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Encyclopedia > Keith Emerson
Keith Emerson

Background information
Born November 02, 1944 (1944-11-02) (age 62)
Todmorden, England
Origin England
Genre(s) Progressive rock
Occupation(s) Musician
Instrument(s) Piano
Organ
Synthesizers
Keyboards
Years active 1968–present
Associated
acts
The Nice
Emerson, Lake and Palmer
Website KeithEmerson.com

Keith Noel Emerson (born 2 November 1944 in Todmorden, Yorkshire) is a British keyboard player and composer. Formerly a member of The T-Bones, V.I.P.s, P.P. Arnold's backing band, and The Nice (which evolved from P.P.Arnold's band), he started Emerson, Lake & Palmer (ELP), one of the early supergroups, in 1970. Following the breakup of ELP, circa 1979, Emerson had modest success with Emerson, Lake & Powell in the 1980s. ELP reunited during the early 90s. Emerson also reunited The Nice in 2002 for a tour. He currently tours (through 2007) with The Keith Emerson Band. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... Classic Hammond B-3 organ. ... For other uses, see Synthesizer (disambiguation). ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Keith Emerson, Lee Jackson, Brian Davison, Davy OList, circa 1967-68. ... ELP can also stand for Extra Long Play, a format for the VCR tape. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up Yorkshire in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Keyboard player is a term used for a musician who plays multiple instruments that have piano-style keyboards. ... Pat Arnold (born Patrica Ann Cole, on 3 October 1946, in Los Angeles,[1] California), professionally known as P.P. Arnold, is an American born soul singer who enjoyed considerable success in the United Kingdom in the 1960s and beyond. ... Keith Emerson, Lee Jackson, Brian Davison, Davy OList, circa 1967-68. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In the late 1960s, the term supergroup was coined to describe music groups comprising members who had already achieved fame or respect in other groups or as individual artists. ... Emerson, Lake & Powell, pictured in that order, left to right, on the cover of Live in Concert (2003) Emerson, Lake & Powell, sometimes abbreviated as ELPowell, were an English rock band, an offshoot or variant lineup of Emerson, Lake & Palmer that released one official studio album in 1986. ... Keith Emerson, Lee Jackson, Brian Davison, Davy OList, circa 1967-68. ... A concert comprises a performance, usually involving some degree of formality, and particularly a performance featuring music. ...

Contents

Biography

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Please help Wikipedia by adding references. See the talk page for details.

Emerson grew up in the seaside resort of Worthing, West Sussex, England. As a child, he learned western classical music, from which he derived a lot of inspiration to create his own style, combining classical music, jazz, and rock themes. Emerson became intrigued with the Hammond organ after hearing jazz organist Jack McDuff perform "Rock Candy" and it subsequently became his instrument of choice for performing in the late 60s. In 1969, Emerson incorporated the Moog modular synthesizer into his battery of keyboards. While other artists such as the Beatles and the Rolling Stones had used the Moog in studio recordings, Emerson was the first artist to tour with one. Image File history File links Circle-question. ... For other uses, see Worthing (disambiguation). ... West Sussex is a county in the south of England, bordering onto East Sussex (with Brighton and Hove), Hampshire and Surrey. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the genre of classical music in the Western musical tradition. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Brother Jack McDuff (September 17, 1926 - January 23, 2001) was a jazz organist and bandleader prominent during the soul jazz era of the 1960s. ... Moog modular synthesizer refers to any of a number of monophonic analog modular synthesizers designed by the late electronic instrument pioneer Dr. Robert Moog and manufactured by R.A Moog Co. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... “Rolling Stones” redirects here. ...


He is known for his technical skill and for his live antics, including using knives to wedge down specific keys of his Hammond organ during solos, playing the organ upside down while having it lie over him and backwards while standing behind it. He also employed a special rig to rotate his piano end-over-end while he's "playing" it (purely theatrical, since acoustic pianos cannot function when turned upside down in this manner). Along with contemporaries Richard Wright of Pink Floyd, Tony Banks of Genesis, Billy Ritchie of Clouds and Rick Wakeman of Yes, Emerson is widely regarded as one of the top keyboard players of the progressive rock era.[1][2][3]. All Music Guide refers to Emerson as "perhaps the greatest, most technically accomplished keyboardist in rock history." [4] To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Richard William Rick Wright (born July 28, 1943 in Hatch End, London, England) is a self-taught pianist and keyboardist best known for his long career with Pink Floyd. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their avant-garde progressive rock music. ... (L–R) Mike Rutherford, Phil Collins, Tony Banks in November 2006, promoting the upcoming Turn It On Again tour Anthony George Tony Banks (born March 27, 1950) is an English songwriter, pianist/keyboard player, and guitarist. ... Genesis are an English rock band formed in 1967. ... Clouds were a 1960s Progressive rock band that disbanded in October 1971. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ...


Emerson has performed several notable rock arrangements of classical compositions, ranging from J. S. Bach via Modest Mussorgsky to 20th century composers such as Béla Bartók, Aaron Copland, Leoš Janáček and Alberto Ginastera. Occasionally Emerson has quoted from classical and jazz works without giving credit, particularly early in his career, from the late 1960s until 1972. The song "Rondo" by The Nice is a 4/4 interpretation of "Blue Rondo à la Turk" by the Dave Brubeck Quartet, originally in 9/8 time signature. The piece is introduced by an extensive quote from Bach's Italian Concerto, third movement. In fact, considering the Bach and Emerson's own improvisations, the Brubeck contribution is merely the anchoring theme. “Bach” redirects here. ... Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (Russian: , Modest Petrovič Musorgskij, French: ) (March 9/21, 1839 – March 16/28, 1881), one of the Russian composers known as the Five, was an innovator of Russian music. ... Béla Bartók in 1927 Béla Viktor János Bartók (March 25, 1881 – September 26, 1945) was a Hungarian composer, pianist and collector of Eastern European and Middle Eastern folk music. ... Aaron Copland Aaron Copland (November 14, 1900 – December 2, 1990) was an American composer of concert and film music, as well as an accomplished pianist. ... LeoÅ¡ Janáček in 1928 LeoÅ¡ Janáček ( ; July 3, 1854 in Hukvaldy, Moravia, then Austrian empire – August 12, 1928 in Ostrava, then Czechoslovakia) was a Czech composer. ... Alberto Evaristo Ginastera (Buenos Aires, April 11, 1916 – June 25, 1983 Geneva) was an Argentinian composer of classical music. ... a rondo is played between episode which are played by non solo people Rondo, and its French equivalent rondeau, is a word that has been used in music in a number of ways, most often in reference to a musical form, but also in reference to a character-type that... The time signature (also known as meter signature) is a notational device used in Western musical notation to specify how many beats are in each bar and which note value (minim, crotchet, eighth note and so on) constitutes one beat. ... Dave Brubeck (born December 6, 1920 in Concord, California) is an American jazz pianist who wrote a number of jazz standards, including In Your Own Sweet Way and The Duke. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Italian Concerto (properly entitled Concerto in the Italian Style), BWV 971, is a three-movement concerto for harpsichord (without accompaniment) composed by J.S. Bach in 1735. ...


On ELP's eponymous first album, Emerson's classical quotes went largely uncredited. "The Barbarian" is heavily influenced by "Allegro barbaro" by Bartók, and "Knife Edge" is virtually a note-for-note restatement of "Sifonietta" by Janáček. Note-for-note extracts were taken from pieces by Bartók, Janáček and Bach, mixed in with some original material, and credited completely to Emerson, Lake, Palmer and roadie Richard Fraser. By 1971, with the releases Pictures At An Exhibition and Trilogy, Emerson began to fully credit classical composers, Modest Mussorgsky for the piano piece which inspired the first album, and Aaron Copland for "Hoedown" on the second. Emerson was adamant that he did not use Maurice Ravel's orchestration of Pictures at an Exhibition in developing his own version. An eponym is the name of a person, whether real or fictitious, who has (or is thought to have) given rise to the name of a particular place, tribe, discovery, or other item. ... Richard Fraser (sometimes spelled Frazer) was a roadie and lyricist for the British progressive rock band Emerson, Lake & Palmer (ELP). ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (Russian: , Modest Petrovič Musorgskij, French: ) (March 9/21, 1839 – March 16/28, 1881), one of the Russian composers known as the Five, was an innovator of Russian music. ... Aaron Copland Aaron Copland (November 14, 1900 – December 2, 1990) was an American composer of concert and film music, as well as an accomplished pianist. ... Maurice Ravel. ... Mussorgsky in 1874 This article refers to the original suite by Modest Mussorgsky. ...


In 2004 Emerson published his autobiography entitled "Pictures of an Exhibitionist", which deals with his entire career, particularly focusing on his early days with The Nice, and his nearly career-ending nerve-graft surgery in 1993. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Keith Emerson, Lee Jackson, Brian Davison, Davy OList, circa 1967-68. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ...


Emerson has provided music for a number of films since 1980, including Dario Argento's Inferno and World of Horror, the 1981 thriller Nighthawks and, more recently, Godzilla: Final Wars. He was also the composer for the short-lived 1994 animated television series Iron Man. Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Dario Argento (born September 7, 1940) is an Italian film director, producer and screenwriter. ... Inferno is a 1980 Italian supernatural horror film written and directed by Dario Argento. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the painting by Edward Hopper. ... Godzilla: Final Wars (2004) is the 50th anniversary film in the Godzilla series of films. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...


Instrumentation and playing style

On stage Emerson started out on Hammond organ, with a grand piano toward the back of the stage. By the end of his time with The Nice, the standard arrangement was two Hammond organs, a C-3 and an L-100, placed facing each other with the C-3 to the left from the audience point of view. The L-100 took plenty of abuse during the stage act and was usually reinforced, to the point where it weighed so much that, on at least one occasion, Emerson became trapped beneath it and had to be rescued by a roadie. At any given time Emerson is said to have owned several L-100 models, in various stages of repair, to support his act. The C-3, in contrast, seems to have lasted for years.


With ELP Emerson added the Moog synthesizer behind the C-3 with the keyboard and ribbon controller stacked on the top of the organ. The ribbon controller allowed Emerson to vary pitch, tone or timbre of the output from the Moog by moving his finger up and down the length of a touch-sensitive strip. It also could be used as a phallic symbol, which quickly became a feature of the act. When the Minimoog entered the act it was placed where needed, such as on top of the grand piano. The same location was also used for an electric clavinet keyboard, used almost exclusively for the encore piece Nut Rocker. A ribbon controller is a user interface used to control parameters of electronic musical instruments, primarily used with analog synthesizers. ... The Clavinet D6, the most popular model, introduced in 1971. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


During the Brain Salad Surgery tour of 1974 (shows of which were recorded and released as a 3-album set, "Welcome Back My Friends, to the Show That Never Ends"), Emerson's keyboard setup included the Hammond C-3 organ, run through multiple Leslie speakers driven by HiWatt guitar amplifiers, the Moog IIIC modular synthesizer with ribbon controller, a Steinway concert grand piano with a Moog Minimoog synthesizer on top of it (used for the steel drum part on Karn Evil 9, 2nd Impression), an upgright acoustic-electric piano that was used for honky-tonk piano sounds, a Hohner Clavinet and another Moog Minimoog synthesizer. Emerson also used a prototype polyphonic synthesizer produced by Moog, which was the test bed for the Moog Polymoog polyphonic synthesizer. The original synthesizer setup as envisioned by Moog was called the Constellation, and consisted of 3 instruments - the polyphonic synthesizer, called the Apollo, a monophonic lead synthesizer called the Lyra, and a bass-pedal synthesizer, called the Taurus. Moog eventually produced the Moog Taurus bass pedal synthesizer as a separate intrument, as well as the Polymoog Synthesizer and Polymoog Keyboard. The Apollo polyphonic synthesizer is currently at a keyboard museum in Calgary, Canada. Emerson still owns the Lyra synthesizer.


Occasionally Emerson used a pipe organ, when available. In particular, at the Newcastle City Hall he used the Harrison & Harrison pipe organ for the introductory section of Pictures at an Exhibition. The organ is located at the rear above the stage, at the top of a series of steps where choirs can stand. The end of the introductory passage is followed by a drum roll, covering the time while Emerson descended the steps. While all went well for the recording used to produce the album, the debut tour performance at the same venue ground to a halt as the power failed, just as Emerson arrived at the Hammond organ to open the next part of the piece. After a lengthy delay the performance continued with only the Hammond L-100 functioning. The baroque organ in Roskilde Cathedral, Copenhagen The pipe organ is a musical instrument that produces sound by admitting pressurized air (referred to as wind) through a series of pipes. ... Newcastle City Hall is a concert hall located in Newcastle upon Tyne, which has hosted many popular music acts through the years. ... New organ at St Davids Cathedral built by Harrison & Harrison in 2000. ...


Emerson also used the organ at the Royal Festival Hall for the recording of the debut album by the group. It is not known if he also used it in a live context. The Royal Festival Hall reopening celebrations The Royal Festival Hall is a concert, dance and talks venue within Southbank Centre in London, England. ...


Amplifiers and speakers behind Emerson became more elaborate, including a Leslie unit. There was also a board attached to the front of the stack, intended as a target for his knife-throwing. During the Brain Salad Surgery tour, at the end of the show, a sequencer in the Moog Modular synthesizer was set running at an increasing rate, with the Moog Synthesizer pivoting to face the audience while a large pair of silver bat wings was deployed at the back of the synthesizer.


As the technology of electronic keyboard instruments became more sophisticated, Emerson was quick to adopt new instruments, such as the Yamaha GX-1 polyphonic synthesizer, one of which can be seen on the video promoting Fanfare for the Common Man. Emerson was reported to have spent $50,000 to buy the Yamaha GX-1 synthesizer at the time of the Works album. Emerson later bought a 2nd GX-1 from John Paul Jones of Led Zeppelin, to use to repair his GX-1, which was damaged by a tractor crash into Emerson's home studio. At the time that Emerson left England in the early 1990s to move to Santa Monica, California, he sold the majority of his keyboard equipment, rhough not the modular Moog. The original Yamaha GX-1 was bought by Hans Zimmer of movie soundtrack fame, while the John Paul Jones GX-1 was bought by a collector in Italy. Other more elaborate innovations have been previously described in this article. Fanfare for the Common Man is one of the most recognizable pieces of 20th Century American classical music. ... Look up Works in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... John Paul Jones (July 6, 1747–July 18, 1792) was Americas first well-known naval hero in the American Revolutionary War. ... For the bands 1969 self-titled debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... Hans Florian Zimmer (born September 12, 1957) is an Academy Award, Grammy, and Golden Globe award-winning film score composer from Germany. ...


Even on the grand piano, Emerson refused to limit his technique to hitting the keys. He would sometimes reach into the interior and hit, pluck or strum the strings with his hand. The introduction to Take a Pebble includes chords and arpeggios played by pressing down on keys, to raise the dampers from the strings, and playing the strings inside the piano as one might play the autoharp. In the live performance of Hang on to a Dream with the Nice, recorded for the post-breakup album Elegy, he performed a cadenza of sorts hitting the piano strings with a small hammer, followed by a lengthy wind-down returning to the song in which he alternated keyboard arpeggios with blows directly on the bass strings. The standard finale to the song has him reaching into the piano with fingers spread on both hands to pluck the final chord, presumably depressing the sustain pedal at the same time to lift all the string dampers. This can be clearly seen on a performance filmed for the television show Beat Club. An Autoharp The Autoharp is a musical string instrument having a series of chord bars attached to dampers which, when depressed, mute all the strings other than those that form the desired chord. ... In music, a cadenza (Italian for cadence) is, generically, an improvised or written-out ornamental passage played or sung by a soloist or soloists, usually in a free rhythmic style, and often allowing for virtuosic display. ... For the record label, see Beat Club Records Der Beat-Club was a German music programme that ran from September 1965 to December 1972. ...


Despite his training, Emerson's finger technique was highly idiosyncratic.[citation needed] He tended to curl up his ring finger and little finger while playing, which a true classical musician would never do.[citation needed]


During the late 1970s and the 1980s, Emerson owned and lived in a house previously owned by J.M. Barrie, the author who created Peter Pan. When Emerson and his wife were divorced in the early 1990s, she received nearly all the property and funds from the union, an estimated 10 million pounds. Emerson moved to the US at this time, reportedly sleeping on friend's couches for a time. Emerson has a private pilot's license, and enjoys riding motorcycles. He currently plays with his own group, the Keith Emerson Band. Emerson has 2 sons, Aaron (who is also a musician) and Damon (who is involved with graphics). Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet, Scottish author Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet (May 9, 1860 - June 19, 1937), more commonly known as J. M. Barrie, was a Scottish novelist and dramatist. ... Statue of Peter Pan in Bowring Park, St. ...


Partial list of pieces based on other composers' works

Note that lack of credit does not imply plagiarism. It is certain that, where required, royalties were paid to composers or their estates. Permission to use pieces was sometimes denied by the composer's family or estate, as for instance with Gustav Holst's Mars, the Bringer of War. Aaron Copland was said to be somewhat puzzled by Emerson's take on Fanfare For the Common Man, but approved its use. Alberto Ginastera, on the other hand, was thrilled by Emerson's electronic realization and declared that he wished he could have done it in that fashion himself. Gustav Holst Gustav Holst (September 21, 1874, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire - May 25, 1934, London) [1] [2] was an English composer and was a music teacher for over 20 years. ...


With The Nice

and Lennie Tristano's Turkish Mambo, uncredited. For The Games song, see Westside Story (song). ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Antonín Leopold Dvořák ( ; September 8, 1841 – May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer of Romantic music, who employed the idioms and melodies of the folk music of his native Bohemiaand Moravia in symphonic, oratorial, chamber and operatic works. ... New World Symphony redirects here; for the Miami-based orchestra, see New World Symphony Orchestra. ... David Warren Brubeck (born December 6, 1920 in Concord, California[1]), better known as Dave Brubeck, is a U.S. jazz pianist. ... The Italian Concerto (properly entitled Concerto in the Italian Style), BWV 971, is a three-movement concerto for harpsichord (without accompaniment) composed by J.S. Bach in 1735. ... The Symphonie Espagnole is a work for violin and orchestra by Edouard Lalo, his Opus 21 in D minor. ... Édouard Victoire Antoine Lalo (January 27, 1823 - April 22, 1892) was a French composer of Spanish descent. ... Portrait of Sergei Rachmaninoff (1925) by Konstantin Somov This article is about the composer Sergei Rachmaninoff. ... Leonard Joseph Tristano (19 March 1919 - 18 November 1978) was a jazz pianist and composer. ...

Ars longa, vita brevis is part of an aphorism by Ancient Greek physician Hippocrates. ... The six Brandenburg concertos (BWV 1046-1051) by Johann Sebastian Bach are a collection of instrumental works presented by Bach to the Margrave of Brandenburg in 1721, but probably composed earlier. ... The Karelia Suite is a collection of pieces composed by the Finnish composer Jean Sibelius. ... Contrary to what Rachel Lewis believes. ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October... Tim Hardin (December 23, 1941 – December 29, 1980) was a United States folk musician and composer who was a part of the 1960s Greenwich Village folk scene and performer at the Woodstock Festival. ... The cast of Porgy and Bess during the Boston try-out prior to the Broadway opening. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... She Belongs To Me is a song by Bob Dylan first appearing in 1965 on the album Bringing It All Back Home. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... The Magnificent Seven is a 1960 western film directed by John Sturges about a group of hired gunmen tasked with protecting a Mexican village from bandits. ... Elmer Bernstein (pronounced Bern-steen[1]) (April 4, 1922 – August 18, 2004) was an Academy and two-time Golden Globe award winning American film score composer. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... The six Brandenburg concertos (BWV 1046-1051) by Johann Sebastian Bach are a collection of instrumental works presented by Bach to the Margrave of Brandenburg in 1721, but probably composed earlier. ...

With ELP

Béla Bartók in 1927 Béla Viktor János Bartók (March 25, 1881 – September 26, 1945) was a Hungarian composer, pianist and collector of Eastern European and Middle Eastern folk music. ... Sinfonietta is an orchestral piece written by Czech composer, LeoÅ¡ Janáček. ... LeoÅ¡ Janáček in 1928 LeoÅ¡ Janáček ( ; July 3, 1854 in Hukvaldy, Moravia, then Austrian empire – August 12, 1928 in Ostrava, then Czechoslovakia) was a Czech composer. ... French Suites are suites composed in a style that for one or more reasons is considered French. ... For other people named Bach and other meanings of the word, see Bach (disambiguation). ... Mussorgsky in 1874 This article refers to the original suite by Modest Mussorgsky. ... Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky (Russian: , Modest Petrovič Musorgskij, French: ) (March 9/21, 1839 – March 16/28, 1881), one of the Russian composers known as the Five, was an innovator of Russian music. ... Rodeo is a ballet score written by American composer Aaron Copland in 1942. ... Aaron Copland Aaron Copland (November 14, 1900 – December 2, 1990) was an American composer of concert and film music, as well as an accomplished pianist. ... Shortenin Bread is a traditional song. ... Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry (February 27, 1848 – October 7, 1918) was an English composer, probably best known for his setting of William Blakes poem, Jerusalem. ... Alberto Evaristo Ginastera (Buenos Aires, April 11, 1916 – June 25, 1983 Geneva) was an Argentinian composer of classical music. ... Fanfare for the Common Man is one of the most recognizable pieces of 20th Century American classical music. ... Aaron Copland Aaron Copland (November 14, 1900 – December 2, 1990) was an American composer of concert and film music, as well as an accomplished pianist. ... Carmina Burana (IPA: ; note that the stress is on the first syllable of Carmina, not the second) also known as the Burana Codex is a manuscript collection, now in the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek in Munich, of more than 1000 poems and songs written in the early 13th century. ... Carl Orff Carl Orff (July 10, 1895 – March 29, 1982) was a 20th-century German composer, most famous for Carmina Burana (1937). ...

See also

This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Trivia

The surreal comedy series Big Train featured Keith Emerson, played by Kevin Eldon, as a Roman slave, fighting his enemies with Prog Rock. Big Train is a surreal television comedy sketch show written by the creators of the more successful Father Ted, Arthur Mathews and Graham Linehan. ... Eldon as evil hypnotist in Big Train Kevin Eldon ( b. ... The progressive rock band Yes performing in 1977. ...


He was given his trademark knife by Lemmy who was a roadie for The Nice in his earlier days. Lemmy (born Ian Fraiser Kilmister on December 24, 1945, also known as Ian Willis, Lemmy Kilmister, and Lemmy von Motörhead), is an English singer and bass guitarist, most famous for being the founding member of the heavy metal band Motörhead. ...


His favorite current-generation progressive rock band is Dream Theater. For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Dream Theater is an American progressive metal band comprised of James LaBrie, John Petrucci, Jordan Rudess, John Myung, and Mike Portnoy. ...


References

  1. ^ VH1.com: Keith Emerson: Biography. Retrieved on 2007-07-10.
  2. ^ (1977) "". Contemporary Keyboard 3 (10): 22-30, 32, 36, 38, 52. Retrieved on 2007-07-10. 
  3. ^ (1980) "". Contemporary Keyboard 6 (9): 16-23. Retrieved on 2007-07-10. 
  4. ^ ?.
  • Forrester, George, Martyn Hanson and Frank Askew. Emerson, Lake & Palmer, The Show That Never Ends, A Musical Biography. (2001) Helter Skelter Publishing ISBN 1-900924-17-X.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


Persondata
NAME Emerson, Keith
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION British keyboard player and composer
DATE OF BIRTH 2 November 1944
PLACE OF BIRTH Todmorden, England
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Keith Emerson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (384 words)
Keith Emerson (born November 2, 1944) is a British keyboard player and composer.
As a performer on the Hammond organ, Emerson jumped at the opportunity to collaborate with Robert Moog, and work with his invention, the Moog Modular, an analog synthesizer, in 1969.
In 2004 Emerson published his critically acclaimed autobiography entitled "Pictures of an Exhibitionist" which deals with his entire career, particularly focusing on his early days with The Nice and his nearly career ending nerve-graft surgery in 1993.
Keith Emerson - definition of Keith Emerson in Encyclopedia (224 words)
Keith Emerson (November 2, 1944 -) born in Todmorden, England is a British keyboard player and composer.
As a child, Emerson learned western classical music, from which he derived a lot of inspiration to create his own style, combining classical music, jazz, and rock themes.
As a performer on the Hammond organ, Emerson jumped at the opportunity to collaborate with Robert Moog, and work with his invention, the Modular Moog, an analog synthesizer, in 1969.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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