel paths arranged to form a pleasing pattern. ... Henry Wise (1653 - 1738) was an English gardener and landscape architect apprenticed to George London at Brompton Nursery. ...

The Cupola Room, designed by William Kent, 1722: the monumental musical clock, which once played tunes by Handel, Corelli and Geminiani, remains in the room.
The Cupola Room, designed by William Kent, 1722: the monumental musical clock, which once played tunes by Handel, Corelli and Geminiani, remains in the room.

George I spent lavishly on new royal apartments from 1718. William Kent painted a staircase and some ceilings. In 1722 he designed the Cupola Room, the principal state room, with feigned coffering in its high coved ceiling; in 1819 the Cupola Room was the site of the christening of Princess Victoria, who had been born at Kensington, in the apartments of the Duke and Duchess of Kent (the actual room being what is now the North Drawing Room). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (720x634, 97 KB) Summary The Cupola Room at Kensington Palace. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (720x634, 97 KB) Summary The Cupola Room at Kensington Palace. ... George I King of Great Britain and Ireland George I (George Ludwig von Guelph-dEste) (28 May 1660–11 June 1727) was Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) from 23 January 1698, and King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 1 August 1714, until his death. ... William Kent William Kent (born in Bridlington, Yorkshire, c. ... // Events Abraham De Moivre states De Moivres theorem connecting trigonometric functions and complex numbers Publication of the first book of Bachs Well-Tempered Clavier Fall of Persias Safavid dynasty during a bloody revolt of the Afghani people. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ...


The last reigning monarch to use Kensington Palace was George II. For his consort, Charles Bridgeman swept away the outmoded parterres and redesigned Kensington Gardens in a form that is still recognizable today: his are The Sepentine, the Basin and the Grand Walk. After George II's death there in the palace in 1760, Kensington Palace was only used for more minor royalty, including the young daughter of the Duke of Kent who was living in the palace with her widowed mother when she was told of her accession to the throne as Queen Victoria. Queen Mary (grandmother of the present Queen) was born at Kensington Palace in 1867. George II King of Great Britain and Ireland George II (George Augustus) (10 November 1683–25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... Charles Bridgeman (1690-1738) was an English garden designer in the onset of the naturalistic landscape style. ... See also Kensington Gardens, South Australia, a suburb of Adelaide, Australia Kensington Gardens, once the private gardens of Kensington Palace, is one of the Royal Parks of London, lying immediately to the west of Hyde Park. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... Mary of Teck (Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes; 26 May 1867 – 24 March 1953) was the Queen Consort of George V. Queen Mary was also the Empress of India. ...

The King's Gallery at Kensington Palace from The History of the Royal Residences by W.H. Pyne (1819).

In 1981 apartments 8 and 9 were combined to create the London residence of the newly married Prince and Princess of Wales, Charles and Diana, and it remained the official residence of Diana, Princess of Wales after her marriage and until the day of her death. Her sons, Prince William and Prince Harry, went to local nursery and pre-preparatory schools in Notting Hill, which is a short drive away. Currently open to the public is Apartment 1A, which belonged to the late The Princess Margaret. The tour takes a step back in time and explains the history of Apartment 1A, from the time of the Duke of Sussex through to Princess Louise then to the most recent The Princess Margaret and Lord Snowdon. You also get to see, via guided tour only, the invention Lord Snowdon was most proud of-- his "free-standing" extractor fan-- which can be seen in the kitchen. Image File history File linksMetadata Pynekingsgallerykensingtonpalace_edited. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Pynekingsgallerykensingtonpalace_edited. ... The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George[2]; born 14 November 1948), is the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ... “Diana Spencer” redirects here. ... HRH Prince William of Wales William Arthur Philip Louis His Royal Highness Prince William of Wales (William Arthur Philip Louis Mountbatten-Windsor) (born June 21, 1982) is a member of the British Royal Family, grandson of Queen Elizabeth II and first son of Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales. ... HRH Prince Harry of Wales Henry Charles Albert David His Royal Highness Prince Henry of Wales (Henry Charles Albert David Mountbatten-Windsor) (born September 15, 1984), nicknamed Prince Harry, is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandson of Queen Elizabeth II. Harry is third in the line of... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Lord Snowdon redirects here. ...


Nearest Tube: Queensway, Bayswater, High Street Kensington, or (slightly further) Gloucester Road. Queensway is a London Underground station, just inside the boundary of the City of Westminster with the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. ... High Street Kensington is a London Underground station at High Street in Kensington. ... District line building Piccadilly line building Gloucester Road is a London Underground station in Kensington, near the intersection of Gloucester Road and Cromwell Road. ...


The state rooms are managed by the Historic Royal Palaces Agency. The offices and private accommodation areas of the palace remain the responsibility of the Royal Household and are maintained by the Royal Household Property Section. Historic Royal Palaces is a public body created in 1989 to manage the UKs unoccupied royal palaces. ...


See also

See also Kensington Gardens, South Australia, a suburb of Adelaide, Australia Kensington Gardens, once the private gardens of Kensington Palace, is one of the Royal Parks of London, lying immediately to the west of Hyde Park. ... Kensington Palace Gardens is a street in west central London which contains some of the grandest and most expensive houses in the world. ...

External links


Royal Standard of England Royal Palaces and residencies in the United Kingdom Royal Standard of Scotland
Occupied: Bagshot ParkBalmoral CastleBirkhallBuckingham PalaceClarence HouseGatcombe Park • Highgrove • Hillsborough Castle • Holyrood Palace • St. James's PalaceKensington PalaceSandringham HouseThatched House LodgeWindsor Castle
Historical: Palace of BeaulieuBeaumont PalaceBridewell PalaceBrantridge ParkCumberland LodgeDunfermline PalaceEltham PalaceFalkland PalaceFort BelvedereHampton Court PalaceKew PalaceLinlithgow PalaceMarlborough HouseCastle of MeyNonsuch PalaceOsborne HousePalace of PlacentiaQueen's HouseRichmond PalaceRoyal PavilionSavoy PalaceTower of LondonPalace of WestminsterPalace of WhitehallWoodstock Palace
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Kensington Palace

  Results from FactBites:
 
Kensington Palace - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (832 words)
Kensington Palace is a royal residence set in Kensington Gardens in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London, England.
Kensington Palace south front with its parterres, engraved by Jan Kip, 1724.
After George II's death there in the palace in 1760, Kensington Palace was only used for more minor royalty, including the young daughter of the Duke of Kent who was living in the palace with her widowed mother when she was told of her accession to the throne as Queen Victoria.
Buckingham Palace - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6780 words)
Originally known as Buckingham House, the building forming the core of today's palace was formerly a large townhouse built for the Duke of Buckingham in 1703 and acquired by King George III in 1762 as a private residence.
James's Palace remained the official and ceremonial royal residence; indeed, the tradition continues to date of foreign ambassadors being formally accredited to "the Court of St. James's", even though it is at Buckingham Palace that they present their credentials and staff to the Queen upon their appointment.
On VE Day (May 8, 1945), the Palace was the centre of British celebrations, with the King, Queen and the Princess Elizabeth, the future Queen, and Princess Margaret appearing on the balcony, with the palace's fled-out windows behind them, to the cheers from a vast crowd in the Mall.
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