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Encyclopedia > Kansas City, Missouri
City of Kansas City
Official flag of City of Kansas City
Flag

Seal
Nickname: "KC", "City of Fountains", "Heart of the Nation"
Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri.
Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri.
Coordinates: 39°06′35″N 94°35′19″W / 39.10972, -94.58861
Country United States of America
State Missouri
Counties Jackson
Clay
Platte
Cass
Incorporated March 28, 1853
Government
 - Mayor Mark Funkhouser
Area
 - City 318.0 sq mi (823.7 km²)
 - Land 313.5 sq mi (812.1 km²)
 - Water 4.5 sq mi (11.6 km²)
 - Urban 584.4 sq mi (1,513.6 km²)
Elevation 910 ft (277 m)
Population (2006)[1][2][3]
 - City 447,306
 - Density 1,406.6/sq mi (543/km²)
 - Urban 1,361,744
 - Metro 1,947,694
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Area code(s) 816
FIPS code 29-38000GR2
GNIS feature ID 0748198GR3
Website: http://www.kcmo.org/

Kansas City is the largest city in the state of Missouri. It encompasses parts of Jackson, Clay, Cass, and Platte counties and is the anchor city of the Kansas City Metropolitan Area, the second largest in Missouri, which includes counties in both Missouri and Kansas. As of 2006, the city had an estimated population of 447,306[4], with a metro area of nearly two million.[5] Kansas City was founded in 1838 as the "Town of Kansas"[6] at the confluence of the Missouri and Kansas rivers and was incorporated in its present form in 1850. Situated opposite Kansas City, Kansas, the city was the location of several battles during the Civil War, including the Battle of Westport. The city is well known for its contributions to the musical styles of jazz and blues as well as to cuisine (Kansas City-style barbecue). Image File history File linksMetadata Kcskylinebridge. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links KCMOSeal. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... Image File history File links Clay_County_Missouri_Incorporated_and_Unincorporated_areas_Kansas_City_Highlighted. ... Jackson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... Clay County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... Platte County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... Cass County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Missouri has 114 counties and one independent city. ... Jackson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... Clay County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... Platte County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... Cass County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... A Municipal Corporation is a legal defintion for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, and towns. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Mayor of Kansas City has his office on the 29th floor of the Kansas City City Hall which is the highest occupiable floor in the building The Mayor of Kansas City, Missouri is the highest official in the Kansas City, Missouri Municipal Government. ... Mark Funkhouser (born 1950)[1] is the mayor-elect of Kansas City, Missouri, and a former city auditor for the same. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Area Code 816 is an area code in the state of Missouri that covers the Kansas City Metropolitan Area and the city of St. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Jackson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... Clay County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... Cass County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... Platte County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... Kansas City satellite map The Kansas City Metropolitan Area is a metropolitan area situated at the confluence of the Kansas and Missouri Rivers, sometimes known as (Kaw Point). ... Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Look up confluence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... The Kansas River near De Soto Kaw River (map) looking southward from middle of Turner Diagonal bridge. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: Location in Wyandotte, County in the state of Kansas. ... Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Samuel R. Curtis Sterling Price Strength Army of the Border (22,000) Army of Missouri (8,500) Casualties 1,500 1,500 Cannon at Loose Park. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Blues music redirects here. ... Cuisine (from French cuisine, cooking; culinary art; kitchen; ultimately from Latin coquere, to cook) is a specific set of cooking traditions and practices, often associated with a specific culture. ... Kansas City-style barbecue plate. ...

Contents

Abbreviations and nicknames

Kansas City Skyline from Liberty Memorial
Kansas City Skyline from Liberty Memorial

Kansas City, Missouri, is often abbreviated as "KCMO", or simply "KC" (both abbreviations often refer to the metro area). It is officially nicknamed the City of Fountains, with over 200 examples, the city claims to have second most in the world, just behind Rome.[7] The city also has more boulevards than any city except Paris and has often been called "Paris on the Plains." Informal nicknames include BBQ Capital of the World, and residents are known as Kansas Citians. It is sometimes referred to colloquially as the Heart of America as it is near both the geographic and population centers of the United States. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Kansas City satellite map The Kansas City Metropolitan Area is a metropolitan area situated at the confluence of the Kansas and Missouri Rivers, sometimes known as (Kaw Point). ... Fountain is also the name of an artwork by Marcel Duchamp An ornamental lit fountain photographed at night for about 6 seconds. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... A member of the Airpork Crew barbecue team prepares pork shoulder at the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. ... This is a list of geographic centers of each U.S. state: See also Extreme points of the United States Extreme points of each U.S. state List of U.S. states by elevation List of highest points of Canadian provinces and territories Extreme points of Canada Categories: | ...


History

Kansas City Pioneer Square monument in Westport features Pony Express founder Alexander Majors, Westport/Kansas City founder John Calvin McCoy and Mountainman Jim Bridger who owned Chouteau's Store next to Kelly's
Kansas City Pioneer Square monument in Westport features Pony Express founder Alexander Majors, Westport/Kansas City founder John Calvin McCoy and Mountainman Jim Bridger who owned Chouteau's Store next to Kelly's

Kansas City, Missouri was incorporated in 1850. The territory straddling the border between Missouri and Kansas at the confluence of the Kansas and Missouri rivers was considered a good place to build settlements. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2337x2001, 722 KB) Summary Kansas City memorial in Pioneer Square at Westport Road and Broadway. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2337x2001, 722 KB) Summary Kansas City memorial in Pioneer Square at Westport Road and Broadway. ... Frank E. Webner, pony express rider c. ... Alexander Majors (1814 - 1900) was a U.S. businessman, often credited along with William Hepburn Russell and William B. Waddel as the founders, owners, and operators of the Pony Express. ... John Calving McCoy (center) is honored along with Alexander Majors (left) and Mountainman James Bridger at Pioneer Square in Westport in Kansas City. ... Jim Bridger Jim Bridger (right) is honored along with Pony Express founder Alexander Majors (left) and Kansas City founder John Calvin McCoy at Pioneer Square in Westport in Kansas City. ... The History of Kansas City of Missouri and Kansas (and surrounding communities) dates back to the 1800s. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Kansas City satellite map The Kansas City Metropolitan Area is a metropolitan area situated at the confluence of the Kansas and Missouri Rivers, sometimes known as (Kaw Point). ...


Exploration and settlement

The first documented European visit to Kansas City was Étienne de Veniard, Sieur de Bourgmont, who was also the first European to explore the lower Missouri River. Criticized for his handling of a Native American attack of Fort Detroit, he had deserted his post as commander of the fort and was avoiding the French authorities. Bourgmont lived with a Native American wife in the Missouri village about 90 miles east near Brunswick, Missouri, and illegally traded furs. Étienne de Veniard, Sieur de Bourgmont (April 1679-1734) was a French explorer who made the first maps and documentation of the Missouri and Platte rivers. ... Fort Pontchartrain du Détroit or Fort Detroit was a fort established by the French officer Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac in 1701. ... Otoe-Missouria tribal flag The Missouri or Missouria were an aboriginal tribe that inhabited parts of the midwestern United States before European explorers arrived. ... Brunswick is a city located in Chariton County, Missouri. ...


In order to clear his name, he wrote "Exact Description of Louisiana, of Its Harbors, Lands and Rivers, and Names of the Indian Tribes That Occupy It, and the Commerce and Advantages to Be Derived Therefrom for the Establishment of a Colony" in 1713 followed in 1714 by "The Route to Be Taken to Ascend the Missouri River." In the documents he describes the junction of the "Grande Riv[iere] des Cansez" and Missouri River, being the first to refer to them by those names. French cartographer Guillaume Delisle used the descriptions to make the first reasonably accurate map of the area. Guillaume Delisle (February 28, 1675 - January 25, 1726) was a French cartographer, born in Paris, France (he also died there). ...


The Spanish took over the region in the Treaty of Paris (1763) but were not to play a major role in the area other than taxing and licensing all traffic on the Missouri River. The French continued their fur trade on the river under Spanish license. The Chouteau family operated under the Spanish license at St. Louis in the lower Missouri Valley as early as 1765, but it would be 1821 before the Chouteaus reached Kansas City, when François Chouteau established Chouteau's Landing. The Treaty of Paris, often called the Peace of Paris, or the Treaty of 1763, was signed on February 10, 1763, by the kingdoms of Great Britain, France and Spain, with Portugal in agreement. ... Chouteau was the name of French fur-trading family in the Midwest. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... Missouri Valley may refer to: Missouri Valley, Iowa Missouri River This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... François Gesseau Chouteau (1797 - 1838) is traditionally credited as being the founder of Kansas City, Missouri. ...


After the Louisiana Purchase, Lewis and Clark visited the confluence of the Kansas and Missouri rivers, noting it was a good place to build a fort. For the musical, see Louisiana Purchase (musical) and Louisiana Purchase (film). ... The Lewis and Clark expedition (1804-1806) was the first American overland expedition to the Pacific coast and back. ...


In 1833 John McCoy established West Port along the Santa Fe Trail, three miles away from the river. Then in 1834, McCoy established Westport Landing on a bend in the Missouri River to serve as a landing point for West Port. Soon after, the Kansas Town Company, a group of investors, began to settle the area, taking their name from an English spelling of "Cansez." In 1850 the landing area was incorporated as the Town of Kansas.[8] John Calving McCoy (center) is honored along with Alexander Majors (left) and Mountainman James Bridger at Pioneer Square in Westport in Kansas City. ... Kansas City Pioneer Square monument in Westport features Pony Express founder Alexander Majors, Westport/Kansas City founder John Calvin McCoy and Mountainman Jim Bridger who owned Chouteaus Store next to Kellys Kellys at 500 Westport Road or neighboring Chouteaus Store at 504 Westport are considered to... Trail logo The Santa Fe Trail was an historic 19th century transportation route across southwestern North America connecting Missouri with Santa Fe, New Mexico. ... Kansas City Pioneer Square monument in Westport features Pony Express founder Alexander Majors, Westport/Kansas City founder John Calvin McCoy and Mountainman Jim Bridger who owned Chouteaus Store next to Kellys Kellys at 500 Westport Road or neighboring Chouteaus Store at 504 Westport are considered to...


By that time, the Town of Kansas, Westport, and nearby Independence, had become critical points in America's westward expansion. Three major trails -- the Santa Fe, California, and Oregon -- all originated in Jackson County. A government map, probably created in the mid-20th century, that depicts a simplified history of territorial acquisitions within the continental United States. ... Historical roads and trails of the United States is a list of roads and trails important to the settlement and development of the United States including those used by the American Indians. ... Trail logo The Santa Fe Trail was an historic 19th century transportation route across southwestern North America connecting Missouri with Santa Fe, New Mexico. ... Main route of California Trail (thick red line), including Applegate-Lassen and Beckwourth variations (thinner red lines) The California Trail was a major overland emigrant route across the Western United States from Missouri to California in the middle 19th century. ... The Ox Team or the Old Oregon Trail 1852-1906 by Ezra Meeker. ... Jackson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ...


On February 22, 1853, the City of Kansas was created with a newly elected mayor. It had an area of 0.70 square miles and a population of 2,500. The boundary lines at that time extended from the middle of the Missouri River south to what is now Ninth Street, and from Bluff Street on the west to a point between Holmes Road and Charlotte Street on the east.[9] is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Civil War

The area was ripe with animosity as the Civil War approached. As citizens of a slave state, Missourians tended to sympathize with the southern states. With Kansas petitioning to enter the Union under the new doctrine of popular sovereignty, many from the area crossed into Kansas to sway the state towards allowing slavery, at first by ballot box and then by bloodshed. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The free and slave states as of 1861, with free states in blue and slave states in red. ... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Pooybuttpular sovereignty is the doctrine that the state is created by and therefore subject to the will of its people, who are the source of all political power. ... Slave redirects here. ...

Bird's eye view of Kansas City, Missouri. Jan. 1869. Drawn by A. Ruger, Merchants Lith. Co., currently located at the Irish Museum and Cultural Center in Union Station

During the Civil War, the City of Kansas was in the midst of battles, almost all of them victories by the Union. The Battle of Independence in August 1862 stunted a Confederate advance into northern Missouri (settled by pro-slavery Virginians), and the October 1864 Battle of Westport effectively ended Confederate efforts to occupy the city. However, a successful raid on nearby Lawrence, Kansas, led by William Quantrill forced General Thomas Ewing to issue General Order No. 11, forcing the eviction of residents in four counties, including Jackson, except those living in the city and nearby communities and those whose allegiance to the Union was certified by Ewing. Image File history File links Kansas_city_mo_1869. ... Image File history File links Kansas_city_mo_1869. ... The Irish Museum and Cultural Center is the newest addition to Kansas Citys Irish American community. ... The First Battle of Independence was a battle of the American Civil War, occurring on August 11, 1862 in Jackson County, Missouri. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Samuel R. Curtis Sterling Price Strength Army of the Border (22,000) Army of Missouri (8,500) Casualties 1,500 1,500 Cannon at Loose Park. ... Lawrence is a river city in and the seat of Douglas County, Kansas, United States, 41 miles (66 km) west of Kansas City, along the banks of both the Kansas (Kaw) and Wakarusa Rivers. ... William Clark Quantrill of Quantrills Raiders William Clarke Quantrill (July 31, 1837 – June 6, 1865), was a Confederate guerrilla leader during the American Civil War. ... Thomas Ewing, Jr. ... General Order No. ...

Walnut St., Downtown Kansas City, Mo. 1906

Image File history File links Walnut-street-kcmo-1906. ... Image File history File links Walnut-street-kcmo-1906. ...

Post-Civil War

After the Civil War, the City of Kansas grew rapidly. The selection of the city over Leavenworth, Kansas, for the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad bridge over the Missouri River brought about significant growth. The population exploded after 1869, when the Hannibal Bridge, designed by Octave Chanute, opened. The boom prompted a name change to Kansas City in 1889 and the city limits to extend south and east. Westport became part of Kansas City on December 2, 1897. Leavenworth redirects here. ... Hannibal and St. ... Octave Chanute Octave Chanute (18 February 1832 - November 23, 1910) was a French-born American railroad engineer and aviation pioneer. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Kansas City, guided by architect George Kessler, became a forefront example of the City Beautiful movement, developing a network of boulevards and parks around the city. The relocation of Union Station to its current location in 1914 and the opening of the Liberty Memorial in 1923 gave the city two of its most identifiable landmarks. Further spurring Kansas City's growth was the opening of the innovative Country Club Plaza development by J.C. Nichols in 1925 as part of his Country Club District plan. George Kessler After his career in various mercenary troops like South Africa mercenaries and French Foreign Legion, in the Zanzibar Independence War, (commonly referred to as War of the Mercenaries) he was severely wounded in his right thigh, and his professional military career was over. ... The City Beautiful movement was a Progressive reform movement in North American architecture and urban planning that flourished in the 1890s and 1900s with the intent of using beautification and monumental grandeur in cities to counteract the perceived moral decay of poverty-stricken urban environments. ... Kansas City Union Station in Kansas City, Missouri is one of many union stations in the United States. ... Liberty Memorial Liberty Memorial, in Kansas City, is dedicated to the victory of liberty over oppression, in World War I against the Triple Alliance. ... Kansas Citys Country Club Plaza The Country Club Plaza (often referred to as the Plaza) is an upscale shopping district in Kansas City, Missouri, USA. It was the second shopping center in the world designed to accommodate shoppers arriving by automobile. ... Jesse Clyde Nichols (August 23, 1880 - February 16, 1950), better known as J. C. Nichols, was a prominent developer of commercial and residential real estate in Kansas City. ... J.C. Nicholss home in Sunset Hill, located on West 55th Street between Ward Parkway and State Line Road The Country Club District is the name of a group of neighborhoods comprising an upscale, historic residential district in Kansas City, Missouri, and Johnson County, Kansas, USA, developed by noted...


Pendergast era

At the turn of the century, political machines attempted to gain clout in the city, with the one led by Tom Pendergast emerging as the dominant machine by 1925. A new city charter passed that year made it easier for his Democratic Party machine to gain control of the city council (slimmed from 32 members to nine) and appoint a corrupt city manager. Several important buildings and structures were built during this time, to assist with the great depression-- all led by Pendergast, including the Kansas City City Hall and the Jackson County Courthouse-- both added new skyscrapers to the city's growing skyline. The machine fell in 1939 when Pendergast, riddled with health problems, pleaded guilty to tax evasion. The machine, however, gave rise to Harry S. Truman, who quickly became Kansas City's favorite son. Fin de siècle is French for End of the Century. The term turn-of-the-century is sometimes used as a synonym, but is more neutral (lacking some or most of the connotations described below), and can include the first years of a new century. ... Thomas Joseph Pendergast (July 22, 1873 – January 26, 1945) controlled Kansas City as a political boss. ... The Kansas City, Missouri City Hall, in Kansas City, Missouri, is a skyscraper located in downtown Kansas City and the official seat of government for the city of Kansas City, Missouri. ... This article contrasts tax evasion, tax avoidance, tax resistance and tax mitigation. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ...


Post-World War II sprawl

After World War II, the city experienced considerable sprawl, as the affluent populace left for suburbs like Johnson County, Kansas, and eastern Jackson County, Missouri. However, many also went north of the Missouri River, where Kansas City had incorporated areas between the 1940s to 1970s. The population of the urban core significantly dipped, while the city as a whole gained population. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... Johnson County (standard abbreviation: JO) is a county located in the state of Kansas. ... Jackson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


The sprawl of the city mainly took shape after the "race riots" of the Civil Rights Movement in Kansas City. At this time, slums were also beginning to form in the inner city, and those who could afford to leave, left for the suburbs and outer edges of the city. The post-WWII idea of suburbs and the "American Dream" also contributed to the sprawl of the area. As the city continued to sprawl, the inner city also continued to decline.


In 1940, the city had about 400,000 residents; by 2000, the same area was home to only about 180,000. From 1940 to 1960, the city more than doubled its physical size, while increasing its population by only about 75,000. By 1970, the city had a total area of approximately 316 square miles, more than five times its size in 1940.


The future for sprawl in Kansas City is uncertain. Johnson County has continued to sprawl at a constant rate, and Clay County, Missouri, also has begun to sprawl once more. However recent revelations in urban planning have slowed sprawl and focused instead on the inner city, existing infrastructure and housing, as well as reviving the city's formerly blighted downtown. Uses of the New Urbanism style of planning is now also occurring in some of the most prominent suburban projects. The New urbanism is an American urban design movement that arose in the early 1980s. ...


Notable Kansas City residents/natives

  • Walt Disney moved to Kansas City and established his first animation studio, Laugh-O-Gram Studio, at E 31st Street and Forest Avenue in 1923
  • Jean Harlow, American film actress and sex symbol of the 1930s
  • John Kander, American composer of a series of musical theatre successes as part of the songwriting team of Kander and Ebb
  • Aaron Yates, rap and hip-hop artist, known by his pseudonym, Tech N9ne

For other persons named Robert Altman, see Robert Altman (disambiguation). ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... This biographical article needs additional references for verification. ... Thomas Hart Benton, painter Thomas Hart Benton, or Tom Benton (April 15, 1889 - January 19, 1975) was an American muralist of the Regionalist school. ... Noah Beery (January 17, 1882 - April 1, 1946) was an American actor. ... Wallace Beery (April 1, 1885 – April 15, 1949) was an American actor, best known for his many cinema appearances. ... Charles Ragland Bunnell (born in Kansas City, Missouri in 1897, died in Colorado in 1968), was an American painter, printmaker, and muralist. ... Don Cheadle (born November 29, 1964) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Evan S. Connell (b. ... Christopher W. Cooper (born July 9, 1951) is an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... For other persons named Joan Crawford, see Joan Crawford (disambiguation). ... Walter Leland Cronkite, Jr. ... For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... Laugh-O-Gram Studio in Kansas City. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... David Timothy Dreier (born July 5, 1952), American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since January 1981, representing Californias 26th congressional district (map). ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... David F. Duncan, Dr. P.H. was Born in Kansas City, Missouri on June 26, 1947. ... Anthony Kevin Tony Dungy (born October 6, 1955) is a former professional American football player and the current head coach of the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League. ... Eddie Griffin (July 15, 1968) is an American comedian and television/film actor. ... Joyce C. Hall, founder of Hallmark Cards. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Jean Harlow (March 3, 1911 – June 7, 1937) was an American film actress and sex symbol of the 1930s. ... Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... The Kansas City Star is a newspaper in Kansas City, Missouri. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Clarence M. Kelley (October 24, 1911 - August 5, 1997) was a public servant and former director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. ... John Harold Kander (born March 18, 1927 in Kansas City, Missouri) is the American composer of a series of musical theatre successes as part of the songwriting team of Kander and Ebb. ... Ewing Marion Kauffman (September 21, 1916-August 1, 1993) was an American pharmaceutical magnate, philanthropist, and Major League Baseball owner. ... Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmacon is drug, and logos is science) is the study of how chemical substances interfere with living systems. ... An entrepreneur (a loanword from French introduced and first defined by the Irish economist Richard Cantillon) is a person who operates a new enterprise or venture and assumes some accountability for the inherent risks. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1969–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 10, 20, 42 Name Kansas City Royals (1969–present) Other nicknames The Boys in Blue Ballpark Kauffman Stadium (1973–present) a. ... Patrick Bruce Metheny (born August 12, 1954 in Lees Summit, Missouri) is an American jazz guitarist and composer. ... Mancows 2003 book Erich Matthew Muller (born June 21, 1966 in Kansas City, Missouri) is a United States radio and television personality known as Mancow and Mancow Muller. ... Mancows 2003 book, on sale at amazon. ... William Least Heat-Moon, byname of William Trogdon (born 1940) is an American travel writer of English, Irish and Osage Nation ancestry. ... Wayne Nelson (born June 1, 1950 in Kansas City, MO) is an American musician best known for being a member of the famed Australian rock band, Little River Band. ... Little River Band is an Australian rock band formed in Melbourne in 1975 and named after a road sign for the Victorian township of Little River, near Geelong. ... Leroy Robert Satchel Paige (July 7, 1906–June 8, 1982)[1] was an American baseball player who pitched in several different Negro Leagues and in Major League Baseball. ... A baseball pitcher delivers the ball to home plate In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitchers mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter who attempts to either make contact with it or draw a... Part of the History of baseball series. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... Charles Bird Parker, Jr. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... “Pujols” redirects here. ... Ginger Rogers (Virginia Katherine McMath, July 16, 1911 – April 25, 1995) was an Academy Award-winning American film and stage actress and singer. ... Paul Stephen Rudd (born April 6, 1969) is an American film, television, and stage actor. ... Craig Stevens (born July 8, 1918; died May 10, 2000) was an American motion picture and television actor. ... Virgil Thomson, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1947 Virgil Thomson (November 25, 1896 - September 30, 1989) was an American composer from Missouri, whose rural background gave a sense of place in his compositions. ... Eddie Timanus is a Jeopardy! champion and USA Today sportswriter who graduated from Wake Forest University. ... Jeopardy redirects here. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... Calvin Trillin (born Kansas City, Missouri, December 5, 1935) is an American journalist, humorist, and novelist. ... Big Joe Turner (born Joseph Vernon Turner Jr. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Blues music redirects here. ... Rock and roll (also spelled rock n roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Tech N9ne (born Aaron Dontez Yates on November 8, 1971 in Kansas City, Missouri) is an American rapper. ... Tech N9ne (born Aaron Dontez Yates on November 8, 1971 in Kansas City, Missouri) is an American rapper. ...

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 318.0 mi² (823.7 km²). 313.5 mi² (812.1 km²) of it is land and 4.5 mi² (11.6 km²) of it (1.41%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ...


Kansas City is often imagined to be flat like Chicago, Manhattan or Dallas, but in fact it has many rolling hills. Much of urban Kansas City sits atop 100-200ft bluffs overlooking the rivers and river bottoms areas. Kansas City proper is bowl-shaped and is surrounded to the north and south by limestone and bedrock cliffs that were carved by glaciers. Kansas City is situated at the junction between the Dakota and Minnesota ice lobes during the maximum late Independence glaciation of the Pleistocene epoch. The Kansas and Missouri rivers cut wide valleys into the terrain when the glaciers melted and drained. A partially filled spillway valley crosses the central portion of Kansas City, Missouri. This valley is an eastward continuation of Turkey Creek valley. Union Station is located in this valley.[10] Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... Dallas redirects here. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... Bedrock is the native consolidated rock underlying the Earths surface. ... This article is about the geological formation. ... The Pleistocene epoch (IPA: ) on the geologic timescale is the period from 1,808,000 to 11,550 years BP. The Pleistocene epoch had been intended to cover the worlds recent period of repeated glaciations. ... // For other uses, see time scale. ... Kansas City Union Station in Kansas City, Missouri is one of many union stations in the United States. ...


The city's municipal water was recently rated the cleanest among the 50 largest cities in the United States, containing no detectable impurities.[11] A water tap Tap water (also known as running water) has existed for as long as indoor plumbing, i. ...


Climate

Kansas City lies near the geographic center of the contiguous United States, at the confluence of the second largest river in the country, the Missouri River, and the Kansas River (also known as the Kaw River). This makes for a humid continental climate (Koppen climate classification Dfa) with moderate precipitation and extremes of hot and cold. Summers can be very humid, with moist air riding up from the Gulf of Mexico, and during July and August daytime highs can reach into the triple digits. Winters vary from mild days to bitterly cold, with lows reaching into the teens below zero a few times a year. Spring and autumn are pleasant and peppered with thunderstorms. The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... The Kansas River near De Soto Kaw River (map) looking southward from middle of Turner Diagonal bridge. ... The humid continental climate is a climate found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid-latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ... The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ...

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Avg high °F
(°C)
38
(3)
44
(7)
56
(13)
67
(19)
76
(24)
86
(30)
90
(32)
89
(32)
80
(27)
69
(21)
53
(12)
42
(6)
66
(19)
Avg low °F
(°C)
21
(-6)
26
(-3)
36
(2)
46
(8)
57
(14)
67
(19)
72
(22)
70
(21)
61
(16)
49
(9)
36
(2)
25
(-4)
47
(8)
Rainfall in inches
(millimeters)
1.13
(28.7)
1.02
(25.9)
2.38
(60.5)
3.27
(83.1)
4.55
(115.6)
4.73
(120.1)
3.61
(91.7)
3.62
(91.9)
4.17
(105.9)
3.28
(83.3)
2.30
(58.4)
1.45
(36.8)
35.51
(902)

Weather

Kansas City is situated in "Tornado Alley," a broad region where cold air from the Rocky Mountains and Canada collides with warm air from the Gulf of Mexico, leading to the formation of powerful storms. Kansas City has had many severe outbreaks of tornados, including the Ruskin Heights tornado in 1957,[12] and the May 2003 Tornado Outbreak Sequence, as well as other severe weather, most notably the Kansas City derecho in 1982. The region is also prone to ice storms, such as the 2002 ice storm during which hundreds of thousands lost power for days and (in some cases) weeks.[13] Kansas City and its outlying areas are also subject to flooding, including the Great Flood of 1993 and the Great Flood of 1951. An outline of Significant Tornado Alley in the United States, where the highest percentage of violent tornadoes occur Tornado Alley is a colloquial term most often used in reference to the area of the United States in which tornadoes are most frequent. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... 1Time from first tornado to last tornado 2Most severe tornado damage; see Fujita scale The May 2003 Tornado Outbreak Sequence in the United States was a series of tornado outbreaks that occurred from May 3 to May 11, 2003. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... A typical view of a winter storm. ... The 2002 Central Plains Ice Storm was a major winter storm that affected the American Midwest, causing significant damage expecially in the Kansas City Metropolitan Area. ... The Great Flood of 1993 was a major flood that occurred in the American Midwest, along the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, and their tributaries, from April to October of 1993. ... Flooding in northeast Topeka, 1951 In mid-July 1951, heavy rains led to a great rise in the Kansas River and other surrounding areas. ...

See also: List of tornadoes and tornado outbreaks, List of tornadoes striking downtown areas, and 1980 United States heat wave

// Tornado Events These are some notable tornadoes, tornado outbreaks, and tornado outbreak sequences that have occurred around the globe. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The 1980 United States heat wave was among the most devastating natural disasters in terms of deaths and destruction in U.S. history. ...

Cityscape

See Also: The Districts of Downtown (Kansas City, Missouri) There are six sections of districts located in Downtown Kansas City, Missouri which consists of business, entertainment, office buildings, and residential living. ...

Brush Creek on the Country Club Plaza at Night
Brush Creek on the Country Club Plaza at Night

Kansas City, Missouri, is organized into a system of more than 150 neighborhoods, some with histories as independent cities or the sites of major events. Image File history File links Brush_creek. ... Image File history File links Brush_creek. ... Brush Creek flowing through Kansas City, Missouri Brush Creek in the Country Club Plaza Brush Creek is a stream that runs from Johnson County, Kansas through Jackson County, Missouri. ... A neighbourhood or neighborhood (see spelling differences) is a geographically localised community located within a larger city or suburb. ...


Downtown, the center of the city, is currently undergoing major redevelopment. Near Downtown, the urban core of the city has a variety of neighborhoods, including historical Westport, the Crossroads Arts District, 18th and Vine Historic District, Pendleton Heights, Quality Hill, the West Bottoms and the River Market. . ... Kansas City Pioneer Square monument in Westport features Pony Express founder Alexander Majors, Westport/Kansas City founder John Calvin McCoy and Mountainman Jim Bridger who owned Chouteaus Store next to Kellys Kellys at 500 Westport Road or neighboring Chouteaus Store at 504 Westport are considered to... The Crossroads Arts District is an historic registered neighborhood in downtown Kansas City, Missouri, USA, centered at approximately 20th Street and Main Street, between Downtowns Central Business District and Crown Center. ... The 18th and Vine District is a center of African American culture in Kansas City, Missouri. ... Pendleton Heights is an historic registered neighborhood in Kansas City, Missouri, USA. It is located near the downtown loop, between I-35/29 and Chestnut Trafficway to the west and east, and Independence Boulevard and Cliff Drive to the south and north. ... Quality Hill is an historic and highly upscale registered neighborhood in downtown Kansas City, Missouri, USA. It is located on the west side of downtown, between Broadway and I-35 to the east and west, and between 7th Street and 14th Street to the north and south. ... The West Bottoms is an industrial area immediately to the west of downtown Kansas City, Missouri at the confluence of the Missouri River and Kansas River. ... This article needs to be wikified. ...

The city's tallest buildings and characteristic skyline is roughly contained inside the downtown freeway loop (shaded in red). Downtown Kansas City itself is established by city ordinance to stretch from the Missouri River south to 31st Street (beyond the bottom of this map), and from I-35 to Bruce R. Watkins

Other areas near Downtown Kansas City include: Map of the Downtown Alphabet Loop in Kansas City File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Map of the Downtown Alphabet Loop in Kansas City File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The downtown freeway loop (also called the downtown Alphabet loop) is the unofficial name for a complex layout of freeways in downtown Kansas City, Missouri involving 23 exits, four Interstate Highways, four U.S. Highways and numerous city streets. ... A local ordinance is a law usually found in a municipal code. ...


The 39th Street District is known as Restaurant Row[1] and features one of Kansas City's largest selections of independently owned restaurants and boutique shops. It is a center of literary and visual arts and bohemian culture. The term Bohemian describes artists, writers, and disenchanted people of all sorts who wished to live non-traditional lifestyles. ...


Crown Center is the headquarters of Hallmark Cards and a major downtown shopping and entertainment complex. It is connected to Union Station by a series of covered walkways. Crown Center is a shopping and entertainment complex operated by the Hallmark corporation and located adjacent to the companys headquarters in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ...


The Country Club Plaza, or simply "the Plaza," is an upscale, outdoor shopping and entertainment district. It was the first shopping district in the United States designed to accommodate shoppers arriving by automobile, and is surrounded by apartments and condominiums, including a number of high rise buildings. Kansas Citys Country Club Plaza The Country Club Plaza (often referred to as the Plaza) is an upscale shopping district in Kansas City, Missouri, USA. It was the second shopping center in the world designed to accommodate shoppers arriving by automobile. ...


The associated Country Club District to the south includes the Sunset Hill and Brookside neighborhoods, and is traversed by Ward Parkway, a beautiful, landscaped boulevard known for its statuary, fountains and large, historic homes. J.C. Nicholss home in Sunset Hill, located on West 55th Street between Ward Parkway and State Line Road The Country Club District is the name of a group of neighborhoods comprising an upscale, historic residential district in Kansas City, Missouri, and Johnson County, Kansas, USA, developed by noted... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ward Parkway, located in Kansas City, Missouri near the Kansas-Missouri state line, is one of the most famous parkways in the United States. ...


Kansas City's Union Station is now home to Science City, restaurants, shopping, theaters, and the city's Amtrak facility. Kansas City Union Station in Kansas City, Missouri is one of many union stations in the United States. ... Science City is a centre for interactive science in different cities across the world. ... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ...

Further information: List of neighborhoods in Kansas City, Missouri
A look down Downtown Kansas City streets today.
A look down Downtown Kansas City streets today.

. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Downtown redevelopment

Main article: Downtown Kansas City
See Also: The Districts of Downtown (Kansas City, Missouri); Downtown Kansas City Redevelopment

Downtown Kansas City is an area of 2.9 square miles bounded by the Missouri River to the north, 31st Street to the south, Bruce R. Watkins Drive (U.S. Highway 71) to the east and I-35 to the west. View from atop the Liberty Memorial; The Loop and Crossroads skyline, Crown Center isnt shown. ... There are six sections of districts located in Downtown Kansas City, Missouri which consists of business, entertainment, office buildings, and residential living. ... In recent years, Downtown Kansas City, Missouri, USA, has been undergoing a massive boom in renovations and new construction. ... United States Highway 71 is a north-south United States highway. ...


After years of neglect and seas of parking lots, Downtown Kansas City currently is undergoing a period of change. Many residential properties recently have been or currently are under redevelopment. The Power & Light District, a new, nine-block entertainment district comprising numerous restaurants, bars, and retail shops, was developed by the Cordish Company of Baltimore, Maryland, and is nearing completion in the southern part of the downtown freeway loop. Its first tenant opened on November 9, 2007, with more openings to continue throughout 2007 and 2008. Due to a new Missouri state law passed in 2005, the Power & Light District will be one of only two places in the United States, along with the French Quarter of New Orleans, Louisiana, where open containers of alcohol are allowed in the street. View from atop the Liberty Memorial; The Loop and Crossroads skyline, Crown Center isnt shown. ... The Power & Light District is the new nine city block entertainment district on the south end of Downtown Kansas City, Missouri, USA. The district is located on Main Street to Grand Boulevard from west to east and on 13th Street to Interstate 670 from north to south. ... The Cordish Company is a real estate development and entertainment operating company based in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Baltimore redirects here. ... The downtown freeway loop (also called the downtown Alphabet loop) is the unofficial name for a complex layout of freeways in downtown Kansas City, Missouri involving 23 exits, four Interstate Highways, four U.S. Highways and numerous city streets. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... French Quarter: upper Chartres street looking down towards Jackson Square and the spires of St. ... NOLA redirects here. ... Prohibition of Open Containers of Alcohol in Motor Vehicles as of January 1, 2006 Open container laws prohibit possessing and/or drinking from an open container of alcohol in certain areas. ... Alcoholic beverages An alcoholic beverage (also known as booze in slang term) is a drink containing ethanol, commonly known as alcohol, although in chemistry the definition of alcohol includes many other compounds. ...


Adjacent to the Power & Light District, a new arena, the Sprint Center, opened on October 10, 2007. The arena was designed by a consortium of local architects, and hopes to lure an NBA or NHL franchise to the city. Los Angeles-based Anschutz Entertainment Group has invested in the arena project and will run its daily operations. Sprint Center[1] is a large, multi-use indoor arena in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... NBA redirects here. ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... The Anschutz Entertainment Group is a sporting and music entertainment presenter and a subsidiary of The Anschutz Corporation. ...


Parks and parkways

J.C. Nichols Memorial Fountain, in Mill Creek Park, adjacent to the Country Club Plaza
J.C. Nichols Memorial Fountain, in Mill Creek Park, adjacent to the Country Club Plaza

Kansas City is well-known for its spacious parkways and numerous parks. The parkway system winds its way through the city with broad, landscaped medians that include statuary and fountains. One of the best examples is Ward Parkway on the west side of the city, near the Kansas state line. Originally designed for aesthetics and minor automobile/horse and buggy traffic, many parkways were drastically altered to accommodate more and more vehicles, becoming minor freeways. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2973x1827, 468 KB) Summary J.C. Nichols Memorial Fountain (the horse fountain) in Country Club Plaza. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2973x1827, 468 KB) Summary J.C. Nichols Memorial Fountain (the horse fountain) in Country Club Plaza. ... Ward Parkway, located in Kansas City, Missouri near the Kansas-Missouri state line, is one of the most famous parkways in the United States. ... Official language(s) English[2] Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  Ranked 15th  - Total 82,277 sq mi (213,096 km²)  - Width 211 miles (340 km)  - Length 417 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ... State Line Road is a major north/south street in the Kansas City Metropolitan Area that runs along the Kansas/Missouri border. ...


Swope Park is one of the nation's largest in-city parks, comprising 1,763 acres (2.75mi²), more than twice as big as New York's Central Park[2]. It includes a full-fledged zoo, two golf courses, a lake, an amphitheatre, day-camp area, and numerous picnic grounds. Swope Park is a large city park within the city of Kansas City, Missouri. ... Giraffes in Sydneys Taronga Zoo A zoological garden, zoological park, or zoo is a facility in which animals are confined within enclosures and displayed to the public, and in which they may also be bred. ... The Colosseum in Rome, Italy. ...


Kansas City has always had one of the nation's best urban forestry programs[citation needed]. At one time, almost all residential streets were planted with a solid canopy of American elms but Dutch elm disease devastated them. Most of the elms died and were replaced with a variety of other shade trees. A program is underway currently to replace many of the fast-growing sweetgum trees with hardwood varieties.[14] Urban forestry is the care and management of tree populations in urban settings for the purpose of improving the urban environment. ... Binomial name Ulmus americana L. The American Elm Ulmus americana is a species of elm native to eastern North America, occurring from Nova Scotia west to southeast Saskatchewan, and south to Florida and central Texas. ... Branch death, or Flagging, at multiple locations in the crown of a diseased elm. ... Binomial name Liquidambar styraciflua L. American Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), also known as Redgum, is a deciduous tree in the genus Liquidambar native to warm temperate areas of eastern North America. ... Beech is a typical temperate zone hardwood For the record label, see Hardwood Records. ...


Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1860 4,418
1870 32,260 630.2%
1880 55,785 72.9%
1890 132,716 137.9%
1900 163,752 23.4%
1910 248,381 51.7%
1920 324,410 30.6%
1930 399,746 23.2%
1940 400,178 0.1%
1950 456,622 14.1%
1960 475,539 4.1%
1970 507,087 6.6%
1980 448,159 -11.6%
1990 435,146 -2.9%
2000 441,545 1.5%

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there are 441,545 people, 183,981 households, and 107,444 families residing in the city. The population density is 1,408.2 people per square mile (543.7/km²). There are 202,334 housing units at an average density of 249.2 per square mile (645.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city is 60.68% White, 31.23% African American or Black, 0.48% Native American, 1.85% Asian, 0.11% Pacific Islander, 3.21% from other races, and 2.44% from two or more races. 6.93% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... This article is about the color. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... Hispanic flag, not widely used. ... For the Brazilian pop singer, see Latino (singer). ...


There are 183,981 households out of which 28.1% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.0% are married couples living together, 16.0% have a female householder with no husband present, and 41.6% are non-families. 34.1% of all households are made up of individuals and 9.4% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.35 and the average family size is 3.06.


In the city the population is spread out with 25.4% under the age of 18, 9.7% from 18 to 24, 32.5% from 25 to 44, 20.6% from 45 to 64, and 11.7% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 34 years. For every 100 females there are 93.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 89.9 males.


The median income for a household in the city is $37,198, and the median income for a family is $46,012. Males have a median income of $35,132 versus $27,548 for females. The per capita income for the city is $20,753. 14.3% of the population and 11.1% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 20.2% are under the age of 18 and 10.5% are 65 or older. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... The poverty threshold, or poverty line, is the minimum level of income deemed necessary to achieve an adequate standard of living. ...


The United States Census bureau updated their American Community Survey information in 2005 for Kansas City. Their study estimated a population of about 440,885 people, the margin of error was placed at +/- 9,193 people. Growth in Kansas City is increasing, with 3,618 housing permits granted in 2004 and 2005. As of 2005, about 210,000 households exist.


Economy

Main article: Kansas City Economy
Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank "J" insignia on the dollar bill
Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank "J" insignia on the dollar bill

Greater Kansas City is headquarters to 3 Fortune 500 companies (H&R Block, Embarq Corporation, and YRC Worldwide Inc.) and additional Fortune 1000 corporations (Interstate Bakeries Corporation, Great Plains Energy,Aquila, AMC Theatres, and DST Systems). Hallmark Cards's gross revenues certainly would qualify it for both lists, but it cannot be included because it is privately owned by the Hall family. Numerous agriculture companies operate out of the city and the Kansas City Board of Trade is the principal trading center for hard red winter wheat — the principal ingredient of bread. Kansas City, Missouri, USA, is, based on the United States Census Bureaus 2004 population estimates, the largest city in Missouri and the 40th largest city in the United States. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (766x781, 164 KB) Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City J insignia on dollar bill. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (766x781, 164 KB) Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City J insignia on dollar bill. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... H&R Block (NYSE: HRB) is the leading tax preparation company in the United States, and claims more than 22 million customers worldwide, with offices in Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom. ... Embarq Corporation, or EMBARQ is the fourth largest local exchange carrier in the United States (below the Baby Bells) and the largest independent local provider, serving customers in 18 states and providing local, long distance, high-speed data and wireless services to residential and business customers. ... YRC Worldwide Inc. ... Fortune 1000 is a reference to a list maintained by the American business magazine Fortune. ... Interstate Bakeries Corporation (IBC) (NYSE: IBCIQ) is the largest wholesale baker and distributor of fresh bakery products in the United States, and is the owner of the Hostess, Wonder Bread, Dolly Madison, Butternut Breads, and Drakes brands. ... Great Plains Energy Incorporated (NYSE: GXP) is a holding company based on Kansas City, Missouri that owns electric utility Kansas City Power & Light and Strategic Energy, LLC, an energy management company. ... The term Aquila can refer to several things: Aquila is Latin for eagle. ... AMC Promenade 16 multiplex in the Woodland Hills area of Los Angeles, California. ... DST Systems Inc. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Donald J. Hall Sr. ... Founded in 1856 and formally chartered in 1876, the Kansas City Board of Trade (KCBT), located at 4800 Main Street in Kansas City, Missouri, is a commodity futures and options exchange regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC). ... Winter wheat is a cereal. ... For other uses, see Bread (disambiguation). ...

H&R Block's new oblong headquarters in downtown Kansas City
H&R Block's new oblong headquarters in downtown Kansas City

The business community is serviced by two major business magazines, the Kansas City Business Journal (published weekly) and Ingram's Magazine (published monthly), as well as numerous other smaller publications, including a local society journal, the Independent (published weekly). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2287x1207, 428 KB) Summary HR Block Headquarters in downtown Kansas City. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2287x1207, 428 KB) Summary HR Block Headquarters in downtown Kansas City. ... H&R Block (NYSE: HRB) is the leading tax preparation company in the United States, and claims more than 22 million customers worldwide, with offices in Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom. ... High Society is a 1956 musical film made by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in VistaVision with music and lyrics by Cole Porter. ...


Kansas City is literally "on the money." Bills issued by the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City are marked the letter "J" and/or number "10." The single dollar bills have Kansas City's name on them. Missouri is the only state to have two of the 12 Federal Reserve Bank headquarters (St. Louis also has a headquarters). Kansas City's effort to get the bank was helped by former Kansas City mayor James A. Reed who as senator broke a tie to get the Federal Reserve Act passed.[15] Various Federal Reserve Notes Federal Reserve note is the official name for the kind of banknote used in the United States, more commonly known as dollar bills. ... Front of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City The Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City covers the 10th District of the Federal Reserve, which includes Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Wyoming, and portions of western Missouri and northern New Mexico. ... Federal Reserve Districts The United States Federal Reserve System consists of twelve Federal Reserve Banks, each responsible for a particular district, and some with branches. ... James Alexander Reed (November 9, 1861 September 9, 1944) was an American politician. ... The Federal Reserve Act, also known as the Act of December 23, 1913, ch. ...


Law and government

City government

See also: List of mayors of Kansas City
See also: Alcohol laws of Missouri

Kansas City is home to the largest municipal government in the state of Missouri. The mayor of Kansas City is Mark Funkhouser, elected on March 27, 2007. The city has a city manager form of government, however the role of city manager has diminished over the years following excesses during the days of Tom Pendergast. The mayor is the head of the Kansas City City Council, which has 12 members (one member for each district, plus one at large member per district), and the mayor himself is the presiding member. Kansas City holds city elections on odd numbered years (every four years unless there is a special reason). The last major city-wide election was May 2007, meaning the next one will be in May 2011. Kansas City, Missouri mayors served one year terms until 1946 when they began serving four-year terms. ... Location of Missouri Flag of the State of Missouri Although fairly comprehensive, the alcohol laws of Missouri are among the most permissive in the United States, perhaps only behind those of Nevada and Louisiana. ... Much of the Kansas City, Missouri Municipal Government is based in City Hall The Municipal Government of Kansas City, Missouri is the largest municipal government in the state of Missouri and one of the largest in the United States. ... The Mayor of Kansas City has his office on the 29th floor of the Kansas City City Hall which is the highest occupiable floor in the building The Mayor of Kansas City, Missouri is the highest official in the Kansas City, Missouri Municipal Government. ... Mark Funkhouser (born 1950)[1] is the mayor-elect of Kansas City, Missouri, and a former city auditor for the same. ... The council-manager government is one of 2 main variations of representative municipal government (for contrast, also see Mayor-Council government). ... Thomas Joseph Pendergast (July 22, 1873 – January 26, 1945) controlled Kansas City as a political boss. ... The Kansas City, Missouri The City Council meets on the 26th floor of Kansas City City Hall and its offices are on the 24th floor The City Council of Kansas City, Missouri, is the legislative body of the City of Kansas City, Missouri. ...


From the late 19th Century to the mid 20th Century, Kansas City's municipal government was controlled by often corrupt olitical machines. Tom Pendergast was the most infamous leader of the party machine. The most nationally prominent Democrat associated with Pendergast's machine was Harry S. Truman, who became a Senator, Vice President of the United States and then President of the United States from 1945-1953. For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. ...


Courts

The Charles Evans Whittaker United States Courthouse in Downtown Kansas City, seat of the United States District Court for the Western District of Missouri.

Kansas City is the seat of the United States District Court for the Western District of Missouri, one of two federal district courts in Missouri (the other, the Eastern District, is in St. Louis). It also is the seat of the Western District of the Missouri Court of Appeals, one of three districts of that court (the Eastern District is in St. Louis and the Southern District is in Springfield). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Charles Evans Whittaker (February 22, 1901 – November 26, 1973) was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1957 to 1962. ... The U.S. Courts for the Western District of Missouri encompass 66 counties in the western half of Missouri. ... The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system. ... Map of the boundaries of the United States Courts of Appeals and United States District Courts The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system. ... Within Missouri, there are three levels of government: state government county city Missouris state capital is Jefferson City lying approximately halfway between its two largest cities, St. ... Hammons Tower in downtown Springfield Springfield is the third largest city in Missouri. ...


Hosted national political conventions

Kansas City has hosted the 1900 Democratic National Convention, the 1928 Republican National Convention, which nominated Herbert Hoover from Iowa for President, and the memorable 1976 Republican National Convention, which nominated Kansas U.S. Senator Bob Dole for Vice President. Convention Hall The 1900 Democratic National Convention was a United States presidential nominating convention that took place the week of July 4, 1900 at Convention Hall in Kansas City, Missouri. ... 1928 Republican National Convention - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Largest metro area Des Moines metropolitan area Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... The 1976 Republican National Convention was held in Kansas City, Missouri at Kemper Arena from August 16 to August 19. ... § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ...


Kansas City consistently votes Democratic in Presidential elections, however on the state and local level Republicans often find some modest success, especially in the Northland and other parts of Kansas City that are predominately suburban.


Congressional representation

Kansas City is represented by two members of the United States House of Representatives: Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party...

Missouris 5th Congressional District has been represented in the United States House of Representatives by Democrat Emanuel Cleaver since 2005. ... The Reverend Emanuel Cleaver II (born October 26, 1944) is a United Methodist pastor and a Democratic politician from the state of Missouri. ... Missouris 6th congressional district takes in a large swath of land in rural Northwest Missouri. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Largest metro area Des Moines metropolitan area Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... Samuel Sam Graves (born November 7, 1963) is a politician from the U.S. state of Missouri, currently representing the states 6th Congressional district (map) in the United States House of Representatives. ...

Crime

History

Some of the earliest violence in Kansas City erupted during the American Civil War. Shortly after the city's incorporation in 1850, the period which has become known as Bleeding Kansas erupted, affecting border ruffians and Jayhawkers, who both lived in the city. During the war, Union troops burned all occupied dwellings in Jackson County south of Brush Creek and east of Blue Creek to Independence in an attempt to halt raids into Kansas. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Division of the states during the Civil War:  Union states  Union territories  Border states  Bleeding Kansas  The Confederacy  Confederate territories (not always held) Bleeding Kansas, sometimes referred to in history as Bloody Kansas or the Border War, was a sequence of violent events involving Free-Staters (anti-slavery) and pro... In U.S. history, Border Ruffians were pro-slavery sympathizers who infiltrated into Kansas from the slave state of Missouri in the 1850s to harass abolitionists and others who desired Kansas to be admitted to the Union as a free state (one in which slavery was forbidden). ... A jayhawker was a radical guerrilla fighter during the American Civil War. ... General Order â„– 11 is the title of the 25 August 1863 order that all persons living in Jackson, Cass, and Bates counties in Missouri, and in that part of Vernon included in this district, except those living within one mile of the limits of Independence, Hickmans Mills, Pleasant Hill...


After the war, the Kansas City Times turned outlaw Jesse James into a folk hero in its coverage. James was born in the Kansas City metro area at Kearney, Missouri, and notoriously robbed the Kansas City Fairgrounds at 12th Street and Campbell Avenue. The Kansas City Times was a morning newspaper in Kansas City, Missouri, from 1867 to 1990. ... Jesse Woodson James (September 5, 1847–April 3, 1882) was an American outlaw, the most famous member of the James-Younger gang. ... Kearney is a city in Clay County, Missouri, United States. ...


In the early 20th Century under Democratic political "Boss" Tom Pendergast, Kansas City became the country's "most wide open town", with virtually no enforcement of prohibition. While this would give rise to Kansas City Jazz, it also led to the rise of the Kansas City mob (initially under Johnny Lazia), as well as the arrival of organized crime. The 1930s saw the Kansas City Massacre at Union Station, as well as a shootout between police and outlaws Bonnie and Clyde at the Red Crown Tavern near what is now Kansas City International Airport. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Thomas Joseph Pendergast (July 22, 1873 – January 26, 1945) controlled Kansas City as a political boss. ... Prohibition in the United States aimed to achieve alcohol abstinence through legal means. ... Memorial to Charlie Parker at the American Jazz Museum at 18th and Highland in Kansas City Kansas City Jazz is a style of jazz that developed and flourished in Kansas City, Missouri and the surrounding Kansas City Metropolitan Area during the 1930s and marked the transition from the structured big... This article is about the criminal society. ... John Lazia (1896-July 10, 1934) was an American organized crime figure in Kansas City, Missouri during Prohibition. ... Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... Charles Arthur “Pretty Boy” Floyd. ... Kansas City Union Station in Kansas City, Missouri is one of many union stations in the United States. ... This article is about the outlaws. ... The Red Crown Tavern and Red Crown Tourist Court in Platte County, Missouri was the site of the July 18, 1933 gun battle between law men and outlaws Bonnie & Clyde that was to ultimately result in the death of Buck Barrow and capture of Blanche Barrow. ... Airport diagram Airport from the east. ...


In the 1970s, the Kansas City mob was involved in a gangland war over control of the River Quay entertainment district, in which three buildings were bombed and several gangsters were killed. Police investigations into the mob took hold after boss Nick Civella was recorded discussing gambling bets on Super Bowl IV (where the Kansas City Chiefs defeated the Minnesota Vikings). The war and investigation would lead to the end of mob control of the Stardust Casino, which was the basis for the film Casino (although the Kansas City connections are minimized in the movie). The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The River Market (also known as River Quay) is a shopping area and neighborhood in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. ... Nicholas Civella (March 19, 1912-March 12, 1983) was a Kansas City mobster involved in union racketeering and tax evasion. ... Date January 11, 1970 Stadium Tulane Stadium City New Orleans, Louisiana MVP Len Dawson, Quarterback Favorite Vikings by 12 1/2 National anthem Al Hirt Coin toss Game referee Referee John McDonough Halftime show Mardi Gras with Carol Channing Attendance 80,562 TV in the United States Network CBS Announcers... The Stardust is a resort and casino located on the famed Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada on 63 acres on the Las Vegas Strip. ... Casino is a 1995 movie directed by Martin Scorsese, based on the book of the same name by Nicholas Pileggi and Larry Shandling. ...


Today

As of October 30, 2006, Kansas City ranks 21st on the Federal Bureau of Investigation's annual survey of crime rates for cities with populations over 400,000.[16] is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The following table of 2005 homicides is based on Federal Bureau of Investigation Uniform Crime Reports statistics that initially became available in September 2006. ... F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ...


Kansas City ranked sixth in the rate of murders in that same stdy. The entire Kansas City metropolitan area has the fourth worst violent crime rate among cities with more than 100,000, with a rate of 614.7 violent crimes per 100,000 residents.[17]


Much of the city's murders and violent crimes occur in the city's inner core. The violent crime rates in the core consistently have driven the city and metropolitan area down on "livability" indices, hindering initiatives in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s to revive downtown Kansas City. In the 2000s, however, attempts at revitalizing the downtown area have been more successful.[18] Downtown currently has one of the lowest crime rates in the urban core, and thousands of new residents have moved there.[citation needed] Other parts of the urban core with higher poverty levels remain places in which crime remains largely unabated. The term inner-city is often applied to the poorer parts at the centre of a major city. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... This article is about the first decade of the 21st century. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ...


In 2004, a gang war erupted when local rappers Mac Dre and Fat Tone were murdered. Mac Dre allegedly was killed by a local gang, the 51st Street Crips while returning to his hotel after a concert. Fat Tone then was killed in Las Vegas, Nevada, allegedly in retaliation for Mac Dre's death. Since their deaths, Kansas City has experienced a local gang war, which has involved some of the more prominent local gangs, including the 51st Street Crips. Police recently announced that they believed they had found the sources of much of the fighting, and were concentrating their efforts on certain individuals and neighborhoods. Some of the recent suspects had been caught before by the police for other homicides, but had to be released after the witnesses either were harmed or were threatened. Police had hoped that they possibly could put an end to the gang violence and wars which have been the cause of most of the inner city's crime rate problems. The police increased pressure on gangs in 2007, capturing allegedly major and minor gang figures. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Andre Hicks (July 5, 1970 – November 1, 2004), better known by his stage name, Mac Dre, was a San Francisco Bay Area-based gangsta rapper from Vallejo, California. ... The blue bandanas worn by most Crip gangs. ... For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Sister cities

Scout Indian statue in Seville, sistered with Kansas City. Kansas City has an almost identical statue in Penn Valley Park, near the Liberty Memorial that is pointing in the direction of Seville.
Scout Indian statue in Seville, sistered with Kansas City. Kansas City has an almost identical statue in Penn Valley Park, near the Liberty Memorial that is pointing in the direction of Seville.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (960x1280, 614 KB) Sumario Homenaje en forma de indio rastreador, al hermanamiento de la ciudad de Kansas City con Sevilla (España). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (960x1280, 614 KB) Sumario Homenaje en forma de indio rastreador, al hermanamiento de la ciudad de Kansas City con Sevilla (España). ... Liberty Memorial Liberty Memorial, in Kansas City, is dedicated to the victory of liberty over oppression, in World War I against the Triple Alliance. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... Tainan redirects here; for the county of the same name see Tainan County. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... For other uses, see Seville (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Xian redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sierra_Leone. ... For other places with the same name, see Freetown (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Ramla (Hebrew רמלה Ramlāh; Arabic الرملة ar-Ramlah, colloquial Ramleh), is a city in the Center District of Israel in Israel. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nigeria. ... Port Harcourt is the capital city of Rivers State, Nigeria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... San Nicolás de los Garza, sometimes known only as San Nicolás, is a municipality that is part of the Greater Monterrey metropolitan area. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Kurashiki (倉敷市; -shi) is a historic city located to the west of Okayama, Japan, sitting on the Takahashi River, on the coast of the Inland Sea. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) Cathedral St. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... Coordinates: , Country State Foundation 1542 Government  - Mayor Alfonso Petersen Farah ( PAN) Area  - City 187. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Tanzania. ... Arusha with a view of Mount Meru This article refers to the city of Arusha. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... This article is about the city. ...

Transportation

First, it was at the confluence of the Missouri River and Kansas River and the launching pointing for travelers on the Santa Fe, Oregon, and California trails. Then with the construction of the Hannibal Bridge across the Missouri River it became the central location for 11 trunk railroads. More rail traffic in terms of tonnage still passes through the city than any other city in the country. TWA located its headquarters in the city and had ambitious plans to turn the city into an air hub for the world. Kansas City satellite map The Kansas City Metropolitan Area is a metropolitan area situated at the confluence of the Kansas and Missouri Rivers, sometimes known as (Kaw Point). ... Kansas City satellite map The Kansas City Metropolitan Area is a metropolitan area situated at the confluence of the Kansas and Missouri Rivers, sometimes known as (Kaw Point). ... Trail logo The Santa Fe Trail was an historic 19th century transportation route across southwestern North America connecting Missouri with Santa Fe, New Mexico. ... The Ox Team or the Old Oregon Trail 1852-1906 by Ezra Meeker. ... Main route of California Trail (thick red line), including Applegate-Lassen and Beckwourth variations (thinner red lines) The California Trail was a major overland emigrant route across the Western United States from Missouri to California in the middle 19th century. ... Original Hannibal Bridge from 1908 postcard The Hannibal Bridge is a rail bridge over the Missouri River in Kansas City, Missouri that formerly served as dual-purpose bridge with automobile traffic on the top. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... The Twa, also known as Batwa, are a pygmy people who were the oldest recorded inhabitants of the Great Lakes region of central Africa. ...


Missouri and Kansas were the first states to start building interstates with Interstate 70. An ever increasing number of interstate loops has encouraged suburban sprawl. Interstate 435, which encircles the entire city, is the second longest beltway in the nation. Today, Kansas City and its metropolitan area has more miles of highway per person than any other city in the United States. Interstate 70 (abbreviated I-70) is a long interstate highway in the United States that runs from Interstate 15 about a mile from Cove Fort, Utah to a Park and Ride in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Interstate 435 (abbreviated I-435) is an Interstate Highway beltway that encircles much of the Kansas City metropolitan area in the states of Kansas and Missouri, USA. I-435, a spur route of Interstate 35, is 80. ...


Airports

Kansas City International Airport was built to the specifications of TWA to make a world hub for the supersonic transport and Boeing 747. Its passenger friendly design in which its gates were 100 feet from the street has, since the September 11, 2001 attacks, required a costly overhaul to retrofit it to incorporate elements of a more conventional security system. Recent proposals have suggested replacing the three terminals with a new single terminal situated south of the existing runways, thus allowing the airport to operate during construction and to shave miles off of the travel time from downtown and the southern suburbs. The airport is completely supported by user fees and receives no general fund support for operations. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 2858 KB)Taken by me on a departing flight. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 2858 KB)Taken by me on a departing flight. ... Airport diagram Airport from the east. ... Airport diagram Airport from the east. ... The Concorde supersonic transport has a delta wing, a slender fuselage and four underslung Olympus engines. ... The Boeing 747, sometimes nicknamed the Jumbo Jet,[4][5] is long-haul, widebody commercial airliner manufactured by Boeing in the United States. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


Charles B. Wheeler Downtown Airport was the original headquarters of Trans World Airlines and houses the Airline History Museum. It is still used for general aviation and airshows. Kansas City Downtown Airport, also known as Charles B. Wheeler Downtown Airport, is an airport in Kansas City, Missouri, Clay County, Missouri. ... Trans World Airlines (IATA: TW, ICAO: TWA, and Callsign: TWA), commonly known as TWA, was an American airline company that was acquired by American Airlines in April 2001. ... The Airline History Museum is located at the Kansas City Downtown Airport in Kansas City, Missouri. ... General aviation (abbr. ...


Mass transit

Like most American cities, Kansas City's mass transit system was originally rail-based. An electric trolley network ran through the city until 1957. The rapid sprawl in the following years lead to this privately-run system to be shut down. The Kansas City Area Transportation Authority (KCATA) was formed with the signing of a Bi-State compact created by the Missouri and Kansas legislatures on December 28, 1965. The compact gives the KCATA responsibility for planning, construction, owning and operating passenger transportation systems and facilities within the seven-county Kansas City metropolitan area. These include the counties of Cass, Clay, Jackson and Platte in Missouri, and Johnson, Leavenworth and Wyandotte in Kansas. The KCATA is governed by a 10-member Board of Commissioners, five from the state of Kansas and five from the state of Missouri. This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ...


The KCATA offers customers three types of service in the Kansas City area: 1) Fixed-route service along 75 routes 2) Share-A-Fare Paratransit service for the elderly and persons with disabilities 3) MetroFlex service which offers a combination of fixed-route and demand-response.


The base fare is $1.25 one-way, with a variety of passes available. On predicted Ozone Alert! Days from June 1 through September 30, the fare is $.50.


A light rail petition initiative was approved by voters in November 2006. The KCATA is currently conducting a federally mandated Alternatives Analysis study in an effort to gain federal funding toward a 12-mile starter system. The complete system is planned to run from the Kansas City Zoo north through downtown stopping at Union Station, the newly built Sprint Center and others. It will continue north across the Missouri River stopping at Zona Rosa and terminating at the Kansas City International Airport.


Bus rapid transit

In July 2005, the Kansas City Area Transportation Authority (KCATA) launched Kansas City’s first Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) line called "MAX" (Metro Area Express). MAX links the vibrant River Market, Downtown, Union Station, Crown Center and the Country Club Plaza. This corridor boasts over 150,000 jobs, as well as some of the area’s most prestigious real estate and treasured cultural amenities. Kansas City Area Transportation Authority is a public transit operator in Kansas City, Missouri. ...


This $21 million project was the region’s most significant public transportation improvement in decades, providing quicker and more convenient service than the local bus routes. MAX is the spine for future transit expansions and a key component of the region’s long-range transit vision, Smart Moves.


By design, MAX operates and is marketed more like a rail system than a local bus line. A unique identity was created for MAX, including 13 modern diesel buses and easily identifiable “stations". MAX features state-of-the-art technology to deliver customers a high level of reliability, speed and comfort. Dedicated lanes during rush hour help give MAX a rapid, smooth ride, and special traffic signalization holds a green light longer, only if needed, to keep MAX on schedule. Limited stops resulted in reduced travel time between Downtown and the Plaza to about 10 minutes.


MAX has successfully attracted new riders who had not tried transit in Kansas City previously. In fact, 27% of MAX riders indicate they had not ridden transit prior to MAX and a full 77% say that as a result of their experience on MAX, they will now use other Metro routes more often. An average of 5,000 riders use the MAX line daily. It is augmented by the #57 local route, which shares most of the same stops.


The second MAX line is in the design phase and will launch in the Troost Avenue corridor in 2009. It will augment the #25 route, which has an average of 7,500 riders daily.


MAX runs seven days a week from 5am to 1am. During rush hour periods, the buses make stops about every 10 minutes. The one-way fare is $1.25.


Light rail

  • Kansas City does not currently have a subway or light rail system, and several proposals to build one have been rejected by voters in the past. However, the city is currently in the development phase of a starter light rail system. On November 7, 2006, Kansas City voters narrowly approved a ballot initiative brought forward by Clay Chastain from Virginia, proposing a city-wide light rail system paid for by a 3/8-cent sales tax that currently funds 40% of Kansas City’s bus system. That sales tax, which will expire April 2009, would have been brought to vote for renewal, but the citizen petition for light rail occurred before this could happen. The initiative requires a 27-mile light rail line running from the Kansas City Zoo, through the city’s urban core, and out to Kansas City International Airport. In addition to the light rail system, the initiative requires a gondola system that will link Kansas City’s Union Station with the Liberty Memorial, the purchase of 60 hybrid electric busses and the removal of street access through Penn Valley Park, adjacent to the Liberty Memorial. The KCATA estimates that to build the entire light rail system as written will cost between $1.4 and $1.6 billion. The original price tag presented to voters for the line was just below $800 million.
  • In August of 2007, it was announced by the KCATA that an Alternatives Analysis study of the voter-approved light rail plan had a $415 million funding shortfall, even if the federal government paid half of planned construction costs. This study also revealed that the November 2006 plan had technical problems including issues with bridges, steep inclines, and sharp turns beyond typical tolerances. Currently, a citizens’ petition seeking a repeal of the November 2006 initiative is making its way through the City Council. It is expected on the ballot for voters in February 2008. Should the November 2006 initiative be overturned, Chastain has stated that he would seek legal recourse against the city.

The KCATA will have its Alternatives Analysis complete in Spring 2008, at which time a recommended alternative will be presented. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... Clay Chastain is an electrical engineer and home renovator who currently lives in Bedford, Virginia. ...


Trolley/Streetcars

  • Kansas City has a long history with streetcars and trolleys. From 1870-1957 Kansas City's streetcar system was among the top in the country, with over 300 miles of track at its peak. Following the decision to scrap the system, many of its former streetcars have been serving other American cities for a long time. In 2007, ideas and plans arose to add normal trolley lines, as well as possibly fast streetcars to the city's Downtown for the first time in decades. These proposals are being seen as possible first steps in implemented a larger mass transit network, that would include light rail.

Culture

Ethnic Culture

There is a large community of Irish in Kansas City which numbers around 250,000. The Irish Community includes a large number of bands, including Kansas City's own The Elders, multiple newspapers, the numerous Irish stores, including Browne's Irish Market, the oldest Irish owned business in North America, and the Irish Museum and Cultural Center is the new center of the community. The first book that detailed the history of the Irish in Kansas City was Missouri Irish, Irish Settlers on the American Frontier, published in 1984. The first podcast on the history of the Irish in Kansas City appeared in 2006, under the title of 'Missouri Irish'. It is also of some note that the leading publisher of Irish family works, the Irish Genealogical Foundation, was founded and remains based in Kansas City. The Elders is a six-piece Irish American folk rock band, that formed in Kansas City. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... The Irish Museum and Cultural Center is the newest addition to Kansas Citys Irish American community. ...


Architecture

Kansas City has long been praised for its varied architecture, which includes many famous and interesting buildings. Its skyline is notable for various structures, including the immense Bartle Hall Convention Center, the adjoined art deco Municipal Auditorium, and numerous skyscrapers such as the Kansas City Power and Light Building and One Kansas City Place (the tallest habitable structure in Missouri), as well as the KCTV-Tower (the tallest freestanding structure in Missouri and 39th tallest tower in the world), and the Liberty Memorial (the national World War I memorial and museum of the United States). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1536 pixel, file size: 651 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo taken by Richard Wilkins in May 2005. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1536 pixel, file size: 651 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo taken by Richard Wilkins in May 2005. ... Municipal Auditorium in August 2006 For other uses, see Municipal Auditorium (disambiguation). ... // Bartle Halls four, tall, art deco pylons are a highly noticeable fixture in the Kansas City skyline Bartle Hall stretches across Interstate 670 in Kansas City. ... Kansas City, Missouri, USA, is known for many famous and interesting buildings. ... // Bartle Halls four, tall, art deco pylons are a highly noticeable fixture in the Kansas City skyline Bartle Hall stretches across Interstate 670 in Kansas City. ... Asheville City Hall. ... Municipal Auditorium in August 2006 For other uses, see Municipal Auditorium (disambiguation). ... One Kansas City Place, the tallest habitable structure in Missouri One Kansas City Place is a skyscraper in Downtown Kansas City, Missouri, USA, built in 1988. ... KCTV-Tower is a 317. ... The following fall under the definition of a tower which is a tall man-made structure, always taller than it is wide, and usually much higher. ... Liberty Memorial Liberty Memorial, in Kansas City, is dedicated to the victory of liberty over oppression, in World War I against the Triple Alliance. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Kansas City offices of significant national and international architecture firms include ACI/Boland, BNIM, 360 Architecture, Ellerbe Becket, HNTB and HOK Sport. This article is about building architecture. ... Rendering: Oakland Athletics Cisco Field 360 Architecture is an architectural practice focused on planning, design and execution. ... Ellerbe Becket is an international architecture, engineering, and construction firm, founded in 1909, with its corporate office located in Minneapolis, MN, and other offices located in Washington, DC, Kansas City, MO, San Francisco, CA, and Dubai, UAE. Areas of Expertise include architecture, construction, engineering, interior design, and environmental graphics. ... HNTB Corporation (formerly Howard, Needles, Tammen & Bergendoff) is an architecture and engineering firm based in Kansas City, Missouri that built many bridges and professional ball stadiums across the United States and around the world. ... HOK Sport is a division of the international architectural firm HOK which specializes in sports facilities. ...


City of Fountains

With more than 200 fountains, Kansas City claims that only Rome has more fountains. A fountain is the logo for the city and "City of Fountains" is an official nickname. The densest and most famous area for fountains is the Country Club Plaza (the 1960 J.C. Nichols Memorial Fountain is located at 47th and Main). Many smaller fountains dot the streetscape throughout the district. Official seal of City of Kansas City J.C. Nichols Memorial Fountain Waterworks Spectacular at Royals Stadium Following is a List of Fountains in Kansas City that are officially recognized by the City of Fountains Foundation in Kansas City, Missouri. ...


Kansas City cuisine

Kansas City is most famous for its steak and barbecue. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2863x638, 212 KB) Summary The Hereford Bull on Quality Hill in Kansas City, Missouri looking at Kemper Arena and Kansas City Livestock Exchange in the West Bottoms. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2863x638, 212 KB) Summary The Hereford Bull on Quality Hill in Kansas City, Missouri looking at Kemper Arena and Kansas City Livestock Exchange in the West Bottoms. ... The American Hereford Association bull and Kemper Arena and the Kansas City Live Stock Exchange Building in the former stockyards of the West Bottoms as seen from Quality Hill The American Hereford Association is a trade organization that promotes Hereford cattle. ... Kemper Arena American Royal Center is an 19,500 seat indoor arena in Kansas City, Missouri that has hosted NCAA Final Four basketball games, professional basketball and hockey teams, the 1976 Republican Convention, and is the ongoing host of the American Royal livestock show. ... The American Hereford Association bull and Kemper Arena and the Kansas City Live Stock Exchange Building in the former stockyards of the West Bottoms as seen from Quality Hill The Kansas City Live Stock Exchange at 1600 Gennesse in Kansas City, Missouri in the West Bottoms was the headquarters of... The American Hereford Association bull and Kemper Arena and the Kansas City Live Stock Exchange Building in the former stockyards of the West Bottoms as seen from Quality Hill Kansas City Stockyards in 1909 The Kansas City Stockyards in the West Bottoms west of downtown Kansas City, Missouri flourished from... The West Bottoms is an industrial area immediately to the west of downtown Kansas City, Missouri at the confluence of the Missouri River and Kansas River. ... Quality Hill is an historic and highly upscale registered neighborhood in downtown Kansas City, Missouri, USA. It is located on the west side of downtown, between Broadway and I-35 to the east and west, and between 7th Street and 14th Street to the north and south. ... A steak (from Old Norse steik, roast) is a slice from a larger piece of meat, typically from red meat like beef, or fish. ... A barbecue in a public park in Australia A barbecue on a trailer at a block party in Kansas City Pans on the top shelf hold hamburgers and hot dogs that were grilled earlier when the coals were hot. ...


Kansas City steaks

During the heyday of the Kansas City Stockyards, the city was known for its Kansas City steaks or Kansas City strip steaks. The most famous of the steakhouses is the Golden Ox in the Kansas City Live Stock Exchange in the stockyards in the West Bottoms. The stockyards, which were second only to those of Chicago in size, never recovered from the Great Flood of 1951 and eventually closed. The famed Kansas City Strip cut of steak is largely identical to the New York Strip cut, and is sometimes referred to just as a strip steak. Kansas City Stockyards in 1909 The Kansas City Stockyards in the West Bottoms west of downtown Kansas City, Missouri flourished from 1871 until closing in 1991. ... The strip steak, also called the Delmonico, Kansas City or New York strip steak, is one of the highest quality beef steaks on the market. ... The American Hereford Association bull and Kemper Arena and the Kansas City Live Stock Exchange Building in the former stockyards of the West Bottoms as seen from Quality Hill The Kansas City Live Stock Exchange at 1600 Gennesse in Kansas City, Missouri in the West Bottoms was the headquarters of... The West Bottoms is an industrial area immediately to the west of downtown Kansas City, Missouri at the confluence of the Missouri River and Kansas River. ... Flooding in northeast Topeka, 1951 In mid-July 1951, heavy rains led to a great rise in the Kansas River and other surrounding areas. ... The strip steak, also called the Delmonico, Kansas City or New York strip steak, is one of the highest quality beef steaks on the market. ...


Kansas City-style barbecue

Main article: Kansas City-style barbecue

Along with Texas, Memphis & North Carolina, Kansas City is a "world capital of barbecue." There are more than 90 barbecue restaurants[3] in the metropolitan area and the American Royal each fall hosts what it claims is the world's biggest barbecue contest. Kansas City-style barbecue plate. ... The American Royal in Kansas City, Missouri is a livestock show, horse show and rodeo held each year in October and November in the West Bottoms next to to Kemper Arena. ...


The classic Kansas City-style barbecue was an inner city phenomenon that evolved from the pit of Henry Perry from the Memphis, Tennessee area in the early 1900s and blossomed in the 18th and Vine neighborhood. Arthur Bryant's was to take over the Perry restaurant and added molasses to sweeten the recipe. In 1946 Gates and Sons Bar-B-Q was opened by one of Perry's cooks. The Gates recipe added even more molasses. Although Bryant's and Gates are the two definitive Kansas City barbecue restaurants they have just recently begun expanding outside of the Greater Kansas City Area. Also, Smokehouse Barbecue, located north of the river, is generally considered by locals to be the finest barbecue in Kansas City. The term inner-city is often applied to the poorer parts at the centre of a major city. ... Henry Perry (1875-March 22, 1940) was a restaurateur who is considered the father of Kansas City barbecue. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... The 18th and Vine District is a center of African American culture in Kansas City, Missouri. ... Arthur Bryants is a restaurant located in Kansas City, Missouri. ... Molasses or treacle is a thick syrup by-product from the processing of the sugarcane or sugar beet into sugar. ... Gates Bar-B-Q headquarters on Brush Creek in Kansas City Gates and Sons Bar-B-Q is one of two Kansas City, Missouri, restaurants that traces its roots back to Henry Perry the founder of the Kansas City barbecue. ...


In 1977 Rich Davis, a psychiatrist, test-marketed his own concoction called K.C. Soul Style Barbecue Sauce. He renamed it KC Masterpiece and in 1986 he sold the sauce to the Kingsford division of Clorox. Davis retained rights to operate restaurants using the name and sauce, with a restaurant in the suburb of Overland Park, KS. Richard E. Davis (born in 1926) founded KC Masterpiece barbecue sauce. ... KC Masterpiece is a barbecue sauce that claims to be the number 1 premium barbeque sauce sold in the United States. ... Clorox headquarters The Clorox Company (NYSE: CLX) is a manufacturer of various food and chemical products based in Oakland, California, which is best known for its bleach product, Clorox. ...


Entertainment and performing arts

Classical/opera

The Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, future home of the Kansas City Symphony, the Lyric Opera, and the Kansas City Ballet, due to open in 2009.

Kansas City is home to the Kansas City Symphony, founded by R. Crosby Kemper Jr. in 1982 to supersede the Kansas City Philharmonic, which had existed since 1933. The symphony currently is located at the Lyric Theatre in Downtown Kansas City, but will move to the new Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, also downtown, when it is completed in December of 2009. The current music director and lead conductor of the symphony is the world-renowned Michael Stern. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Once completed, the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts will be a 316,000 square-foot performing arts center. ... The Kansas City Symphony (KCS) is a a major United States symphony orchestra based in Kansas City, Missouri. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Kansas City Symphony (KCS) is a a major United States symphony orchestra based in Kansas City, Missouri. ... R. Crosby Kemper, Jr. ... Once completed, the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts will be a 316,000 square-foot performing arts center. ... Michael Stern (born 1959) is a noted American symphony conductor. ...


The Lyric Opera of Kansas City, founded in 1970, is one of the nation's premier regional opera companies. It prides itself on offering one American contemporary opera production during its annual season consisting of either four or five productions. Originally, all operas were performed in English, although in the late-1990s the company decided to perform all productions in their original languages. The Lyric Opera also is located at the Lyric Theatre, and also will move to the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts in 2009.


The Kansas City Ballet, founded in 1957 by Tatiana Dokoudovska, is a ballet troupe comprising 25 professional dancers and apprentices. Between 1986 and 2000, it was combined with Dance St. Louis to form the State Ballet of Missouri, although it remained located in Kansas City. From 1980 to 1995, the Ballet was run by renowned dancer and choreographer Todd Bolender. Today, the Ballet offers an annual repertory split into three seasons which ranges from classical to contemporary ballets. The Ballet also is located at the Lyric Theatre, and also will move with the Symphony and Opera to the Kauffman Center in 2009. Todd Bolender (February 27, 1914 – October 10, 2006) was a renowned ballet dancer, teacher, choreographer, and director. ...


Jazz

Main article: Kansas City Jazz
Memorial to Charlie Parker at the American Jazz Museum at 18th and Highland in Kansas City

Kansas City Jazz in the 1930s marked the transition from big bands to the bebop influence of the 1940s. In the 1930s City Boss Tom Pendergast was at his height of his power and left Kansas City a wide open town in which night clubs were allowed to remain open from dusk to dawn. In this venue, an era of musical improvisation developed in which it was not uncommon for a single "song" to be performed all night by competing performers who passed through the city. The era ended in 1936 when producer John H. Hammond began signing Kansas City talent and transferring the acts to New York City. Memorial to Charlie Parker at the American Jazz Museum at 18th and Highland in Kansas City Kansas City Jazz is a style of jazz that developed and flourished in Kansas City, Missouri and the surrounding Kansas City Metropolitan Area during the 1930s and marked the transition from the structured big... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 1903 KB) Summary Charlie Parker at the Kansas City Jazz Museum. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3072x2304, 1903 KB) Summary Charlie Parker at the Kansas City Jazz Museum. ... Charles Bird Parker, Jr. ... The Premiere Jazz Museum in the United States. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... Thomas Joseph Pendergast (July 22, 1873 – January 26, 1945) controlled Kansas City as a political boss. ... Musical improvisation is the spontaneous creative process of making music while it is being performed. ... John Henry Hammond (December 15, 1910–July 10, 1987) was a record producer, musician and music critic from the 1930s to the early 1980s. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


The era of Kansas City influence is bracketed by the signing of Count Basie in 1929 to the advent of Kansas City native Charlie Parker in the 1940s. Pendergast pleaded guilty to income tax evasion in 1939 and the city soon began a crackdown of the clubs. William Count Basie (August 21, 1904 – April 26, 1984) was an American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer. ... Charles Bird Parker, Jr. ...


In the 1970s Kansas City attempted to resurrect the glory of the jazz era in a sanitized family friendly atmosphere. In the 1970s an effort to open jazz clubs in the River Quay area of City Market along the Missouri ended in a gangland war in which three of the new clubs were blown up in what ultimately resulted in the removal of Kansas City mob influence in the Las Vegas casinos that was partially depicted in the movie Casino (movie). Casino is a 1995 movie directed by Martin Scorsese, based on the book of the same name by Nicholas Pileggi and Larry Shandling. ...


In 1981, 114 people died in the Hyatt Regency walkway collapse at a tea dance that was attempting to recreate the jazz era. In 1999 the American Jazz Museum opened in the 18th and Vine neighborhood. Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... View of the lobby floor, during the first day of the investigation The Hyatt Regency hotel walkway collapse was a major disaster that occurred on July 17, 1981 in Kansas City, Missouri, killing 114 people and injuring more than 200 others during a tea dance. ... A tea dance or thé dansant is an afternoon or early evening dance. ... The Premiere Jazz Museum in the United States. ...


Rock/Blues/Hip-Hop

Kansas City's local music scene enjoyed a revival starting in the mid-1960s, based around rock and blues in addition to jazz. Live music venues can be found throughout the city, with the highest concentration in the Westport entertainment district centered on Broadway and Westport Road near the Country Club Plaza. More recently, punk and hip-hop acts have been popular. Recent rock groups originating in Kansas City and direct surrounding areas include Puddle of Mudd, The Get Up Kids, Shiner, Flee The Seen, The Life and Times, Reggie and the Full Effect, Coalesce, The Casket Lottery, The Gadjits, The Appleseed Cast, The Esoteric, Vedera, and Blackpool Lights. Native rappers include Tech N9ne, and Solè. Kansas City Pioneer Square monument in Westport features Pony Express founder Alexander Majors, Westport/Kansas City founder John Calvin McCoy and Mountainman Jim Bridger who owned Chouteaus Store next to Kellys Kellys at 500 Westport Road or neighboring Chouteaus Store at 504 Westport are considered to... Kansas Citys Country Club Plaza The Country Club Plaza (often referred to as the Plaza) is an upscale shopping district in Kansas City, Missouri, USA. It was the second shopping center in the world designed to accommodate shoppers arriving by automobile. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... For other uses, see Hip hop (disambiguation). ... Puddle of Mudd is an American post-grunge band from Kansas City, Missouri, United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Shiner was a band from Kansas City, Missouri. ... Flee The Seen is a Rock band based out of Kansas City, Missouri and is currently signed to Facedown Records. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Reggie and the Full Effect is a Kansas City-based American band featuring James Dewees who was the former drummer for Coalesce, keyboardist for The Get Up Kids, and former touring keyboardist for New Found Glory. ... For other uses of coalesce, see Coalescence. ... The Casket Lottery is a a three-piece indie rock band from Kansas City, Missouri. ... The Gadjits were a third wave ska and rock and roll band from Kansas City, Missouri. ... The Appleseed Cast is an indie rock band based in Lawrence, Kansas and currently comprises singer/guitarist Christopher Crisci, guitarist Aaron Pillar, bassist Marc Young and drummer Aaron Coker. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline for Music. ... Vedera (formerly Veda) is an indie rock and art rock band from Kansas City, Missouri. ... Blackpool Lights are an indie rock/pop-punk band founded in Kansas City, Missouri, that includes former Get Up Kids band member Jim Suptic. ... Tech N9ne (born Aaron Dontez Yates on November 8, 1971 in Kansas City, Missouri) is an American rapper. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...


In addition, The New York Times declared nearby Lawrence, Kansas "the most vital music scene between Chicago and Denver" in a travel column dated February 25, 2005. The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Lawrence is a river city in and the seat of Douglas County, Kansas, United States, 41 miles (66 km) west of Kansas City, along the banks of both the Kansas (Kaw) and Wakarusa Rivers. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Media

Kansas City Star new printing plant that opened in June 2006. The Star headquarters is the red brick building on the lower right.
Kansas City Star new printing plant that opened in June 2006. The Star headquarters is the red brick building on the lower right.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2882x1287, 190 KB) Summary Kansas City Star printing plant. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2882x1287, 190 KB) Summary Kansas City Star printing plant. ... The Kansas City Star is a newspaper in Kansas City, Missouri. ...

Print media

The Kansas City Star is the area's primary newspaper. William Rockhill Nelson and his partner, Samuel Morss, first published the evening paper on September 18, 1880. The Star competed heavily with the morningTimes before acquiring it in 1901. The "Times" name was discontinued in March 1990, when the morning paper was renamed the "Star." [19] (African American focused) and several weekly papers, including the Kansas City Business Journal, The Pitch, the bilingual paper "Dos Mundos" and various suburban papers also serve the Kansas City area. The Kansas City Star is a McClatchy newspaper based in Kansas City, Missouri, in the United States. ... William Rockhill Nelson (March 7, 1841 - April 13, 1915) founded The Kansas City Star in 1880. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Pitch is a free alternative weekly newspaper distributed in the Kansas City Metropolitan Area, including Lawrence and Topeka, Kansas. ...


Broadcast media

Landmark KCTV-TV Tower on West 31st on Union Hill
Landmark KCTV-TV Tower on West 31st on Union Hill

The Kansas City media market (ranked 29 by Arbitron and 31 by Nielsen) includes ten television channels along with 30 FM and 21 AM radio stations. Kansas City is a stepping stone for many national broadcasters including Walter Cronkite, Rush Limbaugh, and Mancow Muller. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1610x2900, 214 KB) Summary KCTV Tower on 31st Street on Union Hill in Kansas City, with the Firefighters Memorial Fountain in the foreground. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1610x2900, 214 KB) Summary KCTV Tower on 31st Street on Union Hill in Kansas City, with the Firefighters Memorial Fountain in the foreground. ... For the North Korean TV channel, see Korean Central Television KCTV (channel 5, DTV 24), KCTV5 is the CBS affiliate television station in the Kansas City Designated market area. ... Landmark KCTV-TV tower on 31st Street on Union Hill, with the Firefighters Fountain in foreground. ... Walter Leland Cronkite, Jr. ... For other uses, see Limbaugh. ... Erich Matthew Muller (born June 21, 1966 in Kansas City, Missouri) is an American radio and television personality known as Mancow or Mancow Muller. ...


Film community

Main article: Film in Kansas City

Kansas City has also been a locale for Hollywood productions and television programming. Most notably, the 1983 television movie The Day After was filmed in Kansas City and Lawrence, Kansas. The 1990s film Truman starring Gary Sinise was also filmed in various parts of the city. Other films shot in or around Kansas City include Article 99, Mr. & Mrs. Bridge, Kansas City, Paper Moon, In Cold Blood, and Sometimes They Come Back (in and around nearby Liberty, MO). The city of Kansas City, Missouri has often been a locale for Hollywood productions and television programming. ... ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... This article is about the 1983 TV movie about nuclear war. ... Lawrence is a river city in and the seat of Douglas County, Kansas, United States, 41 miles (66 km) west of Kansas City, along the banks of both the Kansas (Kaw) and Wakarusa Rivers. ... Truman is a 1995 HBO movie starring Gary Sinise as Harry S. Truman. ... Gary Alan Sinise (born March 17, 1955) is an Emmy and Golden Globe winning, Golden Palm and Academy Award nominated American actor and film director. ... Article 99 is a 1992 American film written by Ron Cutler and directed by Howard Deutch. ... Mr. ... Kansas City is a 1996 film, directed by Robert Altman, and featuring numerous jazz tracks. ... Paper Moon is an American motion picture comedy that was released in 1973 and was directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ... The 1967 film In Cold Blood was based on Capotes novel of the same name. ... Sometimes They Come Back is a 1974 short story by Stephen King. ... Liberty is a city in Clay County, Missouri. ...

See also: The Independent Filmmakers Coalition of Kansas City

Independent Filmmakers Coalition of Kansas City is an organization devoted to the support of film production, including video and multimedia, in the region around the Kansas City Metropolitan Area. ...

Sports

Main article: Sports in Kansas City
Kauffman Stadium
Kauffman Stadium

Kauffman Stadium Kansas City sports teams presently include the following: // Jackie Robinson Sprint Center Rendering With the construction of the new Sprint Center arena, Kansas City is hoping to land an NHL or NBA franchise as the premier tenant for the new arena in the near future. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1618 KB) Summary night game at kauffman stadium Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1618 KB) Summary night game at kauffman stadium Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ...

Current teams

Kansas City sports teams presently include the following:

Club Sport Founded League Venue
Kansas City Chiefs American Football 1963 National Football League : AFC Arrowhead Stadium
Kansas City Royals Baseball 1969 Major League Baseball : AL Kauffman Stadium
Kansas City Explorers Tennis 1993 World TeamTennis Barney Allis Plaza
Kansas City Wizards Soccer (Football) 1996 Major League Soccer : EC Arrowhead Stadium
Kansas City Brigade Arena Football 2006 Arena Football League : AC Sprint Center

City Kansas City, Missouri Team colors Red, white and yellow Head Coach Herman Edwards Owner The Hunt Family (Clark Hunt, chairman)[1] General manager Carl Peterson Mascot K.C. Wolf (1989-present) Warpaint (1963-1988) League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Western Division (1960-1969) National Football League... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... NFL redirects here. ... American Football Conference logo. ... Arrowhead Stadium is a stadium located in Kansas City, Missouri, and home to the National Football Leagues Kansas City Chiefs and Major League Soccers Kansas City Wizards. ... Major league affiliations American League (1969–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 10, 20, 42 Name Kansas City Royals (1969–present) Other nicknames The Boys in Blue Ballpark Kauffman Stadium (1973–present) a. ... This article is about the sport. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Ewing M. Kauffman Stadium (formerly Royals Stadium) is a Major League Baseball stadium located in Kansas City, Missouri, and home to the Kansas City Royals of the American League. ... The Kansas City Explorers are a World TeamTennis team that play at the Country Club Plaza Tennis Center in Kansas City, Missouri, USA. All home matches begin at 7:35 p. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... World TeamTennis is a league of team tennis in the United States. ... A view of the Kansas City Explorers Tennis Court from the stands in Barney Allis Plaza. ... Year founded 1995 League Major League Soccer Nickname Wizards Stadium Arrowhead Stadium Kansas City, MO Coach Curt Onalfo Owner OnGoal, LLC. First Game Kansas City Wiz 3–0 Colorado Rapids (Arrowhead Stadium; April 13, 1996) Largest Win Kansas City Wizards 6–0 MetroStars (Arrowhead Stadium; June 20, 1999) Worst Defeat... The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Major League Soccer (MLS) is a professional soccer league with teams in the United States and Canada. ... Eastern Conference logo The Eastern Conference is one of Major League Soccers two conferences. ... Arrowhead Stadium is a stadium located in Kansas City, Missouri, and home to the National Football Leagues Kansas City Chiefs and Major League Soccers Kansas City Wizards. ... Conference American Division Central Year founded 2006 Home arena Kemper Arena (2006-2007); Sprint Center (2008-) City, State Kansas City, Missouri Head Coach Kevin Porter ArenaBowl championships none Conference titles none Division titles none Wild Card berths 1: 2007 The Kansas City Brigade is a team from the Arena Football... Arena football is a sport invented by Jim Foster, a former executive of the United States Football League and the National Football League. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Arena Football League (AFL) was founded in 1987 as an American football indoor league. ... The Central Division is one of four divisions that make up the Arena Football League. ... Sprint Center[1] is a large, multi-use indoor arena in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. ...

Sporting events

  • Kansas City is often the home of the Big 12 College Basketball Tournaments. Men's Basketball is played at Kemper Arena, while women's Basketball is played at Municipal Auditorium. Lately newer arenas in Dallas and Oklahoma City have hosted the tournament. The new Sprint Center will host the tournament in March 2008.

Categories: College athletics conferences ... Kemper Arena American Royal Center is an 19,500 seat indoor arena in Kansas City, Missouri that has hosted NCAA Final Four basketball games, professional basketball and hockey teams, the 1976 Republican Convention, and is the ongoing host of the American Royal livestock show. ... Municipal Auditorium in August 2006 For other uses, see Municipal Auditorium (disambiguation). ... Sprint Center[1] is a large, multi-use indoor arena in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. ... Arrowhead Stadium is a stadium located in Kansas City, Missouri, and home to the National Football Leagues Kansas City Chiefs and Major League Soccers Kansas City Wizards. ... Categories: College athletics conferences ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Northwest Missouri State University is a state university in Maryville, Missouri. ... Pittsburg State University, also called Pitt State or PSU, is a public university with approximately 6,600 students (5,200 undergraduates and 1,400 graduate students) located in Pittsburg, Kansas. ... The Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association (MIAA) is a college athletic conference which operates in the midwestern United States (in the states of Kansas and Missouri). ... Arkansas State University student union, Jonesboro, Arkansas Arkansas State University (A-State) or (ASU) is a public university and is the flagship campus of the Arkansas State University System, the states second largest college system. ... University of Missouri redirects here. ... The sports teams at the University of Kansas are known as the Jayhawks. ... University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma founded in 1890. ...

Sites of interest

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 498 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (831 × 1000 pixel, file size: 393 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Cookiecaper took this photograph on Memorial Day 2003 when he visited. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 498 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (831 × 1000 pixel, file size: 393 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Cookiecaper took this photograph on Memorial Day 2003 when he visited. ... Liberty Memorial Liberty Memorial, in Kansas City, is dedicated to the victory of liberty over oppression, in World War I against the Triple Alliance. ...

Museums

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art as seen from Emanuel Cleaver Boulevard to the south The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art is the preeminent art museum in both Kansas City, Missouri, and the Kansas City Metropolitan Area as a whole. ... The Jewel Ball is a debutante ball in Kansas City, Missouri. ... The Premiere Jazz Museum in the United States. ... For other memorials to liberty, see Monument of Liberty. ... The Negro Leagues Baseball Museum was founded in 1990 in Kansas City, Missouri. ... The Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art opened in 1994 in Kansas City, Missouri. ... The Airline History Museum is located at the Kansas City Downtown Airport in Kansas City, Missouri. ... Kansas City Pioneer Square monument in Westport features Pony Express founder Alexander Majors, Westport/Kansas City founder John Calvin McCoy and Mountainman Jim Bridger who owned Chouteaus Store next to Kellys Kellys at 500 Westport Road or neighboring Chouteaus Store at 504 Westport are considered to... The Arabia Steamboat. ... The Irish Museum and Cultural Center is the newest addition to Kansas Citys Irish American community. ... Kansas City Union Station in Kansas City, Missouri is one of many union stations in the United States. ...

Art galleries

Kansas City satellite map
Kansas City satellite map
  • Dennis Morgan Gallery
  • Joseph Nease Gallery
  • The Bohemian Gallery
  • Dead Sea Artworks
  • Belger Arts Center

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 401 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (669 × 1000 pixel, file size: 118 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The permission for use of this work has been archived in the Wikimedia OTRS system. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 401 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (669 × 1000 pixel, file size: 118 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The permission for use of this work has been archived in the Wikimedia OTRS system. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

Historical sites

  • Battle of Westport and the John Wornall House Museum (website).
  • Country Club Plaza (website) -- first shopping center designed to accommodate the automobile. Now considered one of the great urban shopping districts in America.
  • Liberty Memorial (website)-- Official World War I memorial and museum of the United States. Tower and observation deck restored and re-opened in 2002, additional museum space was added beneath the tower and two original museum buildings.
  • Laugh-O-Gram Studio (www.laughograms.com), Walt Disney's original cartoon studio in Kansas City. Now being renovated.
  • Thomas Hart Benton Home and Studio State Historic Site (website)

Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Samuel R. Curtis Sterling Price Strength Army of the Border (22,000) Army of Missouri (8,500) Casualties 1,500 1,500 Cannon at Loose Park. ... Kansas Citys Country Club Plaza The Country Club Plaza (often referred to as the Plaza) is an upscale shopping district in Kansas City, Missouri, USA. It was the second shopping center in the world designed to accommodate shoppers arriving by automobile. ... Liberty Memorial Liberty Memorial, in Kansas City, is dedicated to the victory of liberty over oppression, in World War I against the Triple Alliance. ... Laugh-O-Gram Studio in Kansas City. ... Thomas Hart Benton is a name shared by the following American men: Thomas Hart Benton (senator) (1782-1858) Thomas Hart Benton (painter) (1889-1975) Thomas H. Benton (higher education columnist) (1968-) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

Entertainment

  • Worlds of Fun and Oceans of Fun amusement parks
  • Kansas City Zoo and Starlight Theatre, located in Swope Park.
  • Ameristar Casino Kansas City
  • Dave & Busters
  • Kansas City Irish Fest (website), Labor Day weekend annually.
  • The Country Club Plaza Christmas lighting ceremony occurs every Thanksgiving; the Plaza Art Fair is held annually in September.
  • The Kansas City St. Patrick's Day parade, one of the largest such parades in the United States.
  • The Kansas City Renaissance Festival held in Bonner Springs, Kansas.

Worlds of Fun (WOF) is an amusement park in Kansas City, Missouri, United States. ... Oceans of Fun is a water park that opened on May 31, 1982 in Kansas City, Missouri. ... Kansas City Zoological Park (Kansas City Zoo) is a large zoo located in Swope Park at 6800 Zoo Drive. ...

Educational institutions

Further information: Kansas City Metropolitan Area#Educational institutions

Kansas City satellite map The Kansas City Metropolitan Area is a metropolitan area situated at the confluence of the Kansas and Missouri Rivers, sometimes known as (Kaw Point). ...

Post-secondary

MCC-Penn Valley
MCC-Longview
MCC-Maple Woods
MCC-Business and Technology
MCC-Blue River

Avila University is a private university in Kansas City, Missouri which is sponsored by the Sisters of St. ... Begining in 1932, Calvary Bible College has become a nationally-known Bible college. ... DeVry University and DeVry Institute of Technology are divisions of Devry Inc. ... Mineral Hall at Kansas City Art Institute The Kansas City Art Institute (KCAI) is a private, independent, four-year college of fine arts and design founded in 1885 that has taught Walt Disney and other artists in Kansas City, Missouri. ... Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, located in Kansas City, Missouri, is the second oldest medical school in Missouri, and the largest in the state. ... Metropolitan Community College (MCC) is a community college located in Kansas City, Missouri that consists of five separate campuses. ... Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (MBTS) is one of six official seminaries of the Southern Baptist Convention. ... National American University is a private, regionally-accredited, multi-campus institution of higher learning committed to building a learning partnership with students locally, nationally and worldwide. ... This article is about Rockhurst University. ... The University of Missouri - Kansas City (often referred to as UMKC) is an institution of higher learning located in Kansas City, Missouri, USA. Its main campus is in Kansas Citys Rockhill neighborhood east of the Country Club Plaza. ... University of Phoenix (UOP) is a for-profit educational institution specializing in adult education, with campuses located throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Puerto Rico. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Elementary and secondary

Kansas City is served by a variety of school districts.


School districts that serve Kansas City include:

  • Blue Springs R-IV School District
  • Center 58 School District
  • Grandview Consolidated No.4 School District
  • Hickman Mills Consolidated No.1 School District
  • Independence School District
  • Kansas City, Missouri School District (KCMSD)
  • Lee's Summit R-VII School District
  • Liberty Schools
  • North Kansas City School District
  • Park Hill School District
  • Platte County School District
  • Raytown Consolidated No.2 School District
  • Shawnee Mission School District (SMSD)
  • Smithville School District

Private schools in Kansas City include: The Blue Springs R-VII School District is a school district that serves Blue Springs, Missouri in the State of Missouri. ... Kansas City, Missouri School District is a school district headquartered in Kansas City, Missouri, United States. ... The Lees Summit R-VII School District is a school district that serves parts Kansas City, Missouri, Unity Village, Greenwood, Lake Winnebago , Lake Lotawana and rural eastern Jackson County. ... An accredited school district in Platte County, Missouri. ... Smithville School District is a school district located north of the Kansas City Metropolitan Area in Clay County, Missouri. ...

The Barstow School (commonly known simply as Barstow), founded in 1884[1] by Miss Mary Louise Barstow, is a nonsectarian, coeducational, private preparatory school located on State Line Road in suburban southern Kansas City, Missouri, USA. The Barstow School enrolls approximately 650 students in preschool through 12th grade. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... The Pembroke Hill School (commonly known as Pembroke Hill) is a nonsectarian, coeducational, private preparatory school in Kansas City, Missouri, USA. The school is located on two campuses, the Ward Parkway Campus and the Wornall Campus, both in Kansas Citys Sunset Hill neighborhood near the Country Club Plaza. ... Rockhurst High School (usually referred to simply as Rockhurst) is a private, Roman Catholic, Jesuit, preparatory school for boys located in Kansas City, Missouri, USA, on the Missouri-Kansas border along State Line Road. ... Archbishop OHara High School is a private, Roman Catholic high school in Kansas City, Missouri. ... Saint Pius X Catholic High School is a private Roman Catholic university prepratory secondary school in Kansas City, Missouri, United States. ... St. ...

References

  1. ^ Census Bureau Estimates Program (2005). Retrieved on 2006-09-11.
  2. ^ Annual Estimates of the Population of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2005 (CBSA-EST2005-01). Retrieved on 2006-09-11.
  3. ^ Census Bureau Estimates Program (2006). Retrieved on 2007-29-07.
  4. ^ Census Bureau Estimates Program (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-18.
  5. ^ http://www.census.gov/population/www/estimates/metro_general/2006/CBSA-EST2006-01.csv
  6. ^ http://www.kcmo.org/kcmo.nsf/web/kchistory?opendocument
  7. ^ ‘City of Fountains’ Indeed. Retrieved on 2006-09-10.
  8. ^ Why is Kansas City located in Missouri instead of Kansas?. Retrieved on 2006-09-11.
  9. ^ Early City Limits. Retrieved on 2006-09-11.
  10. ^ Aber, James S.. Glacial Geology of the Kansas City Vicinity. Retrieved on 2006-09-05.
  11. ^ Cities by Category Ranking: Tap Water Quality. Retrieved on 2006-09-10.
  12. ^ Kansas City Tornado Almanac, wdaftv4.com. Accessed Sept. 2006.
  13. ^ KC powerless as icy barrage pummels the area, leaves behind disaster zone, Accessed 10 September 2006.
  14. ^ http://www.kcmo.org/planning/pdf/focus/NA_reports/triblen.pdf
  15. ^ A Foregone Conclusion: The Founding of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis by James Neal Primm - stlouisfed.org - Retrieved January 1, 2007.
  16. ^ 25 Safest Cities www.morganquinto.com Accessed Nov. 2006
  17. ^ Kevin Collison, "FBI crime data paint grim portrait", The Kansas City Star, September 26, 2006
  18. ^ Kansas City Area Development Council
  19. ^ [Harry Haskell, Boss-Busters and Sin Hounds: Kansas City and Its "Star" (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2007) ISBN 9780826217691</<ref> Monthly newspapers such as ''The Kansas City Metro Voice'', ''The Call''<ref>http://www.kccall.com/</li></ol></ref>

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Coordinates: 39.10° N 94.58° W Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... Chambers of commerce are business advocacy groups which are usually not associated with government. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Kansas City, Missouri - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2994 words)
Situated at the junction of the Missouri and Kansas rivers, it lies along the boundary between Missouri and Kansas, and is directly opposite of Kansas City, Kansas.
Downtown Kansas City is an area of 2.9 square miles bounded by the Missouri River to the north, 31st Street to the south, Bruce R. Watkins Drive (U.S. Highway 71) to the east and I-35 to the west.
Kansas City is home to the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletic Association, a NCAA Division II conference of nine schools in Missouri and Kansas.
Kansas City, Missouri - definition of Kansas City, Missouri in Encyclopedia (1397 words)
Kansas City is a city in Clay, Cass, Jackson, and Platte counties in Missouri.
The City was connected to the telegraph system in 1858, to the railway in 1864 (with a bridge crossing the river in 1869) and the first aircraft landed at the Municipal Airport in 1927.
Kansas City Sports team presently include the Kansas City Chiefs of the NFL's American Conference Western Division; The Kansas City Royals, of MLB's American League Central; The MLS's KC Wizards; the MISL's KC Comets; the ABA's KC Knights; and the newly formed Kansas City Outlaws in the United Hockey League.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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