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Encyclopedia > Kenneth Wolstenholme

Kenneth Wolstenholme, DFC (born Worsley, Lancashire,. July 17, 1920; died March 25, 2002) was the original football commentator for BBC television in the 1950s and 1960s, responsible for the game's most famous commentary phrase. This article is about the award given in the United Kingdom; a separate article describes the award given in the United States. ... Worsley, in Lancashire, England, is a village that is best known as one terminus of the Bridgewater Canal. ... Lancashire is a county of England, lying on the Irish Sea. ... July 17 is the 198th day (199th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 167 days remaining. ... 1920 (MCMXX) is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... 2002 (MMII) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Corporate logo of the British Broadcasting Corporation The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national public service broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... // Events and trends The 1950s in Western society was marked with a sharp rise in the economy for the first time in almost 30 years and return to the 1920s-type consumer society built on credit and boom-times, as well as the the baby boom from returning GIs who... The 1960s in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969, but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past twenty years. ...

Contents


Career

Wolstenholme started his career as a journalist with a newspaper in Manchester, before joining the RAF as a bomber pilot. After the war he became a freelance journalist, working for BBC radio before moving to television in 1948. The Royal Air Force (often abbreviated to RAF) is the air force branch of the British Armed Forces. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ...


While most sports commentators gain some recognition if their career is long enough, Wolstenholme is almost entirely remembered for his commentary of the 1966 Football World Cup Final, specifically the words he used as the match came to a conclusion during injury time, as a small pitch invasion took place just as Geoff Hurst scored to put England 4-2 ahead: FIFA World Cup Trophy The Football World Cup (official name: FIFA World Cup) is the most important competition in international football (soccer). ... Sir Geoff Hurst, MBE (born Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire, 8th December 1941) is a footballer enshrined in the games history as the only player to have scored a hat-trick in a World Cup final. ... First International Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Largest win Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Northern Ireland; 18 February 1882) Worst defeat Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First...


'Some people are on the pitch ... they think it's all over ... IT IS NOW!' They think its all over is a catch phrase popular in England. ...


These have become arguably the most famous words in English football, and among the most famous phrases in modern English. Wolstenholme always said that it was just a natural verbal piecing together of the situation before him and it took years before he realised just how well it fitted.


Wolstenholme commentated on English domestic football's most famous games of the 1950s and 1960s, including the first ever game featured on Match of the Day in 1964. He covered every FA Cup final between 1953 (the Matthews final) and 1971 (the year of Arsenal's "double"). He was the BBC presence at Wembley as Manchester United defeated Benfica to capture the 1968 European Cup and also the BBC's main man at the 1970 World Cup, commentating with panache on the final between Brazil and Italy. He left the corporation in 1971 after David Coleman was installed as the BBC's top commentator, his final BBC commentary being on the 1971 European Cup final between Ajax Amsterdam and Panathinaikos at Wembley Stadium. // Events and trends The 1950s in Western society was marked with a sharp rise in the economy for the first time in almost 30 years and return to the 1920s-type consumer society built on credit and boom-times, as well as the the baby boom from returning GIs who... The 1960s in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969, but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past twenty years. ... Match of the Day is the BBCs principal football programme. ... For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... The FA Cups trophy is also known as the FA Cup. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Sir Stanley Matthews, CBE (February 1, 1915 - February 23, 2000) was a football player, often regarded as one of the greats of the English game. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) are a football club based in north London. ... The 1970 Football World Cup was held in Mexico. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... David Coleman, OBE (born April 26, 1926) is a former British sports commentator and TV presenter. ... Amsterdamsche Football Club Ajax (Euronext: AJAX) also referred to as Ajax Amsterdam, AFC Ajax, or simply Ajax (pronounced Ah-yahx), is a football club from Amsterdam, Netherlands. ... Panathinaikos Sports Club (Greek: Παναθηναϊκός Αθλητικός Όμιλος, Panathinaikos Athlitikos Omilos, i. ... New Wembley Stadium (2006) Old Wembley Stadium (1923-2000) England captain Bobby Moore with the Jules Rimet trophy. ...


Wolstenholme later commentated for Tyne Tees Television in the mid to late 1970s. After this, he went into semi-retirement, but re-appeared on TV to provide reports and occasional features for Channel 4 when they earned rights in the early 1990s to show Serie A games from Italy. His most famous phrase was hijacked shamelessly for the sports quiz They Think It's All Over, on which he once appeared as a guest. Tyne Tees Television, City Road Tyne Tees Television Limited is the ITV television contractor for North East England. ... The 1970s in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1970 and 1979. ... Channel 4 is a public service television broadcaster in the United Kingdom (see British television). ... // Events and trends The 1990s in its most obvious sense refers to the years 1990 to 1999, but has held a strong influence into the 2000s. ... Serie A is the top division of the Italian Football League, the highest football league in Italy. ...


Legacy

Bill Oddie wrote a song about Wolstenholme for the BBC radio comedy show I'm Sorry, I'll Read That Again which includes the lines: "I'm going Wolsten-home/And you can't get Wolsten (worse than) him!" Bill Oddie William Edgar (Bill) Oddie, OBE, MA (Cantab. ... Im Sorry, Ill Read That Again was a long-running radio comedy programme that originally grew out of the Cambridge University revue Cambridge Circus. ...


Quotations

"Oh, that was sheer delightful football!" - after Carlos Alberto's memorable fourth goal for Brazil in the 1970 World Cup final Carlos Alberto Torres (born July 17, 1944) was a Brazilian football (soccer) player. ...


"There's the man who's really fighting for his Cup medal - can he score the winning goal now?" - on Stanley Matthews, seconds before the veteran winger set up the winner in the 1953 FA Cup final The FA Cups trophy is also known as the FA Cup. ... Sir Stanley Matthews, CBE (February 1, 1915 - February 23, 2000) was a football player, often regarded as one of the greats of the English game. ...


"And a great tackle, almost on the line!" - ironic quote after a policeman grabbed a pitch invader and forced him to the turf at Wembley during the 1966 FA Cup final Constables and Police Community Support Officer of the Metropolitan Police Royal Canadian Mounted Police A police car of the Saarland Police, Germany Police forces are government organisations charged with the responsibility of maintaining law and order. ...


"Yes, yes, yes - no! The linesman says no! The linesman says no. The linesman, who only speaks Russian and Turkish...it's a goal!" - describing the immediate debate as to whether Geoff Hurst's shot had crossed the line or not in the 1966 World Cup final


"Are we going to see a dramatic ending? Yes we are!" - seconds before and after Ronnie Boyce scored a last-minute winner for West Ham United in the 1964 FA Cup final West Ham United Football Club are a professional English football club based in East London. ...


"A Bobby Charlton goal is always one of the most popular sights at Old Trafford, Manchester" - surmising after Charlton had scored for Manchester United during a League game in 1969. Sir Robert Bobby Charlton, CBE (born 11 October 1937) Ashington, Northumberland is a former English professional football player, one of the most famous names in the game and a hero of the 1966 World Cup. ... Old Trafford Football Stadium (given the nickname The Theatre of Dreams by Bobby Charlton) is the home of Manchester United F.C., one of the most famous football clubs in the world. ... Manchester is a city in the North West of England. ... Manchester United Football Club is an English football club, based at Old Trafford in Greater Manchester. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ...


"That was a goal good enough to win the league, the cup, the Charity Shield, the World Cup and even the Grand National!" - after another Bobby Charlton goal, this time in the 1967 Charity Shield. The FA Community Shield (formerly the Charity Shield) is an English association football trophy. ... The Grand National is the premier horse race over fences in the United Kingdom. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


"And the Liverpool fans are all saying "If only he'd done it two minutes ago!" - assessing the reaction of Liverpool supporters after Steve Heighway scored two minutes into the extra-time period during the 1971 FA Cup final Liverpool Football Club (also known simply as Liverpool) is an English football club based in the North-West of England. ... Steve Heighway (born Dublin, November 25, 1947) was a cultured footballer in the hugely successful Liverpool team of the 1970s. ...


"It's only eight inches high, solid gold, and it means that England are the world champions!" - describing the scene as Bobby Moore collected the Jules Rimet trophy from the Queen and showing it to the Wembley crowd after England's World Cup win The Jules Rimet trophy was the original physical manifestation of the prize for winning the football world cup, a small gold cup representing the hopes and ambitions of every footballing nation on earth. ... Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), born 21 April 1926, is the Queen regnant of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Football | Obituary: Kenneth Wolstenholme (963 words)
Kenneth Wolstenholme clambered out of the cab, gave a generous smile of thanks and bade farewell in that rich velvet voice for which he was so celebrated.
Wolstenholme, who died today in a Torquay hospital at the age of 81, was justifiably proud of that rhythmic phrase crafted with spontaneous genius as Geoff Hurst bore down on the German goal to complete his World Cup final hat-trick in 1966.
Wolstenholme's style was light and frothy, but critical and authoritative too and unencumbered with detail in an age when the commentator invariably introduced and presented the programme as well as conducted the post-match interviews.
Telegraph | News | Kenneth Wolstenholme (1332 words)
KENNETH WOLSTENHOLME, who has died aged 81, was the voice of football on the BBC for almost a quarter of a century and the author of arguably the most celebrated words in British sports broadcasting, his commentary on England's last goal in the World Cup Final of 1966: "Some people are on the pitch.
Wolstenholme was not given a permanent contract by the BBC until the late 1950s, and until then supplemented his income with promotional work for sports companies such as Dunlop, and by writing for newspapers.
Wolstenholme also acted as an agent for several players, including John Charles, and was involved in Liberal politics; in the early 1950s he was mooted as a candidate for the Rochdale seat.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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