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Encyclopedia > Ken Russell
Ken Russell
Born Henry Kenneth Alfred Russell
July 3, 1927 (1927-07-03) (age 80)
Hampshire, England
Spouse(s) Shirley Russell (1956-1978)
Vivian Jolly (1983-1991)
Hetty Baynes (1992-1999)
Lisi Tribble (2001-)

Henry Kenneth Alfred Russell, known as Ken Russell (born July 3, 1927), is an English film director, particularly well-known for his films about famous composers and his controversial, often outrageous pioneering work in film. If you hold the copyright to an image (e. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hampshire is a county on the south coast of England. ... Shirley Russell was the first wife of English film director Ken Russell, married from 1956 to 1978. ... Hetty Baynes began her career as a ballet dancer at the Royal Ballet School and made her professional debut at 12 in Rudolf Nureyev’s The Nutcracker at the Opera House, Covent Garden. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... Women in Love is a 1969 British film which tells the story of the relationships between men and women during the early part of the 20th century. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Director Herbert Brenon with actress Alla Nazimova on the set of War Brides, 1916 A director is a person who directs the making of a film. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ...

Contents

Biography

Early career

Russell was born in Southampton, and was educated in Walthamstow and at Pangbourne College. He served in both the Royal Air Force and the Merchant Navy, and moved into television work after short careers in dance and photography. For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ... , Walthamstow is a town in the London Borough of Waltham Forest, North East London, England. ... Pangbourne College is a coeducational public school located in the civil parish of Pangbourne, just south-west of the village, at Bowden, in the English county of Berkshire. ... RAF redirects here. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Merchant Marine. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Photography [fәtɑgrәfi:],[foʊtɑgrәfi:] is the process of recording pictures by means of capturing light on a light-sensitive medium, such as a film or electronic sensor. ...


His series of documentary Teddy Girl photographs were published in Picture Post magazine in the summer of 1955, and he continued to work as a freelance documentary photographer until 1959. After 1959, Russell's amateur films (his documentaries for the Free Cinema movement, and his 1958 short Amelia and the Angel) secured him a job at the BBC, where he worked regularly from 1959 to 1970 making arts documentaries for Monitor and Omnibus. Amongst his best-known works from this period were Elgar (1962), The Debussy Film (1965), Isadora Duncan, the Biggest Dancer in the World (1967), and Song of Summer (Delius) (1968). The Elgar film was ground-breaking because it was the first time that an arts programme (Monitor) showed one long film about an artistic figure instead of short items, and also it was the first time that re-enactments were used. Russell though, still met resistance from Monitor editor Huw Wheldon in allowing actors to play the subjects of his films. The Elgar film includes sequences of the young composer riding his bicycle on the Malvern Hills accompanied by Elgar's Introduction & Allegro for Strings. Russell has said that he had a particular empathy with Elgar's music because, like the composer, he is a Catholic.[1] Picture Post dated 21 September 1940. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Omnibus is a television series of the BBC. Categories: | ... Elgar is a 1962 drama documentary by the British film director Ken Russell. ... Isadora Duncan, the Biggest Dancer in the World, was a BBC TV film based on the life of the American dancer Isadora Duncan first broadcast on 22 September 1966. ... Sir Huw Wheldon OBE MC (7 May 1916–March 14, 1986) was a BBC broadcaster and executive. ...


His television films became increasingly flamboyant and outrageous: The Debussy Film opens with a scene in which a woman is shot full of arrows (a reference to Debussy's The Martyrdom of St Sebastian); while Dance of the Seven Veils (1970), a self-styled "comic strip in seven parts on the life of Richard Strauss", caused such outrage that questions were asked in the Parliament of the United Kingdom, and the Strauss family withdrew all music rights and imposed a world-wide ban on the film that continues to this day. In 2005 the Strauss family intervened to stop the film from being screened at a festival of Russell's film in Holland. Although the majority of his BBC films were about musical subjects, his most influential film of the era was the seminal film on British Pop Art Pop Goes the Easel (1962). Made in a style which reflected the art works of Peter Blake, Pauline Boty and others, and containing astonishing dream sequences which took the viewer into the mind of the artists, it influenced everyone who was anyone in British cinema in the 1960s, particularly Stanley Kubrick (who would later direct A Clockwork Orange, which is artistically similar to some of Russells work, and was originally intended to be directed by Russell) and Lindsay Anderson. Russell's first feature film was French Dressing (1963), a comedy loosely based on Roger Vadim's And God Created Woman; its critical and commercial failure sent Russell back to the BBC. His second big-screen effort was part of author Len Deighton's Harry Palmer spy cycle, Billion-Dollar Brain (1967), a visually stunning widescreen masterwork, which has only recently began to attract the critical praise it deserves. Claude Debussy Claude Achille Debussy (August 22, 1862 – March 25, 1918), composer of impressionistic classical music. ... This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing? (1956) is one of the earliest works to be considered pop art. ... Blakes album cover Sir Peter Thomas Blake (born June 25, 1932, in Dartford, Kent) is an English pop artist, best known for his design of the sleeve for The Beatles album Sgt. ... Born 1938 Surrey, England; died 1966 London (aged 28, of cancer). ... Kubrick redirects here. ... Clockwork Orange redirects here. ... Lindsay Gordon Anderson (April 17, 1923 - August 30, 1994), was a Scottish film critic, and a film, theatre and documentary director. ... Roger Vadim, born Roger Vladimir Plemiannikov (January 26, 1928 – February 11, 2000) was a French journalist, author, actor, screenwriter, director, and producer who launched Brigitte Bardots career in the film And God Created Woman. ... And God Created Woman (French title: ) is a 1956 movie, directed by Roger Vadim and starring Brigitte Bardot. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Len Deighton (left) teaches Michael Caine how to break an egg on the set of The IPCRESS File. ... Harry Palmer is a fictional secret agent who is the central character in a number of films based on the three of the first four spy novels by Len Deighton. ... Billion-Dollar Brain (1966, ISBN 0099857103) is a spy novel by Len Deighton. ...


The 60s were perhaps the director's artistically richest decade.


1970s and controversy

Ken Russell's 1969 film, Women in Love, based on the novel by D. H. Lawrence, had won an Oscar for Glenda Jackson and broke the cinema taboo on full frontal male nudity in the nude wrestling scene between Alan Bates and Oliver Reed. More importantly, it was the third biggest money-maker of the year in the UK, and it put Russell on a path of box-office success without equal in the British cinema. He followed Women in Love with a string of innovative adult-themed films which were often as controversial as they were successful. In the 1970s he had five No.1 hits at the British box office — more than any other film-maker — and he spent more weeks at No. 1 than any film-maker with the single exception of Guy Hamilton (who directed three James Bond films during the decade). Russell's first No.1 hit of the 1970s was The Music Lovers (1970), a biopic of Tchaikovsky, which was unusual in that it used the composer's music to tell the story of the musician's life. The score was conducted to great acclaim by André Previn. The following year, Russell released The Devils, a film so controversial that its backers, the American company Warner Brothers, still refuse to release it uncut. Inspired by Aldous Huxley's book The Devils of Loudun and using material from John Whiting's play The Devils, it starred Oliver Reed as a noble priest who stands in the way of a corrupt church and state. In America, the film, which had already been cut for distribution in Britain and where it topped the box-office for eight weeks, was further edited. It has never played in anything like its original state in America. British film critic Alexander Walker described the film as "monstrously indecent" in a television confrontation with Russell, leading the director to hit him with a rolled up copy of the Evening Standard, the newspaper for which Walker worked. Women in Love is a 1969 British film which tells the story of the relationships between men and women during the early part of the 20th century. ... David Herbert Richards Lawrence (11 September 1885 – 2 March 1930) was an English writer of the 20th century, whose prolific and diverse output included novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, paintings, translations, literary criticism, and personal letters. ... Glenda Jackson Glenda May Jackson, CBE, (born 9 May 1936) is a two-time Academy Award-winning British actress and politician, currently Labour Member of Parliament for the constituency of Hampstead and Highgate in the London Borough of Camden. ... This article is about cultural prohibitions in general, for other uses, see Taboo (disambiguation). ... Nude redirects here. ... Alan Bates as butler in Gosford Park (2001) Sir Alan Arthur Bates CBE, (February 17, 1934 – December 27, 2003) was a British actor. ... Robert Oliver Reed (February 13, 1938 – May 2, 1999) was an English actor known for his macho image on and off screen. ... Guy Hamilton (born September 11, 1922 [1]) is a noted English film director. ... This article is about the spy series. ... The Music Lovers is a 1971 biopic of the 19th century Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, as conceived by maverick director Ken Russell. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Tchaikovsky” redirects here. ... André Previn (born April 6, 1929)¹ is a prominent pianist, orchestral conductor, and composer. ... The Devils is a 1971 film directed by Ken Russell and starring Oliver Reed and Vanessa Redgrave, based on the 1952 book The Devils of Loudun by Aldous Huxley and the 1960 play The Devils by John Whiting, also based on Huxleys book. ... Warner Bros. ... Aldous Leonard Huxley (July 26, 1894 – November 22, 1963) was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. ... The Devils Of Loudun (1952) is a novel by Aldous Huxley. ... John Whiting was an English dramatist and critic. ... Alexander Walker I born on 1837 He inherited his fathers talent for blending, but brought his own flair and vision to the business too. ...


Russell followed The Devils with a spectacular reworking of the period musical The Boy Friend, for which he cast the model Twiggy, who won two Golden Globe Awards for her performance: one for Best Actress in a comedy of musical, and one for the best newcomer. The film was heavily cut, shorn of two musical numbers for its American release, where it was not a big success. It continues to play in its original form in cinemas across Europe. Russell himself provided most of the financing for Savage Messiah, a biopic of the artist Henri Gaudier-Brzeska, and he provided the producer David Puttnam with a rare box-office hit with Mahler, a film which helped to make Robert Powell a household name. The Boy Friend (sometimes mis-spelled The Boyfriend) is a musical by Sandy Wilson. ... This article is about the English supermodel. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Savage Messiah is a 1972 biographical film of the life of French sculptor Henri Gaudier-Brzeska, made by Russ-Arts and distributed by MGM. It was directed and produced by Ken Russell with Harry Benn as associate producer, from a screenplay by Christopher Logue, based on the book Savage Messiah... Henri Gaudier-Brzeska (4 October 1891 – 5 June 1915) was a French sculptor who developed a rough hewn, primitive style of direct carving. ... David Puttnam receiving his BAFTA Fellowship, 19 February 2006 David Terence Puttnam, Baron Puttnam of Queensgate, CBE is a film producer and politician. ... Mahler is a 1974 film based on the life of Gustav Mahler. ... Robert Powell (born June 1, 1944), is a well-known English television and film actor, known for the title role in Jesus of Nazareth and as the fictional secret agent Richard Hannay. ...


In 1975, Russell's star-studded film version of The Who's rock opera Tommy starring Roger Daltrey, Ann-Margret, Oliver Reed, Elton John, Tina Turner, Eric Clapton and Jack Nicholson, spent a record fourteen weeks at the No.1 spot and played to full houses for over a year. Adapting the rock opera record for the screen, Russell had the composer, Pete Townshend, add some new numbers to fill out the story and changed a key detail in the traumatic murder that Tommy witnesses (leading to the child becoming deaf, dumb and blind). Two months before Tommy was released (in March 1975), Russell started work on Lisztomania (1975), another vehicle for Roger Daltrey, and for the film scoring of prog-rocker Rick Wakeman. One of Russell's aims with this wild comic strip of a film was to explore the power of music for good (inspirational) and evil. In the film, the good music of Franz Liszt is stolen by Richard Wagner who, in his operas, puts forward the theme of the Superman, a philosophy and a music that brought forth Hitler (a similar theme was expressed in Russell's banned 1970 TV film, Dance of the Seven Veils). In Lisztomania, Daltrey (as Liszt) must oppose Wagner who has become a vampire, played by Paul Nicholas. The film's finale, Liszt returning from Heaven in a cartoon spaceship propelled by the energies of the dead women in his life, to vaporise the monstrous Wagner, is one of the strangest in all cinema. Tommy and Lisztomania were important in the rise of improved motion picture sound in the 1970s, as they were among the first films to be released with Dolby-encoded soundtracks. The involvement of these two Russell films in this pioneering work can be attributed in part to his special interest in music and to his location in the United Kingdom, where development work on Dolby film sound was centered. Lisztomania topped the British box-office for two weeks in November 1975, when Tommy was still in the list of the week's top five box-office hits. Russell's next film, the 1977 biopic Valentino, also topped the British box-office for two weeks, but was not a hit in America. Roger Daltrey as Tommy Tommy was a 1975 musical film, based on The Whos 1969 rock opera concept album Tommy. ... The Who are a British rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... Alternate cover Deluxe edition cover Tommy is the first of The Whos two full-scale rock operas (the second being Quadrophenia), and the first musical work explicitly billed as a rock opera. ... Roger Harry Daltrey, CBE (born 1 March 1944), is a rock vocalist, songwriter, and actor, best known as the founder and lead singer of English rock band The Who. ... Ann-Margret Ann-Margret (born April 28, 1941) is a Swedish-born actress and singer. ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Tina Turner (born Anna Mae Bullock) November 26, 1939) is an 11 time Grammy Award-winning (sharing three), American Singer, Dancer, Record Producer, Executive Producer, Film Producer, Actress, Writer, Performer, Songwriter, Author and occasional Painter whose career has spanned from 1956 to present. ... Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE[2] (born 30 March 1945) [3], nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter and composer. ... John Joseph Nicholson (born April 22, 1937), known as Jack Nicholson, is a three time Academy Award-winning American actor internationally renowned for his often dark-themed portrayals of neurotic characters. ... The Whos Tommy, the first album explicitly billed as a rock opera A rock opera is a rock music album or stage production that resembles the form of an opera. ... Pete Townshend (born Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend on 19 May 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, composer, and writer. ... Lisztomania is a 1975 film by Ken Russell, drawn from a biography of Franz Liszt. ... Roger Harry Daltrey, CBE (born 1 March 1944), is a rock vocalist, songwriter, and actor, best known as the founder and lead singer of English rock band The Who. ... The progressive rock band Yes performing in 1977. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Liszt redirects here. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Hitler redirects here. ... Official Biography Paul Nicholas became a household favourite with his role as Vince in the BAFTA Award-winning BBC television series Just Good Friends and for LWT’s major drama series Bust for which he was nominated Best Actor. ... Dolby Laboratories, Incorporated (Dolby Labs) is a company specializing in audio compression and reproduction. ... Valentino is an american biographical drama film about the life of Rudolph Valentino, directed by Ken Russell. ...


1980s

Russell's 1980 effort Altered States was a departure in both genre and tone, in that it is Russell's only foray into science fiction, and contains comparatively few elements of satire and caricature. Working from Paddy Chayefsky's screenplay (based upon his novel), Russell used his penchant for elaborate visual effects to translate Chayefsky's hallucinatory story to the cinema, and took the opportunity to add his trademark religious and sexual imagery. The film was also noteworthy for having one of the most inventive, complex, sonically polished, and powerful soundtracks created for a film up to that time, including an Oscar-nominated score by John Corigliano, best known as a contemporary classical composer. The film enjoyed moderate financial success, scored with critics who had otherwise dismissed Russell's work, and has come to be regarded as a classic "head film". Regrettably, one of the film's greatest detractors was Paddy Chayefsky himself, who dropped out of the project shortly after filming began, and requested prior to the film's release that his name be replaced by the name "Sidney Aaron" (actually his own birth name). Altered States is the name of both a novel (ISBN 0060107278) and a film adaptation of that novel, both written by Paddy Chayefsky. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... For the book of comics by Daniel Clowes, see Caricature (Daniel Clowes collection). ... Sidney Aaron Chayefsky (January 29, 1923 – August 1, 1981) known as Paddy Chayefsky was an acclaimed dramatist who transitioned from the golden age of American live television in the 1950s to have a successful career as a playwright and screenwriter for Hollywood. ... Sample from a screenplay, showing dialogue and action descriptions. ... This article is about the literary concept. ... The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS)[1] to recognize excellence of professionals in the film industry, including directors, actors, and writers. ... John Corigliano (b. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Russell's last American film was Crimes of Passion (1984); it returns to his major themes of sex and religion, contrasting the prostitute China Blue (played by Kathleen Turner) with a spurious street preacher (played by Anthony Perkins). Crimes of Passion is a film released in 1984 and directed by Ken Russell. ... Mary Kathleen Turner (born June 19, 1954) is an Academy Award-nominated American actress. ... Anthony Perkins (April 4, 1932 – September 12, 1992) was an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning American stage and screen actor best known for his role as Norman Bates in Alfred Hitchcocks Psycho and its three sequels. ...


Unable to comply with the artistic conservatism of Hollywood, Russell returned to Europe, finding financing mostly with various independent and fly-by-night companies. Gothic (1986) was a typically hysterical treatment of Lord Byron and the creation of the story that became Frankenstein. Gothic is a 1986 film directed by Ken Russell. ... Byron redirects here. ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ...


In 1988 Russell released two films: the Hammer spoof The Lair of the White Worm, and Salome's Last Dance, the latter reuniting him with his Women in Love star Glenda Jackson. Russell then returned to D.H. Lawrence for what so far has been his last personal project for the cinema, an adaptation of The Rainbow, released in 1989. Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Hammer horror refers to a series of gothic horror films produced from the late 1950s until the 1970s by the British film production company Hammer Film Productions Ltd. ... The Lair of the White Worm is a 1988 film written, produced and directed by Ken Russell which starred Hugh Grant and Amanda Donohoe. ... Salomes Last Dance is a 1988 film by British film director, Ken Russell. ... Women in Love is a 1969 British film which tells the story of the relationships between men and women during the early part of the 20th century. ... Glenda Jackson Glenda May Jackson, CBE, (born 9 May 1936) is a two-time Academy Award-winning British actress and politician, currently Labour Member of Parliament for the constituency of Hampstead and Highgate in the London Borough of Camden. ... The Rainbow was a 1915 novel by British author D.H. Lawrence. ...


In 1989, Russell directed the famous music video for Elton John's worldwide hit, Nikita, and videos for Cliff Richard, Sarah Brightman, and the band Pandora's Box's song It's All Coming Back to Me Now. Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Nikita is a song by English singer Elton John about the Cold War from his 1985 album Ice on Fire. ... Sir Cliff Richard OBE (born Harry Rodger Webb on 14 October 1940) is an English singer, actor and businessman. ... Sarah Brightman (born August 14, 1960) is an English classical crossover soprano, actress and dancer. ... Audio sample: Listen to a sample of Its All Coming Back to Me Now ( file info) — Problems playing the files? See media help. ... Its All Coming Back To Me Now is a power ballad, written by Jim Steinman in 1983. ...


1990s

In the 1990 film The Russia House, starring Sean Connery and Michelle Pfeiffer, Russell made one of his first significant acting appearances, portraying Walter, an ambiguously gay British intelligence officer who discomfits his more strait-laced CIA counterparts. The Russia House is a novel by John Le Carré published in 1989. ... Sir Thomas Sean Connery (born 25 August 1930) is a retired Scottish actor and producer who is perhaps best known as the first actor to portray James Bond in cinema, starring in seven Bond films. ... Michelle Marie Pfeiffer (born April 29, 1958) is an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning, BAFTA-winning American actress. ... An intelligence officer is a person employed by an organisation to collect, compile and analyse information (known as intelligence) which is of use to that organisation. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ...


By the early 1990s, Russell's notoriety and persona had attracted so much media attention that he had come to be widely regarded as nearly unemployable in the cinema. He became largely reliant on his own finances to continue making films. Much of his work since 1990 has been commissioned for television, and he has contributed regularly to The South Bank Show. Prisoner of Honor (1991) was Russell's final work with Oliver Reed; his final film with Glenda Jackson before she gave up acting for politics, The Secret Life of Arnold Bax (1992) is also (to date) his last composer biographical drama. Mindbender (1996) was dismissed as propaganda for mentalist Uri Geller and Tracked (aka Dogboys) (1998) was unrecognizable as a Russell film. For the band, see 1990s (band). ... The South Bank Show is a British television arts magazine show, presented by Melvyn Bragg and seen in over 60 countries — including Australia, New Zealand, the Netherlands, Sweden and the USA. Its stated aim is to bring both high art and popular culture to a mass audience. ... Prisoner of Honor documents the French Dreyfus Affair that saw a French Captain sent to Devils Island for espionage near the end of the nineteenth century. ... Uri Geller (‎, born Gellér György[1] December 20, 1946 in Tel Aviv, Israel) is an Israeli-British performer and celebrity famous for claiming to have psychic powers. ...


2000s

Russell had a cameo in the 2006 film adaptation of Brian Aldiss's novel Brothers of the Head by the directors of Lost in La Mancha. He also had a cameo in the 2006 Colour Me Kubrick. He directed a segment for the horror anthology Trapped Ashes (2007) which also includes segments directed by Sean S. Cunningham, Monte Hellman, and Joe Dante. He is currently in pre-production for two films: The Pearl of the Orient and Kings X. Brian Wilson Aldiss, OBE, (born August 18, 1925 in East Dereham, Norfolk) is a prolific English author of both general fiction and science fiction. ... Spoiler warning: Brothers of the Head is the 2006 mockumentary featuring the story of Tom and Barry Howe (Luke Treadaway and Harry Treadaway), conjoined twins living in the United Kingdom. ... A defeated Terry Gilliam, in Lost in La Mancha Lost in La Mancha is a documentary movie about Terry Gilliams failed attempt to make The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, a movie adaptation of the novel Don Quixote. ... Colour Me Kubrick is a comedy-drama film scheduled to be released in early 2006. ... Sean S. Cunningham is a writer, producer and director of films born on December 31st 1941. ... Monte Hellman (born in 1932 in New York City, New York) is an American film director, producer, and film editor. ... Joe Dante (born November 28, 1946 in Morristown, New Jersey) is an American film director and producer of films generally with humorous and scifi content. ...


Efforts such as The Lion's Mouth (2000) and The Fall of the Louse of Usher (2002) have suffered from low production values (for example, being shot in video on Russell's estate, and often featuring Russell himself) and limited distribution.


Since 2004 Russell has been visiting professor of the University of Wales, Newport Film School. One of his many tasks is to advise students on the making of their graduate films. He also presented the Finest Film Awards (for graduate filmmakers of Newport) in June 2005. The University of Wales (Prifysgol Cymru in Welsh) is a federal university founded in 1893. ... The International Film School Wales (IFSW) is part of the Arts, Media & Design College at University of Wales, Newport. ...


Russell was appointed visiting fellow at the University of Southampton in April 2007, where he will act in a similar capacity to his role at the Newport Film School, until March 2008. His arrival was celebrated with a screening of the rare director's cut of The Devils hosted by Mark Kermode. The University of Southampton is a university situated in the city of Southampton, on the south coast of Great Britain. ... The International Film School Wales (IFSW) is part of the Arts, Media & Design College at University of Wales, Newport. ... Mark Kermode (born Mark Fairey[1] on 2 July 1963) is an English film critic who regularly writes for Sight and Sound magazine and The Observer newspaper. ...


Russell is currently (2007) in production of his first full length film in almost 5 years, Moll Flanders, an adaption of Daniel Defoe's novel, starring Lucinda Rhodes-Flaherty and Barry Humphries. Daniel Defoe (1659/1661 [?] â€“ April 24 [?], 1731)[1] was a British writer, journalist, and spy, who gained enduring fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. ... The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders is a 1722 novel by Daniel Defoe. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... John Barry Humphries, AO, CBE (born 17 February 1934 in Camberwell, Melbourne, Victoria) is an Australian comedian, satirist and character actor best known for his on-stage and television alter egos Dame Edna Everage, a Melbourne housewife, and Sir Les Patterson, Australias foul-mouthed cultural attaché to Britain. ...


In 2007 Russell produced A Kitten For Hitler, a short film hosted by the Comedybox.tv website. Russell comemented that "Ten years ago, while working on The South Bank Show, Melvyn Bragg and I had a heated discussion on the pros and cons of film censorship. Broadly speaking, Melvyn was against it, while I, much to his surprise, was absolutely for it. He then dared me to write a script that I thought should be banned. I accepted the challenge and a month or so later sent him a short subject entitled A Kitten for Hitler. "Ken," he said, "if ever you make this film and it is shown, you will be lynched." [2] Melvyn Bragg, Baron Bragg, FRSL, FRTS (born 6 October 1939, in Wigton, Cumberland) is a British author and broadcaster. ...


Writings

Russell has written books on filmmaking and on the British film industry; a brilliant and witty 1989 autobiography entitled A British Picture: An Autobiography (published in the United States as Altered States: The Autobiography of Ken Russell). He has also published five novels, three on the sex lives of composers - Delius, Brahms and Beethoven; one a science-fiction rewriting of Genesis. His latest novel, published in 2006 is called Violation. It is a very violent future-shock tale of an England where football has become the national religion. He currently writes a column for the Times every Thursday in the Film section of times 2. Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ... Frederick Albert Theodore Delius CH (January 29, 1862, – June 10, 1934) was an English composer born in Bradford in the West Riding of Yorkshire in the north of England. ... Johannes Brahms Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of the Romantic period. ... “Beethoven” redirects here. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ...


Celebrity Big Brother 5

Russell joined Celebrity Big Brother on January 3, 2007, at the start of the series. He left voluntarily on the following Sunday (7 January), after an altercation with Jade Goody, He had however earlier that day before his argument with Goody told Big Brother in the diary room not to be surprised if he asked to leave. Celebrity Big Brother 5 was the third season of Celebrity Big Brother UK. It started on January 6, 2005 and ended on January 23, 2005, airing on Channel 4. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jade Cerisa Lorraine Goody[2] (born 5 June 1981) is a British reality television celebrity, who became famous after appearing on the Channel 4 reality show Big Brother in 2002 when she was 21 years old. ...


As he entered the house, he sang "Singin' in the Rain"; his entrance was unusual as he was escorted down the stairs to the interior of the house by host Davina McCall.[3] Gene Kelly performing in Singin in the Rain For other meanings, see Singin in the Rain. ... Davina redirects here. ...


On the January 7 episode of Celebrity Big Brother's Little Brother it was revealed that Russell had made the decision to leave the house, citing difficulty dealing with the arrival of Jade Goody and her family. The cause of the argument between Goody and Russell was the servant task set by the show, in which eight celebrities were told they had to wait on Goody, her family, and three other contestants — including Russell. Ken Russell left the Big Brother house on the afternoon of January 7, even after he and Jade had called a truce. In a statement he said: "I don't want to live in a society riddled with evil and hatred". [1] is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Big Brothers Little Brother (BBLB; also known as Big Brothers Little Breakfast during the run of Celebrity Big Brother 4) is a magazine television programme shown on Channel 4 and its sister digital channel E4 during a series of Big Brother in the UK. Presented by Dermot O... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


During his time in the Celebrity Big Brother house it emerged that Russell once had a cameo in an episode of the popular British soap EastEnders.[citation needed] EastEnders is a popular BBC television soap opera, first broadcast in the United Kingdom on BBC1 on 19 February 1985[4] and continuing to date. ...


Photography

In the early stages of his career Ken Russell struggled to break into the film industry. Before 'making it', Russell enjoyed a brief fling with photography. An exhibition displaying some of Russell's work is currently on display in central London's Proud Galleries in The Strand, London. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


The exhibition, entitled Ken Russell's Lost London Rediscovered: 1951-1957, is set to run until August 21, 2007 and includes over fifty limited edition prints from Russell's personal collection. As implied by the title, the prints displayed are all taken in and around London, with many of the pictures being taken in the Portobello Road area of London. is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Portobello Road Portobello Road is a road in the Notting Hill district of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in west London. ...


References

  1. ^ "BBC Music Magazine June 2007"
  2. ^ My Kitten for Hitler is all in the best bad taste - Times Online
  3. ^ The Sun: Latest news from the Celebrity Big Brother

[2] --BBC Interview with Ken Russell and Tony Lane on Invasion of the Not Quite Dead (2008) Big Brother is a reality show shown on Channel 4 in which a number of contestants live in an isolated house trying to avoid being evicted by the public with the aim of winning a large cash prize at the end of the run. ... Antony David Lane (born June 27, 1978) is an English filmmaker. ... Invasion of the Not Quite Dead is a upcoming (expected 2008) Horror film directed by Tony lane In 1978 the Welsh Mountains are infected by an alien bacteria. ...


Filmography

Elgar is a 1962 drama documentary by the British film director Ken Russell. ... Billion-Dollar Brain (1966, ISBN 0099857103) is a spy novel by Len Deighton. ... Women in Love is a 1969 British film which tells the story of the relationships between men and women during the early part of the 20th century. ... The Music Lovers is a 1971 biopic of the 19th century Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, as conceived by maverick director Ken Russell. ... The Boy Friend (sometimes mis-spelled The Boyfriend) is a musical by Sandy Wilson. ... The Devils is a 1971 film directed by Ken Russell and starring Oliver Reed and Vanessa Redgrave, based on the 1952 book The Devils of Loudun by Aldous Huxley and the 1960 play The Devils by John Whiting, also based on Huxleys book. ... Savage Messiah is a 1972 biographical film of the life of French sculptor Henri Gaudier-Brzeska, made by Russ-Arts and distributed by MGM. It was directed and produced by Ken Russell with Harry Benn as associate producer, from a screenplay by Christopher Logue, based on the book Savage Messiah... Mahler is a 1974 film based on the life of Gustav Mahler. ... Roger Daltrey as Tommy Tommy was a 1975 musical film, based on The Whos 1969 rock opera concept album Tommy. ... Lisztomania is a 1975 film by Ken Russell, drawn from a biography of Franz Liszt. ... Valentino is an american biographical drama film about the life of Rudolph Valentino, directed by Ken Russell. ... Altered States is the name of both a novel (ISBN 0060107278) and a film adaptation of that novel, both written by Paddy Chayefsky. ... Crimes of Passion is a film released in 1984 and directed by Ken Russell. ... Gothic is a 1986 film directed by Ken Russell. ... Aria is a 1987 British film, in Italian, French and German, made up of ten short pieces directed by a variety of different directors, based on pieces of classical music. ... The Lair of the White Worm is a 1988 film written, produced and directed by Ken Russell which starred Hugh Grant and Amanda Donohoe. ... Salomes Last Dance is a 1988 film by British film director, Ken Russell. ... Poster for the 1991 film Whore Whore, also known as, If Youre Afraid to Say It. ... Prisoner of Honor documents the French Dreyfus Affair that saw a French Captain sent to Devils Island for espionage near the end of the nineteenth century. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... “Telefilm” redirects here. ... Invasion of the Not Quite Dead is a upcoming (expected 2008) Horror film directed by Tony lane In 1978 the Welsh Mountains are infected by an alien bacteria. ...

External links

  • Ken Russell at the Internet Movie Database
  • Savage Messiah--a Ken Russell site by Iain Fisher
  • Ken Russell's film on Delius, Song of Summer
  • Ken Russell on Television - a comprehensive study of Russell's small-screen work, from the British Film Institute's Screenonline site. Video clips are restricted to UK schools and libraries for copyright reasons, but the text can be accessed by everyone.
  • Celebrity Big Brother Updates: Ken Russell
  • Celebrity Big Brother 5 Coverage
  • Claude Debussy
  • Huw Wheldon creator of the Monitor arts programme
  • Edward Elgar
  • New (2007) Ken Russell Discussion Group : The Lair Of Ken Russell
The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Claude Debussy, photo by Félix Nadar, 1908. ... Sir Huw Wheldon OBE MC (7 May 1916–March 14, 1986) was a BBC broadcaster and executive. ... Sir Edward Elgar Sir Edward William Elgar, 1st Baronet, OM, GCVO (2 June 1857 – 23 February 1934) was an English Romantic composer. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ken Russell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1155 words)
Russell was born in Southampton and educated in Walthamstow and at Pangbourne College, he served in both the RAF and the Merchant Navy, and moved into television work after a brief affair with dancing and photography.
Russell's last American film was Crimes of Passion (1984), and returns to his major themes, sex and religion, contrasting the prostitute with the "priest" and benefits from the performances of Kathleen Turner and Anthony Perkins.
By the 1990s, Russell's notoriety and persona had attracted so much media attention that he was widely regarded as unemployable in the cinema, and is now largely reliant on his own finances to continue making films.
BBC - BBC Four - Audio Interviews - Ken Russell (339 words)
Russell made more than 30 films for the BBC Monitor and Omnibus programmes, and became known as one of the finest directors working in British television.
Russell's later work is not considered to have reached the heights attained in these films, with the possible exception of Altered States (1980), although The Rainbow (1989) and Lady Chatterley (1992) are regarded as impressive pieces of work.
Some feel that Russell's extraordinary talent never quite matured and believe this may be due in part to the hostile criticism he received in his earlier years, when he was accused of "warping" his subject matter by the misguided application of an excessively lively imagination.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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