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Encyclopedia > Karl Malden
Karl Malden

from the trailer for the film I Confess (1953)
Birth name Mladen George Sekulovich
Born March 22, 1912 (1912-03-22) (age 95)
Flag of the United States Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
Spouse(s) Mona Greenberg (1938-)
Karl Malden

26th President of Academy of Motion Pictures, Arts and Sciences
In office
1989 – 1992
Preceded by Richard Kahn
Succeeded by Robert Rehme

Karl Malden (born on March 22, 1912) is an Emmy Award-winning, Oscar-winning and Golden Globe-nominated American actor, known for his expansive manner. In a career that spanned over seven decades, he was featured in classic films such as A Streetcar Named Desire, On the Waterfront and One-Eyed Jacks, with Marlon Brando, and also starred in the blockbuster movie, Patton. Among other notable film roles are Archie Lee Meighan in Baby Doll and Zebulon Prescott in How the West Was Won both starring Carroll Baker. His best-known role was on television as Lt. Mike Stone on the 1970s crime drama, The Streets of San Francisco. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... I Confess is a 1953 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock starring Montgomery Clift as Fr. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... A Streetcar Named Desire is an Academy Award-winning 1951 film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play of the same name by Tennessee Williams. ... An Emmy Award. ... This is a list of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winners: 1979: Marlon Brando - Roots: The Next Generations 1980: George Grizzard - The Oldest Living Guard 1981: David Warner - Masada 1982: Laurence Olivier - Brideshead Revisited 1983: Richard Kiley - The Thorn Birds 1984: Art... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Actor: The Screen Actors Guild Award Statue The Screen Actors Guild Awards are an annual award given by the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) to recognize outstanding performances by members. ... The Screen Actors Guilds National Honors and Tributes Committee bestows an annual Life Achievement Award for outstanding achievement in fostering the finest ideals of the acting profession. ... Richard Ferdinand Kahn was born in 1905, in Hampstead, England. ... Robert Rehme (5th May 1935 in Cincinatti Ohio) is a film producer, and his credits include films such as Patriot Games, Clear and Present Danger and The Generals Daughter. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... An Emmy Award. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... A Streetcar Named Desire is an Academy Award-winning 1951 film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play of the same name by Tennessee Williams. ... On the Waterfront is an Oscar-winning American 1954 film about mob violence and corruption among longshoremen, and it has become a standard of its kind. ... One-Eyed Jacks, a western movie released in 1961, is the only film directed by Marlon Brando, who replaced the original director, Stanley Kubrick. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... Patton is a 1970 epic biographical film which tells the story of General George S. Pattons commands during World War II. It stars George C. Scott, Karl Malden, Michael Bates, and Karl Michael Vogler. ... Baby Doll is a 1956 film which tells the story of the childlike bride of a Mississippi cotton gin owner, who becomes the pawn in a battle between her husband and his enemy. ... How the West Was Won is an epic 1962 western film which follows four generations of a family (starting as the Prescotts) as they move ever westward, from western New York state to the Pacific Ocean. ... Carroll Baker, born on May 28, 1931, is a Golden Globe Award winning and Oscar nominated American actress who has enjoyed popularity as both a serious dramatic actress and, particularly in the sixties, a movie sex symbol. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... The Streets of San Francisco was a successful 1970s television police drama filmed on location in San Francisco, California, and produced by Quinn Martin Productions, with the first season produced in association with Warner Bros. ...

Contents

Early life

The eldest of three brothers, Malden was born Mladen George Sekulovich (from Mladen George Sekulović, Serbian:Младен Ђорђе Секуловић) in Chicago, Illinois on 22 March 1912. He was the product of a Serb father, Petar Sekulovich, and Minnie Sekulovich, a Czech seamstress. The family moved from Chicago to the Serbian quarter of Gary, Indiana in 1917, when Malden was five years old. It is in Gary where his father would work in the steel mills and as a milk man. The Sekulovich family roots trace back to the city of Bileća in Herzegovina. Malden spoke Serbian until he was in kindergarten. Malden's father had a passion for music, as Petar began organizing for the choir. As a teenager, Karl joined the Carol George Choir. In addition, his father produced Serbian plays at his church. Petar also taught students acting. A young Malden took part in many of these plays, including a version of Jack and the Beanstalk but most centering on the community's Serbian heritage. In high school he was a popular student and the star of the basketball team (according to his autobiography, Malden broke his nose twice while playing basketball, taking elbows to the face and resulting in his trademark bulbous nose). He participated in the drama department, and was narrowly elected senior class president. After graduating from Emerson School for Visual and Performing Arts in 1931, with high marks, he briefly planned to leave Gary for Arkansas, where he hoped to win an athletic scholarship, but college officials did not admit him due to his refusal to play any sport beside basketball. From 1931 until 1934, he worked as a factory worker in the steel mills, just like his father had. Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Languages Serbian Religions Predominantly Serbian Orthodox Christian Related ethnic groups Other Slavic peoples, especially South Slavs See Cognate peoples below (* many Serbs opted for Yugoslav ethnicity) [27] Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in... Turn of the century sewing in Detroit, Michigan An old sewing machine Sewing is an ancient craft involving the stitching of cloth, animal skins, furs, or other materials, using needle and thread. ... This article is about the city. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Bileća (Serbian Cyrillic: Билећа) is a town and municipality in the southeast of Republika Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... This article is about the geographic area of Herzegovina. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... Emerson School for Visual and Performing Arts is a seven year (6-12) school for the visual and performing arts of the Gary Community School Corporation in Gary, Indiana. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the city. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... Steel Mill was one of Bruce Springsteens early bands and performed regularly on the Jersey Shore, in Virginia, and also in California from 1969 till January 1971. ...


From his uncle, he changed his name from Mladen Sekulovich to Karl Malden, when he became an actor at age 22.


Stage work and education

In September of 1934, Malden decided to leave his native Gary, Indiana to pursue formal dramatic training at the Goodman Theater (later DePaul University). Although he had worked in the steel mills in Gary for three years, he had helped support his family and was unable to save enough money to pay for schooling. Making a deal with the director of the program, he gave the Institute the little money he did have, agreeing that if he did well, he would be rewarded with a full scholarship. He won the scholarship. When Malden performed in the Goodman's children's theater, he wooed the actress Mona Greenberg (stage name: Mona Graham), who married him in 1938. He graduated from the Chicago Art Institute in 1937. Soon after, without work and without money, Malden returned to Gary. This article is about the city. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... The Goodman Theatre in Chicagos Loop was founded in 1925 as a tribute to the Chicago playwright Kenneth Sawyer Goodman, who had died of pneumonia in 1918. ... DePaul University is a private institution of higher education and research in Chicago, Illinois, USA. Founded by the Vincentians in 1898, the university takes its name from the 17th century French priest who valued philanthropy, Saint Vincent de Paul. ... Steel Mill was one of Bruce Springsteens early bands and performed regularly on the Jersey Shore, in Virginia, and also in California from 1969 till January 1971. ... This article is about the city. ... This article is about the city. ...


Film career and character actor before and after World War II

His life in his hometown came to an end as he traveled to New York City, and found some more appropriate plays for the city. He first appeared as an actor on Broadway in 1937, then did some radio work, before becoming a movie character actor in 1940, where his first film was They Knew What They Wanted (1940). He also attended the Group Theatre where he began acting in many plays and was introduced to a young Elia Kazan, who would soon work with him on A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and On the Waterfront (1954). His acting career was interrupted by World War II and Malden served as a noncommissioned officer in the US 8th Air Force. While in the war, he was given a small role in the U.S. Army Air Forces play and film Winged Victory. After the war in 1945, he resumed his acting career, receiving yet another small supporting role in the play, Truckline Cafe, with a young, unknown actor, Marlon Brando. He also guest-starred in both The Ford Theatre and The Armstrong Circle Theatre. Jobs were getting harder to find for him as he was in his mid-30s and was about to give up. He received a co-starring role in the play, All My Sons with the help of director, Elia Kazan. With that success, he then crossed over into movies. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... A character actor is an actor, especially in motion pictures, who predominantly performs in similar roles throughout the course of a career. ... They Knew What They Wanted is a 1940 film with Carole Lombard, Charles Laughton, William Gargan, Harry Carey, and Karl Malden (in his film debut). ... Elia Kazan, (Greek: Ηλίας Καζάν, IPA: ), (September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) was a Greek-American film and theatre director, film and theatrical producer, screenwriter, novelist and cofounder of the influential Actors Studio in New York in 1947. ... A Streetcar Named Desire is an Academy Award-winning 1951 film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play of the same name by Tennessee Williams. ... On the Waterfront is an Oscar-winning American 1954 film about mob violence and corruption among longshoremen, and it has become a standard of its kind. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A non-commissioned officer (sometimes noncommissioned officer), or NCO, is an enlisted member of an armed force who has been delegated leadership or command authority by a commissioned officer. ... The Eighth Air Force was a World War II, United States Army Air Force unit, which carried out day-time bombing operations in western Europe from airfields in eastern England from 1942. ... The United States Army Air Forces, or USAAF, was a part of the U.S. military during World War II. The direct precursor to the U.S. Air Force, the USAAF formally existed between 1941 and 1947. ... Winged Victory is a play and, later, a film by Moss Hart, originally created and produced by the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II as a morale booster and as a fundraiser for the Army Emergency Relief Fund. ... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... Elia Kazan, (Greek: Ηλίας Καζάν, IPA: ), (September 7, 1909 – September 28, 2003) was a Greek-American film and theatre director, film and theatrical producer, screenwriter, novelist and cofounder of the influential Actors Studio in New York in 1947. ...


Film career: 1950s to 1970s

Malden resumed his film acting career in the 1950s, starting with The Gunfighter (1950), which followed by Halls of Montezuma (1950). The following year, he starred in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951), where he played Mitch, Stanley Kowalski's best friend and started a romance with Blanche DuBois (Vivian Leigh), On the Waterfront (1954), where he played a priest who influenced Terry Malloy (Marlon Brando) to testify against mobster-union boss Johnny Friendly (Lee J. Cobb). In Baby Doll (1956), he played a power-hungry sexual man who had been frustrated by a teenaged wife. Before and after he arrived in Hollywood, he starred in dozens of films of the late 1950s to the early 1970s, such as Fear Strikes Out (1957), Pollyanna (1960), Birdman of Alcatraz (1962), Gypsy (1962), How the West Was Won (1962), The Cincinnati Kid (1965), and Patton (1970), playing General Omar Bradley. After his last film, Summertime Killer (1972), roles were harder to find, however, he also starred in the made-for-television movie The Hijacking of the Achille Lauro (1989) (as Leon Klinghoffer). The Gunfighter was a 1950 film starring Gregory Peck and directed by Henry King. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... A Streetcar Named Desire is an Academy Award-winning 1951 film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play of the same name by Tennessee Williams. ... On the Waterfront is an Oscar-winning American 1954 film about mob violence and corruption among longshoremen, and it has become a standard of its kind. ... Baby Doll is a 1956 film which tells the story of the childlike bride of a Mississippi cotton gin owner, who becomes the pawn in a battle between her husband and his enemy. ... ... 1957 film based on Jimmy Piersalls autobiography by the same title. ... Pollyanna is a 1913 novel by Eleanor H. Porter that has become a classic of childrens literature. ... Birdman of Alcatraz is a 1962 film starring Burt Lancaster and directed by John Frankenheimer. ... Gypsy is a musical film made in 1962, about the life of striptease artist Gypsy Rose Lee, starring Rosalind Russell, Natalie Wood, and Karl Malden. ... How the West Was Won is an epic 1962 western film which follows four generations of a family (starting as the Prescotts) as they move ever westward, from western New York state to the Pacific Ocean. ... The Cincinnati Kid is a 1965 movie directed by Norman Jewison. ... Patton is a 1970 epic biographical film which tells the story of General George S. Pattons commands during World War II. It stars George C. Scott, Karl Malden, Michael Bates, and Karl Michael Vogler. ... Omar Nelson Bradley (February 12, 1893 – April 8, 1981) was one of the main U.S. Army field commanders in North Africa and Europe during World War II and a General of the Army of the United States Army. ... Leon Klinghoffer (September 24, 1916 – October 8, 1985) was a retired appliance manufacturer from New York who was disabled (from a stroke) and used a wheelchair for mobility. ...


Television work

The Streets of San Francisco

In 1972, Malden was approached by producer Quinn Martin about starring as Lt. Mike Stone in The Streets of San Francisco. Although the concept originated as a made-for-television movie, ABC quickly signed on to carry it as a series. Martin hired Michael Douglas to play Lt. Stone's young partner, Inspector Steve Keller. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Quinn Martin (May 22, 1922 – September 6, 1987), born Martin Cohn,[1] was one of the most successful American television producers. ... The Streets of San Francisco was a successful 1970s television police drama filmed on location in San Francisco, California, and produced by Quinn Martin Productions, with the first season produced in association with Warner Bros. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... For other people bearing this name, see Michael Douglas (disambiguation) Michael Kirk Douglas (born September 25, 1944) is an American actor and producer, primarily in movies and television. ...


On Streets, Malden played a widowed veteran cop with more than 20 years of experience who is paired with a young officer recently graduated from college. During its first season, it was a ratings winner among many other 1970s crime dramas, and served as ABC's answer to such shows as Hawaii Five-O, Ironside, Kojak, McMillan and Wife, Police Woman, The Rockford Files and Switch.[citation needed] This does not cite any references or sources. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... Hawaii Five-O is an American television series that starred Jack Lord and James MacArthur as detectives for a fictional Hawaii state police department. ... Ironside (originally broadcast under the name A Man Called Ironside in the United Kingdom) was a Universal television series which ran on NBC from March 28, 1967 to January 16, 1975. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... McMillan & Wife was a lighthearted American crime drama television series that aired on NBC from September 17th, 1971 to April 24th, 1977. ... Police Woman was an American television police drama starring Angie Dickinson that ran from 1974 to 1978 on NBC. It is considered the first successful primetime drama to feature a female lead, and a female as a police officer. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Switch was an American action-adventure television series that was broadcast on the CBS network for three seasons between 1975 and 1978. ...


During the second season, production shifted from Los Angeles to San Francisco. For his work as Lt. Stone, Malden was nominated for Emmys four times between 1974 and 1977 as Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series but never won. After two episodes in the fifth season, Douglas left the show to act in movies (also, in 1975 he had produced the film One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest); on the show, his character left police work for teaching. Lt. Stone's new partner was Inspector Dan Robbins, played by Richard Hatch. The show took a ratings nosedive, and ABC canceled The Streets of San Francisco after five seasons and 119 episodes. Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... An Emmy Award. ... One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest can refer to: One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest (novel), a 1962 fiction novel by Ken Kesey One Attempted to Fly Over the Cuckoos Nest But Didnt Give Himself Enough Clearing Room, (film), a 1975 film adaptation of the novel One... This article is about the actor. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... The Streets of San Francisco was a successful 1970s television police drama filmed on location in San Francisco, California, and produced by Quinn Martin Productions, with the first season produced in association with Warner Bros. ...


American Express

He famously delivered the line "Don't leave home without it!" in a series of US television commercials for American Express in the 1970s and 1980s. American Express (NYSE: AXP), sometimes known as AmEx or Amex, is a diversified global financial services company, headquartered in New York City. ...


Awards

Karl Malden won the 1951 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for A Streetcar Named Desire and was nominated in 1954 for his supporting role in On the Waterfront. Karl Malden is a past president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. In October of 2003, Malden was named the 40th recipient of the Screen Actors Guild's Life Achievement Award for career achievement and humanitarian accomplishment. The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Pickford Center for Motion Picture Study in Hollywood, California Founded on May 11, 1927 in California, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is a professional honorary organization dedicated to the advancement of the arts and sciences of motion pictures. ... The Screen Actors Guild (S.A.G.) is the labor union representing over 120,000 film actors in the United States. ...


On November 12, 2005, the L.A. Barrington Station renamed the building, Karl Malden Post Office, in Los Angeles, California, in honor of his proud achievements, which was followed by a passage of a bill founded by U.S. Congressman, Henry Waxman. Henry Arnold Waxman (born September 12, 1939 in Los Angeles, California) is an American politician. ...


For his contribution to the motion picture industry, Karl Malden has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6231 Hollywood Blvd. In 2005, he was inducted into the Western Performers Hall of Fame at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Buskers perform on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ... The Hall of Great Western Performers is a Hall of Fame at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States. ... Bronze Wrangler The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum is a museum and art gallery, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, housing one of the largest collections of: Western, American cowboy, American rodeo, and American Indian; art, artifacts, and archival materials, in the world. ... Downtown Oklahoma City The State Capitol of Oklahoma From The South Motto: Nickname: Capital of the New Century Founded 1889 Incorporated County Oklahoma County Cleveland County Canadian County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Mick Cornett Area  - Total  - Water 1,608. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Largest metro area Oklahoma City metro area Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ...

Awards
Preceded by
George Sanders
for All About Eve
Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor
1951
for A Streetcar Named Desire
Succeeded by
Anthony Quinn
for Viva Zapata!
Preceded by
Art Carney
for Terrible Joe Moran
Primetime Emmy Award for Supporting Actor - Miniseries or a Movie
1985
for Fatal Vision
Succeeded by
John Malkovich
for Death of a Salesman
Preceded by
Clint Eastwood
Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award
2004
Succeeded by
James Garner

George Sanders (July 3, 1906 – April 25, 1972) was an English actor in British and American films. ... For other uses, see All About Eve (disambiguation). ... The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the awards given to male actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... A Streetcar Named Desire is an Academy Award-winning 1951 film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play of the same name by Tennessee Williams. ... Anthony Quinn (April 21, 1915 Chihuahua, Mexico – June 3, 2001 Boston, Massachusetts) was a two-time Academy Award-winning Mexican-American actor, as well as a painter and writer. ... Viva Zapata! is a 1952 biographical drama film directed by Elia Kazan. ... Arthur William Matthew Carney (November 4, 1918 – November 9, 2003) was an Academy Award-winning American actor in film, stage, television, and radio. ... This is a list of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winners: 1979: Marlon Brando - Roots: The Next Generations 1980: George Grizzard - The Oldest Living Guard 1981: David Warner - Masada 1982: Laurence Olivier - Brideshead Revisited 1983: Richard Kiley - The Thorn Birds 1984: Art... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... John Gavin Malkovich (born December 9, 1953) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor, producer and director. ... Cover to the Penguin Group edition. ... Clint Eastwood (born Clinton Eastwood, Jr. ... The Screen Actors Guilds National Honors and Tributes Committee bestows an annual Life Achievement Award for outstanding achievement in fostering the finest ideals of the acting profession. ... James Garner (born April 7, 1928) is an American film and television actor. ...

Trivia

  • Malden often finds ways to say "Sekulovich" (his real last name) in the movies and television shows he appears in. For example, as General Omar Bradley in "Patton", as his troops slog their way through enemy fire in Sicily, Malden says "Hand me that helmet, Sekulovich" to another soldier.
  • He is a member of the United States Postal Service's 16-member Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee, which meets to review recommendations for U.S. commemorative postage stamps.[1]
  • When he won the Best Supporting Actor in 1951 for his role as Mitch in A Streetcar Named Desire, he had to rent a tuxedo for the Oscar ceremony. At the ceremony, he was sat behind Hollywood legend Humphrey Bogart, and when his name was announced as the winner, he gave his rented suit jacket to Bogart for him to look after. Later, backstage, he sought Bogart for his jacket, but when he couldn't find it he asked Bogart where it had gone. Bogart replied: 'Forget about the jacket, kid. You've just won an Oscar!' He later found his jacket and returned it to the store the following day.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... USPS and Usps redirect here. ... The United States Postal Services Citizens Stamp Advisory Committee (CSAC) is a committee whose purpose is to evaluate potential subjects for U.S. postage stamps, stamped post cards and postal stationery. ... A Streetcar Named Desire is an Academy Award-winning 1951 film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play of the same name by Tennessee Williams. ... Humphrey DeForest Bogart (December 25, 1899 – January 14, 1957) was an American actor. ...

Private life

In 1976, his father, Petar Sekulovich, died of old age. To honor the memory of his father, Malden had a big role in Twilight Time six years later. It was a private film that was watched by a few people.


Malden has been married to Mona Greenberg since December 18, 1938. Their marriage is the third longest in Hollywood history. Actor Charles Lane's marriage to Ruth Covell Lane, from 12 April 1931 until her death on 30 November 2002, was the longest. is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... “Hollywood” redirects here. ... Charles Lane (January 26, 1905 – July 9, 2007[1] ) was an American character actor seen in many movies and TV shows, and at the time of his death was the oldest living American actor. ...


Selected Filmography

They Knew What They Wanted is a 1940 film with Carole Lombard, Charles Laughton, William Gargan, Harry Carey, and Karl Malden (in his film debut). ... Winged Victory is a now out of print, 1934 novel by an English World War I fighter pilot named V.M. Yeates. ... Boomerang! is a 1947 film based on a true story about the early career of Attorney General Homer Cummings. ... Kiss of Death is a 1947 film noir movie written by Ben Hecht and Charles Lederer from a story by Eleazar Lipsky. ... The Gunfighter was a 1950 film starring Gregory Peck and directed by Henry King. ... Where the Sidewalk Ends is a 1950 film directed by Otto Preminger starring Dana Andrews, Gene Tierney, and Karl Malden. ... Halls of Montezuma is a 1950 World War II action/drama that follows a group of U.S. Marines from the beach to a Japanese rocket site through enemy infested jungles as their ex-school teacher leader is transformed into a battle veteran and his squad becomes a tight fighting... A Streetcar Named Desire is an Academy Award-winning 1951 film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play of the same name by Tennessee Williams. ... Ruby Gentry is a 1953 American film starring Jennifer Jones, Charlton Heston and Karl Malden and directed by King Vidor. ... I Confess is a 1953 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock starring Montgomery Clift as Fr. ... Take the High Ground! is a Korean War picture with Richard Widmark and Karl Malden as drill instructors who must transform a batch of everyday civilians into real combat soldiers. ... On the Waterfront is an Oscar-winning American 1954 film about mob violence and corruption among longshoremen, and it has become a standard of its kind. ... Baby Doll is a 1956 film which tells the story of the childlike bride of a Mississippi cotton gin owner, who becomes the pawn in a battle between her husband and his enemy. ... 1957 film based on Jimmy Piersalls autobiography by the same title. ... Bombers B-52 is a 1957 film starring Natalie Wood, Karl Malden, Efrem Zimbalist Jr. ... Time Limit is a 1957 court room drama directed by actor Karl Malden, it would be his only directing credit. ... These gallows in Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park are maintained by Arizona State Parks. ... Pollyanna is a 1913 novel by Eleanor H. Porter that has become a classic of childrens literature. ... Based on Robert Crichtons 1959 book by the same name, The Great Impostor is a 1961 movie based on the life of the con artist Ferdinand Waldo Demara. ... One-Eyed Jacks, a western movie released in 1961, is the only film directed by Marlon Brando, who replaced the original director, Stanley Kubrick. ... Parrish is a 1961 drama film made by Warner Bros. ... All Fall Down is an album by the speed-punk band Against All Authority. ... Birdman of Alcatraz is a 1962 film starring Burt Lancaster and directed by John Frankenheimer. ... How the West Was Won is an epic 1962 western film which follows four generations of a family (starting as the Prescotts) as they move ever westward, from western New York state to the Pacific Ocean. ... Gypsy is a musical film made in 1962, about the life of striptease artist Gypsy Rose Lee, starring Rosalind Russell, Natalie Wood, and Karl Malden. ... Come Fly with Me is a 1963 comedy film about three beautiful international airline stewardesses (see flight attendants) looking for romance and excitement. ... Dead Ringer, also known as Who is Buried in my Grave? is a 1964 thriller film made by Warner Bros. ... Cheyenne Autumn is a 1964 western starring Richard Widmark, Carroll Baker, James Stewart, and Edward G. Robinson. ... The Cincinnati Kid is a 1965 movie directed by Norman Jewison. ... Nevada Smith is a 1966 Western, released by Paramount Pictures, produced and directed by Henry Hathaway. ... Murderers Row (sometimes spelled Murderers Row) is the title of a 1966 American comedy-spy-fi motion picture starring Dean Martin and very loosely based upon the Matt Helm spy novel Murderers Row by Donald Hamilton, which was published in 1962. ... Hotel is a 1967 film adaptation of the novel Hotel written by Arthur Hailey. ... Billion-Dollar Brain (1966, ISBN 0099857103) is a spy novel by Len Deighton. ... For other uses, see Blue (disambiguation). ... Patton is a 1970 epic biographical film which tells the story of General George S. Pattons commands during World War II. It stars George C. Scott, Karl Malden, Michael Bates, and Karl Michael Vogler. ... The Cat o Nine Tails is a 1971 Italian mystery thriller. ... Wild Rovers is a 1971 film by Blake Edwards. ... 1979 Sequel to The Poseidon Adventure that follows a salvage crew and a band of terrorists that board the Poseidon looking for gold and a lost shipment of plutonium. ... Meteor (1979) is a film in which scientists detect an asteroid on a collision course with Earth and struggle with international, cold war politics in their efforts to prevent disaster. ... The 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team celebrates the goal that led them to victory over the USSR. The Miracle on Ice is the popular nickname for the mens ice hockey game in the 1980 Olympic Winter Games, in which a team of amateur and collegiate players from the... Il Mondo dellorrore di Dario Argento (Dario Argentos World of Horror) is an Italian documentary film, released in 1985, which chronicles the career of Italian horror and suspense movie director, Dario Argento. ... Nuts is a film about a strong-willed, high-class call girl (Streisand) that kills a customer in self-defense. ...

External links

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ...

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.usps.com/communications/organization/csac.htm

  Results from FactBites:
 
Karl Malden - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1387 words)
Karl Malden (born on March 22, 1912) is an Oscar-winning American actor, known for his bulbous nose and expansive manner who starred in both films, A Streetcar Named Desire and On the Waterfront, with the late Marlon Brando.
Malden was born to a Serbian father, Petar Sekulovich, who left San Francisco, California in 1910, to move to Eastern Indiana, where he worked as a factory worker in the steel mills, and Minnie Sevarian, a Czech mother, who was a seamstress, as Mladen Sekulovich in Gary, Indiana.
Karl Malden is a past president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
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