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Encyclopedia > Kenneth Clark
Kenneth Clark presenting the BBC TV series Civilisation.
Kenneth Clark presenting the BBC TV series Civilisation.

Kenneth McKenzie Clark, Baron Clark of Saltwood, OM, CH, KCB, FBA (July 13, 1903May 21, 1983) was an English author, museum director, broadcaster, and one of the most famous art historians of his generation. In 1969, he was catapulted to international fame as the writer, producer and presenter of the BBC Television series, Civilisation: A Personal View. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Front cover Civilisation (full title, Civilisation: A Personal View) was a popular TV series outlining the history of Western society produced by the BBC and aired in 1969 on BBC Two. ... Persons with the first name Kenneth and a last name of either Clark or Clarke include: Ken Clark, American actor Ken Clark, Canadian politician Ken Clark, jazz organist Kenneth Clark, a British art historian Kenneth Clark, African-American psychologist Kenneth Clarke, British politician Kenneth Clarke Spearman (known as Kenny) United... The Order of Merit is a British and Commonwealth Order bestowed by the Monarch. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order (decoration). ... Badge of a Companion of the Order of the Bath (Military Division) Ribbon of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath (formerly The Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath)[1] is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on May 18, 1725. ... Fellows of the British Academy (FBA). ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

Kenneth Clark was born in London, the only child of Kenneth MacKenzie Clark and Margaret Alice McArthur, his cousin. The Clarks were a wealthy Scottish family with roots in the textile trade (the "Clark" in Coats & Clark threading). His grandfather had invented the cotton spool. Kenneth Clark the elder had retired in 1909 at the age of 41 to become a member of the 'idle rich' (as described by W. D. Rubinstein in The Biographical Dictionary of Life Peers). This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... Spool can mean the following: Bobbin, cylinder or reel for winding yarn, thread, cable, or film. ... W. D. Rubinstein is a noted historian. ...


Clark was educated at Winchester College and Trinity College, Oxford, where he studied the history of art. In 1927 he married a fellow Oxford student, Elizabeth Jane Martin. The couple had three children: Alan, in 1928, and twins Colette (known as Celly) and Colin in 1932. Winchester College is a well-known boys independent school, and an example of an English public school, in the city of Winchester in Hampshire, England. ... College name The College of the Most Holy and Undivided Trinity and Sir Thomas Pope (Knight) Named after The Holy Trinity Established 1555 Sister College Churchill College President Sir Ivor Roberts KCMG MA JCR President Richard Appleton Undergraduates 298 MCR President Andrew Ng Graduates 105 Homepage Boatclub See also Trinity... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Alan Kenneth Mackenzie Clark (13 April 1928 - 5 September 1999) was a British Conservative politician, historian and diarist. ...


Early career

An admirer of Ruskin and a protégé of the most influential art critic of the time, Bernard Berenson, Clark quickly became the British art establishment's most respected aesthetician. After a stint as fine arts curator at Oxford's Ashmolean Museum, in 1933 at age 30, Clark was appointed director of the National Gallery. He was the youngest person ever to hold the post. The following year he also became Surveyor of the King's Pictures, a post he held until 1945. He was a controversial figure however, in part due to his distaste for much of modern art and Post-Modernist thought. Nevertheless, he was an influential supporter of modern sculptor Henry Moore and, as Chairman of the War Artists committee, he persuaded the government not to conscript artists thus ensuring that Moore found work. In 1946 Clark resigned his directorship in order to devote more time to writing. Between 1946 and 1950 he was Slade Professor of Fine Art at Oxford. He was a founding board member and also served as Chairman of the Arts Council of Great Britain from 1955 to 1960, and had a major role in the art program of the Festival of Britain. Upper: Steel-plate engraving of Ruskin as a young man, made circa 1845, scanned from print made circa 1895. ... Bernard Berenson in the garden of his estate Villa I Tatti in 1911 Bernard Berenson (born Bernhard Valvrojenski, June 26, 1865 – October 6, 1959), was an American art historian. ... Aesthetics (or esthetics) (from the Greek word αισθητική) is a branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of beauty. ... Ashmolean Museum main entrance. ... Londons National Gallery, founded in 1824, houses a rich collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900 in its home on Trafalgar Square. ... Shaped by the personal tastes of kings and queens over more than 500 years, the Royal Collection includes paintings, drawings and watercolours, furniture, ceramics, clocks, silver, sculpture, jewellery, books, manuscripts, prints and maps, arms and armour, fans, and textiles. ... Dejeuner sur lHerbe by Pablo Picasso At the Moulin Rouge: Two Women Waltzing by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1892 The Scream by Edvard Munch, 1893 I and the Village by Marc Chagall, 1911 Fountain by Marcel Duchamp, 1917 Campbells Soup Cans 1962 Synthetic polymer paint on thirty-two... Postmodernism (sometimes abbreviated pomo) is a term applied to a wide-ranging set of developments in critical theory, philosophy, architecture, art, literature, and culture, which are generally characterized as either emerging from, in reaction to, or superseding, modernism. ... Reclining Figure (1951) outside the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, is characteristic of Moores sculptures, with an abstract female figure intercut with voids. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Slade Professorship of Fine Art is the senior professorship of art at the universities of Cambridge, Oxford and London. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... The Arts Council of Great Britain was a Quango dedicated to the promotion of the fine arts in Britain. ... The Festival of Britain emblem, designed by Abram Games, from the cover of the South Bank Exhibition Guide, 1951 The Festival of Britain was a national exhibition which opened in London and around Britain in May 1951. ...


Kenneth Clark was created Knight Commander of the Bath in 1938, and made a Companion of Honour in 1959. He also received the Order of Merit in 1976. In 1955 he purchased Saltwood Castle in Kent. Badge of a Companion of the Order of the Bath (Military Division) Ribbon of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath (formerly The Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath)[1] is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on May 18, 1725. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... The Order of Merit is a British and Commonwealth Order bestowed by the Monarch. ... Saltwood Castle ca. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ...


Clark the broadcaster

An indefatigable lecturer in both academic and broadcast settings, Clark's mastery was to make accessible complex and profound subject matter that could then be appreciated by an extremely broad audience. He was one of the founders, in 1954, of the Independent Television Authority, serving as its Chairman until 1957, when he moved to ITA's rival BBC. In 1966 he wrote and produced Civilisation: A Personal View for BBC television, a series on the history of Western civilisation as seen through its art. Also broadcast on PBS in 1969, Civilisation was a hit on both sides of the Atlantic, catapulting Clark to international fame. According to Clark, the series was created in answer to the growing criticism of Western Civilisation, from its value system to its heroes. In 1970, the Irish national newspaper TV critics honoured Clark with a Jacob's Award for Civilisation.[1] The Independent Television Authority (ITA) was a body created by the Television Act 1954 to supervise the creation of Independent Television (ITV), the first commercial television network in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... The Jacobs Awards were instituted in December 1962 as the first Irish television awards. ...


A self-described "hero-worshipper", Clark proved to be an ardent pro-individualist, Humanist, anti-marxist and anti-elitist. His comments on the subject of 1960s radical University students, from a final episode of Civilisation, are but one example of his extremely critical view of Post Modernism in all its contemporary forms: "I can see them [the students] still through the University of the Sorbonne, impatient to change the world, vivid in hope, although what precisely they hope for, or believe in, I don't know." - Clark, Civilisation, Episode 12. See also the specific life stance known as Humanism For the Renaissance liberal arts movement, see Renaissance humanism Humanism is a broad category of ethical philosophies that affirm the dignity and worth of all people, based on the ability to determine right and wrong by appeal to universal human qualities... Postmodernism (sometimes abbreviated pomo) is a term applied to a wide-ranging set of developments in critical theory, philosophy, architecture, art, literature, and culture, which are generally characterized as either emerging from, in reaction to, or superseding, modernism. ... Inscription over the entrance to the Sorbonne The front of the Sorbonne Building The name Sorbonne (La Sorbonne) is commonly used to refer to the historic University of Paris in Paris, France or one of its successor institutions (see below), but this is a recent usage, and Sorbonne has actually...


Clark believed in the sublime and noble nature of man, and his quiet, witty and often devastating criticism of environmentalism, the Monarchy, religious authoritarianism and Statism continues to win him praise from a wide range of the political spectrum, most notably from those of a Classical Liberal and Objectivist mind-set. And yet, Clark was also able to see the Church as a repository for the best minds that the West had produced, a place where men of action were necessarily attracted. A highly tolerant man, in discussing those with whom he disagreed, Clark was able in a dignified and respectful manner, to illustrate his differences along with effectively expressing his praise. Statism (or Etatism) is a term that is used to describe: Specific instances of state intervention in personal, social or economic matters. ... Liberalism is a political current embracing several historical and present-day ideologies that claim defense of individual liberty as the purpose of government. ... This article is about the philosophy of Ayn Rand. ...


Later life

He was Chancellor of the University of York from 1967 to 1978 and a trustee of the British Museum. Clark was awarded a life peerage in 1969, taking the title Baron Clark, of Saltwood in the County of Kent (The British satirical magazine Private Eye nicknamed him Lord Clark of Civilisation). A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... This article is about the British university. ... The British Museum in London, England is one of the worlds greatest museums of human history and culture. ... In the United Kingdom, Life Peers are appointed members of the Peerage whose titles may not be inherited (those whose titles are inheritable are known as hereditary peers). ... Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio...


In 1975 he supported the campaign to create a separate Turner Gallery for the Turner Bequest (an aim still unfulfilled) and in 1980 agreed to open a symposium on Turner at the University of York, of which he had been Chancellor, but illness compelled him to back out of that commitment, which Lord Harewood undertook in his place.


His wife Jane died in 1976 and the following year Lord Clark married Nolwen de Janzé-Rice, former wife of Edward Rice, and daughter of the Count of Janzé alias Comte Frederic de Janze (a well-known French racing driver of the 1920s and 1930s) by his wife Alice Silverthorne (better known by her married names as Alice de Janze or Alice de Trafford), a wealthy American heiress resident in Kenya. Lord Clark died in Hythe after a short illness in 1983. Alice de Janzé, née Silverthorne (28 September 1899 – 30 September 1941[1]), also known as Alice de Trafford, was an American heiress who spent several years in Kenya, where she was involved in a famous murder case. ... Hythe (pronounced ) is a small coastal market town on the edge of Romney Marsh, in the District of Shepway (derived from Sheep Way) on the south coast of Kent. ...


Legacy

Lord Clark's elder son, Alan Clark, became a prominent Conservative MP and was a writer-historian. Alan Kenneth Mackenzie Clark (13 April 1928 - 5 September 1999) was a British Conservative politician, historian and diarist. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ...


Lord Clark continues to be a source of inspiration for many contemporary artists, historians and television producers.


Quotes

  • "The great artist takes what he needs."
  • "Heroes don't often tolerate the company of other heroes."
  • "Seen by itself the David's body might be some unusually taut and vivid work of antiquity; it is only when we come to the head that we are aware of a spiritual force that the ancient world never knew. I suppose that this quality, which I may call heroic, is not a part of most people's idea of civilisation. It involves a contempt for convenience and a sacrifice of all those pleasures that contribute to what we call civilised life. It is the enemy of happiness."
  • "Opera, next to Gothic architecture, is one of the strangest inventions of Western man. It could not have been foreseen by any logical process."
  • "People sometimes tell me that they prefer barbarism to civilization. I doubt if they have given it a long enough trial. Like the people of Alexandria, they are bored by civilisation; but all the evidence suggests that the boredom of barbarism is infinitely greater."
  • "It is lack of confidence, more than anything else, that kills a civilisation. We can destroy ourselves by cynicism and disillusion, just as effectively as by bombs."
  • "Lives devoted to Beauty seldom end well."
  • "I wonder if a single thought that has helped forward the human spirit has ever been conceived or written down in an enormous room: except, perhaps, in the reading room of the British Museum."

For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Interior of Cologne Cathedral Interior of San Zanipolo, Venice, photo Giovanni dallOrto. ... Occident redirects here. ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ...

Popular culture references

In Episode 37 of the television series Monty Python's Flying Circus, Clark is portrayed in a boxing match against Jack Bodell, then UK heavyweight champion. Since Clark merely paces the ring lecturing about English renaissance art and does not throw any punches, Bodell knocks him out in the first round. Bodell is thus named the new Professor of Fine Art at Oxford. This article is about the television series. ...


In episode 21 of the television series Second City Television, Clark is portrayed as a guest on the Sammy Maudlin Show, where he promotes a sequel to Civilisation by showing some outtakes from the show. Second City Television, or SCTV, was a Canadian television sketch comedy show offshoot from the Toronto troupe of The Second City. ...


Books

  • The Gothic Revival (1928)
  • Catalogue of the Windsor Leonardo Drawings (1935)
  • Leonardo da Vinci (1939)
  • Piero della Francesca (1951)
  • Landscape into Art (1949)
  • Moments of Vision (1954), the Romanes Lecture for 1954. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • The Nude (1956)
  • Looking at Pictures (1960)
  • Ruskin Today (1964) (edited and annotated by)
  • Rembrandt and the Italian Renaissance (1966)
  • Civilisation: A Personal View (1969)
  • Blake and Visionary Art (1973)
  • Another Part of the Wood (1974) (autobiography)
  • The Other Half (1977) (autobiography)
  • What is a Masterpiece? (1979)
  • Feminine Beauty (1980)
  • The Romantic Rebellion (1986)

The Romanes Lecture is a prestigious free public lecture given annually at the Sheldonian Theatre, Oxford. ...

Further reading

  • Meryle Secrest. Kenneth Clark: A Biography (1985)

References

  1. ^ The Irish Times, "Controversy is indication of RTÉ's success, says minister", December 11, 1970
  • Vital Vulgarity Clark's role in the founding of ITV (from the Transdiffusion group of TV history websites)
  • http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec/message/an/localities.africa.general/435.3 – for Clark's second marriage to Nolwen, and her maternal affiliation
  • http://www.cousinconnect.com/d/a/11502 – for Lady Clark's mother

External link

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Kenneth Clark
Cultural offices
Preceded by
Sir Augustus Daniel
Director of the National Gallery
1933–1946
Succeeded by
Sir Philip Hendy
Preceded by
Ernest Pooley
Chair of the Arts Council of Great Britain
1953–1960
Succeeded by
Lord Cottesloe
Honorary titles
Preceded by
Sir Collins Baker
Surveyor of the King's Pictures
1934–1944
Succeeded by
Anthony Blunt
Academic offices
Preceded by
Lord Harewood
Chancellor of the University of York
1967–1978
Succeeded by
Michael Swann
Media offices
Preceded by
New office
Chairman of the Independent Television Authority
1954–1957
Succeeded by
Sir Ivone Kirkpatrick
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
New creation
Baron Clark of Saltwood
1969–1983
Succeeded by
Extinct

This page incorporates information from Leigh Rayment's Peerage Page. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The National Portrait Gallery is an art gallery in St Martins Place, London, England, which opened to the public in 1856. ... Sir Augustus Moore Daniel (1866-1950) was the Director of the National Gallery in London, England, for five years from January 1929 to December 1933. ... Londons National Gallery, founded in 1824, houses a rich collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900 in its home on Trafalgar Square. ... Sir Philip Anstiss Hendy (27 September 1900 – 6 September 1980) was a British art curator who worked both in Britain and overseas, notably the United States. ... The Arts Council of Great Britain was a Quango dedicated to the promotion of the fine arts in Britain. ... John Walgrave Halford Fremantle, 4th Baron Cottesloe (1900-1994) was Chairman of the Arts council and the South Bank Theatre Board. ... The office of the Surveyor of the Kings/Queens Pictures, in the Royal Collection Department of the Royal Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom, is responsible for the care and maintenance of the royal collection of pictures owned by the Sovereign in an official capacity — as... Anthony Frederick Blunt (26 September 1907 – 26 March 1983), known as Sir Anthony Blunt, KCVO between 1956 and 1979, was an English art historian, formerly Professor of the History of Art, University of London and director of the Courtauld Institute of Art, London (1947-74). ... George Henry Hubert Lascelles, 7th Earl of Harewood KBE (born 7 February 1923), styled The Hon. ... This article is about the British university. ... Ennobled as Lord Swann of Coln St Denys, Michael Meredith Swann FRS (1920-1990) was a distinguished molecular and cell biologist working on the mechanisms of cell division and fertilisation. ... The Independent Television Authority (ITA) was a body created by the Television Act 1954 to supervise the creation of Independent Television (ITV), the first commercial television network in the United Kingdom. ... Sir Ivone Augustine Kirkpatrick (1897 – May 25, 1964) was a British diplomat. ... The Peerage of the United Kingdom comprises most peerages created in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland after the Act of Union in 1801. ... Baron Clark may refer to: Kenneth Clark - English author, museum director, broadcaster, and art historian David George Clark, Baron Clark - British Labour politician and author Category: ...

Persondata
NAME Clark, Kenneth
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Clark, Kenneth Mackenzie; Clark, Kenneth, Sir; Clark, Baron
SHORT DESCRIPTION Art historian, broadcaster and museum director
DATE OF BIRTH July 13, 1903
PLACE OF BIRTH London, United Kingdom
DATE OF DEATH May 21, 1983
PLACE OF DEATH Hythe, United Kingdom

  Results from FactBites:
 
Kenneth Clarke Summary (3192 words)
Clarke was defeated for the presidency of the Cambridge Union Society by Howard, although he was subsequently elected President of the Union a year later.
Clarke's lack of involvement in front bench politics since 1997 meant that, unlike his leadership rivals, he was not associated with the policies and electoral failures of the Tory party under the leaderships of William Hague, Iain Duncan Smith and Michael Howard.
Clarke's position in the Wembley crowd was right behind the linesman at the time, and he shouted at the official to award a goal.
Kenneth Clarke - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1455 words)
Clarke was defeated for the presidency of the Cambridge Union Society by Howard, although he was subsequently elected President of the Union a year later.
Clarke's lack of involvement in frontbench politics since 1997 meant that, unlike his leadership rivals, he was not associated with the policies and electoral failures of the Tory party under the leaderships of William Hague, Iain Duncan Smith and Michael Howard.
Clarke's position in the Wembley crowd was right behind the linesman at the time, and he shouted at the official to award a goal.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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