FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Kenneth Clarke
The Rt Hon Kenneth Clarke


In office
27 September 1993 – 2 May 1997
Prime Minister John Major
Preceded by Norman Lamont
Succeeded by Gordon Brown

Home Secretary
In office
10 April 1992 – 27 May 1993
Preceded by Kenneth Baker
Succeeded by Michael Howard

In office
2 November 1990 – 10 April 1992
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher
John Major
Preceded by John MacGregor
Succeeded by John Patten

In office
25 July 1988 – 2 November 1990
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher
Preceded by John Moore
Succeeded by William Waldegrave

In office
13 July 1987 – 25 July 1988
Preceded by Norman Tebbit
Succeeded by Tony Newton

Born July 02, 1940 (1940-07-02) (age 67)
Flag of England Nottingham, UK
Political party Conservative
Alma mater Caius College, Cambridge

Kenneth Harry Clarke, QC, MP, (born 2 July 1940) is a prominent Conservative Party politician in the United Kingdom. He is MP for Rushcliffe, near Nottingham. He was Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1993 until 1997, and a minister throughout all 18 years of Conservative rule from 1979 to 1997. He has contested the leadership of the party three times (in 1997, 2001 and 2005), being defeated each time. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Persons with the first name Kenneth and a last name of either Clark or Clarke include: Ken Clark, American actor Ken Clark, Canadian politician Ken Clark, jazz organist Kenneth Clark, a British art historian Kenneth Clark, African-American psychologist Kenneth Clarke, British politician Kenneth Clarke Spearman (known as Kenny) United... Image File history File links Untitled4affgdsfsdfsjpg. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ... Norman Stewart Hughson Lamont, Baron Lamont of Lerwick, PC (born 8 May 1942) was Conservative Member of Parliament for Kingston-upon-Thames, England from 1972 until 1997. ... For others with the same or similar names, see Gordon Brown (disambiguation). ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Kenneth Baker Kenneth Wilfrid Baker, Baron Baker of Dorking, CH, PC, (born November 3, 1934), is a British politician, and former Conservative MP. Son of a civil servant, he was educated at Hampton Grammar school between 1946 and 1948 and thereafter at St Pauls School, London and Magdalen College... The Rt Hon. ... The Secretary of State for Education and Skills is the chief minister of the Department for Education and Skills in the United Kingdom government. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC (born October 13, 1925), former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, in office from 1979 to 1990. ... For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ... John Macgregor (1802-1858) was a Scottish shipbuilder. ... John Haggitt Charles Patten, Baron Patten, PC, (born July 17, 1945) was a Conservative party Member of Parliament of Oxford West and Abingdon in the United Kingdom. ... Minister of Health redirects here. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC (born October 13, 1925), former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, in office from 1979 to 1990. ... John Edward Michael Moore, Baron Moore of Lower Marsh, PC (born November 26, 1937), is a British politician who was Member of Parliament for Croydon, Central, and under Margaret Thatcher was a cabinet minister. ... William Arthur Waldegrave, Baron Waldegrave of North Hill, PC (born August 15, 1946), educated at Corpus Christi College, Oxford and now a fellow of All Souls College, Oxford is a British Conservative politician who served in the Cabinet from 1990 until 1997. ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Norman Beresford Tebbit, Baron Tebbit, CH, PC (born 29 March 1931) is a British Conservative politician and former Member of Parliament (MP) for Chingford, who was born in Southgate in Enfield. ... Anthony Harold Newton, Baron Newton of Braintree, OBE PC, known as Tony Newton, (born August 29, 1937), is a British Conservative politician and former Cabinet member. ... July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 182 days remaining. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto - Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348 Sister College Brasenose College Master Neil McKendrick Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Graduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, generally known as Caius (though pronounced... For information about The Times satire Queens Counsel, see Queens Counsel (comic strip). ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Rushcliffe is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... David Cameron, the eventual winner of the contest. ...

Contents

Early Life

Born in Nottingham, England in 1940, Clarke was educated at Nottingham High School (then a "direct grant" school) and went on to study law at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge where he graduated with a 2:1. He had joined the Conservatives while at university, where he was chairman of the Cambridge University Conservative Association. As a student, he controversially invited the former British fascist leader Sir Oswald Mosley to speak for a second year in succession,[1] leading some Jewish students (including his future successor at the Home Office Michael Howard) to resign from CUCA in protest. Clarke was defeated for the presidency of the Cambridge Union Society by Howard, although he was subsequently elected President of the Union a year later. In an early 1990s documentary journalist Michael Cockerell played Clarke tape recordings of himself speaking at the Cambridge Union as a young man; Clarke displayed amusement at the stereotypically upper class accent with which he spoke at the time. For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nottingham High School is a leading UK independent fee-paying boys school situated about a mile north of Nottingham city centre. ... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348, refounded 1557 Sister College(s) Brasenose College Master Sir Christopher Hum Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Postgraduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge is a... Sir Oswald Ernald Mosley, 6th Baronet (November 16, 1896 – December 3, 1980), was a British politician known principally as the founder of the British Union of Fascists. ... The Rt Hon. ... The coat of arms for the Cambridge Union Society, which shares much in common with the coat of arms for the University of Cambridge. ...


On leaving Cambridge, Clarke was called to the Bar in 1963. The Call to the Bar is a legal term of art in most common law jurisdictions. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Member of Parliament

Clarke sought election to the House of Commons almost immediately after university. He cut his teeth by fighting the Labour stronghold of Mansfield in the 1964 and 1966 elections. In June 1970, at the age of 29, he gained the East Midlands constituency of Rushcliffe, south of Nottingham, from Labour MP Tony Gardner. Labour has never come close to winning the seat since, but Gardner's 1966 victory was partly due to the unpopular sitting Tory MP whom he defeated. Clarke has sat for Rushcliffe (on changed boundaries) ever since, making him by 2005 one of the longest serving of all MPs. Mansfield is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1964 result was a very slim majority for the Labour Party, of 4, and led to their first government since 1951. ... The UK general election in 1966 was called by Harold Wilson because his government, elected in the 1964 election, had an unworkably small majority. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The East Midlands is one of the regions of England and consists of most of the eastern half of the traditional region of the Midlands. ... Rushcliffe is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ...


He was soon appointed a Government whip - from 1972 to 1974 - where he helped ensure that the Heath administration won key votes on entry to the European Community with the assistance of Labour rebels. Even though he opposed the election of Margaret Thatcher as party leader in 1975, he was appointed as her industry spokesman from 1976 to 1979, and then occupied a wide range of ministerial positions during her premiership, from 1979 onwards. He was appointed QC in 1980. In politics, a whip is a member of a political party in a legislature whose task is to ensure that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC (born October 13, 1925), former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, in office from 1979 to 1990. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... For information about The Times satire Queens Counsel, see Queens Counsel (comic strip). ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...


In the government

Clarke served as junior transport minister, and then as Minister of State for Health (1982-85). He joined the Cabinet as Paymaster General and Employment Minister (1985-87) (his Secretary of State, Lord Young, was in the Lords), and served as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister at the DTI (1987-88), with responsibility for the Inner Cities ("because," as one wag put it, "he looked like he lived in one"). Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ... The Department of Trade and Industry is a United Kingdom government department. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ...


He was appointed Health Secretary in 1988, introducing the 'internal market' concept in the NHS, before being appointed Education Secretary in the final weeks of Thatcher's government, in the reshuffle caused by Sir Geoffrey Howe's resignation (the job had been offered to Norman Tebbit, who declined to return to the Cabinet). He was famously the first Cabinet minister to advise Thatcher to resign after her inadequate first-round performance in the November 1990 leadership contest; she referred to him in her memoirs as a "candid friend". He supported Douglas Hurd in the next round. Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The National Health Service (NHS) is the publicly-funded healthcare system of the United Kingdom. ... Richard Edward Geoffrey Howe, Baron Howe of Aberavon, PC (born December 20, 1926), usually known before 1992 as Sir Geoffrey Howe, is a senior British Conservative politician. ... Norman Beresford Tebbit, Baron Tebbit, CH, PC (born 29 March 1931) is a British Conservative politician and former Member of Parliament (MP) for Chingford, who was born in Southgate in Enfield. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... The 1990 Conservative Party leadership election in the United Kingdom took place in November 1990 following the decision of former Trade and Industry Secretary Michael Heseltine to stand against the incumbent Conservative leader and Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher. ... Douglas Richard Hurd, Baron Hurd of Westwell, CH, CBE, PC (born 8 March 1930), is a senior British Conservative politician and novelist, who served in the governments of Margaret Thatcher and John Major between 1979 and his retirement in 1995. ...


Despite the victory of John Major in that contest, he came to work with Thatcher's successor very closely, and quickly emerged as a central figure in his government. After continuing as Education Secretary (1990-92), where he introduced a number of reforms, he was appointed as Home Secretary in the wake of the Conservatives' unexpected victory at the 1992 general election. In May 1993, seven months after the impact of 'Black Wednesday' had terminally damaged the credibility of Norman Lamont as Chancellor of the Exchequer, Major forced Lamont to resign from that office and appointed Clarke in his place. For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... The United Kingdom general election of 1992 was held on 9 April 1992. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... In British politics and economics, Black Wednesday refers to September 16, 1992 when the government was forced to withdraw the Pound from the European Exchange Rate Mechanism (ERM) by currency speculators—most notably George Soros who earned over US$1 billion in doing so. ... Norman Stewart Hughson Lamont, Baron Lamont of Lerwick, PC (born 8 May 1942) was Conservative Member of Parliament for Kingston-upon-Thames, England from 1972 until 1997. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. ...


Chancellor of Exchequer

At first Clarke was seen as the dominant figure in the Cabinet, and at the October 1993 Conference he "defended" Major from his critics by announcing "Any enemy of John Major is an enemy of mine" in a manner widely seen as overbearing. By the time of the Redwood leadership challenge in June 1995 there were even rumours (always denied) that Major had offered the Exchequer to Heseltine.


Clarke enjoyed an increasingly successful record as Chancellor, as the economy recovered from the recession of the early 1990s and a new monetary policy was put into effect after Black Wednesday. He was able to reduce the basic rate of Income Tax from 25 to 23%, as well as reduce the share of GDP consumed by government spending, and halve the budget deficit[citation needed]. For the band, see 1990s (band). ...


Differences of opinion within the Cabinet on European policy, on which Clarke was one of the leading pro-Europeans, complicated his tenure as Chancellor. Whereas other ministers such as Malcolm Rifkind wished to imply that British euro membership was unlikely, Clarke fought successfully to maintain the possibility that Britain might join a European single currency under a Conservative government, but conceded that such a move could only take place on the basis of a referendum. When the 'Eurosceptic' Party Chairman, Brian Mawhinney, (allegedly) briefed against him, on one occasion, Clarke memorably declared: "Tell your kids to get their scooters off my lawn" - an allusion to Harold Wilson's rebuke of trade union leader Hugh Scanlon in the late 1960s. Brian Stanley Mawhinney, Baron Mawhinney PC (born 26 July 1940) was a member of the Cabinet until 1997 and a Member of Parliament until 2005. ... James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, FRS, PC (11 March 1916 – 24 May 1995) was one of the most prominent British politicians of the 20th century. ... Hugh Parr Scanlon, Lord Scanlon of Davyhulme (26 October 1913–27 January 2004) was a British trade union leader. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ...


Clarke is president of the moderate, pro-European ginger group within the Conservative Party, Tory Reform Group. A ginger group is a formal or informal grouping of people within a larger organisation that actively works for more radical change to the policies, practices or office-holders of the organisation, while still supporting the goals of the organisation. ... The Tory Reform Group (TRG) is a group within the United Kingdoms Conservative Party, that uphold the One Nation Tory vision, which they describe[citation needed] as being the promotion of: Social justice Political progress Prosperity for all // Europe The TRG is commonly seen as being pro-European. ...


Since the Conservatives entered Opposition in 1997, Clarke has stood for the leadership of the Conservative Party three times. In 1997, a vote exclusively among Members of Parliament, he topped the poll in the first and second rounds. For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Final round William Hague - 90 Kenneth Clarke - 72 Hague becomes Leader ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ...


Failed Leadership Bids

In the third and final round he formed an alliance with Eurosceptic John Redwood, who would have become Shadow Chancellor and Clarke's deputy if Clarke had won the contest. This alliance of opposites earned Clarke little support from the eurosceptic right; Redwood was not able to deliver the votes of many of his followers after Lady Thatcher publicly endorsed Clarke's rival William Hague in a photocall outside the House of Commons, and the latter won the vote comfortably. The contest was criticised for not involving, except in an advisory role, the rank-and-file members of the party, where surveys showed Clarke to be more popular. The Right Honourable John Redwood Dr. John Alan Redwood (born June 15, 1951 in Dover, Kent) is a British Conservative Party politician, Member of Parliament for Wokingham and formerly Shadow Secretary of State for Deregulation in the Shadow Cabinet. ... William Jefferson Hague (born 26 March 1961) is a British politician, the Member of Parliament for Richmond, North Yorkshire, former leader of the Conservative Party, and current Conservative Shadow Foreign Secretary. ...


Ironically, in 2001, after coming first in the parliamentary ballot, Clarke lost in a final round among the rank-and-file membership—a new procedure introduced by Hague—to a much less experienced, but strongly Eurosceptic rival, Iain Duncan Smith. This loss, by a margin of 62% to 38%, was attributed to the former Chancellor's pro-European views being increasingly out of step with the dominant Euroscepticism of the party membership. In Opposition, Clarke has so far refused to accept any Shadow Cabinet position, having first been offered a senior role by Hague in 1997. The 2001 Conservative leadership election was held after the United Kingdom Conservative Party failed to make inroads into the Labour governments lead in the 2001 general election. ... Rt. ... Euroscepticism (a portmanteau of European and scepticism) has become a general term for opposition to the process of European integration. ...


When Michael Howard stepped down after the Conservative's 2005 general election defeat, Clarke confirmed he would stand again for the position of party leader in autumn 2005, against the other expected contenders including Malcolm Rifkind, David Cameron, David Davis and Liam Fox. Refuting suggestions that at 65 he was too old to lead the party Clarke said that he was "overwhelmingly more popular" (amongst the voters at large) than his potential rivals. [2] Lord Tebbit accused Clarke of being "lazy" and said that voters would find his connections with the tobacco industry distasteful. [3] The Rt Hon. ... It has been suggested that Marginal constituencies in the United Kingdom be merged into this article or section. ... Sir Malcolm Leslie Rifkind, KCMG, QC (born 21 June 1946) is a Scottish Conservative and Unionist politician and Member of Parliament for the constituency of Kensington and Chelsea. ... David William Donald Cameron (born 9 October 1966) is the Leader of the Conservative Party and Leader of the Opposition in the United Kingdom, positions he has occupied since December 2005. ... David Michael Davis (born December 23, 1948) is a British politician, Conservative Member of Parliament (MP) for Haltemprice and Howden and Shadow Home Secretary. ... Dr. Liam Fox (born September 22, 1961) is a UK Conservative politician, currently Shadow Defence Secretary and Member of Parliament for Woodspring. ... Norman Beresford Tebbit, Baron Tebbit, CH, PC (born 29 March 1931) is a British Conservative politician and former Member of Parliament (MP) for Chingford, who was born in Southgate in Enfield. ... The tobacco industry comprises those persons and companies engaged in the growth, preparation for sale, shipment, advertisement, and distribution of tobacco and tobacco-related products. ...


Clarke's lack of involvement in front bench politics since 1997 meant that, unlike his leadership rivals, he was not associated with the policies and electoral failures of the Tory party under the leaderships of William Hague, Iain Duncan Smith and Michael Howard. In his campaign speeches Clarke attacked Tony Blair's "catastrophic error" in involving the UK in the war with Iraq [4] and accused the government of being "autocratic". "We have a Prime Minister who is more George III than Clement Attlee", he said.[5] William Jefferson Hague (born 26 March 1961) is a British politician, the Member of Parliament for Richmond, North Yorkshire, former leader of the Conservative Party, and current Conservative Shadow Foreign Secretary. ... Rt. ... The Rt Hon. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... “George III” redirects here. ... Clement Richard Attlee, 1st Earl Attlee, KG, OM, CH, PC (3 January 1883 – 8 October 1967) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland from 1945 to 1951. ...


An ICM opinion poll conducted for Newsnight on 5 September 2005 gave Clarke a 40% approval rating for leader (amongst the public) as against 10% for the man then perceived as his nearest rival, David Davis. Nevertheless, Clarke was knocked out in the first round of the 2005 leadership contest, effectively ending his ambition to become party leader. Clarke polled 38 votes against 42 for Liam Fox, 56 for David Cameron and 62 for David Davis. David Cameron became Conservative Leader after a run off with Davis in December 2005. is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... David Michael Davis (born December 23, 1948) is a British politician, Conservative Member of Parliament (MP) for Haltemprice and Howden and Shadow Home Secretary. ... David William Donald Cameron (born 9 October 1966) is the Leader of the Conservative Party and Leader of the Opposition in the United Kingdom, positions he has occupied since December 2005. ...


Cameron appointed Clarke to head a Democracy task force as part of his extensive 18-month policy review in December 2005, exploring issues such as the reform of the House of Lords and party funding. The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ...


As a backbencher, Clarke has taken a number of non-executive directorships and engaged in non-political media work, including serving as Deputy Chairman of British American Tobacco (BAT) (1998-2005) and Deputy Chairman of Alliance Unichem, and has faced allegations over the activities of BAT in lobbying the developing world to reject stronger health warnings on cigarette packets and evidence that his corporation has been involved in smuggling.[6] He has presented several series of jazz programmes on BBC Radio Four, including one on his namesake, bebop drummer Kenny Clarke. British American Tobacco Plc (LSE: BATS, AMEX: BTI) (BTI on the American Stock Exchange) is the third largest cigarette company in the world. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alliance UniChem Plc (LSE: AUN) wholesales, distributes, and retails pharmaceutical, surgical, medical, and healthcare products throughout Europe. ... old Radio 4 logo BBC Radio 4 is a UK domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ... Kenny Clarke (born January 9, 1914 in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania-died January 26, 1985 in Paris, France) was a jazz drummer and an early innovator of the bebop style of drumming. ...


Personal Life

Ken Clarke's principal interests are jazz, birdwatching, reading political history and watching most kinds of sport (he is a big fan of Nottingham Forest). He attended the 1966 World Cup final and claims (with a little jest) to have been influential in persuading the man known vernacularly as "the Russian linesman" Tofik Bakhramov (who was actually from Azerbaijan), to award a goal to Geoff Hurst when the England striker had seen his shot hit the crossbar of opponents West Germany and bounce down, leaving doubt as to whether the ball had crossed the line. Clarke's position in the Wembley crowd was right behind the linesman at the time, and he shouted at the official to award a goal. Clarke makes this claim in jest as Bakhramov understood no English at all. History Nottingham Forest F.C. are an English football club, based at the City Ground, which is just outside the official boundary of Nottingham on the south side of the River Trent. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Sir Geoffrey Charles Hurst, MBE (born December 8, 1941 in Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire) is a footballer enshrined in the games history as the only player to have scored a hat-trick in a World Cup final. ... First international  Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win  Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat  Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in... Wembley Stadium was a football stadium located in Wembley, London. ...


Clarke is a former President of Nottinghamshire County Cricket Club and a keen follower of Formula one motorsport. As a director of the tobacco giant BAT he was involved with their Formula One team British American Racing and has attended Grands Prix in support of the BAR team. BAR was sold to Honda in 2005. Nottinghamshire County Cricket Club is one of the 18 major county clubs which make up the English domestic cricket structure, representing the historic county of Nottinghamshire. ... Formula One - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... British American Tobacco Plc (LSE: BATS, AMEX: BTI) (BTI on the American Stock Exchange) is the third largest cigarette company in the world. ... British American Racing is a Formula One constructor that competed in the sport from 1999 to 2005. ... The logo of the Honda automobiles The logo of the Honda motorcycles Honda Motor Company, Limited )   (TYO: 7267 , NYSE: HMC), or simply called Honda, is a Japanese multinational corporation, engine manufacturer and engineering corporation. ...


Clarke is a lover of Real Ale and has been a member of the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA). A pint of real ale. ... The Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) is an independent, voluntary, consumer organisation in the United Kingdom whose main aim is promoting real ale and the traditional British pub. ...


He married Gillian Edwards, also a Cambridge graduate, in November 1964. They have two children - a son, and a daughter. Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ...


External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Kenneth Clarke
  • Tory Leadership blog
  • "Conservative Leadership Watch" from the BBC (updated link - 2nd October 2005)
  • Conservative Party - Kenneth Clarke official biography
  • Guardian Unlimited Politics - Ask Aristotle: Kenneth Clarke MP
  • TheyWorkForYou.com - Kenneth Clarke MP
  • The Public Whip - Kenneth Clarke MP
  • BBC News - Kenneth Clarke profile 15 February, 2005
  • George Monbiot, The Guardian, 23 August 2005, "Smoke and mirrors"
Parliament of the United Kingdom (1801–present)
Preceded by
Antony Gardner
Member of Parliament for Rushcliffe
1970 – present
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
John Gummer
Paymaster-General
1985–1987
Succeeded by
Peter Brooke
Preceded by
Norman Tebbit
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
1987–1988
Succeeded by
Tony Newton
Preceded by
Secretary of State for Social Services
John Moore
Secretary of State for Health
1988–1990
Succeeded by
William Waldegrave
Preceded by
John MacGregor
Secretary of State for Education and Science
1990–1992
Succeeded by
John Patten
Preceded by
Kenneth Baker
Home Secretary
1992–1993
Succeeded by
Michael Howard
Preceded by
Norman Lamont
Chancellor of the Exchequer
1993–1997
Succeeded by
Gordon Brown

  Results from FactBites:
 
Kenneth Clarke Summary (3192 words)
Clarke was defeated for the presidency of the Cambridge Union Society by Howard, although he was subsequently elected President of the Union a year later.
Clarke's lack of involvement in front bench politics since 1997 meant that, unlike his leadership rivals, he was not associated with the policies and electoral failures of the Tory party under the leaderships of William Hague, Iain Duncan Smith and Michael Howard.
Clarke's position in the Wembley crowd was right behind the linesman at the time, and he shouted at the official to award a goal.
Kenneth Clarke - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1455 words)
Clarke was defeated for the presidency of the Cambridge Union Society by Howard, although he was subsequently elected President of the Union a year later.
Clarke's lack of involvement in frontbench politics since 1997 meant that, unlike his leadership rivals, he was not associated with the policies and electoral failures of the Tory party under the leaderships of William Hague, Iain Duncan Smith and Michael Howard.
Clarke's position in the Wembley crowd was right behind the linesman at the time, and he shouted at the official to award a goal.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m