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Encyclopedia > Karaoke bar
A Karaoke machine
A Karaoke machine

Karaoke (カラオケ?kara, "empty" or "void", and オーケストラ ōkesutora, "orchestra") is a form of entertainment in which an amateur singer or singers sing along with recorded music on microphone. The music is typically of a well-known song in which the voice of the original singer is absent or reduced in volume. Lyrics are usually also displayed, sometimes including color changes synchronized with the music, on music video to guide the sing-along. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x1200, 110 KB)Karaoke machine Source: US Army File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x1200, 110 KB)Karaoke machine Source: US Army File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Recreation. ... Look up amateur in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ercole de Roberti: Concert, c. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... // The word microphone (Greek mikros small and phone voice or sound) originally referred to a mechanical hearing aid for small sounds. ... A song is a relatively short musical composition for the human voice (commonly accompanied by other musical instruments), which features words (lyrics). ... Volume is how much space a thing has. ... Lyrics are the words in songs. ... A music video is a short film or video that accompanies a complete piece of music, most commonly a song. ...


Karaoke has been a popular form of entertainment beginning first in Japan, then the rest of East Asia, since at least the 1980s, and has since spread to other parts of the world. East Asia is a subregion of Asia that can be defined in either geographical or cultural terms. ... The 1980s refers to the years of 1980 to 1989. ...

Contents

Word origin

Look up Karaoke in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

The Japanese word stems from the words kara (空) which is short for karano, meaning "empty", and oke which is short for ōkesutora, meaning "orchestra". The words together make a contraction literally meaning "empty orchestra". Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ...


This term used to be slang for media where pre-recorded music substitutes for a live performance, thus it is written in katakana. The term karaoke can be interpreted as "virtual orchestra" because one can specify a key to the music and start singing along without the presence of a live band or orchestra. In the United States, the word is often pronounced as /kɛriˈoʊki/, and in Britain /kæɹɪˈəʊkɪ/. The Japanese pronunciation is /kaɽaoke/. (These pronunciations are in IPA.) This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words see here. ...

Entrance Hall of a K-TV in Taipei
Entrance Hall of a K-TV in Taipei

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1840x1232, 727 KB) Description: de: Eingangshalle eines K-TV in Taipei. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1840x1232, 727 KB) Description: de: Eingangshalle eines K-TV in Taipei. ... Nickname: the City of Azaleas Government Official Website City of Taipei Mayor Ma Ying-jeou Capital District Xinyi Geographical characteristics Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 16 of 25 271. ...

History

It has been common to provide musical entertainment at a dinner or a party in Japan, as in the rest of the world, for a long time. This tradition appeared in the earliest Japanese mythology. For a long time, singing and dancing remained one of the few adult entertainments in rural areas. Noh was initially played at a tea party and guests were welcomed to join in for a cheer or a shout of praise. Dancing and singing was also a part of a samurai's education. It was expected that every samurai have a dance or a song they could perform. During the Taisho period, Utagoe Kissa, (literally song coffee shop), became popular and customers sung to a live performance of a music band. Japanese mythology is a complex system of beliefs. ... Noh performance at Itsukushima Shrine, Miyajima, Hiroshima Noh or Nō (Japanese: 能) is a major form of classical Japanese musical drama that has been performed since the 14th century. ... Japanese samurai in armour, 1860s. ... History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei The Taisho period (大正 Taishō, lit. ...


The karaoke industry started in Japan in the early 1970s when singer Daisuke Inoue (Inoue Daisuke) was asked by frequent guests in the Utagoe Kissa, where he performed, to provide a recording of his performance so that they could sing along on a company-sponsored vacation. Realizing the potential for the market, Inoue made a tape recorder that played a song for a 100-yen coin. This was the first karaoke machine. Instead of selling karaoke machines, he leased them out, so that stores did not have to buy new songs on their own. Originally it was considered a fad which was lacking the "live atmosphere" of a real performance. It was also regarded as somewhat expensive since 100 yen in the 1970s was the price of two typical lunches. However, it caught on as a popular entertainment. Karaoke machines were initially placed in restaurants or hotel rooms; soon, new businesses called Karaoke Box with compartmented rooms became popular. (See below "Public Places for Karaoke" and "Terms of Karaoke" for a description of karaoke boxes.) In 2004, Daisuke Inoue was awarded the tongue-in-cheek Ig Nobel Peace Prize for inventing karaoke, "thereby providing an entirely new way for people to learn to tolerate each other." The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... Inoue Daisuke invented the karaoke machine in 1971 but never bothered to patent it, losing his chance to become one of Japans richest men. ... In biochemistry, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is the precursor molecule to FADH2. ... The Ig Nobel Prizes are a parody of the Nobel Prizes and are given each year in early fall — a week or two before the recipients of the genuine Nobel Prizes are announced — for ten achievements that cannot or should not be reproduced. Sponsored by the scientific humor...


Early karaoke machines used cassette tapes but technological advances replaced this with CDs, VCDs, laserdiscs and, currently, DVDs. In 1992, Taito introduced the X2000 that fetched music via a dial-up telephone network. Its repertoire of music and graphics was limited, but the advantage of continuous updates and the smaller machine size saw it gradually replace traditional machines. Karaoke machines connected via fiber-optic links to provide instant high-quality music and video are becoming increasingly popular. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Video CD (aka VCD, VideoCD, View CD, Compact Disc digital video) is a standard digital format for storing video on a Compact Disc. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... DVD (commonly Digital Versatile Disc, previously Digital Video Disc) is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... The Taito Corporation (タイトー株式会社, taitou kabushikigaisha) TYO: 9646 is a Japanese developer of video game software and arcade hardware. ...

A big karaoke-box building in Tokyo, which was featured in the movie Lost In Translation.
A big karaoke-box building in Tokyo, which was featured in the movie Lost In Translation.

Karaoke soon spread to the rest of Asia and then to the United States in the 1990s. Facilities such as karaoke bars or "KTV boxes" provided the venue, equipment and software for amateur singers to entertain each other. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 692 KB) Description: Karaoke-Khan, Shinjuku, Tokyo. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 692 KB) Description: Karaoke-Khan, Shinjuku, Tokyo. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Lost in Translation is a film released in the United States on October 3, 2003. ...


Its popularity has spread rapidly to the United States, Canada and other Western countries. Some people still regard it as "hokey" and simply a method for the intoxicated to embarrass themselves, but as the novelty has worn off and the available selection of music has exploded, more and more people within the industry see it as a very profitable form of lounge and nightclub entertainment. It is not uncommon for some bars to have karaoke performances seven nights a week, commonly with much more high-end sound equipment than the small, standalone machines noted above. Dance floors and lighting effects are also becoming common sights in karaoke bars. Lyrics are often displayed on multiple TV sets around the bar, including big screens.


Technology

A basic karaoke machine consists of audio input, a means of altering the pitch of the music (not the singer) and an audio output. Some low-end machines attempt to provide vocal suppression so that one can feed regular songs into the machine and suppress the voice of the original singer, however this is not very effective (see below). Most common machines are audio mixers with microphone input built-in with CD+G, Video CD, Laser Disc, or DVD players. CD+G players use a special track called subcode to encode the lyrics and pictures displayed on the screen, while the other formats natively display both audio and video. In some countries, karaoke with video lyrics display capabilities is called KTV. A CD+G (also known as CD+Graphics) is a special audio compact disc that contains graphics data in addition to the audio data on the disc. ... Video CD (aka VCD, VideoCD, View CD, Compact Disc digital video) is a standard digital format for storing video on a Compact Disc. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... DVD (commonly Digital Versatile Disc, previously Digital Video Disc) is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... KTV, meaning karaoke television, is a variant of karaoke that is popular in East Asia, particularly in Taiwan, Hong Kong. ...


Most karaoke machines have technology that electronically changes the pitch of music so that amateur singers can sing along to any music source by choosing a key that is appropriate for their vocal range, while maintaining the original tempo of the song. (There were some very old systems that used cassettes, and these changed the pitch by altering playback speed, but none are still on the market, and their commercial use is virtually nonexistent.) Pitch is the perceived fundamental frequency of a sound. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Ercole de Roberti: Concert, c. ... Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ...


A popular game using karaoke is to randomly type in a number and call up a song, which participants take a turn to try to sing as much as they can. In some machines, this game is pre-programmed and may be limited to a genre so that they cannot call up an obscure national anthem that none of them can sing. This game has come to be called "Kamikaze Karaoke" in some parts of the United States and Canada. It has been suggested that Personnel involved in the development of World War II suicide attacks be merged into this article or section. ...


Many low-end entertainment systems (boom boxes etc) have a karaoke mode that attempts to remove the vocal track from general (non-karaoke) audio CDs. This is done by center removal which exploits the fact that in most music the vocals are in the center. This means that the voice, as part of the music, has equal volume on both stereo channels and no phase difference. To get the quasi-karaoke (mono) track the left channel of the original audio is subtracted from the right channel. The crudeness of that approach is reflected in the often poor performance of voice removal. Common effects are hearing the echo of the voice track (due to stereo echo being put on the vocals), and also other instruments that happen to be mixed into the center get removed (snare/bass drum, solo instruments), degrading this approach to hardly more than a gimmick in those devices. Label for 2. ...


MIDI applications and *.kar files

Some computer programs that serve a similar purpose to the standard karaoke machine have been developed that use MIDI instrumentation to generate the accompaniment rather than a recorded track. This has the advantage of making transposition technically trivial and also shrinks the information needed to provide the accompaniment to the point where it is easy to transfer it across the Internet, even over slow connections. The standard file format used is *.KAR, which is an extension of the standard .MID MIDI disk format which includes embedded lyrics and can be played unaltered by MIDI player software. Musical Instrument Digital Interface, or MIDI, is a system designed to transmit information between electronic musical instruments. ...


Video game

A karaoke game was initially released for the NES but its limited computing ability made for a short catalog of songs, and therefore reduced replay value. As a result, karaoke games were considered little more than collector's items until games saw release in higher-capacity DVD formats. Karaoke Revolution, created for the PlayStation 2 by Konami and released in North America in 2003, is a console game in which a single player sings along with on-screen guidance, and receives a score based on his or her pitch, timing, and rhythm. The game soon spawned four more versions, Karaoke Revolution Vol. 2, Karaoke Revolution Vol. 3, Karaoke Revolution Party Edition, and CMT Presents Karaoke Revolution: Country. While the original Karaoke Revolution was also eventually released for the Microsoft Xbox console in late 2004, the new online-enabled version included the ability to download additional song packs through the console's exclusive Xbox Live service. Nes is: A municipality in the county of Akershus in Norway, see Nes, Akershus. ... DVD (commonly Digital Versatile Disc, previously Digital Video Disc) is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... Karaoke Revolution, and its sequels Karaoke Revolution Volume 2, Karaoke Revolution Volume 3, Karaoke Revolution Party, and CMT Presents: Karaoke Revolution Country are Sony PlayStation 2, Nintendo GameCube, and Microsoft Xbox video games developed by Harmonix and published by Konami in its Bemani line of music games. ... The PlayStation 2 (PS2) ) is Sonys second video game console, the successor to the PlayStation and the predecessor to the PlayStation 3. ... Konami Corporation (コナミ) TYO: 9766 (NYSE: KNM) (SGX: K20) is a leading developer and publisher of numerous popular and strong-selling computer and video games. ... Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft. ... Xbox Live is a subscription-based online gaming service for Microsofts Xbox and Xbox 360 video game consoles. ...


A similar game, SingStar, published by Sony Computer Entertainment Europe, is particularly popular in the European and Australasian markets. Other similar titles in the rhythm-based game genre include Bemani's Dance Dance Revolution, GuitarFreaks, Donkey Konga, and DrumMania. SingStar is a karaoke video game for the PlayStation 2, published by Sony Computer Entertainment Europe and developed by SCEE and London Studio. ... Bemani (ビーマニ, biimani) is Konamis music video game division. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... GuitarFreaks (alternately GUITARFREAKS, abbreviated GF) is a 1998 arcade game created by Konami that is part of the Bemani series. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... DrumMania (alternately drummania, abbreviated DM) is a video game created by Konami as part of the Bemani series. ...


Karaoke VCD

The takeoff of Video CDs in East and Southeast Asia is partly due to the cheap but tolerable quality, and partly due to the popularity of karaoke. Many VCD players in Southeast Asia have built-in Karaoke function. If users disable the singer's voice and leave the music alone, they can play karaoke. In the past, there were only pop-song karaoke VCDs. Nowadays, different types of karaoke VCDs are available. Cantonese opera karaoke VCD is now a big hit among the elderly in Hong Kong. Video CD (aka VCD, VideoCD, View CD, Compact Disc digital video) is a standard digital format for storing video on a Compact Disc. ... World map showing the location of Asia. ... Cantonese opera is one of the major categories in Chinese opera, originating in southern Chinas Cantonese culture. ...


Karaoke on mobile phones

In 2003, several companies started offering a karaoke service on mobile phones, using a Java MIDlet that runs with a text file containing the words and a MIDI file with the music. This is still a budding service and it is unclear whether it will become popular; however, some Mobile Karaoke providers, such as Karaokini, have begun to achieve commercial success. Java is an object-oriented programming language developed by Sun Microsystems in the early 1990s. ... A MIDlet is a Java program for embedded devices, more specifically the J2ME virtual machine. ...


Karaoke on computers and Internet

Starting in 2003, much software has been released for hosting karaoke shows, and playing karaoke songs on a personal computer. Instead of having to carry around hundreds of CD-G's or laserdiscs, a KJ can 'rip' their entire library onto a hard drive, and play the songs and lyrics from that.


Additionally, new software permits singers to sing and listen to one another over the Internet with collaborators/audience from all around the world.


Various online karaoke websites provide the opportunity for karaoke enthusiasts to participate and share in a worldwide karaoke community. Users can create a personal, online karaoke profiles, which store their individual recordings and even allow video synching. Examples of free sites are www.bix.com and www.singshot.com.


Karaoke in automobiles

Chinese automobile maker, Geely Automobile, received much press in 2003 for being the first to equip a car, their "Beauty Leopard", with a karaoke machine as standard equipment. Karaoke is often also found as a feature in aftermarket in-car DVD players. Car redirects here. ... Geely logo Geely Automobile (吉利汽车, pronounced JEE-lee) (SEHK: 0175) was the first independent automobile manufacturer in the Peoples Republic of China, beginning in 1998, having acquired a minivan makers license. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Geely BL at the IAA 2005 in Frankfurt The Geely BL is a coupe automobile from Chinese manufacturer, Geely Automobile. ... DVD (commonly Digital Versatile Disc, previously Digital Video Disc) is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ...


Alternative playback devices

The CD+G format of karaoke disc, which contains the lyrics on a specially encoded subcode track, has heretofore required special—and expensive—equipment to play it. Commercial players have come down in price, though, and some unexpected devices (including the Sega Saturn videogame console) can decode the graphics; in fact, karaoke machines, including video and sometimes recording capability, are often popular electronics items for sale in toy stores and electronics stores. A CD+G (also known as CD+Graphics) is a special audio compact disc that contains graphics data in addition to the audio data on the disc. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... The Nintendo GameCube is an example of a popular video game console. ...


Additionally, there is software for Windows, Pocket PC, Linux, and Macintosh PCs that can decode and display karaoke song tracks, though usually these must be ripped off of the CD first, and possibly compressed. Recently, Karaoke software was also made available for mobile telephones, mainly in Asian countries. A CD ripper, CD grabber or CD extractor is a piece of software designed to extract raw digital audio (in format commonly called CDDA) from a compact disc to a file or other output. ...


In addition to CD+G and Software-based Karaoke, microphone-based Karaoke players enjoy popularity mainly in North America and some Asian countries such as the Philippines. Microphone-based Karaoke Players only need to be connected to a TV - and in some cases to a power outlet, in other cases they run on batteries. These devices often sport advanced features, such as pitch correction and special sound effects. Some companies offer Karaoke content for paid download to extend the song library in microphone-based Karaoke systems. World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ...


CD+G, DVD, VCD and microphone-based players are most popular for home use. Due to song selection and quality of recordings, CD+G is the most popular format for English and Spanish. It's also important to note that CD+G has limited graphical capabilities, whereas VCD and DVD usually have a moving picture or video background. VCD and DVD are the most common format for Asian singers due to music availability and largely due to the moving picture/video background.

Karaoke bar in Hamburg
Karaoke bar in Hamburg

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2949x1965, 2837 KB) Description:   en: Karaoke in the Irish Pub The Old Dubliner (http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2949x1965, 2837 KB) Description:   en: Karaoke in the Irish Pub The Old Dubliner (http://www. ... Hamburgs motto: May the posterity endeavour with dignity to conserve the freedom, which the forefathers acquired. ...

Public places for karaoke

In Asia, a Karaoke box (also called KTV or, in Korea, Noraebang) is the most popular type of karaoke venue. A karaoke box is a small or medium-sized room containing karaoke equipment for a group of friends to rent by timed increments, providing for a more intimate and less public atmosphere. Generally, entire businesses provide karaoke as their primary function, although karaoke machines are sometimes included in hotel or other business facilities. "Going to karaoke" is considered a first step in nanpa. Karaoke Box is a variant of karaoke that is popular in East Asia. ... NANPA can mean: the North American Numbering Plan Administrator [1] the North American Nature Photography Association [2] Nanpa also refers to the Japanese renai games of Dokyusei ...


A karaoke bar / karaoke restaurant / karaoke club / karaoke lounge is simply a bar or restaurant with karaoke equipment, so that people can sing publicly. This is the most common arrangement in North America and Europe. Many establishments offer karaoke on a weekly schedule, while some have shows every night. Such establishments commonly invest more in both equipment and song discs, and are often extremely popular, with an hour or more wait between a singer's opportunities to take the stage (called the 'rotation'). East Asian, North American and other Western karaoke arrangements are usually add-ons to an existing bar or social lounge. Most of these establishments allow patrons to sing for free, with the expectation that sufficient revenue will be made selling food and drink to the singers. Less commonly, the patron wishing to sing must pay a small fee for each song they sing. Tourists sit outside a bar in Chiang Mai, Thailand A Depression-era bar in Louisiana. ...


In some traditional Chinese restaurants, there are so-called "mahjong-karaoke rooms" where the elderly can play mahjong and teenagers can enjoy karaoke. The result is fewer complaints about boredom but more noise. Dim sum (Chinese: 點心; Cantonese IPA: dɪm2sɐm1; Pinyin: diǎnxīn; Wade-Giles: tien-hsin; literally dot heart or order heart, meaning order to ones hearts content; also commonly translated as touch the heart, dotted heart, or snack), a Cantonese term... Mahjong (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Cantonese: Màhjeung; or Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Cantonese: Màhjeuk; other common English spellings include mahjongg, majiang, and hyphenated forms such as mah-jong or mah-jongg) is a game for four players that originated in China. ...


Terms of karaoke

Karaoke using scenes from movies. Amateur actors replace their favorite movie star in popular movies. Ususally facilitated by software or remote control muting and screen blanking/freezing.


Gian

A character ("Jaian" in romaji, ジャイアン) from Doraemon, known for his highly questionable singing ability. Thus someone who loves karaoke but can only sing completely out of tune, is referred as a Gian, pronounced like giant, but without the t sound on the end. Japanese writing Kanji 漢字 Kana 仮名 Hiragana 平仮名 Katakana 片仮名 Uses Furigana 振り仮名 Okurigana 送り仮名 Romaji ローマ字 The title given to this article lacks diacritics because of certain technical limitations. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ...


Ohako (18th)

Some karaoke singers have one song which they are especially good at, and which they use to show off their singing abilities. It is called Ohako (十八番), meaning "18th", which refers to the 18 most popular kabuki plays. It is also used to mean being good at any entertainment such as dancing or playing an instrument. "Number 18" is slang in Korean and mildly obscene because going to karaoke was one of the few occasions where a male and a female could get together in Korea. The term took hold in Korea during the Japanese colonial period when varieties of entertainment were introduced. The Kabukiza in Ginza is one of Tokyos leading kabuki theaters. ... Slang is the use of highly informal words and expressions that are not considered standard in the speakers dialect or language. ... Korea under Japanese rule was the period of Japans de facto administrative control of Korea from 1910 to 1945. ...


In Hong Kong, such a song is called a "banquet song" (飲歌).


Karamovie or Movioke

Karaoke using scenes from movies. Amateur actors replace their favorite movie stars in popular movies. Usually facilitated by software or remote control muting and screen blanking/freezing. Karamovie originated in 2003 and is becoming popular world-wide.


KTV, Karaoke box, Noraebang

Main article: Karaoke Box

A KTV, Karaoke box, or Noraebang (Korean for "song room") is a venue where small, private rooms can be rented for singing. Karaoke Box is a variant of karaoke that is popular in East Asia. ...


Karaoke jockey or KJ

A Karaoke Jockey plays and manages the music for a venue. The role of the KJ often includes announcing song titles and whose turn it is to use the microphone.


Sing K

There is a new term originating from Hong Kong which refers to "going to a karaoke box"; karaoke is abbreviated as "K". This buzzword is now particularly prevalent in Chinese-speaking countries or regions like Hong Kong, Macau, Mainland China, Taiwan, and Singapore. In fact, there are other similar new terms, of which karaoke is identically shorted as a single "K", e.g.: The highlighted area in the map is what is commonly known as mainland China. Mainland China (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; literally The Chinese Massive Landmass or Continental China) is a geopolitical term which is usually synonymous with the area currently administered by the Peoples Republic of China (PRC...

  • The K King / The King of K: a man who is sophisticated in karaoke singing.
  • The K Queen / The Queen of K: a woman who is sophisticated in karaoke singing.
  • a K song: (1)similar to "Ohako" (see above); (2) a song which is designated for karaoke, particularly due to its easy-to-remember melody and smooth lyrics, which have a negative meaning.
  • KTV: Karaoke Music Video.
  • K lunch / K buffet: meals (buffet) served in karaoke boxes; people can sing songs while enjoying their food.
  • K hours: going to a karaoke box in happy hours, usually with special discounts.
  • K fun: karaoke discount coupons, or the act of going for karaoke

KTV, meaning karaoke television, is a variant of karaoke that is popular in East Asia, particularly in Taiwan, Hong Kong. ...

Bandoke

Karaoke for musicians. All band's members may perform their part along the pre-recorded backing. There are at least 16 tracks of each song on a DVD: the full performance and tracks with variations of missing instruments or lead vocals. The first Bandoke DVD is Hits Of Iron Maiden, produced in Finland by KSF. For decades, Pocket Songs has made similar recordings with one missing instrument - the series is called "Music Minus One". For other uses, see iron maiden. ...


Videoke

Video recording highlights of karaoke singers performing out in karaoke venues. It is not so important to capture the entire performance; just those spectacularly good, or bad, aspects.[citation needed]


Karaoke in fiction

Karaoke appears in a variety of fictional settings in Asia, often as a place young people gather for fun. The small size of a karaoke room makes for an intimate and simple setting.


Karaoke in film

Karaoke has been depicted in a variety of movies and television shows, including the 1996 comedy film The Cable Guy, the 1997 romantic comedy My Best Friend's Wedding, the 2006 Disney film High School Musical, Lost in Translation, and the 1997 Korean movie No. 3, a gangster comedy film, in which some of the characters are depicted drunk and singing off-key. Rush Hour 2 includes a karaoke performance by Chris Tucker, where he upstages one of the tone-deaf locals, by singing Michael Jackson's Don't Stop 'Til You Get Enough. Karaoke is central to the 2000 movie Duets, which was reasonably well researched, and presents the topic in a fairly positive light. Several episodes of Angel feature the demonic Karaoke bar Caritas, whose proprietor Lorne (Andy Hallett) can tell fortunes based on the songs he hears. Karaoke is the central theme of The Karaoke King, an independent film scheduled for release in 2006. Airplane! is considered by some critics to be one of the funniest movies of all time. ... For the comedian, see Larry the Cable Guy. ... My Best Friends Wedding is a 1997 romantic comedy film directed by P. J. Hogan. ... High School Musical is an American made-for-television musical film, produced and distributed by Disney Channel, and was released on January 20, 2006. ... Lost in Translation is a film released in the United States on October 3, 2003. ... No. ... For other uses, see Gangster (disambiguation). ... Airplane! is considered by some critics to be one of the funniest movies of all time. ... Rush Hour 2 is a 2001 martial arts/buddy cop film, starring Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker. ... Christopher Tucker (born August 31, 1972 in Atlanta, Georgia) is an American actor and comedian, whose distinctive characteristic is his high-pitched voice and portrayal of high-strung characters. ... For other people named Michael Jackson, see Michael Jackson (disambiguation). ... Dont Stop Til You Get Enough was the first big hit single to taken from Michael Jacksons 1979 Off The Wall album, which was his first album with Epic Records and the first he had real control over. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... Duets is a road-trip comedy film released in 2000, co-produced and directed by Bruce Paltrow. ... Angel is a spin-off from the American television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer. ... Andy Hallett (born August 4, 1975) is from the tiny Cape Cod village of Osterville, part of the town of Barnstable. ... The Karaoke King is a comedy film scheduled for release in 2006. ...


See also

ZookMan Characteroke system prototype. ...

External links


 
 

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