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Encyclopedia > Katherine Swynford
Coat of arms designed for Katherine Swynford: three gold Catherine wheels ("roet" means "wheel") on a red background.

Katherine (or Katharine or Catherine) (c. 13501403) was the daughter of Payne (or Paen) de Roet (or Rouet or Roelt) a Flemish herald from Hainault who was knighted just before dying in the wars, leaving Katherine and her older sister Philippa, as well as a brother, Walter, and eldest sister, Isabel (Elizabeth) de Roet, (who died chanoinness of the convent of St. Waudru's, Mons, c. 1366). About the year 1366, at the age of 16, Katherine married Hugh Swynford or Synford, an English knight from the manor of Kettlethorpe in Lincolnshire, and bore him at least two children (Blanch, Thomas, and likely the Margaret Swynford who was nominated a nun at the prestigious Barking Abbey by the command of Richard II in 1377) before he, too, died in the European wars. She then became attached to the household of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, ostensibly as governess to his two daughters (the sisters of the future Henry IV of England) by his first wife Blanche, but eventually she became his official mistress. Katherine's sister Philippa married the poet Geoffrey Chaucer, whose poem The Book of the Duchess commemorated Blanche's death in about 1369. katherine swynford coat of arms I created this image as a bitmap, according to the heraldic description, and then converted it to JPG. K. Kay Shearin File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... katherine swynford coat of arms I created this image as a bitmap, according to the heraldic description, and then converted it to JPG. K. Kay Shearin File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... Catherine Wheel is a band hailing from Great Yarmouth, England. ... Events Hayam Wuruk becomes ruler of the Majapahit Empire The Black Death ravages Europe (1347-1351) Births Manuel II Palaeologus, future Byzantine Emperor John Montacute, 3rd Earl of Salisbury (approximate date). ... Events July 21 - Battle of Shrewsbury. ... This article is in need of attention. ... A herald was originally a messenger sent by a king or nobleman to convey a message or proclamation. ... Hainault is a place in the London Borough of Redbridge. ... A silver statue of an armoured knight, created as a trophy in 1850 For the chess piece, see knight (chess). ... Philippa Roet was the second daughter of Payne (Gilles) Roet of Hainault. ... Events Births Anne of Bohemia, Queen consort of Richard II of England. ... Events Births Anne of Bohemia, Queen consort of Richard II of England. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... Lincolnshire (abbreviated Lincs) is a county in the East Midlands of England, traditionally the second largest after Yorkshire. ... Barking is a town in the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham, England. ... There is also a play entitled Richard II by Shakespeare. ... Events January 17 – Gregory XI enters Rome. ... John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster (June 24, 1340 - February 3, 1399), the third surviving son of King Edward III of England, gained his name because he was born at Ghent in 1340. ... There were several Dukes of Lancaster in the 14th and early 15th Centuries. ... Henry IV of England, depicted in Cassells History of England, Century Edition, published circa 1902 Henry IV King of England, Lord of Ireland. ... Chaucer: Illustration from Cassells History of England, circa 1902 Chanticleer the rooster from an outdoor production of Chanticleer and the Fox at Ashby-de-la-Zouch castle Geoffrey Chaucer (ca. ... Events King Charles V of France renounces the treaty of Brétigny and war is declared between France and England. ...


Long after the death of his second wife Constance (or Constanza) of Castile, John and Katherine married in January 1396, three years before he died. The four children Katherine had borne John of Gaunt had been given the surname "Beaufort" and were already adults when they were legitimized (but barred from inheriting the throne by a clause inserted by half-brother Henry IV well into the latter's reign) in 1390: A former kingdom of Spain, Castile comprises the two regions of Old Castile in north-western Spain, and New Castile in the centre of the country. ... Events September 25 - Bayezid I defeats Sigismund of Hungary and John of Nevers at the Battle of Nicopolis. ... Events Births December 27 - Anne Mortimer John Dunstable, English composer (d. ...

Katherine Swynford's tomb
1640 drawing of the tombs of Katherine Swynford and her daughter Joan Beaufort in Lincoln Cathedral before the tombs were despoiled in 1644 by the Roundheads.

Her son John was the great-grandfather of Henry VII of England and the grandfather of James II of Scotland; her daughter Joan Beaufort was the grandmother of Edward IV of England and Richard III of England, whom Henry VII defeated to take the throne. (Henry then married Elizabeth of York, daughter of Edward IV, and their son became Henry VIII of England). Her step-son became Henry IV of England by deposing Richard II of England (who was imprisoned and died shortly thereafter, in Pontefract Castle, where Katherine's son Thomas Swynford was constable, and he was said to have starved Richard to death for his step-brother); her step-daughter, John and Constance's daughter Catherine (or Catalina), was the great-grandmother of Catherine of Aragon, the first wife of Henry VIII of England and mother of Mary I of England. John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset (c. ... Henry Beaufort, the second son of John of Gaunt and his mistress Katherine Swynford, was born in Anjou (France) in about 1374 and educated for a career in the Church. ... Thomas Beaufort, Duke of Exeter (c. ... Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland, (c. ... Westmorland is one of the 39 traditional counties of England. ... swynford chantry in lincoln cathedral This is an 1809 drawing by John Buckler of the chantry in the sanctuary of Lincoln Cathedral where the tombs of Katherine Swynford and her daughter Joan Beaufort are. ... swynford chantry in lincoln cathedral This is an 1809 drawing by John Buckler of the chantry in the sanctuary of Lincoln Cathedral where the tombs of Katherine Swynford and her daughter Joan Beaufort are. ... tombs in Lincoln Cathedral This is a 1640 drawing of the tombs of Katherine Swynford and her daughter Joan Beaufort as they were before they were despoiled in 1644 by the Roundheads. ... tombs in Lincoln Cathedral This is a 1640 drawing of the tombs of Katherine Swynford and her daughter Joan Beaufort as they were before they were despoiled in 1644 by the Roundheads. ... The city of Lincoln in England has had a cathedral since the 11th century. ... Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), was the founder of the Tudor dynasty and is generally acknowledged as one of Englands most successful kings. ... James II of Scotland (October 16, 1430 - August 3, 1460) was king of Scotland from 1437 to 1460. ... Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland, (c. ... The text below is generated by a template, which has been proposed for deletion. ... Richard III (October 2, 1452 – August 22, 1485) was the King of England from 1483 until his death and the last king from the House of York. ... Elizabeth of York (February 11, 1466–February 11, 1503) was the Queen consort of King Henry VII of England, who she married in 1486, and the mother of King Henry VIII. She was born at Westminster, the eldest child of King Edward IV and his own Queen consort Elizabeth Woodville... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Henry IV of England, depicted in Cassells History of England, Century Edition, published circa 1902 Henry IV King of England, Lord of Ireland. ... There is also a play entitled Richard II by Shakespeare. ... Pontefract Castle in West Yorkshire near to the town of Pontefract, was constructed in approximately 1070 by a knight, Ilbert de Lacy (who is also responsible for the construction of Kirkstall Abbey), on land which had been granted to him by William the Conqueror as a reward for his support... United Kingdom A Constable is a police officer in Britain and most countries with a British colonial history (now mostly members of the Commonwealth of Nations). ... The recently-widowed young Catherine of Aragon, by Henry VIIs court painter, Michael Sittow, c. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de jure) or 19 July 1553 (de facto) until her death. ...


Katherine survived John by only four years, dying on May 10, 1403. (Since she was then dowager Duchess of Lancaster, there was a record of the exact day, as there was not for her birth, when she was a nobody.) Her tomb, and that of her daughter Joan Beaufort, are under a carved-stone canopy in the sanctuary of Lincoln Cathedral, but their remains are no longer in them, because the tombs were despoiled in 1644, during the English Civil War, by the Roundheads. May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (131st in leap years). ... Events July 21 - Battle of Shrewsbury. ... A dowager is a widow who holds a title or property derived from her deceased husband. ... Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland, (c. ... The city of Lincoln in England has had a cathedral since the 11th century. ... Events February to August - Explorer Abel Tasmans second expedition for the Dutch East India Company maps the north coast of Australia. ... The English Civil War (or Wars) refers to the series of armed conflicts and political machinations which took place between Parliamentarians and Royalists from 1642 until 1651, specifically to the first (1642–1645) and second (1648–1649) civil wars between the supporters of King Charles I and the supporters of... The Roundheads was the nickname given to supporters of the Parliamentarian cause in the English Civil War. ...


Katherine Swynford is the subject of Anya Seton's novel Katherine (©1954). Anya Seton (January 23, 1906 (although the year is often misstated to be 1904 or 1916) - November 8, 1990) was an American author of historical romances. ... Anya Setons Katherine is a thoroughly researched historical novel based largely in fact. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Katherine Swynford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (290 words)
1640 drawing of the tombs of Katherine Swynford and her daughter Joan Beaufort in Lincoln Cathedral before the tombs were despoiled in 1644 by the Roundheads.
Her son John was the great-grandfather of Henry VII of England and the grandfather of James II of Scotland; her daughter Joan Beaufort was the grandmother of Edward IV of England and Richard III of England, whom Henry VII defeated to take the throne.
Katherine Swynford is the subject of Anya Seton's novel Katherine (first published in 1954).
Background-Draft-Katheryn Swynford (1404 words)
Katherine did indeed have a mother-in-law named Nicholaa whose husband, Thomas Swynford, was sheriff of Lincoln and is noted as being one of those bearers of authority 'who made a bad use of it' (he seems to have had a problem with the pidgeons).
Well, given that none of the various branches of the Swynford family were particularly well-off, it is puzzling that one of their numbers enters the prestigious and wealthy Barking Abbey; stranger still that this entry is facilitated by no less a person than the king of England, Richard II, as a right of royal privilege.
Katherine dutifully maintained the family properties holdings during the minority of her son, making numerous improvements to Kettlethorpe which, ironically, her son later was probably unable to financially maintain.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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