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Encyclopedia > Kemmu Restoration

History of Japan ImageMetadata File history File links Satsuma-samurai-during-boshin-war-period. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article Japan#History. ...

Glossary The Japanese Paleolithic ) covers a period from around 100,000 [citation needed] to 30,000 BCE, when the earliest stone tool implements have been found, to around 12,000 BCE, at the end of the last Ice-age, which corresponds to the beginning of the Mesolithic Jomon Period. ... Characters for Jōmon (Cord marks). The Jomon period (Japanese: 縄文時代 Jōmon-jidai) is the time in Japanese pre-history from about 10,000 BCE to 300 BCE. Most scholars agree that by around 40,000 BCE glaciation had connected the Japanese islands with the Asian mainland. ... History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei Yayoi (弥生時代) is an era in Japan from 300... The Yamato period ) is the period of Japanese history when the Japanese Imperial court ruled from modern-day Nara Prefecture, then known as Yamato Province. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Yamato period. ... The Nara period ) of the history of Japan covers the years from about AD 710 to 794. ... The Heian period (Japanese: 平安時代, Heian-jidai) is the last division of classical Japanese history, running from 794 to 1185. ... The Kamakura period (Japanese: 鎌倉時代, Kamakura-jidai; 1185–1333) is a period of Japanese history that marks the governance of the Kamakura Shogunate; officially established in 1192 by the first Kamakura shogun Minamoto no Yoritomo. ... The Muromachi period (Japanese: 室町時代, Muromachi-jidai, also known as the Muromachi era, the Muromachi bakufu, the Ashikaga era, the Ashikaga period, or the Ashikaga bakufu) is a division of Japanese history running from approximately 1336 to 1573. ... The Nanboku-cho period (Japanese: 南北朝時代, nanbokuchō-jidai, South and North courts period), also known as the Northern and Southern Courts period, spanning from 1336 to 1392, was a period that occurred during the early years of the Muromachi period of Japans history. ... The Sengoku period (Japanese: 戦国時代, Sengoku-jidai) or Warring States period, was a period of civil war in the history of Japan that spans from the middle 15th to the early 17th centuries. ... The Azuchi-Momoyama period (Japanese: 安土桃山時代, Azuchi-Momoyama-jidai) is a division of Japanese history running from approximately 1568 to 1600. ... The Nanban Trade Period (Jp:南蛮貿易時代, Lit. ... The Edo period (Japanese: 江戸時代, Edo-jidai), also called Tokugawa period, is a division of Japanese history running from 1603 to 1867. ... The Late Tokugawa Shogunate (Japanese: Bakumatsu) is the period between 1853 and 1867 during which Japan ended its isolationist foreign policy called sakoku and modernized from a feudal shogunate to the Meiji government. ... The Meiji period ) denotes the 45-year reign of Emperor Meiji, running from 8 September 1868 (in the Gregorian calendar, 23 October 1868) to 30 July 1912. ... The Meiji Restoration ), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution, or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to a change in Japans political and social structure. ... The Taishō period (Japanese: 大正時代, Taishō-jidai, period of great righteousness) is a period in the history of Japan dating from 30 July 1912 to 25 December 1926. ... Japan entered World War I in 1914, seizing the opportunity of Germanys distraction with the European War and wanting to expand its sphere of influence in China. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... At the end of the Second World War, Japan was occupied by the Allied Powers. ... History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei Following the end of the Allied occupation in 1952... It has been suggested that Updated Japan News be merged into this article or section. ... The Economic history of Japan is one of the most studied for its spectacular growth, first in the period from the late nineteenth century that saw Japan become a world power and then again after the devastation of the Second World War when the island nation rose to become the... The history of education in Japan dates back at least to the sixth century, when Chinese learning was introduced at the Yamato court. ... The military history of Japan is characterized by a long period of feudal wars, followed by domestic stability, and then foreign conquest. ... The naval history of Japan traces back to early interactions with states on the Asian continent at the beginning of the medieval period, and reached a peak of activity during the 16th and 17th century at a time of cultural exchange with European powers during the Nanban trade period. ... This is the glossary of Japanese history including historical figures, events, places, policies and others. ...

The Kemmu Restoration (建武の新政; Kemmu no shinsei) was a period of Japanese history that occurred from 1333 to 1336 AD. It marks the three year period between the fall of the Kamakura shogunate and the rise of the Ashikaga shogunate, when Emperor Go-Daigo attempted to re-established Imperial control (but failed). Events End of the Kamakura period and beginning of the Kemmu restoration in Japan. ... Events End of the Kemmu restoration and beginning of the Muromachi period in Japan. ... This wooden Kongorikishi statue was created during the Kamakura shogunate during 14th century Japan. ... The Ashikaga shogunate (Jp. ... Emperor Go-Daigo (後醍醐天皇 Go-Daigo Tennō) (November 26, 1288 – September 19, 1339) was the 96th Emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ...


Attempt by Go-Daigo in 1333-1336 to bring an end to rule by shoguns and to restore imperial rule, which terminated the Kamakura period. By the early 14th century the Kamakura bakufu (military government) of the Hojo family was in disarray: the efforts needed to repel the abortive invasions from the Mongol Empire in 1274 and 1281 had been costly, and the shogun had been unable to reward provincial leaders who had rallied to the banner.


In 1318 Go-Daigo came to the throne from the junior line of the imperial house, but was reluctant to step down later in favour of the senior line, and became determined to overthrow the bakufu. He was sent into exile in 1331, but supporters such as the provincial warrior Kusunoki Masahige continued the struggle, and in 1333 the bakufu was destroyed when Ashikaga Takauji turned against it. Go-Daigo returned to Kyoto convinced that the days of the shoguns and other usurpers were over and that the emperors could rule in fact as well as in name once more. However, his regime had neither the administrative experience nor the provincial power to deal with the realities of a warrior-dominated society. Go-Daigo refused to appoint Takauji shogun even when asked directly in 1335, and when he clashed with Takauji in 1336 the result was not in doubt. He fled south from Kyoto to Yoshino, while Takauji established a new bakufu in Kyoto, known as the Muromachi bakufu, crushed remaining loyalists in battle near Kobe, and installed a puppet emperor on the throne. This initiated a schism between two rival branches of the imperial family which lasted until 1392. Takauji's Ashikaga family ruled as shoguns for the rest of the Muromachi period. The Kemmu Restoration was a failure, but it kept alive the ideology of imperial rule, which finally succeeded in bringing centuries of shogunal rule to an end in 1868 with the Meiji Restoration.


Kemmu Restoration in fiction

In the alternate history novel Romanitas by Sophia MacDougall, the Kemmu Restoration becomes as major an event in Japanese, or 'Nionian' hstory, as the Meiji Restoration in reality. In that continuity, the Emperor Go-Daigo had (surreptitiously) acquired gunpowder technology from a still-extant (and ascendant) Roman Empire, and laid the groundwork for Nionia to challenge Rome for global supremacy in the centuries to come. The Meiji Restoration ), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution, or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to a change in Japans political and social structure. ...


< Kamakura period | History of Japan | Muromachi period > The Kamakura period (Japanese: 鎌倉時代, Kamakura-jidai; 1185–1333) is a period of Japanese history that marks the governance of the Kamakura Shogunate; officially established in 1192 by the first Kamakura shogun Minamoto no Yoritomo. ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article Japan#History. ... The Muromachi period (Japanese: 室町時代, Muromachi-jidai, also known as the Muromachi era, the Muromachi bakufu, the Ashikaga era, the Ashikaga period, or the Ashikaga bakufu) is a division of Japanese history running from approximately 1336 to 1573. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Kemmu restoration - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (462 words)
The Kemmu Restoration (建武の新政; Kemmu no shinsei) was a period of Japanese history that occurred from 1333 to 1336 AD.
By the early 14th century the Kamakura bakufu (military government) of the Hojo family was in disarray: the efforts needed to repel the abortive invasions from the Mongol Empire in 1274 and 1281 had been costly, and the shogun had been unable to reward provincial leaders who had rallied to the banner.
The Kemmu Restoration was a failure, but it kept alive the ideology of imperial rule, which finally succeeded in bringing centuries of shogunal rule to an end in 1868 with the Meiji Restoration.
Meiji Restoration - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1175 words)
The defeat of the armies of the former shogun (led by Hijikata Toshizo) marked the end of the Meiji Restoration; all defiance to the emperor and his rule ended.
The leaders of the Meiji Restoration, as this revolution came to be known, acted in the name of restoring imperial rule.
The Meiji Restoration was the catalyst towards industrialization in Japan that led to the rise of the island nation as a military power by 1905, under the slogan of "National Wealth and Military Strength" (fukoku kyohei, 富国強兵).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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