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Encyclopedia > Keith Jackson

Keith Jackson (born October 18, 1928, in Roopville, Georgia) is a former American sportscaster, known for his long career with ABC Sports television, his coverage of college football as well as his style of folksy, down-to-earth commentary and deep voice.[1] This article is about people called professionals. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Keith Jackson (born April 9, 1965 in Little Rock, Arkansas) was a professional American football tight end who played for the Philadelphia Eagles(1988-1991), Miami Dolphins(1992-1994), and Green Bay Packers(1996-1996). ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Roopville is a town located in Carroll County, Georgia. ... American Sportscasters A sportscaster, sports announcer, or sports commentator is a type of journalist on radio or television who specializes in reporting or commenting on sports events. ... [1] ABC Sports is a division of ABC, responsible for the televising of many sports events on the network. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ...

Contents

Early life

Jackson was born and raised on a farm outside Carrollton, Georgia, near the Georgia-Alabama state line.[2] The only surviving child in a poor family, he grew up listening to sports on the radio.[2] After a stint in the Marines, he attended Washington State University under the G.I. Bill.[3] Jackson began as a police science major, but he became interested in broadcasting.[4] He graduated in 1954 with a degree in Speech Communications.[5] Panoramic of Carrollton circa 1912. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... Washington State University (WSU) is a major public research university in Pullman, Washington. ... The Servicemens Readjustment Act of 1944 (better known as the G.I. Bill) provided for college or vocational education for returning World War II veterans (commonly referred to as GIs or G.I.s) as well as one year of unemployment compensation. ... Police science is often an ambiguous term that denotes the studies and research which directly or indirectly deal with police work. ...


Broadcast career

Though best known for his college football broadcasts, Jackson announced numerous other sports for ABC throughout his career, including Major League Baseball, NBA basketball, boxing, auto racing, and the Olympic Games. He briefly worked college basketball with Dick Vitale.[6] Jackson also served as the pregame anchor for ABC's coverage of Super Bowl XXII in 1988. Major League Baseball on ABCs Wide World of Sports. ... The NBA on ABC is a TV show that telecasts NBA games on ABC Sports since Christmas Day 2002. ... For other senses of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... Motor racing and Motorsports redirect here. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... College basketball most often refers to the American basketball competitive governance structure established by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA. Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... Richard J. Dick Vitale, also known as Dickie V and Mr. ... Date January 31, 1988 Stadium Jack Murphy Stadium City San Diego, California MVP Doug Williams, Quarterback Favorite Broncos by 3 National anthem Herb Alpert Coin toss Don Hutson Referee Bob McElwee Halftime show Chubby Checker and The Rockettes Attendance 73,302 TV in the United States Network ABC Announcers Al... See also: 1987 in sports, other events of 1988, 1989 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing Stock car racing: Bobby Allison won the Daytona 500 NASCAR Championship - Bill Elliott CART Racing - Danny Sullivan won the season championship Indianapolis 500 - Rick Mears Formula One Championship - Ayrton...


Jackson began his career as a broadcaster at Washington State in 1952, when he called a radio game between Stanford and Washington State. He then worked for KOMO-TV and Radio, an ABC affiliate in Seattle, from 1954 for the next ten years as co-anchor for their first news team (first co-anchor news team on the West Coast), covering Seafair hydroplane races, minor league Seattle Rainiers baseball games, and University of Washington Huskies football games. In 1958, Jackson became the first American sports announcer to broadcast an event from the Soviet Union, a crew race between the Washington Huskies and a Soviet team.[7] Despite heavy suspicion and numerous hurdles by the Soviet authorities, Jackson and his cohorts were able to cover the race: the first ever American sports victory on Russian soil.[8] He joined ABC Sports in 1962, full time in 1964 as a radio news correspondent and later became sports director of ABC Radio West.[2] Washington State University (WSU) is a major public research university in Pullman, Washington. ... See also: 1951 in sports, 1953 in sports and the list of years in sports. Auto Racing NASCAR Championship - Tim Flock AAA Racing: Troy Ruttman won the Indianapolis 500 Chuck Stevenson won the season championship Formula One Championship - Italy 24 hours of Le Mans: Hermann Lang / Fritz Reiss won, driving... Stanford may refer: Stanford University Places: Stanford, Kentucky Stanford, California, home of Stanford University Stanford Shopping Center Stanford, New York, town in Dutchess County. ... KOMO Studio KOMO-TV (KOMO 4) is a television station in Seattle, Washington. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... tyler rules The Washington Huskies are the athletic teams at the University of Washington. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... // World Artistic Gymnastics Championships Mens all-around champion: Yuri Titov, USSR Womens all-around champion: Larissa Latynina, USSR Team competition champions: mens - Japan; womens - USSR Seventh European Championships, held from September 12 to September 16 in Belgrade, Yugoslavia August 29 — Asian Games Marathon, Jakarta, Indonesia Men...


Jackson helped Walter Cronkite cover the 1964 Republican National Convention in San Francisco, California.[7] Walter Leland Cronkite, Jr. ... The 1964 Republican National Convention took place in Cow Palace, San Francisco, California, July 13 - 16 1964. ... “San Francisco” redirects here. ...


In the early 1960s, Jackson covered American Football League games.[2] In 1970, he was chosen to be the first play-by-play announcer on Monday Night Football covering the NFL, but he remained in that capacity only for the program's first season.[2] Frank Gifford was ABC's initial target but could not get out of his CBS contract until after the 1970 season. In 1971, however, Gifford landed the job. The American Football League (AFL) was a professional football league that operated from 1960 until 1969, when all of its teams were absorbed into the National Football League (NFL). ... The 1970 NFL season was the 51st regular season of the National Football League, and the first one after the AFL-NFL Merger. ... Monday Night Football (MNF) is a live television broadcast of the National Football League. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Francis Newton Gifford (born August 16, 1930 in Santa Monica, California) was an American football player and one of the better-known American sports commentators in the latter part of the 20th century who made the transition from an athlete to broadcasting. ... The 1971 NFL season was the 52nd regular season of the National Football League. ...


Jackson was involved in the ABC coverage of the 1972 Summer Olympics and continued to contribute even when an attack by Palestinian terrorists transformed the coverage from that of a typical sporting event to that of a greater international and historical news event.[9] He covered a total of 10 Summer and Winter Olympic Games.[7] The 1972 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XX Olympiad, were held in Munich, West Germany, from 26 August to 11 September 1972. ... The Munich massacre occurred during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, when members of the Israeli Olympic team were taken hostage by the Palestinian terrorist group Black September, a group with ties to Yasser Arafat’s Fatah organization. ... A runner carries the Olympic torch The Winter Olympic Games, Winter Olympics for short but more correctly The Olympic Winter Games, are the cold-weather counterpart to the Summer Olympic Games. ...


Jackson was a regular part of ABC's popular Wide World of Sports (WWOS), covering both popular sports and obscure events like wrist wrestling.[4] For WWOS he covered Evel Knievel's successful jump at Exhibition Stadium, in Toronto, Canada, on August 20, 1974;[10] as well as his spectacular May 31, 1975 crash while attempting to jump over thirteen double decker Routemaster buses at London's Wembley Stadium, prompting Jackson to exclaim, "Oh my God!".[11] He also handled WWOS' first coverage of boxer Sugar Ray Leonard at the North American Continental Boxing Championships on July 26, 1975, who Jackson called a young boxer to watch.[12] ABCs Wide World of Sports is a long-running sports anthology show on American television. ... Robert Craig Evel Knievel, Jr. ... Original architectural model of the 4th Exhibition Stadium, from 1948 Exhibition Stadium was a stadium that formerly stood on the Exhibition Place grounds in Toronto, Ontario. ... Motto: Diversity Our Strength Map of Ontario Counties, Toronto being red Area: 641 sq. ... A double decker is a bus, airplane, train, tram, ferry, or any public transit vehicle that has two levels for passengers, one deck above the other. ... First London AEC Routemaster, RML 2473 (JJD 473D), on route 7 towards Ladbroke Grove tube station, April 2002. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For the new stadium, see Wembley Stadium. ... Ray Charles Leonard (born May 17, 1956 in Wilmington, North Carolina) is a retired professional boxer. ...


In baseball, Keith Jackson called (alongside Tim McCarver) the now famous 16-inning long sixth game of the 1986 National League Championship Series between the New York Mets and Houston Astros. This article is about the sport. ... James Timothy McCarver (born October 16, 1941 in Memphis, Tennessee) is an American former Major League and minor league baseball catcher, and a current broadcaster for FOX Sports. ... The 1986 National League Championship Series pitted the New York Mets against the Houston Astros. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 24, 25, 32, 33, 34, 40, 42, 49 Name Houston Astros (1965–present) Houston Colt . ...


College football

Jackson began his ABC career at a time when television play-by-play announcers did not always have regular analysts. He would only once miss working a college season in his over 50 years, starting in 1952.[2] Jackson was joined in the booth by Joe Paterno for the 1974 Michigan-Ohio State game in Columbus, while Woody Hayes accompanied him for the 1974 Notre Dame-USC game.[citation needed] Joseph Vincent Paterno (born December 21, 1926, in Brooklyn, New York), nicknamed JoePa, is the head coach of Pennsylvania State Universitys college football team, a position he has held since 1966. ... The Michigan-Ohio State Rivalry is the intense rivalry between the University of Michigan and The Ohio State University football teams. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Delaware, and Fairfield Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City  212. ... Wayne Woodrow “Woody” Hayes (February 14, 1913 â€“ March 12, 1987) was a college football coach who is best remembered for his 28-year tenure at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, from 1951-1978. ... Notre Dame Fighting Irish football rivalries encompass many teams. ...


In his many years covering college football, Jackson has been paired with a wide variety of color commentators, including former Arkansas coach and athletic director Frank Broyles (1978-1986) and pro football legend Bob Griese (1987-1999). For many years, he was assigned by ABC to the primary national game of the week. His quirky expressions such as "Whoa, Nellie!" and "Fum-BLE!" are often the subject of comedic imitation. Though he greatly popularized it, Jackson notes that he learned the term "Whoa, Nellie" from earlier television announcer Dick Lane.[7] He has often referred to offensive and defensive line players as the Big Uglies. Jackson is also credited with coining the nickname for Michigan Stadium, The Big House.[13] In the season before his first retirement, during what was thought to be his final game at The Big House, the Michigan Marching Band's halftime show concluded by spelling out "Thanks Keith" across the field, the 111,019 fans turned toward the press box, stood up and cheered for the commentator, and as a part of the halftime event former Michigan coach Bo Schembechler presented Jackson with a jersey with "The Big House" across the front and a Michigan football helmet.[13] The University of Arkansas is a public co-educational land-grant university. ... blah blah Modern athletic directors are often in a coaching misconduct being proven, often the athletic director will be terminated along with the offending coach. ... Frank Broyles, current athletic director for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks athletic department. ... Robert Allen Griese (born February 3, 1945 in Evansville, Indiana) is a former American football quarterback who earned All-American honors with the Purdue Boilermakers before being drafted in 1967 by the American Football Leagues Miami Dolphins. ... Dick Lane (May 28, 1899 - September 5, 1982) was a television announcer who made his mark broadcasting wrestling and roller derby (called Roller Games in Los Angeles) shows on KTLA mainly from the Grand Olympic Auditorium in Los Angeles. ... Michigan Stadium, nicknamed The Big House, is the football stadium for the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ... The Michigan Marching Band (or MMB) is University of Michigans Marching Band. ... The Press Box is a special section of a sports stadium or arena that is set up for the media to report about a given event. ... Glenn Edward Bo Schembechler (April 1, 1929 – November 17, 2006) was an American college football coach best known as the head coach at the University of Michigan, where he coached the Wolverines from 1969 until 1989. ...


In the 1990s, Jackson recorded videos for the centennial of the Alabama Crimson Tide. In 2006, Jackson became the voice behind the Nebraska Cornhuskers' "Tunnel Walk" video. This video is played before every home game at Memorial Stadium. Athletic teams at The University of Alabama are known as the Crimson Tide. ... The 2006 NCAA Division I FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) football season, or the college football season, began on August 31, 2006 and, aside from all-star exhibition games that follow, concluded with the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) National Championship Game on January 8, 2007 in Glendale, Arizona, USA, where the... The Nebraska Cornhuskers (often abbreviated to Huskers) is the name given to several sports teams of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. ...


Jackson's connections to the University of Nebraska remain strong. It was Jackson himself that the university contacted when designing its new pressbox facility--Jackson's recommendation was that it needed a restroom, as few if any pressboxes had any suitable restroom facilities. When Jackson did the Nebraska/California game the following season (the debut of the Cornhuskers' new pressbox), he found a restroom with the following sign-"The Keith Jackson Memorial Bippy"; the sign was a joke from Jackson's longtime friend, Nebraska sports information director Don Bryant.


Jackson would call the 1972 USC Trojans the greatest team he ever saw.[14]


Jackson's career was not free of incidents. During the 1978 Gator Bowl, Jackson missed Ohio State Head Coach Woody Hayes' infamous punch of Clemson defensive lineman Charlie Bauman and was unable to get a replay, leading to accusations that he was protecting the coach who was fired for the incident.[2] The Toyota Gator Bowl is an annual college football bowl game that is played at ALLTEL Stadium in Jacksonville, Florida. ... The Ohio State Universitys intercollegiate sports teams and players are called the Buckeyes (after the state tree, the Buckeye), and participate in the NCAAs Division I in all sports and the Big Ten Conference in most sports. ... Clemson University is a member of the NCAAs Division I and is in the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference. ...


Retirement

Jackson announced his first retirement from college football at the end of the 1998 season and his intention to live full time at his home in California. Choosing the 1999 National Championship at the Fiesta Bowl between Tennessee and Florida State as his last broadcast, he concluded the program by stating "Tennessee 23, Florida State 16. And so it is done. I say goodbye to all of you. God bless and good night."[4] The 1998 NCAA Division I-A football season was the first of the Bowl Championship Series, which crowned Tennessee its national champion, the schools first since the 1950s and one year after mega star quarterback Peyton Manning left for the NFL. The BCS combined elements of the old Bowl... See also: 1998 in sports, other events of 1999, 2000 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Athletics Hicham El Guerrouj sets the new World Record in the mile at the World Championships in Rome. ... The Fiesta Bowl, now sponsored by Tostitos tortilla chips (a Frito-Lay product), is a United States college football game played annually since 1971. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ... Florida State University (commonly referred to as Florida State or FSU)[6] is a public research university located in Tallahassee. ...


He rescinded this decision the following fall and began to do a more limited schedule of games, teamed with Dan Fouts, almost exclusively sticking to venues on the West Coast, closer to his home in British Columbia. One of the notable exceptions was the 2003 Michigan-Ohio State game, the 100th meeting between the two archrivals. He strongly hinted that he was interested in retiring for good after the 2005 season, telling The New York Times, that he was feeling his age after 53 seasons.[15] ABC tried to lure Jackson to stay, but he made up his mind.[1] Jackson decided to retire for good on April 27, 2006, at age 77, noting he didn't want to die in a stadium parking lot.[6] His last game call was the 2006 Rose Bowl featuring Texas vs. USC for the BCS National Championship. Daniel Francis Fouts (born June 10, 1951) was an American football quarterback in the National Football League for the San Diego Chargers from 1973 through 1987, and is famous for being one of the most prolific quarterbacks of the Super Bowl Era. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Motto: Splendor Sine Occasu (Latin: Splendour Without Sunset (diminishment)) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Iona Campagnolo - Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 36 - Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th - Total 944,735... SCREW USC! The 2003 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) in a heap of controversy. ... The Michigan-Ohio State Rivalry is the intense rivalry between the University of Michigan and The Ohio State University football teams. ... ESPN Game Day photo of The Texas Longhorn mascot Bevo seen with the Bowl Championship Series trophy during the 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... // For an extensive coverage see 2006 in athletics (track and field) May 12 — Justin Gatlin equals the 100m world record. ... 2006 Rose Bowl Bowl game Texas Longhorns at USC Trojans USC Trojans (12-1) 38 January 4, 2006 Rose Bowl Stadium in Pasadena, California The 2006 Rose Bowl Game presented by Citi was the final game and national championship of the 2005-2006 Bowl Championship Series (BCS), the 92nd Rose... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities, and six are health institutions. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... The BCS National Championship Game or BCS title game is the final game of the annual Bowl Championship Series intended by Series organizers to determine the NCAA Division I-A national football championship. ...


Awards and Honors

In 1999, the National Football Foundation awarded Jackson the Gold Medal Award, its highest honor.[16] The same year he was inducted into Rose Bowl Hall of Fame.[17] The Edward R. Murrow School of Communication at Washington State University awarded their alumnus with the Murrow Award for top leaders in the communication industry in 1999;[18] Jackson was a charter member of the WSU Foundation, founded in 1979, provided scholarship money to the Murrow School and chaired the fund-raising drive for the school's alumni center.[4] On April 24, 1995, he was inducted into the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association Hall of Fame, having won its National Sportscaster of the Year five successive times.[9] The American Football Coaches Association awarded him its Amos Alonzo Stagg Award in 1993 as an individual "whose services have been outstanding in the advancement of the best interests of football."[19] He was the first sports announcer to receiver the Stagg award.[7] National Football Foundation logo The National Football Foundation (NFF) is a non-profit organization founded in 1947 by General Douglas MacArthur, legendary Army Black Knights football coach Earl Red Blaik and journalist Grantland Rice. ... There is also the Roses Tournament in England Perhaps one of the United States of Americas most important annual festivities, The Tournament of Roses Parade is the 114-year-old traditional parade generally held on New Years Day in Pasadena, California. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... // History The National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association (NSSA) was formed in 1959 by a local restaurant owner, Pete DiMizio, to honor regional sportscasters and sportswriters whom he had met at the Greensboro Open Golf Tournament in Greensboro, North Carolina. ... AFCA logo The American Football Coaches Association is an association of football coaches on all levels and is responsible for the Coaches Poll that determines the national champion each year. ... AFCA logo The Amos Alonzo Stagg Award is presented annually by the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) to the “individual, group or institution whose services have been outstanding in the advancement of the best interests of football. ...


Longtime Penn State Head Coach Joe Paterno said of Jackson: "I don't think you could say that there is any one person who is not a coach, athletic director or administrator who has done more for college football than Keith Jackson".[7] Michigan Head Coach Lloyd Carr described Jackson as "a symbol of all the good things in college football".[7] The Pennsylvania State University The Pennsylvania State University (commonly known as Penn State) is a state-related land-grant university in Pennsylvania, with over 80,000 students at 24 campuses throughout the state. ... Joseph Vincent Paterno (born December 21, 1926, in Brooklyn, New York), nicknamed JoePa, is the head coach of Pennsylvania State Universitys college football team, a position he has held since 1966. ... The University of Michigan features 24 varsity sports teams called the Wolverines, which compete in the NCAAs Division I and in the Big Ten Conference in all sports except mens ice hockey which competes in the NCAA D1 Central Collegiate Hockey Association. ... Lloyd H. Carr (born July 30, 1945) has served as head coach of the University of Michigan football team since 1995. ...


Film and television appearances

Jackson has had a minor career as an actor, often either playing himself (as on an episode of Coach) or a sportscaster like himself, as in The Fortune Cookie (1966). He has also appeared in and narrated several sports documentaries. His play-by-play of the 1977 World Series is used in the background of the Spike Lee film, Summer of Sam (1999). In 2007, he appeared in clips and voice on the ESPN orginial series, The Bronx Is Burning, featuring clips from ABC's Monday Night Baseball, and ABC Sports coverage of the 1977 World Series. For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Coach is a popular American television sitcom that aired for nine seasons on ABC from 1989 to 1997. ... The Fortune Cookie is a 1967 film with Walter Matthau and Jack Lemmon. ... // Events Top grossing films North America Thunderball Dr. Zhivago Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? That Darn Cat! The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming Academy Awards Best Picture: A Man for All Seasons - Highland, Columbia Best Actor: Paul Scofield - A Man for All Seasons Best Actress: Elizabeth Taylor... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... 1977 World Series Logo The 1977 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the Los Angeles Dodgers, with the Yankees winning in six games to capture their first title since 1962, and their 21st overall. ... Shelton Jackson Lee (born March 20, 1957, in Atlanta, Georgia), better known as Spike Lee, is an Emmy Award - winning, and Academy Award - nominated American film director, producer, writer, and actor noted for his films dealing with controversial social and political issues. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Summer of Sam is a 1999 film about the Son of Sam serial murders. ... The year 1999 in film involved some significant events. ... ESPN/ESPN-DT, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an [[United States|Amer<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here--68. ... The Bronx Is Burning is a television drama that debuted on ESPN on July 9, 2007 following the 2007 MLB Home Run Derby. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1977 World Series Logo The 1977 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the Los Angeles Dodgers, with the Yankees winning in six games to capture their first title since 1962, and their 21st overall. ...


Jackson has appeared in numerous commercials, especially in the latter stages of his career. He once parodied his broadcast persona for a Bud Light beer commercial, in which he played the officiating minister at a wedding, finishing with his famous line, "Whoa, Nellie!" He also appeared in commercials for Shoney's, a chain of family-style restaurants well-known in the Southeast, especially in his native Georgia. Most recently, Jackson has appeared in "The Legend of Gatorade" ads, which he humorously alluded to during his live coverage of the 2006 Rose Bowl. In 2006, he also was shown in a commercial for Ice Breakers' Ice Cubes with Hilary Duff, Haylie Duff, and Joey Lawrence, again contributing his famous "Whoa, Nellie!" Anheuser_Busch (NYSE: BUD), the worlds third largest brewing company in volume after InBev and SABMiller, is based in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA. The company brews 35 different beers and malt liquors. ... For other uses, see Beer (disambiguation). ... Shoneys is a restaurant chain in the United States that had a franchise with the Big Boy chain. ... Gatorade is a non-carbonated sports drink marketed by the Quaker Oats Company, a division of PepsiCo. ... 2006 Rose Bowl Bowl game Texas Longhorns at USC Trojans USC Trojans (12-1) 38 January 4, 2006 Rose Bowl Stadium in Pasadena, California The 2006 Rose Bowl Game presented by Citi was the final game and national championship of the 2005-2006 Bowl Championship Series (BCS), the 92nd Rose... The year 2006 in television involved some significant events. ... Ice Breakers is an American gum and breath mint made by the Hershey Company. ... Hilary Erhard Duff (born September 28, 1987) is an American actress, singer, songwriter, producer, fashion designer, and spokesperson. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Joseph Joey Lawrence (born Joseph Lawrence Mignogna, Jr. ...


Personal

Jackson is a long-time resident of California. He and his wife Turi Ann, have three grown children and homes in the Los Angeles, California area and Pender Harbour, British Columbia, Canada.[2] Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ... Large, multi inleted bay on British Columbias Sunshine Coast. ...


Notable broadcasts

Preceded by
None
Monday Night Football play-by-play man
1970
Succeeded by
Frank Gifford
Preceded by
Jim McKay
Television voice of the
Indianapolis 500

1975
Succeeded by
Jim McKay
Preceded by
Joe Garagiola
World Series network television play-by-play announcer (with Al Michaels in 1979 and 1981; concurrent with Joe Garagiola in odd numbered years)
1977-1981
Succeeded by
Joe Garagiola and Dick Enberg
Preceded by
Chris Schenkel
Play-by-Play announcer, NBA Finals
1972-1973
Succeeded by
Pat Summerall
Preceded by
Dick Enberg
Play-by-Play announcer, Rose Bowl
1989-2006 (except 1993, 1997, 2003)
Succeeded by
Brent Musburger

The Daytona 500 is a 200-lap, 500 mile (805 km) NASCAR NEXTEL Cup Series race held annually at the Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida. ... Richard Lee Petty (born July 2, 1937) is an American former NASCAR Winston Cup Series driver. ... Series Summary Lakers win series 4-1 Categories: | ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Los Angeles, California. ... The 1972 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XX Olympiad, were held in Munich, West Germany, from 26 August to 11 September 1972. ... Mark Andrew Spitz (born February 10, 1950, in Modesto, California) is a American swimmer. ... Results of the 1975 Indianapolis 500 held at Indianapolis on May 30, 1975. ... Robert William Bobby Unser (born February 20, 1934 in Colorado Springs, Colorado) was a U.S. automobile racer. ... The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXI Olympiad, were held in 1976 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... William Bruce Jenner (born October 28, 1949 in Mount Kisco, New York) is a U.S. track athlete. ... Decathlon is an athletic event combining 10 track and field events. ... 1977 World Series Logo The 1977 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the Los Angeles Dodgers, with the Yankees winning in six games to capture their first title since 1962, and their 21st overall. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899-1910), (1913) Brooklyn Grooms... Reginald Martinez Reggie Jackson (born May 18, 1946), nicknamed Mr. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Wayne Woodrow “Woody” Hayes (February 14, 1913 â€“ March 12, 1987) was a college football coach who is best remembered for his 28-year tenure at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, from 1951-1978. ... This article is about the American football game. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship campus of the University of Alabama System. ... The Pennsylvania State University (commonly known as Penn State) is a state-related, land-grant university. ... The 1980 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIII Olympic Winter Games, were held in 1980 in Lake Placid, New York, United States of America. ... Eric Arthur Heiden (born June 15, 1958) is an American speed skater who won all the distances and thus an unprecedented five gold medals at the 1980 Winter Olympic Games in Lake Placid, New York, United States. ... Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme ( file info) — composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... Patrick Aloysius Ewing (born August 5, 1962) is a Jamaican-born American former professional basketball player. ... West Virginia University is an institution of higher learning based in Morgantown, West Virginia, USA. Other campuses include: West Virginia University at Parkersburg in Parkersburg; West Virginia University Institute of Technology in Montgomery; Potomac State College of West Virginia University in Keyser; and a clinical campus for the Universitys... The 1986 National League Championship Series pitted the New York Mets against the Houston Astros. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 24, 25, 32, 33, 34, 40, 42, 49 Name Houston Astros (1965–present) Houston Colt . ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... This article is about the elder Dale Earnhardt. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... This article is about the university in Coral Gables, Florida. ... Florida State University (commonly referred to as Florida State or FSU)[6] is a public research university located in Tallahassee. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... This article is about the American football game. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship campus of the University of Alabama System. ... This article is about the university in Coral Gables, Florida. ... The University of Colorado at Boulder (CU-Boulder, UCB officially[3]; Colorado and CU colloquially) is the flagship university of the University of Colorado System in Boulder, Colorado. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... The Rocket Left football game was a match between the University of Colorado and the University of Michigan. ... The University of Florida (Florida, UFL, or UF) is a public land-grant, space-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... Florida State University (commonly referred to as Florida State or FSU)[6] is a public research university located in Tallahassee. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... Washington State University (WSU) is a major public research university in Pullman, Washington. ... This article is about the university in Coral Gables, Florida. ... The University of Nebraska–Lincoln is a state-supported institution of higher learning located in Lincoln, Nebraska, USA. Often referred to as simply Nebraska or UNL, it is the flagship and largest campus of the University of Nebraska system. ... Auburn University (AU or Auburn) is a state university located in Auburn, Alabama, USA. With more than 24,100 students and 1,200 faculty, it is the largest university in the state,[5] and according to U.S. News & World Report, has a selectivity rating of more selective. ... The 2003 Tostitos Fiesta Bowl took place on January 3, 2003 in Tempe, Arizona at Sun Devil Stadium, with the Ohio State Buckeyes defeating the Miami Hurricanes by a score of 31-24 in double overtime. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ... Colorado State University is a public institution of higher learning located in Fort Collins, Colorado in the United States. ... The Big Game is the annual football game between Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley (known simply as California or Cal), held in November. ... “Stanford” redirects here. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... The Holiday Bowl is a post-season NCAA-sanctioned Division I-A college football bowl game that has been played annually at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego, California, since 1978. ... University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma founded in 1890. ... The University of Oregon is a public university located in Eugene, Oregon. ... 2006 Rose Bowl Bowl game Texas Longhorns at USC Trojans USC Trojans (12-1) 38 January 4, 2006 Rose Bowl Stadium in Pasadena, California The 2006 Rose Bowl Game presented by Citi was the final game and national championship of the 2005-2006 Bowl Championship Series (BCS), the 92nd Rose... University of Texas redirects here. ... Monday Night Football (MNF) is a live television broadcast of the National Football League. ... The 1970 NFL season was the 51st regular season of the National Football League, and the first one after the AFL-NFL Merger. ... Francis Newton Gifford (born August 16, 1930 in Santa Monica, California) was an American football player and one of the better-known American sports commentators in the latter part of the 20th century who made the transition from an athlete to broadcasting. ... James Kenneth McManus, better known by his professional name of Jim McKay (b. ... // 2000s 1990s 1980s 1970s 1960s ABC televised either filmed or taped recorded highlights of the race the following Saturday on Wide World of Sports from 1965-1970. ... Results of the 1975 Indianapolis 500 held at Indianapolis on May 30, 1975. ... James Kenneth McManus, better known by his professional name of Jim McKay (b. ... Joseph Henry Garagiola, Sr. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... Alan Richard Michaels (born November 12, 1944) is an American television sportscaster. ... Dates: October 10 – October 17 MVP: Willie Stargell (Pittsburgh) Television: ABC Announcers: Keith Jackson (Games 1-2; Games 6-7), Al Michaels (Games 3-5), Howard Cosell, and Don Drysdale (In 2006 a collectors edition DVD box set, featuring the complete telecasts of all seven games, was issued by... 1981 World Series Logo The 1981 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the Los Angeles Dodgers, marking their third meeting in the Series in five years. ... Joseph Henry Garagiola, Sr. ... 1977 World Series Logo The 1977 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the Los Angeles Dodgers, with the Yankees winning in six games to capture their first title since 1962, and their 21st overall. ... 1981 World Series Logo The 1981 World Series matched the New York Yankees against the Los Angeles Dodgers, marking their third meeting in the Series in five years. ... Joseph Henry Garagiola, Sr. ... Richard Alan Dick Enberg (born January 9, 1935 in Mount Clemens, Michigan) is an American sportscaster. ... Chris Schenkel Chris Schenkel (born August 21, 1923 in Bippus, Indiana; died September 11, 2005 in Fort Wayne, Indiana) was an American sportscaster. ... Logo of the NBA Finals. ... Series Summary Lakers win series 4-1 Categories: | ... Series Summary Knicks win series 4-1 Categories: | ... George Allen Pat Summerall (born May 10, 1930 in Lake City, Florida) is a former American football player and well-known television sportscaster, having worked at CBS, FOX, and, briefly, ESPN. Summerall is best known for his work with John Madden on CBS and FOXs NFL telecasts, and in... Richard Alan Dick Enberg (born January 9, 1935 in Mount Clemens, Michigan) is an American sportscaster. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... Brent Woody Musburger (born May 26, 1939 in Portland, Oregon) is an American sportscaster for ABC. // Educated at Northwestern Universitys Medill School of Journalism, Musburger began his career as a sportswriter for the now-defunct Chicago American newspaper. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Broadcaster Keith Jackson set to retire, The Sporting News, April 27, 2006.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Jerry Crowe, Big man on campus - sportscaster Keith Jackson, The Sporting News, August 21, 1995.
  3. ^ 1994 Hall of Fame Inductee: Keith Jackson, American Sportscasters Association, Accessed August 20, 2007.
  4. ^ a b c d 'God bless and good night', Associated Press, January 05, 1999.
  5. ^ Craig Murphy, Antique Dealer Can't Ignore a Bargain, Washington State Magazine, May 2004.
  6. ^ a b Steve Kelley, His voice is now ghost of Saturdays past, The Seattle Times, April 28, 2006.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g Andrew Krebs, Wide world of Jackson, The Daily Collegian, November 8, 1997.
  8. ^ Howard Ramaley, 1922-2006, KOMO-TV, October 31, 2007.
  9. ^ a b NSSA Hall Of Fame: 1986-1995 Inductees, National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association, Accessed August 20, 2007.
  10. ^ Classic Wide World of Sports Episode 25, TV.com, Accessed August 20, 2007.
  11. ^ WWOS Flashback: Evel Kneivel's '75 crash at Wembley, ABC Sports Online, Accessed August 20, 2007.
  12. ^ Wide World of Sports Highlights -- 1970s, ABC Sports Online, Accessed August 20, 2007.
  13. ^ a b Sharat Raju, One year later, Taylor still contributing to Wolverines, The Michigan Daily, November 9, 1998.
  14. ^ Beano Cook, All-time top 25: '47 Irish were greatest, ESPN.com, August 1, 2007.
  15. ^ Keith Jackson Mulls Retirement From ABC Sports, The New York Times, March 21, 2006.
  16. ^ Past Gold Medal Winners, National Football Foundation, Accessed August 20, 2007.
  17. ^ Rose Bowl Hall of Fame, Tournament of Roses, Accessed August 20, 2007.
  18. ^ Murrow Symposium, Washington State University, Accessed August 20, 2007.
  19. ^ Amos Alonzo Stagg Award - Past Winners, American Football Coaches Association, Accessed August 20, 2007.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Keith Jackson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (516 words)
Jackson would later call this game, one of several to be known as the Game of the Century, the greatest he ever broadcast.
Jackson was involved in the ABC coverage of the 1972 Summer Olympics and continued to contribute even when an attack by Palestinian terrorists turned the coverage away from being primarily sports coverage to that of a news event.
Jackson announced his retirement from college football announcing at the end of the 1998 season and his intention to live full-time at his home in California, with his last broadcast to have been the 1999 Fiesta Bowl for the National Championship between Tennessee and Florida State.
Keith Jackson - definition of Keith Jackson in Encyclopedia (404 words)
Keith Jackson (born October 18, 1928) is an American sports announcer.
In 1971 he was supplanted in that role by Frank Gifford, who had been hired away from rival CBS; afterwards, his association with football was entirely with the collegiate game, although he announced other sports at ABC as well, notably baseball.
Jackson announced his retirement from college football announcing at the end of the 1998 season and his intention to live full-time at his home in British Columbia, with his last broadcast to have been the 1999 Fiesta Bowl for the "National Championship" between Tennessee and Florida State.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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