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Encyclopedia > Katharine Hepburn
Katharine Hepburn

from Stage Door Canteen (1943)
Born Katharine Houghton Hepburn
May 12, 1907(1907-05-12)
Hartford, Connecticut
Died June 29, 2003 (aged 96)
Old Saybrook, Connecticut
Years active 1928-1994
Spouse(s) Ludlow Ogden Smith
(1928–1941)

Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907June 29, 2003) was an American actress of film, television and stage. Image File history File links KatharineHepburninStageDoorCanteencropped. ... Stage Door Canteen is a 1943 film. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... When used by itself in a sentence, the term Hartford can refer to one of several places in the United States. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Old Saybrook is a town located in Middlesex County, Connecticut. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Ludlow Ogden Smith a Philadelphia socialite married Katherine Hepburn in 1928. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... Morning Glory is a 1933 film which tells the story of an eager would-be actress whose good looks draw more attention than her acting. ... For the 1981 album by Black Uhuru, see Guess Whos Coming to Dinner (album). ... The Lion in Winter is a 1968 historical costume drama made by Embassy Pictures, based on the Broadway play by James Goldman. ... On Golden Pond (1981) was a successful Broadway play written by playwright Ernest Thompson which was turned into a successful and popular movie starring Katharine Hepburn and Henry Fonda. ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role has been presented to its winners since 1952 and actresses of all nationalities are eligible to receive the award. ... The Lion in Winter is a 1968 historical costume drama made by Embassy Pictures, based on the Broadway play by James Goldman. ... For the 1981 album by Black Uhuru, see Guess Whos Coming to Dinner (album). ... On Golden Pond (1981) was a successful Broadway play written by playwright Ernest Thompson which was turned into a successful and popular movie starring Katharine Hepburn and Henry Fonda. ... An Emmy Award. ... This is a list of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie winners: 1974: Mildred Natwick - The Swoop Sisters 1975: Jessica Walter - Amy Prentiss 1976: Rosemary Harris - Notorious Woman 1977: Patty Duke - Captains and Kings 1978: Meryl Streep - Holocaust 1979: Bette Davis - Strangers... Love Among the Ruins is a made-for-television movie (1975) starring Katharine Hepburn and Sir Laurence Olivier. ... The New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress is one of the awards given by the New York Film Critics Circle to honor the finest achievements in filmmaking. ... The Philadelphia Story is a 1940 romantic screwball comedy starring Jimmy Stewart, Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant. ... The Best Actress Award (French: Prix dinterprétation féminine) is an award presented at the Cannes Film Festival. ... Long Days Journey Into Night is a dramatic play in four acts by Eugene ONeill, widely considered to be his masterwork. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A screen legend, Hepburn holds the record for the most Best Actress Oscar wins with four, from twelve nominations (Meryl Streep currently holds the record for most overall acting nominations with fourteen). Hepburn won an Emmy Award in 1976 for her lead role in Love Among the Ruins, and was nominated for four other Emmys and two Tony Awards during the course of her more than 70-year acting career. In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked Hepburn as the top female star of all time. Hepburn wrote an autobiography entitled Me. Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Mary Louise Meryl Streep (born June 22, 1949) is a two-time Academy Award, Cannes Best Actress, Berlin Best Actress winning American actress who has worked in theatre, television, and film. ... An Emmy Award. ... Love Among the Ruins is a made-for-television movie (1975) starring Katharine Hepburn and Sir Laurence Olivier. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Hepburn had a famous and longtime affair with Spencer Tracy. An affair is a euphemism for a situation where two people are involved in an illicit sexual, romantic and/or passionate attachment, usually for a limited duration. ... Spencer Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor who appeared in 74 films from 1930 to 1967. ...

Contents

Biography

Early years

Hepburn was born in Hartford, Connecticut, to Dr. Thomas Norval Hepburn, a successful urologist from Virginia with Maryland roots, and Katharine Martha Houghton. She is of English ancestry from both sides of her family. Hartford redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... The Houghton Family is a prominent New England and Upstate New York business family. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ...


In a time when sexual matters were not discussed, Hepburn's father was a staunch proponent of publicizing the dangers of venereal disease. Hepburn's mother took young Katharine to a suffrage rally and co-founded Planned Parenthood with birth control advocate Margaret Sanger. During adult familial conversation the Hepburn children were never asked to leave the room, shaping them to be outspoken about social and political issues. The Hepburn children, at their parents' encouragement, were unafraid of expressing frank views on various topics, including sex. "We were snubbed by everyone, but we grew quite to enjoy that", Hepburn later said of her unabashedly liberal family, whom she credited with giving her a sense of adventure and independence. Sexually-transmitted infections (STIs), also known as sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs), are diseases that are commonly transmitted between partners through some form of sexual activity, most commonly vaginal intercourse, oral sex, or anal sex. ... This article is about Planned Parenthood Federation of America. ... Margaret Higgins Sanger (September 14, 1879 – September 6, 1966) was an American birth control activist, an advocate of negative eugenics, and the founder of the American Birth Control League (which eventually became Planned Parenthood). ...


Her father insisted the girls do swimming, riding, golf and tennis. Hepburn, eager to please her father, won a bronze medal for figure skating from the Madison Square Garden skating club, shot golf in the low eighties and reached the semifinal of the Connecticut Young Women's Golf Championship. Hepburn especially enjoyed swimming, and regularly took dips in the frigid waters that fronted her bayfront Connecticut home, generally believing that "the bitterer the medicine, the better it was for you." She continued her brisk swims well into her 80s. Hepburn would come to be recognized for her athletic physicality—she fearlessly performed her own pratfalls in films such as Bringing Up Baby (1938), which is now held up as an exemplar of screwball comedy. Swimmer redirects here. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... This article is about the sport. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, and known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Bringing up Baby is a 1938 screwball comedy which tells the story of a scientist who winds up in various predicaments with a woman who has a unique sense of logic and a leopard named Baby. ... The screwball comedy has proven to be one of the most elusive of the film genres. ...


On April 3, 1921, while visiting friends in Greenwich Village, Hepburn found her older brother Tom (born November 8, 1905), whom she idolized, hanging from the rafters of the attic by a rope, dead of an apparent suicide. Her family denied it was self-inflicted, arguing he had been a happy boy. They insisted it must have been an experimentation gone awry. It has been speculated he was trying to carry out a trick he saw in a play with Katharine. Hepburn was devastated and sank into a depression. She shied away from other children and was mostly home-schooled. For many years she used Tom's birthday (November 8) as her own. It was not until she wrote her autobiography, Me: Stories of my Life, that Hepburn revealed her true birth date. is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... On the Threshold of Eternity. ...


She was educated at the Kingswood-Oxford School before going on to attend Bryn Mawr College. While at Bryn Mawr, Hepburn was suspended for breaking curfew and smoking, which at that time was particularly not encouraged for women. Decades later, Hepburn also confirmed that after dark, she would go swimming naked in the college's "Cloisters" fountain (see Bryn Mawr College). She received a degree in history and philosophy in 1928 [1], the same year she had her debut on Broadway after landing a bit part in Night Hostess. Bryn Mawr College (pronounced ) is a highly selective womens liberal arts college located in Bryn Mawr, a community in Lower Merion Township, Pennsylvania, ten miles northwest of Philadelphia. ... For the food preparation, see Smoking (cooking). ... Skinny dip redirects here. ... Bryn Mawr College (pronounced ) is a highly selective womens liberal arts college located in Bryn Mawr, a community in Lower Merion Township, Pennsylvania, ten miles northwest of Philadelphia. ... A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Night Hostess is a play written by Philip Dunning that premiered on Broadway September 12, 1928. ...


A banner year for Hepburn, 1928 also marked her marriage to socialite businessman Ludlow ("Luddy") Ogden Smith, whom she met while attending Bryn Mawr and married after a short engagement. Hepburn and Smith's marriage was rocky from the start—she insisted he change his name to S. Ogden Ludlow so she would not be confused with well-known rotund singer Kate Smith. They were divorced in Mexico in 1934. Fearing that the Mexican divorce was not legal, Ludlow got a second divorce in the United States in 1942 and a few days later he remarried. Katharine Hepburn often expressed her gratitude toward Ludlow for his financial and moral support in the early days of her career. "Luddy" continued to be a lifelong friend to her and the Hepburn family. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ludlow Ogden Smith a Philadelphia socialite married Katherine Hepburn in 1928. ... Kathryn Elizabeth Smith (May 1, 1907 – June 17, 1986) was an American singer (born in Washington, D.C.), best known for her rendition of Irving Berlins God Bless America. She was one of Americas most beloved entertainers, with a radio, TV and recording career that spanned five decades...


On September 21, 1938, Hepburn was staying in her Old Saybrook, Connecticut home when the 1938 New England Hurricane struck and destroyed her house. Hepburn narrowly escaped before the home was washed away. is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Old Saybrook is a town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, United States. ... Duration: Sept. ...


Career

Stage

Hepburn cut her acting teeth in plays at Bryn Mawr and later in revues staged by stock companies. During her last years at Bryn Mawr, Hepburn met a young producer with a stock company in Baltimore, Maryland, who cast her in several small roles, including a production of The Czarina and The Cradle Snatchers. Bryn Mawr College (pronounced ) is a highly selective womens liberal arts college located in Bryn Mawr, a community in Lower Merion Township, Pennsylvania, ten miles northwest of Philadelphia. ... Baltimore redirects here. ...


Hepburn's first leading role was in a production of The Big Pond, which opened in Great Neck, New York. The producer had fired the play's original leading lady at the last minute, and asked Hepburn to assume the role. Terror stricken at the unexpected change, Hepburn arrived late and, once on stage, flubbed her lines, tripped over her feet and spoke so rapidly she was almost incomprehensible. She was fired, but continued to work in small stock company roles and as an understudy. The Big Pond is a 1930 romantic comedy film starring Maurice Chevalier, Claudette Colbert, George Barbier, Marion Ballou and Andrée Corday. ... Great Neck is a village in Nassau County, New York, in the USA, on the North Shore of Long Island. ...


Later, Hepburn was cast in a speaking part in the Broadway play Art and Mrs. Bottle. Hepburn was fired from this role as well, though she was eventually rehired when the director could not find anyone to replace her. After another summer of stock companies, in 1932, Hepburn landed the role of Antiope the Amazon princess in The Warrior's Husband (an update of Lysistrata), which required her to wear a very short costume and debuted to excellent reviews. Hepburn became the talk of New York City, and began getting noticed by Hollywood. Antiope () is a figure from Greek mythology. ... The Amazons (in Greek, ) were a mythical ancient nation of all-female warriors. ... Lysistrata (Attic Greek: Λυσιστράτη Lysistratê, Doric Greek: Λυσιστράτα Lysistrata), loosely translated to she who disbands armies, is an anti-war Greek comedy, written in 411 BC by Aristophanes. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... ...


In the play, Hepburn entered the stage by jumping over a flight of steps while carrying a large stag on her shoulders—an RKO scout (Leland Hayward, whom she would later romance) was so impressed by this display of physicality that he asked her to do a screen test for the studio's next vehicle, A Bill of Divorcement, which starred John Barrymore and Billie Burke. RKO could stand for: RKO Pictures The R.K.O. - finishing manoever (and initials) of WWE professional wrestler Randy Orton. ... Leland Hayward (September 13, 1902 - March 18, 1971) was a popular, powerful and wealthy Hollywood and Broadway agent and theatrical producer. ... Katharine Hepburn and David Manners in A Bill of Divorcement A Bill of Divorcement was a British play written by Clemence Dane that debuted in 1921 in London. ... This article is about John Barrymore, Sr. ... Mary William Ethelbert Appleton Billie Burke (August 7, 1884 – May 14, 1970) was an Oscar-nominated American actress primarily known to modern audiences for her role as Glinda the Good Witch of the North in the musical The Wizard of Oz. ...


In true Hepburn fashion, she demanded an outlandish $1,500 per week for film work (at the time she was earning between $80 and $100 per week). After seeing her screen test, RKO agreed to her demands and cast her. At 5 feet, 7 inches (1.71 m), Hepburn was one of the tallest leading ladies of her time.[2] Her film career was launched alongside legendary actor John Barrymore and director George Cukor, who would become a lifetime friend and colleague. Barrymore pinched Kate's behind on the set in one of his many attempts to seduce her. She said, "If you do that again I'm going to stop acting." Barrymore replied, "I wasn't aware that you'd started, my dear." This article is about John Barrymore, Sr. ... George Dewey Cukor (July 7, 1899 – January 24, 1983) was an American film director. ...


Film

After the audience reaction to A Bill of Divorcement, RKO signed Hepburn to a new contract. But her nonconformist, anti-Hollywood behavior offscreen made studio executives fret she would never become a superstar. The following year (1933), Hepburn won her first Oscar for best actress in Morning Glory, playing a young actress who rejects romance in favor of her career. That same year, Hepburn played Jo in the screen adaptation of Little Women, which broke box-office records. RKO could stand for: RKO Pictures The R.K.O. - finishing manoever (and initials) of WWE professional wrestler Randy Orton. ... Morning Glory is a 1933 film which tells the story of an eager would-be actress whose good looks draw more attention than her acting. ... This article is about the 1933 film . ... Little Women is a novel published in 1868 and written by American author Louisa May Alcott. ...


Intoxicated by her success, Hepburn felt it was time to return to the theater. She chose The Lake, but was unable to obtain a release from RKO and instead went back to Hollywood to film the forgettable Spitfire. Having satisfied RKO, Hepburn went immediately back to Manhattan to begin the play, in which she played an English girl unhappy with her overbearing mother and wimpy father. The play was generally considered a flop, and Hepburn's performance elicited Dorothy Parker's famous quip that the actress "ran the gamut of emotions from A to B." The Lake was a British play written by Dorothy Massingham and Murray MacDonald. ... Spitfire is a 1934 drama film based on the play Trigger by Lula Vollmer. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Dorothy Parker (August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967) was an American writer and poet, best known for her caustic wit, wisecracks, and sharp eye for 20th century urban foibles. ...


In 1935, in the title role of the film Alice Adams, Hepburn earned her second Oscar nomination. By 1938, Hepburn was a bona fide star, and her forays into comedy with the films Bringing Up Baby and Stage Door were well-received critically. But audience response to the two films was tepid, and the good reviews from the critics were not enough to rescue her from an earlier string of flops (The Little Minister, Spitfire, Break of Hearts, Sylvia Scarlett, A Woman Rebels, Mary of Scotland, Quality Street). As a result, Hepburn's movie career began to decline. Alice Adams, also known as Booth Tarkingtons Alice Adams, is a 1935 romantic film remake made by RKO. It was directed by George Stevens and produced by Pandro S. Berman from a screenplay by Dorothy Yost, Mortimer Offner adapted by Jane Murfin from the novel, Alice Adams, by Booth... Bringing up Baby is a 1938 screwball comedy which tells the story of a scientist who winds up in various predicaments with a woman who has a unique sense of logic and a leopard named Baby. ... Stage Door is a 1937 film that tells the story of several would-be actresses who live together in a single boarding house. ... The Little Minister is a 1934 American drama film directed by Richard Wallace. ... Break of Hearts is a 1935 RKO film starring Katharine Hepburn and Charles Boyer. ... Sylvia Scarlett is a 1935 romantic comedy film, directed by George Cukor. ... A Woman Rebels is a 1936 RKO film adapted from the novel Portrait of a Rebel by Netta Syrett and starring Katharine Hepburn as Pamela Thistlewaite, who rebels against the social mores of Victorian England. ... Mary of Scotland is a 1936 RKO film starring Katharine Hepburn as the 16th century ruler, Mary I of Scotland. ... Quality Street is a 1937 Hollywood movie, made by RKO, directed by George Stevens and produced by Pandro S. Berman. ...


Box office poison

Some of what has made Hepburn greatly beloved today—her unconventional, straightforward, anti-Hollywood attitude—at the time began to turn audiences sour. Outspoken and intellectual with an acerbic tongue, she defied the era's "blonde bombshell" stereotypes, preferring to wear pantsuits and disdaining makeup. She also had a famously difficult relationship with the press, turning down most interviews, which did not help her exposure to the public. On her first outing with the Hollywood press corps after the success of A Bill of Divorcement, Hepburn talked with reporters who had invaded her and her husband's cabin aboard the ship City of Paris. A reporter asked if they were really married; Hepburn responded, "I don't remember". Following up, another reporter asked if they had any children; Hepburn's answer: "Two white and three colored." Hepburn's aversion to media attention did not thaw until 1973, when she appeared on The Dick Cavett Show for an extended two-day interview. ... News media satellite up-link trucks and photojournalists gathered outside the Prudential Financial headquarters in Newark, New Jersey in August, 2004 following the announcement of evidence of a terrorist threat to it and to buildings in New York City. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... The Dick Cavett Show has been the title of many talk shows hosted by Dick Cavett on several television networks, including: ABC daytime (March 4, 1968–January 24, 1969) (originally titled This Morning) ABC prime time (May 26–September 19, 1969) ABC late night (December 29, 1969–January 1, 1975...


She could also be prickly with fans; though she relented as she aged, early in her career Hepburn often denied requests for autographs. However, on movie sets, she was eager to learn the ways of the stage and camera crews and befriended many of them. Even so, her refusal to sign autographs and answer personal questions earned her the nickname "Katharine of Arrogance"[1] (an allusion to Catherine of Aragon). Soon, audiences began to stay away from her movies. The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Catherine of Aragon (16 December 1485 – 7 January 1536) (Castilian Infanta Catalina de Aragón y Castilla), was the Queen of England as the first wife of Henry VIII of England. ...


Hepburn was already reeling from a devastating series of flops when, in 1938, she along with Fred Astaire, Joan Crawford, Marlene Dietrich, and others was voted "box office poison" in a poll taken by motion picture exhibitors.[2] In 1939, Hepburn was going to do producer David O. Selznick a favor and play the role of Scarlett O'Hara because he did not yet have anyone else signed for the role. Hepburn insisted that she did not have the lustful sexual appeal that the part demanded and told Selznick that his studio needed to find the woman who did.Hepburn rehearsed the lines thoroughly just in case. The night before the deadline, Selznick finally cast Vivien Leigh. Unbeknownst to Hepburn and the rest of Hollywood, Vivien Leigh was favored for the role early on, but as a British actress, she was deemed unsuitable for the part.In addition, her affair with Laurence Olivier while he was in the middle of a divorce made her a controversial pick. The vast "search for Scarlett" was orchestrated to make it seem as if no other actress could be found, thus limiting the shock of Vivien Leigh landing the role. Hepburn was later the maid of honor at Leigh and Olivier's wedding in 1940.[3] Hepburn remained a close friend of Vivien Leigh until Leigh's death in 1967. Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... For other persons named Joan Crawford, see Joan Crawford (disambiguation). ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer and entertainer. ... David O. Selznick David Oliver Selznick (May 10, 1902–June 22, 1965), was one of the icon Hollywood producers of the Golden Age. ... Scarlett OHara (full name Katie Scarlett OHara Hamilton Kennedy Butler) of French-Irish ancestry is the protagonist in Margaret Mitchells 1936 novel Gone with the Wind and in the later film of the same name. ... Vivien Leigh, Lady Olivier (November 5, 1913 – July 8, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award winning English actress. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM, (IPA: ; 22 May 1907 – 11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... Vivien Leigh, Lady Olivier (November 5, 1913 – July 8, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award winning English actress. ...


Yearning for a comeback on the stage, Hepburn returned to her roots on Broadway, appearing in The Philadelphia Story, a play written especially for her by Philip Barry, a year after Hepburn had starred in the film version of his play Holiday. She played spoiled socialite Tracy Lord to rave reviews. With the help of ex-lover Howard Hughes, she purchased the film rights to the play and sold them to MGM, which adapted the play into one of the biggest hits of 1940. As part of her deal with MGM, Hepburn got to choose the director—George Cukor—and her costars—Cary Grant and James Stewart. She was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for her work. Her career was revived almost overnight. The Philadelphia Story is a 1940 romantic screwball comedy starring Jimmy Stewart, Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant. ... Philip Barry (June 18, 1896 - December 3, 1949) was an American playwright. ... Holiday is a 1938 remake of the 1930 film of the same name—a romantic comedy which tells the story of a playboy who is torn between his free-thinking lifestyle and the tradition of his wealthy fiancées family. ... For the Welsh murderer, see Howard Hughes (murderer). ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... George Dewey Cukor (July 7, 1899 – January 24, 1983) was an American film director. ... For the vocal coach, see Carrie Grant. ... For other persons named James Stewart, see James Stewart (disambiguation). ... Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ...


Hepburn and Spencer Tracy

Tracy and Hepburn from the trailer for the film Adam's Rib (1949)
Tracy and Hepburn from the trailer for the film Adam's Rib (1949)

Hepburn made her first appearance opposite Spencer Tracy in Woman of the Year (1942), directed by George Stevens. Behind the scenes the pair fell in love, beginning what would become one of the silver screen's most famous romances, despite Tracy's marriage to another woman. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Adams Rib is a 1949 film starring Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy and directed by George Cukor. ... Spencer Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor who appeared in 74 films from 1930 to 1967. ... Woman of the Year is a 1942 romantic comedy film in which a feminist, chosen Woman of the Year, tries to keep the spark in her personal relationship. ... George Stevens examining film from A Place in the Sun. ...


They became one of Hollywood's most recognizable pairs both on-screen and off. Hepburn, with her agile mind and distinctive New England accent, complemented Tracy's easy working-class machismo. When Joseph Mankiewicz introduced the two, Hepburn, who was wearing special heels that added several inches to her lanky frame, said, "I'm afraid I'm too tall for you, Mr. Tracy." Mankiewicz retorted, "Don't worry, he'll soon cut you down to size." As the Daily Telegraph observed in Hepburn's obituary, "Hepburn and Spencer Tracy were at their most seductive when their verbal fencing was sharpest: it was hard to say whether they delighted more in the battle or in each other." Joseph Leo Mankiewicz (February 11, 1909–February 5, 1993) was a Polish-American Hollywood screenwriter, director and producer. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ...


Most of their films together stress the sparks that can fly when a couple try to find an equable balance of power. The sexy sparring over power and control is almost always resolved in an agreement to share and share alike. They appeared in a total of nine movies together, including Adam's Rib (1949), Pat and Mike (1952), Desk Set (1957), and Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (1967), for which Hepburn won her second Academy Award for Best Actress. Adams Rib is a 1949 film starring Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy and directed by George Cukor. ... Pat and Mike is 1952 comedy starring Katherine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy. ... Desk Set (or His Other Woman in the U.K.) is a 1957 romantic comedy film directed by Kevin Stevens and starring Spencer Tracy (as Richard Sumner) and Katharine Hepburn (as Bunny Watson). Its screenplay was written by Phoebe Ephron and Henry Ephron from the play by William Marchant. ... For the 1981 album by Black Uhuru, see Guess Whos Coming to Dinner (album). ...


The pair carefully hid their affair from the public, using back entrances to studios and hotels and assiduously avoiding the press. Hepburn and Tracy were undeniably a couple for decades, but did not live together regularly until the last few years of Tracy's life. Even then, they maintained separate homes to keep up appearances. Their relationship was complex and there were often periods of estrangments. Tracy, a Roman Catholic, had been married to the former Louise Treadwell since 1923, and remained so until his death. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Some biographers who believed her remarks have speculated that Hepburn's devotion to Tracy was in part due to her family history of depression, including the suicide of her brother, which made her determined to "save" Tracy. On the Threshold of Eternity. ...


Hepburn had had several prior liaisons, most notably with her agent Leland Hayward and Howard Hughes. Tracy, however, seems to have been her true love. Tracy had several affairs while estranged from Hepburn, notably while filming the Plymouth Adventure with his co-star Gene Tierney. Hepburn took five years off after Long Day's Journey Into Night to care for Tracy while he was in failing health. Out of consideration for Tracy's family, Hepburn did not attend his funeral. She described herself as too heartbroken to ever watch Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, saying it evoked memories of Tracy that were too painful. Leland Hayward (September 13, 1902 - March 18, 1971) was a popular, powerful and wealthy Hollywood and Broadway agent and theatrical producer. ... For the Welsh murderer, see Howard Hughes (murderer). ... Plymouth Adventure is a motion picture drama released in 1952. ... Gene Tierney (November 19, 1920 – November 6, 1991) was an American film and stage actress. ... Long Days Journey Into Night is a 1962 film adaptation of the play by Eugene ONeill made by Embassy Pictures. ...


The African Queen

Hepburn in The African Queen
Hepburn in The African Queen

Hepburn is perhaps best remembered for her role as Rose Sayer in The African Queen (1951), for which she received her fifth Best Actress nomination, losing to Vivien Leigh in A Streetcar Named Desire. She played a prim spinster missionary in Africa who convinces Humphrey Bogart's character, a hard-drinking riverboat captain, to use his boat to attack a German ship. The African Queen is a 1951 film made by Horizon Pictures and Romulus Films, and distributed by United Artists. ... Vivien Leigh, Lady Olivier (November 5, 1913 – July 8, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award winning English actress. ... A Streetcar Named Desire is an Academy Award-winning 1951 film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play of the same name by Tennessee Williams. ... Bogart redirects here. ...


The movie was filmed mostly on location in Africa, where almost all the cast and crew suffered from malaria and dysentery—except director John Huston and Bogart, neither of whom ever drank any water. Hepburn, ever the urologist's daughter, disapproved of the two men's drinking and piously drank gallons of water each day to spite them. She wound up so sick with dysentery that, even months after she returned home, the famously vigorous actress was still ill. The trip and the movie made such an impact on her that later in life she wrote a book about filming the movie: The Making of The African Queen: Or, How I Went to Africa With Bogart, Bacall and Huston and Almost Lost My Mind, which made her a best-selling author at the age of 77. Malaria is a vector-borne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites. ... Dysentery (formerly known as flux or the bloody flux) is frequent, small-volume, severe diarrhea that shows blood in the feces along with intestinal cramping and tenesmus (painful straining to pass stool). ... John Marcellus Huston (August 5, 1906 – August 28, 1987) was an American film director and actor. ...


In an interview in Playboy, Huston spoke of how on their days off, he and Bogart would go hunting for big game, and how one day Hepburn asked to go along. He described her as a "Diana of the Hunt", utterly fearless, and able to shoot with the best of them. For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... The Big Game is the annual football game between Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley (known simply as California or Cal), held in November. ... The Diana of Versailles In Roman mythology, Diana was the goddess of the hunt, in literature the equivalent of the Greek goddess Artemis, though in cult she was Italic in origin. ...


Later film career

Following The African Queen Hepburn often played spinsters, most notably in her Oscar-nominated performances for Summertime (1955) and The Rainmaker (1956), although at 49 some considered her too old for the role. She also received nominations for her performances in films adapted from stage dramas, namely as Mrs. Venable in Tennessee Williams' Suddenly Last Summer (1959) and as Mary Tyrone in the 1962 version of Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night. Katharine Hepburn and Rossano Brazzi in Summertime Summertime is a 1955 film directed by David Lean starring Katharine Hepburn and Rossano Brazzi. ... The Rainmaker is a 1956 film which tells the story of a middle-aged woman, suffering from unrequited love for the local town sheriff; however, she falls for a con man who comes to town with the promise that he can make it rain. ... Thomas Lanier Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983), better known by the nickname Tennessee Williams, was a major American playwright of the twentieth century who received many of the top theatrical awards for his work. ... Suddenly, Last Summer is a play by Tennessee Williams. ... Eugene Gladstone ONeill (October 16, 1888 – November 27, 1953) was a Nobel- and four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning American playwright. ... Long Days Journey Into Night is a 1962 film adaptation of the play by Eugene ONeill made by Embassy Pictures. ...


Hepburn received her second Best Actress Oscar for Guess Who's Coming to Dinner. She always said she believed the award was meant to honor Spencer Tracy, who died shortly after filming was completed. The following year, she won a record-breaking third Oscar for her role as Eleanor of Aquitaine in The Lion in Winter, an award shared that year with Barbra Streisand for her performance in Funny Girl. Peter O'Toole, her co-star in The Lion in Winter, has said in many interviews, including with host Charlie Rose, that Hepburn was his favorite actor to work with. He and Hepburn remained great friends until her death. For the 1981 album by Black Uhuru, see Guess Whos Coming to Dinner (album). ... Eleanor of Aquitaine (right) and John sans Terre Eleanor of Aquitaine (or Aliénor), Duchess of Aquitaine and Gascony and Countess of Poitou (1122[1]–April 1, 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe during the High Middle Ages. ... The Lion in Winter is a 1968 historical costume drama made by Embassy Pictures, based on the Broadway play by James Goldman. ... Barbara Joan Streisand (pronounced STRY-sand, IPA: ; born April 24, 1942) is a two time Academy Award-winning American singer and film and theatre actress. ... Funny Girl is a film based on the stage musical of the same name. ... Peter Seamus OToole (born August 2, 1932, uncertain but presumed correct date[1]) is an eight-time Academy Award-nominated Irish actor. ... This article is about the American journalist. ...


Hepburn continued to do filmed stage dramas, including The Madwoman of Chaillot (1969), The Trojan Women (1971) by Euripides, and Edward Albee's A Delicate Balance (1973). In 1973, she first appeared in an original television production of Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie. The Madwoman of Chaillot is a 1969 satirical comedy-drama film made by Commonwealth United Entertainment and distributed by Warner Bros-Seven Arts. ... The Trojan Women (in Greek, Troiades) is a tragedy by the Greek playwright Euripides. ... A statue of Euripides. ... Edward Franklin Albee III (born March 12, 1928) is an American playwright known for works including Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, The Zoo Story, The Sandbox and The American Dream. ... A Delicate Balance is a 1973 film directed by Tony Richardson and starring Katharine Hepburn, Paul Scofield and Kate Reid, who was nominated for the 1974 Golden Globe Award for the Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture for her performance as Claire. ... The Glass Menagerie is a play by Tennessee Williams. ...


Two years later, Hepburn received an Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Special Program (Drama or Comedy) for Love Among the Ruins, which co-starred friend Sir Laurence Olivier and was directed by George Cukor. Hepburn also appeared with John Wayne in Rooster Cogburn, which was essentially The African Queen done as a western. Hepburn won her fourth Oscar for On Golden Pond (1981), opposite Henry Fonda. In 1994, Hepburn gave her final three movie performances—One Christmas, based on a short story by Truman Capote, as Ginny in the remake of Love Affair; and This Can't Be Love, directed by one of her close friends, Anthony Harvey (The Lion in Winter). An Emmy Award. ... Love Among the Ruins is a made-for-television movie (1975) starring Katharine Hepburn and Sir Laurence Olivier. ... Laurence Olivier, as photographed in 1939 by Carl Van Vechten Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (May 22, 1907 – July 11, 1989) was an English actor and director, esteemed by many as the greatest actor of the 20th century. ... George Dewey Cukor (July 7, 1899 – January 24, 1983) was an American film director. ... For other persons named John Wayne, see John Wayne (disambiguation). ... Reuben J. Rooster Cogburn is a fictional wild west character who first appears in the Charles Portis novel True Grit. ... Broncho Billy Anderson, from The Great Train Robbery The Western movie is one of the classic American film genres. ... Henry Jaynes Fonda (May 16, 1905 – August 12, 1982) was a highly acclaimed Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor, best known for his roles as plain-speaking idealists. ... Truman Capote (pronounced ; 30 September 1924 – 25 August 1984) was an American writer whose stories, novels, plays, and non-fiction are recognized literary classics, including the novella Breakfast at Tiffanys (1958) and In Cold Blood (1965), which he labeled a non-fiction novel. ... There is also a musical group named Love Affair. ...


Personal life

On June 29, 2003, Hepburn died of natural causes at Fenwick, the Hepburn family home in Old Saybrook, Connecticut. She was 96 years old, and was buried in Cedar Hill Cemetery, Hartford, Connecticut. In honor of her extensive theater work, the lights of Broadway were dimmed for an hour. is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dope Hiphop crew out of Sydney Australia. ... Fenwick is a borough located in Middlesex County, Connecticut, in the town of Old Saybrook. ... Old Saybrook is a town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, United States. ... Hartford redirects here. ...


The book Kate Remembered, by award winning biographer A. Scott Berg, was published just 13 days after her death. It documents the friendship between the actress and Berg. He makes one passing reference to her possible bisexuality, referencing a comment made by Irene Selznick.[4] Later writers treat this reputed bisexuality in more detail.[5][6][7] Lindbergh by A. Scott Berg Andrew Scott Berg (b. ... Bisexual redirects here. ...


In 2004, in accordance with Hepburn's wishes, her personal effects were put up for auction with Sotheby's in New York. Hepburn had meticulously collected an extraordinary amount of material relating to her career and place in Hollywood over the years, as well as personal items such as a bust of Spencer Tracy she sculpted herself and her own oil paintings. The auction netted several million dollars, which Hepburn willed mostly to her family and close friends, including television journalist Cynthia McFadden. Sothebys (NYSE: BID) is the worlds second oldest international auction house in continuous operation. ... Bust of Richard Bently by Roubiliac A bust is a sculpture depicting a persons chest, shoulders, and head, usually supported by a stand. ... Spencer Tracy (April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor who appeared in 74 films from 1930 to 1967. ... Martin Bashir, Cynthia McFadden, and Terry Moran in Times Square Studio. ...


Family

Katharine Hepburn's genealogy has been researched through the Whittier line back to King Louis IX of France. She is listed as one of the descendants of the Mayflower compact author William Brewster (her family tree). Her paternal grandfather, Sewell Hepburn, was an Episcopal clergyman, but on the subject of religion, she told another member of the journalism community she loved so much to shock (this time a Ladies Home Journal reporter) in October 1991, "I'm an atheist and that's it. I believe there's nothing we can know except that we should be kind to each other and do what we can for other people."[3] Louis IX (25 April 1215 – 25 August 1270), commonly Saint Louis, was King of France from 1226 to his death. ... Signing of the Mayflower Compact Elder William Brewster (born c. ... A cover of Ladies Home Journal from 1906 Ladies Home Journal is a magazine first published February 16, 1883 as a womens supplement to the Tribune and Farmer. ...


In 1910, the Hepburn family lived at 133 Hawthorne St. in Hartford, Connecticut. Eight years later, they were recorded living at 352 Laurel St., also in Hartford. By 1930, Katharine's parents and four younger siblings had moved to a large eight bedroom house at 201 Bloomfield Avenue in West Hartford. As of 2006, the house is owned by the University of Hartford. Motto: Where City Style meets Village Charm Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated 1854 Government  - Type Council-manager  - Town manager James Francis  - Town council Scott Slifka, Mayor Art Spada, Deputy Mayor Shari Cantor Barbara Carpenter Charles Coursey Maureen K. McClay Mark C. Sinatro Carolyn Thornberry Joseph Verrengia Area  - City 58. ... The University of Hartford, often called UHA or UHart, was founded in 1877, and is a private, independent, and nonsectarian coeducational university located in West Hartford, Connecticut. ...


Margaret "Peg" Perry, Hepburn's last surviving sister, died on February 13, 2006, aged 85.[4] Perry was a librarian in Canton, Connecticut. She was survived by a daughter and three sons. is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Canton is a town, incorporated in 1806, located in Hartford County, Connecticut. ...


Robert Hepburn, the last surviving sibling of Katharine Hepburn, died on November 26, 2007. Robert was a doctor who followed in the footsteps of their father, Dr. Thomas Hepburn. He was the head of the urology department at Hartford Hospital for more than 30 years. He is survived by two children and four grandchildren. is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Hepburn's professional legacy is today carried on within her family. Hepburn's niece is actress Katharine Houghton, who appeared as her daughter in Guess Who's Coming to Dinner. Hepburn's grandniece is actress Schuyler Grant; the two appeared together in the 1988 television movie Laura Lansing Slept Here. {{Infobox actor | name = Katharine Houghton | image = | imagesize = | caption = | birthname = Katharine Houghton Grant | birthdate = March 10, 1945 ) (age 62) | location = Hartford, Connecticut Katharine Houghton, an American actress, was born Katharine Houghton Grant on March 10, 1945, in Hartford, Connecticut. ... Schulyer Grant. ... Laura Lansing Slept Here is a made-for-television movie released in 1988, starring Katharine Hepburn as the title character, Joel Higgins, Karen Austin and Hepburns grand-niece Schuyler Grant. ...


Legacy

To honor Hepburn, a theater is being built in Old Saybrook, Connecticut. Hepburn lived and died in the Fenwick section of Old Saybrook. In the summer of 2008, the state-of-the-art Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center and Theater will open.[5] In October 2007, Old Saybrook First Selectman Michael Pace received a check for $200,000 from the Connecticut Commission on Culture and Tourism, Historic Restoration Grant for the Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center and Theatre, totaling one million dollars received in grants for this project.[3]


On September 8 and 9, 2006, Bryn Mawr College, Hepburn's alma mater, launched the Katharine Houghton Hepburn Center, dedicated to both the actress and her mother. At the launch celebration, Lauren Bacall and Blythe Danner were awarded Katharine Hepburn Medals for "lives, work and contributions that embody the intelligence, drive and independence of the four-time-Oscar-winning actress."[6] is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bryn Mawr College (pronounced ) is a highly selective womens liberal arts college located in Bryn Mawr, a community in Lower Merion Township, Pennsylvania, ten miles northwest of Philadelphia. ... Alma mater is Latin for nourishing mother. It was used in ancient Rome as a title for the mother goddess, and in Medieval Christianity for the Virgin Mary. ... Betty Joan Perske (born on September 16, 1924), better known as Lauren Bacall, is a Golden Globe– and Tony Award–winning, as well as Academy Award–nominated, American film and stage actress. ... Blythe Katherine Danner (born February 3, 1943) is a prolific two time Emmy-winning American actress who has appeared in numerous stage, screen, and film roles. ...


Katharine Hepburn lent her name to some liberal social and political causes, particularly family planning. Was once a member of the Communist Party. In 1985, she received the Humanist Arts Award of the American Humanist Association, presented by her friend Corliss Lamont. The American Humanist Association (AHA) is an educational organization in the United States that advances Humanism. ... Corliss Lamont (March 28, 1902 – April 26, 1995), was a humanist philosopher and civil liberties advocate. ...


Hepburn, who resided in a brownstone located at 244 East 49th Street in the borough of Manhattan of New York City, was honored posthumously by neighbors in her community. First, a garden near her home was dedicated in her name in 2004.[8] The garden contains 12 stepping stones each inscribed with quotes. One reads "I remember when walking as a child, it was not customary to say you were fatigued. It was customary to complete the goal of the expedition." In addition to the garden, the intersection of East 49th Street and 2nd Avenue has been renamed Katharine Hepburn Way by the city.[9] This article is about the building material and the dwelling. ... Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ...


To mark her 100th birthday in May 2007, the cable channel Turner Classic Movies dedicated a week of its evening broadcast hours to her films and documentaries on her life. Warner Brothers Home video also celebrated her 100th birthday by releasing a box set of movies not previously available on DVD -- Morning Glory (1933), Sylvia Scarlett (1936), Dragon Seed (1944), Without Love (1945), Undercurrent (1946), and the TV movie The Corn Is Green (1979). Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ... Morning Glory is a 1933 film which tells the story of an eager would-be actress whose good looks draw more attention than her acting. ... Sylvia Scarlett is a 1935 romantic comedy film, directed by George Cukor. ... Dragon Seed is a 1944 war drama film starring Katharine Hepburn. ... Without Love is a 1945 film starring Katharine Hepburn as a lonely widow, Jamie Rowan, who helps the war effort by marrying a military research scientiest, Patrick Jameison played by Spencer Tracy who has set up his lab in her house. ... Undercurrent may refer to: Undercurrent (film) a 1946 film directed by Vincente Minelli starring Katharine Hepburn, Robert Taylor and Robert Mitchum. ... The Corn is Green (1938) is a semi-autobiographical play by Welsh writer Emlyn Williams. ...


In the summer of 2008, the Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center and Theatre [7] will open in Old Saybrook, Connecticut. The mission of the center is to provide a historically restored environment to promote cultural arts for current and future generations of citizens of Old Saybrook and the surrounding communities.[10] Old Saybrook is a town located in Middlesex County, Connecticut. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ...


Awards

Academy Award

Best Actress
Wins
Nominations

Golden Globe Award

Best Actress in a Motion Picture Drama
Nominations
Best Actress in a Miniseries or Motion Picture Made for Television
Nominations
Best Actress in a Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Nominations

Emmy Award

Best Actress in a Drama
Nominations
Best Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie
Wins
Best Actress in a Limited Series or Special
Nominations

BAFTA Award

Best Actress
Wins
Best Foreign Actress
Nominations

Tony Award

Best Actress in a Musical
Nominations
Best Actress in a Play
Nominations

Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... Morning Glory is a 1933 film which tells the story of an eager would-be actress whose good looks draw more attention than her acting. ... For the 1981 album by Black Uhuru, see Guess Whos Coming to Dinner (album). ... The Lion in Winter is a 1968 historical costume drama made by Embassy Pictures, based on the Broadway play by James Goldman. ... Alice Adams, also known as Booth Tarkingtons Alice Adams, is a 1935 romantic film remake made by RKO. It was directed by George Stevens and produced by Pandro S. Berman from a screenplay by Dorothy Yost, Mortimer Offner adapted by Jane Murfin from the novel, Alice Adams, by Booth... The Philadelphia Story is a 1940 romantic screwball comedy starring Jimmy Stewart, Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant. ... Woman of the Year is a 1942 romantic comedy film in which a feminist, chosen Woman of the Year, tries to keep the spark in her personal relationship. ... The African Queen is a 1951 film made by Horizon Pictures and Romulus Films, and distributed by United Artists. ... Katharine Hepburn and Rossano Brazzi in Summertime Summertime is a 1955 film directed by David Lean starring Katharine Hepburn and Rossano Brazzi. ... The Rainmaker is a 1956 film which tells the story of a middle-aged woman, suffering from unrequited love for the local town sheriff; however, she falls for a con man who comes to town with the promise that he can make it rain. ... Suddenly, Last Summer is a 1959 drama film made by Columbia Pictures Corporation, based on the play of the same title by Tennessee Williams. ... Long Days Journey Into Night is a 1962 film adaptation of the play by Eugene ONeill made by Embassy Pictures. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture - Drama was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1951. ... Suddenly, Last Summer is a 1959 drama film made by Columbia Pictures Corporation, based on the play of the same title by Tennessee Williams. ... Long Days Journey Into Night is a 1962 film adaptation of the play by Eugene ONeill made by Embassy Pictures. ... For the 1981 album by Black Uhuru, see Guess Whos Coming to Dinner (album). ... The Lion in Winter is a 1968 historical costume drama made by Embassy Pictures, based on the Broadway play by James Goldman. ... Best Actress in a Mini-series or Motion Picture Made for Television For the main article see Golden Globe Award. ... The Man Upstairs is a collection of short stories by P. G. Wodehouse, first published in the U.K. in 1914 by Methuen & Co. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1950. ... Pat and Mike is 1952 comedy starring Katherine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy. ... An Emmy Award. ... This is a list of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series winners: 1974: Michael Learned - The Waltons 1975: Jean Marsh - Upstairs, Downstairs 1976: Michael Learned - The Waltons 1977: Lindsay Wagner - The Bionic Woman 1978: Sada Thompson - Family 1979: Mariette Hartley - The Incredible Hulk 1980... The Glass Menagerie is a play by Tennessee Williams. ... This is a list of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie winners: 1974: Mildred Natwick - The Swoop Sisters 1975: Jessica Walter - Amy Prentiss 1976: Rosemary Harris - Notorious Woman 1977: Patty Duke - Captains and Kings 1978: Meryl Streep - Holocaust 1979: Bette Davis - Strangers... Love Among the Ruins is a made-for-television movie (1975) starring Katharine Hepburn and Sir Laurence Olivier. ... This is a list of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie winners: 1974: Mildred Natwick - The Swoop Sisters 1975: Jessica Walter - Amy Prentiss 1976: Rosemary Harris - Notorious Woman 1977: Patty Duke - Captains and Kings 1978: Meryl Streep - Holocaust 1979: Bette Davis - Strangers... The Corn is Green (1938) is a semi-autobiographical play by Welsh writer Emlyn Williams. ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role has been presented to its winners since 1952 and actresses of all nationalities are eligible to receive the award. ... For the 1981 album by Black Uhuru, see Guess Whos Coming to Dinner (album). ... The Lion in Winter is a 1968 historical costume drama made by Embassy Pictures, based on the Broadway play by James Goldman. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role has been presented to its winners since 1952 and actresses of all nationalities are eligible to receive the award. ... Pat and Mike is 1952 comedy starring Katherine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy. ... Katharine Hepburn and Rossano Brazzi in Summertime Summertime is a 1955 film directed by David Lean starring Katharine Hepburn and Rossano Brazzi. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical is awarded to the actress who was voted as the best actress in a musical, whether a new production or a revival. ... Coco is a musical with a book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner and music by André Previn. ... The Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play is awarded to the actress who was voted as the best actress in a play, whether a new production or a revival. ... The West Side Waltz was a Broadway play starring Katherine Hepburn written by the playwright Ernest Thompson. ...

Work

Stage

  • Night Hostess (1928)
  • These Days (1928)
  • Art and Mrs. Bottle (1930)
  • The Warrior's Husband (1932)
  • The Lake (1934)
  • Jane Eyre (1936-1937)

The Philadelphia Story (1938) Night Hostess is a play written by Philip Dunning that premiered on Broadway September 12, 1928. ... The Lake was a British play written by Dorothy Massingham and Murray MacDonald. ...

Constance Collier was a drama coach for many famous actors, including Hepburn during her world tour performing Shakespeare in the 50s. Upon Collier's death in 1955, Hepburn "inherited" Collier's secretary Phyllis Wilbourn, who remained with Hepburn as her secretary for 40 years. Walter Deverell,The Mock Marriage of Orlando and Rosalind, 1853 William Shakespeares As You Like It is a pastoral comedy written in 1599 or early 1600. ... The Millionairess is a 1960 romantic comedy film starring Peter Sellers and Sophia Loren set in London. ... Title page of the first quarto (1600) The Merchant of Venice is a play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written sometime between 1596 and 1598. ... Claudio and Isabella (1850) by William Holman Hunt Measure for Measure is a play by William Shakespeare, written in 1603. ... Taming of the Shrew by Augustus Egg The Taming of the Shrew is a comedy by William Shakespeare. ... The exterior of the Old Vic from the corner of Baylis Road and Waterloo Road. ... Title page of the first quarto (1600) The Merchant of Venice is a play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written sometime between 1596 and 1598. ... Much Ado About Nothing is a comedy by William Shakespeare. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Anthony and Cleopatra, by Lawrence Alma-Tadema. ... Twelfth Night, or What You Will is a comedy by William Shakespeare. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Coco is a musical with a book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner and music by André Previn. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... A Matter of Gravity is a play. ... The West Side Waltz was a Broadway play starring Katherine Hepburn written by the playwright Ernest Thompson. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Constance Collier was a film actress. ...


Filmography

// What follows is a chronological listing of Katharine Hepburns feature film appearances, include the name of the character she played, her leading man, and her director. ...

Television

The Glass Menagerie is a play by Tennessee Williams. ... Love Among the Ruins is a made-for-television movie (1975) starring Katharine Hepburn and Sir Laurence Olivier. ... The Corn is Green (1938) is a semi-autobiographical play by Welsh writer Emlyn Williams. ... Laura Lansing Slept Here is a made-for-television movie released in 1988, starring Katharine Hepburn as the title character, Joel Higgins, Karen Austin and Hepburns grand-niece Schuyler Grant. ...

References

  1. ^ Oldenburg, Ann. "Film icon Katharine Hepburn dies at 96", USA Today, June 30, 2003, p. 1A. 
  2. ^ Mahar, Ted. "Movie Review: The Hepburn Story, Katharine Hepburn's Career is Back in the Spotlight", The Oregonian, Oregonian Publishing, March 4, 2005, p. 46. (English) 
  3. ^ a b Holden, Anthony. "Sneak Previews of Forthcoming Books of Special Interest to Southern Californians, Secretly Married", Los Angeles Times, Magazine, September 18, 1988, p. 8A. 
  4. ^ Interview with A. Scott Berg
  5. ^ William J. Mann in Kate: The Woman Who Was Hepburn
  6. ^ James Robert Parish in Katharine Hepburn: The Untold Story
  7. ^ Darwin Porter in Katharine the Great: A Lifetime of Secrets Revealed (1907-1950)
  8. ^ Kate's Place from the New York Post 29/03/2007
  9. ^ New York Songlines: 2nd Avenue/Chrystie Street
  10. ^ http://www.katharinehepburntheater.org/index.html

is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... William J. Mann is an openly gay biographer and Hollywood historian acclaimed for writing what called the definitive (Sunday Times, London) life of Katharine Hepburn: The Woman Whom Was Hepburn, published in October 2006. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ...

Further reading

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
  • Me: Stories of My Life, Katharine Hepburn, Knopf, 1991.
  • Kate Remembered, A. Scott Berg, Putnam, 2003.
  • Tracy and Hepburn, Garson Kanin, Viking, 1971.
  • Kate, Charles Higham, W. W. Norton, 1975.
  • Knowing Hepburn, James Prideaux, 1996.
  • Kate: The Woman Who Was Hepburn, William J. Mann, 2006.

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Garson Kanin (November 24, 1912 – March 13, 1999) was an American writer and director of plays and films. ... There are several notable persons named Charles Higham Charles Higham, British archaeologist Charles Higham (1931-), Australian poet Charles Higham, author and biographer Category: ... William J. Mann is an openly gay biographer and Hollywood historian acclaimed for writing what called the definitive (Sunday Times, London) life of Katharine Hepburn: The Woman Whom Was Hepburn, published in October 2006. ...

External links

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Awards
Preceded by
None
Volpi Cup for Best Actress - Venice Film Festival
1934
for Little Women
Succeeded by
Paula Wessely
for Episode
Preceded by
Vivien Leigh
for Gone with the Wind
NYFCC Award for Best Actress
1940
forThe Philadelphia Story
Succeeded by
Joan Fontaine
for Suspicion
Preceded by
Sophia Loren
for Two Women
Award for Best Actress – Cannes Film Festival
1962
for Long Day's Journey into Night
Succeeded by
Marina Vlady
for The Conjugal Bed
Preceded by
Anouk Aimée
for A Man and a Woman
BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
1968
for The Lion in Winter; Guess Who's Coming to Dinner
Succeeded by
Maggie Smith
for The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie
Persondata
NAME Hepburn, Katharine Houghton
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American actor
DATE OF BIRTH May 12, 1907
PLACE OF BIRTH Hartford, Connecticut
DATE OF DEATH June 29, 2003
PLACE OF DEATH Old Saybrook, Connecticut
is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... When used by itself in a sentence, the term Hartford can refer to one of several places in the United States. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Old Saybrook is a town located in Middlesex County, Connecticut. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Skvaller pÃ¥ Katharine Hepburn (1363 words)
Katharine Hepburn finnas iconic fyra - tajma akademiutmärkelsen - den sympatiska amerikanska stjärnan av filmen, televisionen och scenen som identifierades brett för her skarpa wit, nya Englandgentility och fierce självständighet.
Den finnas ibland hävdat att den Audrey Hepburn och Katharine Hepburn voren relaterade.
Han sade honom vill sköter fruition som var flera av projekten som, han hjälpte till lanserar, särskilt renovationen av den förutvarande stadkorridoren in i Katharine Hepburn det kulturella konstcentrat och teater.
Katharine Hepburn - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3679 words)
Hepburn's father was a staunch proponent of publicizing the dangers of venereal disease in a time when such things were not discussed, and her mother campaigned for birth control and equal rights for women.
Hepburn, eager to please her father, emerged as a fine athlete in her late teens, winning a bronze medal for figure skating from the Madison Square Garden skating club, shooting golf in the low eighties, and reaching the semifinal of the Connecticut Young Women's Golf Championship.
Hepburn especially enjoyed swimming, and regularly took dips in the frigid waters that fronted her bayfront Connecticut home, generally believing that "the bitterer the medicine, the better it was for you." She continued her brisk swims well into her 80s.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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