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Encyclopedia > Kaw (tribe)
Kaw
The Official Seal of The Kaw Nation of Oklahoma
The Official Seal of The Kaw Nation of Oklahoma
Total population
Regions with significant populations United States (Oklahoma)
Language English, Kaw
Religion Christianity, other
Related ethnic groups other Siouan peoples

The Kaw (or Kanza ) are an American Indian people of the central Midwestern United States. The tribe known as "Kaw" have also been known as the "Wind People", "People of the South Wind", "Kaza", Kanza", Kosa", and "Kasa". Official Seal of the Kaw Nation of Oklahoma This seal is used under fair use. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,960 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on Jesus of Nazareth, and on his life and teachings as presented in the New Testament. ... Siouan is a family of related Native American languages in North America. ... American Indian and Alaskan Natives[1] (term preferred by the majority of people included) are the indigenous peoples within the territory that is now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska down to their descendants in modern times. ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ...


It is from the name of this tribe that the toponym "Kansas" is derived. The Kaw are closely related to the Osage Nation and at times have been thought of as a kind of Osage. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


The region claimed by the Kanzas Nation was ceded to the United States by the treaty of June 1825. The Missouri Shawanoes (or Shawnees) were the first Indians removed to the territory set apart for emigrant tribes by the treaties of June, 1825. The Kanzas and Osages were relocated later. Shawnee The Shawnee are a people native to North America. ...


The Curtis Act in 1898 expanded the powers of the federal government over American Indian affairs. An act of congress in 1902 disbanded the Kaw tribe as a legal entity. This act transferred 160 acres (0.6 km²) to the federal government and about 1,625 acres (6.6 km²) of Kaw land to Curtis and his children. American Indian and Alaskan Natives[1] (term preferred by the majority of people included) are the indigenous peoples within the territory that is now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska down to their descendants in modern times. ...


The federal land was used to found the city of Washungah, Oklahoma. The Kaw Nation of Oklahoma later regained recognition and is currently located in Kaw City, Oklahoma. Washunga is a small community in Kay County, Oklahoma, USA. The post office was established November 15, 1902, and discontinued November 25, 1906. ... Kaw City is a city located in Kay County, Oklahoma. ...


The only Native American to reach the Vice Presidency of the United States was Charles Curtis, under Herbert Hoover (1929–1933). His mother was a Kaw. Charles Curtis (January 25, 1860 – February 8, 1936) was a Representative and a Senator from Kansas as well as the 31st Vice President of the United States. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the 31st President of the United States (1929-1933), was a successful mining engineer, humanitarian, and administrator. ...


The U.S. jazz saxophonist, singer, and composer Jim Pepper (1941-1992) was of both Kaw and Creek ancestry. Jim Pepper (b. ... The Creek are an American Indian people originally from the southeastern United States, also known by their original name Muscogee (or Muskogee), the name they use to identify themselves today. ...


On April 23, 2000 the last Kaw fullblood, William A. Mehojah died: and, the Allegawaho Memorial Heritage Park (AMHP) was dedicated on June 19, 2005 near Council Grove, Kansas. April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (114th in leap years). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Council Grove is a city located in Morris County, Kansas. ...


See also

The Kansas River near De Soto and Lenape, Kansas The Kansas (or Kaw) River is a river in eastern Kansas in the United States. ... Kaw Lake is a manmade lake completed in 1976 in northern Oklahoma, near Kaw City. ... The history of Kansas is rich with the lore of the American West. ... National Museum of the American Indian in Washington D.C., viewed from the northeast Interior view looking down toward the entrance. ... The Indian General Allotment Act (Dawes Act of 1887, ch. ... The Dawes Rolls were created by the Dawes Commission. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,960 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... For other uses, see Cherokee (disambiguation). ... The Lenape or Lenni-Lenape (later named Delaware Indians by Europeans) were, in the 1600s, loosely organized bands of Native American people practicing small-scale agriculture to augment a largely mobile hunter-gatherer society in the region around the Delaware River, the lower Hudson River, and western Long Island Sound. ... The Shawnee are a people native to North America, and are therefore considered to be Native Americans. ...

External links

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