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Encyclopedia > Kapok
Kapok
Kapok planted in Honolulu, Hawaii
Kapok planted in Honolulu, Hawaii
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Malvales
Family: Malvaceae (Bombacaceae)
Genus: Ceiba
Species: C. pentandra
Binomial name
Ceiba pentandra
(L.) Gaertn.

Kapok (Ceiba pentandra) is a tropical tree of the order Malvales and the family Malvaceae (previously separated in the family Bombacaceae), native to Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, northern South America, and (as the variety C. pentandra var. guineensis) to tropical west Africa. The word is also used for the fibre obtained from its seed pods. The tree is also known as the Java cotton, Java kapok, or ceiba. It is a sacred symbol in Maya mythology. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 214 KB) Kapok planted in the Foster Botanical Garden, Honolulu, Hawaii. ... Honolulu as seen from the International Space Station Honolulu is the largest city and the capital of the U.S. state of Hawai‘i. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... Divisions Green algae Chlorophyta Charophyta Land plants (embryophytes) Non-vascular land plants (bryophytes) Marchantiophyta—liverworts Anthocerotophyta—hornworts Bryophyta—mosses †Horneophytopsida Vascular plants (tracheophytes) †Rhyniophyta—rhyniophytes †Zosterophyllophyta—zosterophylls Lycopodiophyta—clubmosses †Trimerophytophyta—trimerophytes Pteridophyta—ferns and horsetails Ophioglossophyta - adders-tongues Seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta—seed ferns Pinophyta—conifers Cycadophyta—cycads Ginkgophyta—ginkgo... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants or angiosperms are the most widespread group of land plants. ... Magnoliopsida is the botanical name for a class: this name is formed by replacing the termination -aceae in the name Magnoliaceae by the termination -opsida (Art 16 of the ICBN). ... Families Malvaceae (mallows,...) Dipterocarpaceae Sarcolaenaceae Cistaceae Muntingiaceae Bixaceae Diegodendraceae Cochlospermaceae Sphaerosepalaceae Thymelaeaceae Neuradaceae The Malvales are an order of flowering plants, mostly comprised of shrubs and trees. ... Subfamilies Bombacoideae Brownlowioideae Byttnerioideae Dombeyoideae Grewioideae Helicteroideae Malvoideae Sterculioideae Tilioideae Malvaceae is family of flowering plants containing Malva, the mallow genus, and its relatives. ... Adansonia – Baobab Bombax – Silk_cotton tree Ceiba – Kapok Durio – Durian Ochroma – Balsa The Bombacaceae is a family of tropical trees in the order Malvales, closely related to the mallow family (Malvaceae), and often included in it, being distinguishable from that family only by the smooth pollen... Species About 10-20 species, including: Ceiba aesculifolia Ceiba glaziovii Ceiba insignis Ceiba pentandra Ceiba speciosa Ceiba trichistandra Ceiba is the name of a genus of many species of large trees found in tropical areas, including Central and South America, The Bahamas,the Caribbean, West Africa, and Southeast Asia. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 23, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Joseph Gaertner (1732-1791; in German Joseph Gärtner) was a German botanist. ... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth. ... In scientific classification used in biology, the order (Latin: ordo, plural ordines) is a rank between class and family (termed a taxon at that rank). ... Families Malvaceae (mallows,...) Dipterocarpaceae Sarcolaenaceae Cistaceae Muntingiaceae Bixaceae Diegodendraceae Cochlospermaceae Sphaerosepalaceae Thymelaeaceae Neuradaceae The Malvales are an order of flowering plants, mostly comprised of shrubs and trees. ... The hierarchy of scientific classification In biological classification, family (Latin: familia, plural familiae) is a rank, or a taxon in that rank. ... Subfamilies Bombacoideae Brownlowioideae Byttnerioideae Dombeyoideae Grewioideae Helicteroideae Malvoideae Sterculioideae Tilioideae Malvaceae is family of flowering plants containing Malva, the mallow genus, and its relatives. ... Adansonia – Baobab Bombax – Silk_cotton tree Ceiba – Kapok Durio – Durian Ochroma – Balsa The Bombacaceae is a family of tropical trees in the order Malvales, closely related to the mallow family (Malvaceae), and often included in it, being distinguishable from that family only by the smooth pollen... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... “West Indian” redirects here. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For the meaning of fiber in nutrition, see dietary fiber. ... A ripe red jalapeño cut open to show the seeds For other uses, see Seed (disambiguation). ... // Look up pod in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Species About 10-20 species, including: Ceiba aesculifolia Ceiba glaziovii Ceiba insignis Ceiba pentandra Ceiba speciosa Ceiba trichistandra Ceiba is the name of a genus of many species of large trees found in tropical areas, including Central and South America, The Bahamas,the Caribbean, West Africa, and Southeast Asia. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Kapok pod showing kapok fibres inside
Kapok pod showing kapok fibres inside

The tree grows to 60-70 m (200-230 ft) tall and has a very substantial trunk up to 3 m (10 ft) in diameter with buttresses. The trunk and many of the larger branches are densely crowded with very large, robust simple thorns. The leaves are compound of 5 to 9 leaflets, each up to 20 cm (8 in) and palm like. Adult trees produce several hundred 15 cm (6 in) seed pods. The pods contain seeds surrounded by a fluffy, yellowish fiber that is a mix of lignin and cellulose. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1888x1508, 510 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Ceiba ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1888x1508, 510 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Ceiba ... Raised thorns on the stem of the wait-a-bit climber Prickles on rose stems Thorns of the Ocotillo A spine is a rigid, pointed surface protuberance or needle-like structure on an animal, shell, or plant, presumably serving as a defense against attack by predators. ... Look up foliage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Lignin (sometimes lignen) is a chemical compound (complex, highly cross-linked aromatic polymer) that is most commonly derived from wood and is an integral part of the cell walls of plants, especially in tracheids, xylem fibres and sclereids. ... Cellulose as polymer of β-D-glucose Cellulose in 3D Cellulose (C6H10O5)n is a polysaccharide of beta-glucose. ...

Contents

Uses

The fibre is light, very buoyant, resilient, highly flammable and resistant to water. The process of harvesting and separating the fibre is labour-intensive and manual. It cannot be spun but is used as an alternative to down as filling in mattresses, pillows, upholstery, teddy bears, zafus and for insulation. It was previously much used in life jackets and similar devices. The fibre has been largely replaced by man-made materials. The seeds produce an oil used locally in soap and that can be used as fertilizer. In physics, buoyancy is the upward force on an object produced by the surrounding fluid (i. ... A symbol for flammable chemicals Flammability is the ease with which a substance will ignite, causing fire or combustion. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A hand-turned spinning wheel in action Cones of yarn for industrial use Z-twist and S-twist yarns Spinning is the process of creating yarn (or thread, rope, cable) from various raw fiber materials. ... The down of birds is a layer of fine feathers found under the tougher exterior feathers. ... A pillow top queen-size mattress. ... Decorative tapestry pillow A pillow is a large cushion support for the head, usually used while sleeping in a bed, or for the body as used on a couch or chair. ... Upholstery is the work of providing furniture, especially seats, with padding, springs, webbing, and fabric or leather covers. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A zafu or zafubuton (jp. ... Thermal insulation on the Huygens probe The term thermal insulation can refer to materials used to reduce the rate of heat transfer, or the methods and processes used to reduce heat transfer. ... It has been suggested that floatation suits be merged into this article or section. ... Synthetic motor oil An oil is any substance that is in a viscous liquid state (oily) at ambient temperatures or slightly warmer, and is both hydrophobic (immiscible with water, literally water fearing) and lipophilic (miscible with other oils, literally fat loving). This general definition includes compound classes with otherwise unrelated... A collection of decorative soaps used for human hygiene purposes. ... Spreading manure, an organic fertilizer Fertilizers (also spelled fertilisers) are compounds given to plants to promote growth; they are usually applied either via the soil, for uptake by plant roots, or by foliar feeding, for uptake through leaves. ...


In Southeast Asian countries kapok has larger seed pods and the fibre which is highly flammable is used as a fuel in fire pistons, in Thailand called taban fai ตะบันไฟ. Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ...


The commercial tree is most heavily cultivated in Asia, notably in Java (hence its nicknames), Malaysia, and Indonesia, but also in the Philippines and South America. World map showing the location of Asia. ... Java (Indonesian, Javanese, and Sundanese: Jawa) is an island of Indonesia, and the site of its capital city, Jakarta. ...


A similar fibre is found in the Indian Bombax ceiba (also known as Bombax malabaricum or "silk-cotton tree"). It is termed Indian kapok and is darker in colour and less buoyant than the true variety. Species Bombax buonopozense Bombax ceiba And six other species Silk cotton trees comprise eight species in the genus Bombax, native to tropical southern Asia, northern Australia and tropical Africa. ...


This tree is the official national tree of Puerto Rico.


Ethnomedical uses

Ceiba pentandra bark decoction has been used as a diuretic, aphrodisiac, and to treat headache, as well as type II diabetes. A decoction is a method of extraction of herbal or plant material, which includes, but is not limited to: Leaves, flowers, stems, roots, bark, and rhizomes. ... A diuretic (colloquially called a water pill) is any drug or herb that elevates the rate of bodily urine excretion (diuresis). ... An aphrodisiac is an agent which is used to increase sexual desire [1]. The name comes from the Greek goddess of Sensuality Aphrodite. ... See diabetes mellitus for further general information on diabetes. ...


References

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Ceiba pentandra
  • Germplasm Resources Information Network: Ceiba pentandra
  • The larger seed pods of SEA kapok and its use as a fuel in fire pistons

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Gallery


  Results from FactBites:
 
kapok - definition of kapok in Encyclopedia (300 words)
Kapok (Ceiba pentandra) is a tropical tree of the order Malvales and the family Malvaceae (previously separated in the family Bombacaceae), native to northern South America, Central America and the Caribbean, and (as the variety C.
The tree is also known as the Java Cotton, Java Kapok, or Silk-cotton tree.
A similar fibre is found in the Indian Bombax malabarica, it is termed Indian kapok and is darker in colour and less buoyant than the true variety.
Kapok (1340 words)
Kapok is the fine, silkily lustrous fruit fibers from the fruit walls of the capsules, 10 - 20 cm in length and 3 cm in thickness, of the kapok tree (Ceiba pentandra).
Kapok fibers are thus used as stuffing for upholstery, bedding and for acoustic and thermal insulation.
Kapok hairs are not wettable and are thus used for filling life jackets and life belts because the large, air-filled lumen ensures that the kapok fibers have a low density and good buoyancy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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