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Encyclopedia > Kensal Green Cemetery
Kensal Green Cemetery
Kensal Green Cemetery

Kensal Green Cemetery, located in Kensal Green, London, England, was incorporated in 1832, and is the oldest of the 'Magnificent Seven' cemeteries still in operation. It is the only Victorian cemetery established by an act of the British Parliament with a mandate that its bodies may not be exhumed and cremated or the land sold for development. Once the cemetery is filled the legislation requires that it must become a memorial park. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3840x2160, 3956 KB) Kensal Green Cemetery, London Photographer: User:Justinc File links The following pages link to this file: Kensal Green Cemetery Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3840x2160, 3956 KB) Kensal Green Cemetery, London Photographer: User:Justinc File links The following pages link to this file: Kensal Green Cemetery Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize... Kensal Green is a place in the London Borough of Brent. ... For other uses, see London (disambiguation) and Defining London (below). ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my [birth]right) Englands location (dark green) within the British Isles Languages English (de facto) Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Magnificent Seven are seven cemeteries used by the citizens of nineteenth century London. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her Accession to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of Great Britain is considered the height of the British industrial revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ...


The cemetery is the burial site of approximately 250,000 individuals in 65,000 graves, including upwards of 500 members of the British nobility and 550 people listed in the Dictionary of National Biography. A garden style cemetery, Kensal Green is the oldest of seven private Victorian cemeteries located in the outskirts of London. Adjacent to Kensal Green is St. Mary's Roman Catholic Cemetery. The Dictionary of National Biography (or DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history. ... St. ...


Interred at Kensal Green is Marigold Frances Churchill, the daughter of Sir Winston Churchill and Lady Clementine who died from a fever in 1921 at age three. Also interred are two children of King George III of the United Kingdom. They are Princess Sophia, who desired to be buried at Kensal Green instead of Windsor Castle, to be near her brother the Duke of Sussex and Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex, who also chose Kensal Green over Windsor Castle. Some of the other notable interred here are: The Right Honourable Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill KG, OM, CH, PC, FRS (November 30, 1874 – January 24, 1965) was a British statesman, best known as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during World War II. At various times an author, soldier, journalist, and politician, Churchill is generally regarded as... George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain, and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... Princess Sophia may refer to: Princess Sophia of the United Kingdom- a daughter of George III of the United Kingdom Princess Sophia of Gloucester- a great granddaughter of George II of Great Britain Sophia Dorothea of Hanover- a daughter of George I of Great Britain Sophia of Hanover- mother of... Windsor Castle: The Round Tower or keep dominating the castle, as seen from the River Thames. ... The Duke of Sussex is a peerage title conferred upon Prince Augustus Frederick (1773-1843), sixth son of King George III. He was created Duke of Sussex and Earl of Inverness (in the Peerage of Great Britain), and Baron Arklow (in the Peerage of Ireland) on 25 November 1801. ... Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex (27 January 1773-21 April 1843), was the sixth son of King George III of the United Kingdom and his consort, Queen Charlotte. ... The Duke of Sussex is a peerage title conferred upon Prince Augustus Frederick (1773-1843), sixth son of King George III. He was created Duke of Sussex and Earl of Inverness (in the Peerage of Great Britain), and Baron Arklow (in the Peerage of Ireland) on 25 November 1801. ... Windsor Castle: The Round Tower or keep dominating the castle, as seen from the River Thames. ...

At the centre is All Souls' Chapel, containing several tombs as well. There is also a catacomb currently not maintained. Henry Hinchliffe Ainley (21 August 1879 - 31 Oct 1945) was an English Shakespearean stage and screen actor, and father of actors Richard Ainley and Anthony Ainley. ... Thomas Allom (13 March 1804 - 21 August 1872) was an English artist, topographical illustrator and architect, and one of the founder members of what eventually became the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). ... Charles Babbage Charles Babbage (26 December 1791 – 18 October 1871) was an English mathematician, analytical philosopher, mechanical engineer and (proto-) computer scientist who originated the idea of a programmable computer. ... George Birkbeck (1776-1841) was a doctor, academic, philanthropist and early pioneer in adult education. ... Blondin (28 February 1824 - 19 February 1897), French tight-rope walker and acrobat, was born at St Omer, France. ... Louis Charles de la Bourdonnais (1795 - 1840) was a French chess master, the strongest player in the early 19th century. ... Brunel before the launching of the Great Eastern. ... Marc Isambard Brunel, engraving by G. Metzeroth, circa 1880 Sir Marc Isambard Brunel (April 25, 1769 – December 12, 1849) was a French-born engineer who eventually settled in the United Kingdom. ... A 1912 obituary in the African Methodist Episcopal Church Review Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (August 15, 1875 - September 1, 1912), was an English composer, born in Croydon to a Sierra Leonean father and English mother. ... Wilkie Collins William Wilkie Collins (8 January 1824 – 23 September 1889) was an English novelist, playwright, and writer of short stories. ... Thomas Hood (Died June 1702) was Mayor of New York in that year. ... Fanny Kemble as a young girl Frances Anne Kemble (Fanny Kemble) (1809 - 1893), the actress and author, was Charles Kembles elder daughter; she was born in London, and educated chiefly in France. ... Alexander McDonnell (1798-1835) was an Irish chess master, who contested a series of six matches with the world’s leading player in the summer of 1834. ... John Lothrop Motley (April 15, 1814 - May 29, 1877), was an American historian. ... Robert Owen Robert Owen continues to be looked up to in this Manchester statue Robert Owen (May 14, 1771 – November 17, 1858) was a Welsh socialist and social reformer. ... Wilhelm Siemens Carl Wilhelm Siemens (en: Charles William Siemens) (April 4, 1823 – November 19, 1883) was a German engineer. ... There have been two people named William Henry Smith William Henry Smith (1792-1865) William Henry Smith (1825-1891), the son of the above This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... William Makepeace Thackeray (18 July 1811 – 24 December 1863) was an English novelist of the 19th century. ... Anthony Trollope (April 24, 1815 – December 6, 1882) was one of the most successful, prolific and respected English novelists of the Victorian era. ... William Vincent Wallace (1814-1865), Irish composer, was born at Colbeck Street, Waterford, Ireland on March 11, 1812, his father, of Scottish family, being a regimental bandmaster. ... Magic Circle (1886) A Hamadryad The Lady of Shalott Hylas and the Nymphs Ophelia John William Waterhouse (April 6, 1849 – February 10, 1917) was a British neo-classical and Pre-Raphaelite painter most famous for his paintings of female characters from mythology and literature. ... James Barry (1795 – 25 July 1865) was a surgeon in the British Army. ... The word catacomb comes from Greek kata kumbas (L. ad catacumbas), near the low place and originally it meant a certain burial district in Rome. ...


See also: List of famous cemeteries This is a list of famous cemeteries, mausoleums and other places people are buried, world-wide. ...


External links

  • Google Map
  • Friends of the Cemetery
  • 54 high-quality Kensal Green photos (London Cemetery Project): no caption
  • Tourist webpage: a dozen medium-quality photos and some trivia
  • Official Siobhan Fahey website: navigable chapel based on about 50 real photos of the chapel, but where there are doors, some are replaced with sky, others with information pages about Fahey. Nevertheless, it offers high quality photos of the interior of the chapel unfound elsewhere on-line. (See also Siobhan Fahey.)
  • London's Victorian Garden Cemeteries
  • (http://www.shaw-hardwick.co.uk / Website in memory of the Hardwick & Shaw family of London.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Kensal Green - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2284 words)
Kensal Green is a neighbourhood in the London Borough of Brent.
A small area on the eastern edge of the London Borough of Brent, Kensal Green borders the boroughs of Westminster to the East, and Kensington and Chelsea to the South.
Kensal Green is not the most dangerous place in the local area but on a statistical basis, it is the neighbourhood where public safety deteriorated the most in 2005.
Kensal Green Cemetery - definition of Kensal Green Cemetery in Encyclopedia (312 words)
Kensal Green Cemetery, located in Kensal Green, London, England, was incorporated in 1832, and is the oldest of the 'Magnificent Seven' cemeteries still in operation.
It is the only Victorian cemetery established by an act of the British Parliament with a mandate that its bodies may not be exhumed and cremated or the land sold for development.
Interred at Kensal Green is Marigold Frances Churchill, the daughter of Sir Winston Churchill and Lady Clementine who died from a fever in 1921 at age three.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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