FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
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Encyclopedia > Kansas
State of Kansas
Flag of Kansas State seal of Kansas
Flag of Kansas Seal
Nickname(s): The Sunflower State
Motto(s): Ad astra per aspera
Official language(s) English[1]
Demonym Kansan
Capital Topeka
Largest city Wichita
Area  Ranked 15th in the US
 - Total 82,277 sq mi
(213,096 km²)
 - Width 211 miles (340 km)
 - Length 417 miles (645 km)
 - % water 0.56
 - Latitude 37° N to 40° N
 - Longitude 94° 35′ W to 102° 3′ W
Population  Ranked 33rd in the US
 - Total 2,688,418
 - Density 32.9/sq mi 
12.7/km² (40th in the US)
Elevation  
 - Highest point Mount Sunflower[2]
4,039 ft  (1,232 m)
 - Mean 2,000 ft  (600 m)
 - Lowest point Verdigris River[2]
679 ft  (207 m)
Admission to Union  January 29, 1861 (34th)
Governor Kathleen Sebelius (D)
Lieutenant Governor Mark Parkinson (D)
U.S. Senators Sam Brownback (R)
Pat Roberts (R)
Congressional Delegation List
Time zones  
 - most of state Central: UTC-6/-5
 - 4 western counties Mountain: UTC-7/-6
Abbreviations US-KS
Website www.kansas.gov

Kansas (IPA: /ˈkænzəs/) is a Midwestern state[3] in the central region of the United States of America, an area often referred to as the American "Heartland". It is named after the Kansas River which flows through it, which in turn was named after the Kansa tribe, who inhabited the area.[4] The tribe's name (natively kką:ze) is often said to mean "people of the wind" or "people of the south wind", although this was probably not the term's original meaning.[5][6] Residents of Kansas are called "Kansans". The name Kansas may refer to— the midwestern state in the United States. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kansas. ... 12. ... Kansas Seal Details The Kansas state seal 2 tells the history of Kansas. ... This is a list of U.S. state nicknames -- both official and traditional (official state nicknames are in bold). ... Here is a list of state mottos for the states of the United States. ... Ad astra is a Latin phrase meaning to the stars. It is used as, or as part of, the motto of many organizations. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_KS.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kansas ... The United States does not have an official language, but English is spoken by about 82% of the population as a native language. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... This article is about the state capital of Kansas. ... For other uses, see Wichita (disambiguation). ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... This is a complete list of the states of the United States ordered by total area, land area, and water area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Map of states populations (2007) This is a list of states of the United States by population (with inhabited non-state jurisdictions included for comparison) as of July 1, 2007, according to the 2007 estimates of the United States Census Bureau. ... Map of states showing population density This is a list of the 50 U.S. states, ordered by population density. ... This is a list of United States states by elevation. ... Mount Sunflower, although not a true mountain, is the highest point in the state of Kansas. ... The Verdigris River is a tributary of the Arkansas River in southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma in the United States. ... The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Kathleen Gilligan Sebelius (born May 15, 1948 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American Democratic politician who currently serves as the 44th Governor of Kansas. ... This is a complete and current List of United States Lieutenant Governors. ... Mark Parkinson is an American lawyer, businessman, and politician who is currently a Democratic candidate for the lieutenant governor of Kansas. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Samuel Dale Brownback (b. ... Charles Patrick Pat Roberts (born April 20, 1936) is a United States Senator from Kansas. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... These are tables of congressional delegations from Kansas to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Map of U.S. time zones with new CST and EST areas displayed This is a list of United States of America States by time zone. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Standard Time Zone (CST) is a geographic region in the Americas that keeps time by subtracting six hours from UTC (UTC-6). ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... MST is UTC-7 The Mountain Standard Time Zone (MST) is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting seven hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), resulting in UTC-7. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... The following is a list of abbreviations used by the United States Postal Service. ... ISO 3166-2 codes for the United States of America cover 50 states, 1 district, 6 outlying areas (including 9 minor outlying islands under separate ISO 3166-1 country code UM). ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Midwest States (United States of America, ND to OH) The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... The Central United States is a bridge region between the Eastern United States and Western United States. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Heartland is a most often a geopolitical term, often used to refer to a central area of Eurasia that is remote and inaccessible from the periphery. ... The Kansas River near De Soto Kaw River (map) looking southward from middle of Turner Diagonal bridge. ... The Kaw (or Kanza ) are an American Indian people of the central Midwestern United States. ...


Historically, the area was home to large numbers of nomadic Native Americans that hunted bison. It was first settled by European Americans in the 1830s, but the pace of settlement accelerated in the 1850s, in the midst of political wars over the slavery issue. When officially opened to settlement by the U.S. government in 1854, abolitionist Free-Staters from New England and pro-slavery settlers from neighboring Missouri rushed to the territory to determine if Kansas would become a free state or a slave state. Thus, the area was a hotbed of violence and chaos in its early days as these forces collided, and was known as Bleeding Kansas. The abolitionists eventually prevailed and on January 29, 1861, Kansas entered the Union as a free state. After the Civil War, the population of Kansas exploded when waves of immigrants turned the prairie into productive farmland. Today, Kansas is one of the most productive agricultural states, producing many crops, and leading the nation in wheat and sunflower production most years. Communities of nomadic people move from place to place, rather than settling down in one location. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Species †B. antiquus B. bison B. bonasus †B. latifrons †B. occidentalis †B. priscus Bison in winter. ... This 1856 map shows slave states (grey), free states (red), and US territories (green) with Kansas in center (white). ... Free Stater[1] is an Irish blog set up (amongst other reasons) as a response to the censorship policies in place at the so-called Freedom Institute, a young think-tank effort by a coterie of (current and former) Irish third-level students of a right-wing bent. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Slavery in the United States began soon after English colonists first settled Virginia and lasted until the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The free and slave states as of 1861, with free states in blue and slave states in red. ... Bleeding Kansas, sometimes referred to in history as Bloody Kansas or the Border War, was a series of violent events, involving Free-Staters (anti-slavery) and pro-slavery Border Ruffian elements, that took place in the Kansas Territory and the western frontier towns of the U.S. state of Missouri... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Animated map of secession, Civil War and re-admission:  States of the Union  Territories of the Union (including occupied territory)  States of the Confederacy  Territories claimed by Confederacy During the American Civil War, the Union was a name used to refer to the twenty-three states of the United States... The free and slave states as of 1861, with free states in blue and slave states in red. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... For other uses, see Prairie (disambiguation). ... Species T. aestivum T. boeoticum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum T. timopheevii References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 Wheat Wheat For the indie rock group, see Wheat (band). ... For other uses, see Sunflower (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Geography

Kansas is bordered by Nebraska on the north; Missouri on the east; Oklahoma on the south; and Colorado on the west. The state is divided up into 105 counties with 628 cities. It is located equidistant from the Pacific and the Atlantic oceans. The geographic center of the 48 contiguous states is located in Smith County near Lebanon, Kansas. The geodetic center of North America was located in Osborne County until 1983. This spot was used until that date as the central reference point for all maps of North America produced by the U.S. government. The geographic center of Kansas is located in Barton County. For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... This is a listing of counties in the U.S. state of Kansas. ... This is a listing of cities located in the U.S. state of Kansas. ... personal space, proxemics. ... A tourist enjoys his trip to the marker located near Lebanon, Kansas, USA A small chapel and picnic ground are located adjacent the marker The Geographic Center of the Contiguous United States is pinpointed by a historical marker that is located within a small park near the town of Lebanon... Smith County (standard abbreviation: SM) is a county located in the state of Kansas. ... Lebanon is a city located in Smith County, Kansas. ... Meades Ranch in Kansas boasts the geodetic base point for the North American Datum of 1927 (NAD 27) at 39° 13 26. ... Osborne County (standard abbreviation: OB) is a county located in the state of Kansas. ... Barton County (standard abbreviation: BT) is a county located in the state of Kansas. ...


Topography

The western two thirds of the state, lying in the great central plain of the United States, has a generally flat or undulating surface. However, the eastern third has many hills and forests. The land displays a gradual slope up from east to west; its altitude above the sea ranges from 684 ft (208 m) along the Verdigris River at Coffeyville in Montgomery County, to 4,039 ft (1,231 m) at Mount Sunflower, one half mile from the Colorado border, in Wallace County. For other uses, see Great Plains (disambiguation). ... The Verdigris River is a tributary of the Arkansas River in southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma in the United States. ... Coffeyville is a city situated along the Verdigris River in the southeastern part of Montgomery County, located in Southeast Kansas, in the central United States. ... Montgomery County (standard abbreviation: MG) is a county located in the state of Kansas. ... Mount Sunflower, although not a true mountain, is the highest point in the state of Kansas. ... Wallace County (standard abbreviation: WA) is a county located in the state of Kansas. ...

Spring River, Kansas
Spring River, Kansas

The Missouri River forms nearly 75 mi (121 km) of the state's northeastern boundary. The Kansas River (locally known as the Kaw), formed by the junction of the Smoky Hill and Republican rivers at appropriately-named Junction City, joins the Missouri at Kansas City, after a course of 170 mi (270 km) across the northeastern part of the state. The Arkansas River (pronounced AR-kan-sas), rising in Colorado, flows with a bending course for nearly 500 mi (800 km) across the western and southern parts of the state. It forms, with its tributaries (the Little Arkansas, Ninnescah, Walnut, Cow Creek, Cimarron, Verdigris, and the Neosho), the southern drainage system of the state. Other important rivers are the Saline and Solomon River's, tributaries of the Smoky Hill River; the Big Blue, Delaware, and Wakarusa, which flow into the Kansas River; and the Marais des Cygnes, a tributary of the Missouri River. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1800 pixel, file size: 715 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1800 pixel, file size: 715 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Note: for the Spring River located in south-central Missouri and north-central Arkansas, see Spring River (Arkansas). ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... The Kansas River near De Soto Kaw River (map) looking southward from middle of Turner Diagonal bridge. ... The Smoky Hill River is a 560-mile river in Colorado and Kansas. ... The Republican River rises on the high plains of eastern Colorado in the United States. ... Junction City is a city in Geary County, Kansas, United States. ... Nickname: Location in Wyandotte, County in the state of Kansas. ... The Arkansas River flows through Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... The Little Arkansas River (prounounced ahr-KAN-zez), is a 90 mi (145 km) long river located in South Central Kansas. ... Cow Creek is a creek in Rice County, Kansas. ... The Cimarron is a river in the USA. It rises near Folsom, New Mexico, and flows through New Mexico, Oklahoma, Colorado, and Kansas before reaching the Arkansas above Tulsa, Oklahoma. ... The Neosho River is a tributary of the Arkansas River in eastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma in the United States. ... The Saline River is a river in Kansas, which is located near a salt spring. ... The Big Blue River. ... The Delaware River in Kansas is located in the North-Eastern part of the state. ... The Wakarusa River is a tributary of the Kansas River, approximately 50 mi (80 km) long, in eastern Kansas in the United States. ... The Marais des Cygnes River (muhr-ee duh SEEN) is a principal tributary of the Osage River, about 140 mi (225 km) long, in eastern Kansas and western Missouri in the United States. ...


National parks and historic sites

Areas under the protection of the National Park Service include: The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...

Brown v. ... California Trail The California Trail was a major overland emigrant route across the American West from Missouri to California in the middle 19th century. ... Fort Larned was established in 1859 as a base of military operations against hostile Indians of the Central Plains, to protect traffic along the Santa Fe Trail and as an agency for the administration of the Central Plains Indians by the Bureau of Indian Affairs under the terms of the... Larned is a city located in Pawnee County, Kansas. ... Promises made and broken! A town attacked at dawn! Thousands made homeless by war! Soldiers fighting settlers! Each of these stories is a link in the chain of events that encircled Fort Scott from 1842-73. ... In 1804, Meriwether Lewis & William Clark began a voyage of discovery with 45 men, a keelboat, two pirogues,and a dog. ... Nicodemus National Historic Site preserves, protects and interprets the only remaining western town established by African Americans during the Reconstruction Period following the Civil War. ... Nicodemus National Historic Site preserves, protects and interprets the only remaining western town established by African Americans during the Reconstruction Period following the Civil War. ... For other uses of the term, see Oregon Trail (disambiguation) The route of the Oregon Trail is shown in red in the western United States Ruts made by wagons on the Oregon Trail in eastern Wyoming, at Register Cliff. ... The Pony Express National Historic Trail was used by young men on fast paced horses to carry the nations mail across the country, from St. ... The Santa Fe Trail was an important route in the western United States, leading from Missouri to Santa Fe, New Mexico. ... On November 12, 1996, legislation was passed creating Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve in the Flint Hills region of Kansas. ... Strong City is a city located in Chase County, Kansas. ...

Climate

Storm clouds in northeastern Kansas
Storm clouds in northeastern Kansas

Kansas contains three climate types, according to the Köppen climate classification: humid continental, semiarid steppe, and humid subtropical. The eastern two-thirds of the state has a humid continental climate, with cold winters and hot summers. Most of the precipitation falls in the summer and spring. The western third of the state has a semiarid steppe climate. Summers are hot, often very hot. Winters are cold in the northwest and cool to mild in the southwest. Also, the western region is semiarid, receiving an average of only about 16 inches (40 cm) of precipitation per year. Chinook winds in the winter can warm western Kansas all the way into the 80°F (25°C) range. The far south-central and southeastern reaches of the state have a humid subtropical climate, with long, hot summers, short, mild winters, and much more precipitation than the rest of the state. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 918 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) My photo of Kansas windmills in Flint Hills. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 918 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) My photo of Kansas windmills in Flint Hills. ... Updated Köppen-Geiger climate map[1] The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ... The humid continental climate is found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ... Semi-arid generally describes regions that receive low annual rainfall (25 to 50 cm /10 to 20 in) and generally have scrub or grass vegetation. ... This article is about the ecological zone type. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... For other uses, see Chinook. ... Subtropical (or semitropical) areas are those adjacent to the tropics, usually roughly defined as the ranges 23. ...


Precipitation ranges from about 46 inches (1200 mm) annually in the southeast of the state, to about 16 inches (400 mm) in the southwest. Snowfall ranges from around 5 inches (130 mm) in the fringes of the south, to 35 inches (900 mm) in the far northwest. Frost-free days range from more than 200 days in the south, to 130 days in the northwest. Thus, Kansas is the 9th or 10th sunniest state in the country, depending on the source. Western Kansas is as sunny as parts of California and Arizona.


In spite of the frequent sunshine throughout much of the state, the state is also vulnerable to strong thunderstorms, especially in the spring. Many of these storms become Supercell thunderstorms. These can spawn tornadoes, often of F3 strength or higher. According to statistics from the National Climatic Data Center, Kansas has reported more tornadoes (for the period 1st January 1950 through to 31st October 2006) than any state except for Texas - marginally even more than Oklahoma. It has also - along with Alabama - reported more F5 tornadoes than any other state. These are the most powerful of all tornadoes. Kansas averages over 50 tornadoes annually.[7] Satellite view of a supercell A supercell is a severe thunderstorm with a deep rotating updraft (a mesocyclone) [1]. Supercell thunderstorms are the largest, most severe class of single-cell thunderstorms. ... For other uses of Tornado, see Tornado (disambiguation). ... F-scale redirects here. ... The U.S. National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina is the worlds largest active archive of weather data. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... F-scale redirects here. ...


According to NOAA, the all time highest temperature recorded in Kansas is 121°F (49.4°C) on July 24, 1936, near Alton, and the all time low is -40°F (-40°C) on February 13, 1905, near Lebanon.


Kansas' all time record high of 121°F (49.4°C) ties with North Dakota for the fifth-highest all-time record high recorded in a state, behind California (134°F/56.7°C), Arizona (128°F/53.3°C), Nevada (125°F/51.7°C), and New Mexico (122°F/50°C). Official language(s) English Demonym North Dakotan Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ...

Monthly Normal High and Low Temperatures For Various Kansas Cities
City Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Concordia 36/17 43/22 54/31 64/41 74/52 85/62 91/67 88/66 80/56 68/44 51/30 40/21
Dodge City 41/19 48/24 57/31 67/41 76/52 87/62 93/67 91/66 82/56 70/44 54/30 44/22
Goodland 39/16 45/20 53/26 63/35 72/46 84/56 89/61 87/60 78/50 66/38 50/25 41/18
Topeka 37/17 44/23 56/33 66/43 75/53 84/63 89/68 88/65 80/56 69/44 53/32 41/22
Wichita 40/20 47/25 57/34 67/44 76/54 87/64 93/69 92/68 82/59 70/47 54/34 43/24
[3]

History

Main article: History of Kansas

For millennia, the land that is presently Kansas was inhabited by Native Americans. The first European to set foot in present-day Kansas was Francisco Vásquez de Coronado, who explored the area in 1541. In 1803, most of modern Kansas was secured by the United States as part of the Louisiana Purchase. Southwest Kansas, however, was still a part of Spain, Mexico, and the Republic of Texas until the conclusion of the Mexican-American War in 1848. From 1812 to 1821, Kansas was part of the Missouri Territory. The Santa Fe Trail traversed Kansas from 1821 to 1880, transporting manufactured goods from Missouri and silver and furs from Santa Fe, New Mexico. Wagon ruts from the trail are still visible in the prairie today. The history of Kansas is rich with the lore of the American West. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Coronado Sets Out to the North, by Frederic Remington, 1861-1909 Francisco Vázquez de Coronado (c. ... The Louisiana Purchase (French: Vente de la Louisiane) was the acquisition by the United States of America of 828,000 square miles (2,140,000 km²) of French territory (Louisiana) in 1803. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... Missouri Territory was a historic, organized territory in the United States. ... Trail logo The Santa Fe Trail was an historic 19th century transportation route across southwestern North America connecting Missouri with Santa Fe, New Mexico. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the chemical element. ... Nickname: Location in Santa Fe County, New Mexico Coordinates: , Country State County Santa Fe Founded ca. ...


In 1827, Fort Leavenworth became the first permanent settlement of white Americans in the future state. The Kansas-Nebraska Act became law on May 30, 1854, establishing the U.S. territories of Nebraska and Kansas, and opening the area to broader settlement by whites. Kansas Territory stretched all the way to the Continental Divide and included the sites of present-day Denver, Colorado Springs, and Pueblo. In 1827, Colonel Henry Leavenworth established a post on the bluffs overlooking the western bank of the Missouri River to protect the fur trade, safeguard commerce on the Santa Fe Trail and maintain the peace among the inhabitants. ... This 1856 map shows slave states (grey), free states (red), and US territories (green) with Kansas in center (white). ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... map of Kansas Territory Kansas Territory was an organized territory of the United States that existed from May 30, 1854 to January 29, 1861, when Kansas became the 34th U.S. state admitted to the Union. ... Nickname: Location of Denver in the State of Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country United States State State of Colorado City and County Denver[1] Founded 1858-11-22, as Denver City, K.T.[2] Incorporated 1861-11-07, as Denver City, C.T.[3] Consolidated... Colorado Springs is most populous Home Rule Municipality in the State of Colorado. ... The City of Pueblo (IPA: //) is a Home Rule Municipality that is the county seat of Pueblo County, Colorado, USA. Pueblo is situated at the confluence of the Arkansas River and Fountain Creek. ...

Missouri and Arkansas sent settlers into Kansas all along its eastern border. These settlers attempted to sway votes in favor of slavery. The secondary settlement of Americans in Kansas Territory were abolitionists from Massachusetts and other Free-Staters, who attempted to stop the spread of slavery from neighboring Missouri. Directly presaging the American Civil War, these forces collided, entering into skirmishes that earned the territory the name of Bleeding Kansas. Kansas was admitted to the United States as a free state on January 29, 1861, making it the 34th state to enter the Union. By that time the violence in Kansas had largely subsided. However, during the Civil War, on August 21, 1863, William Quantrill led several hundred men on a raid into Lawrence, destroying much of the city and killing nearly two hundred people. Until the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Quantrill's raid was the single bloodiest act of domestic terrorism in America.[citation needed] He was roundly condemned by both the conventional confederate military and the partisan rangers commissioned by the Missouri legilature. His application to that body for a commission was flatly rejected due to his pre war criminal record. (see, Jones, Gray Ghosts and Rebel Riders Holt & Co. 1956, p.76) Download high resolution version (900x586, 365 KB)TITLE: The destruction of the city of Lawrence, Kansas, and the massacre of its inhabitants by the Rebel guerrillas, August 21, 1863 SUMMARY: Print shows Rebel troops killing the citizens of Lawrence, Kansas, and setting fire to the buildings. ... Download high resolution version (900x586, 365 KB)TITLE: The destruction of the city of Lawrence, Kansas, and the massacre of its inhabitants by the Rebel guerrillas, August 21, 1863 SUMMARY: Print shows Rebel troops killing the citizens of Lawrence, Kansas, and setting fire to the buildings. ... The Battle of Lawrence was an attack by Quantrills raiders, led by William Clark Quantrill, on the pro-Union town of Lawrence, Kansas, a raid also known as the Lawrence Massacre. ... Lawrence is a river city in and the seat of Douglas County, Kansas, United States, 41 miles (66 km) west of Kansas City, along the banks of both the Kansas (Kaw) and Wakarusa Rivers. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Free Stater[1] is an Irish blog set up (amongst other reasons) as a response to the censorship policies in place at the so-called Freedom Institute, a young think-tank effort by a coterie of (current and former) Irish third-level students of a right-wing bent. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Bleeding Kansas, sometimes referred to in history as Bloody Kansas or the Border War, was a series of violent events, involving Free-Staters (anti-slavery) and pro-slavery Border Ruffian elements, that took place in the Kansas Territory and the western frontier towns of the U.S. state of Missouri... For the term free state as it arises in United States history, see: Free state. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... William Clark Quantrill of Quantrills Raiders William Clarke Quantrill (July 31, 1837 – June 6, 1865), was a Confederate guerrilla leader during the American Civil War. ... Lawrence is a river city in and the seat of Douglas County, Kansas, United States, 41 miles (66 km) west of Kansas City, along the banks of both the Kansas (Kaw) and Wakarusa Rivers. ... Alfred P. Murrah building four days before its demolition Alfred P. Murrah building during demolition Aerial view of Alfred P. Murrah building after bombing The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was a United States Federal Government complex located at 200 N.W. 5th Street in downtown Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. ... Nickname: Location in Oklahoma County and the state of Oklahoma. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


After the Civil War, many veterans constructed homesteads in Kansas. Many African Americans also looked to Kansas as the land of "John Brown," and led by men like Benjamin "Pap" Singleton began establishing black colonies in the state. At the same time, the Chisholm Trail was opened and the Wild West era commenced in Kansas. Wild Bill Hickok was a deputy marshal at Fort Riley and a marshal at Hays and Abilene. Dodge City was another wild cowboy town, and both Bat Masterson and Wyatt Earp worked as lawmen in the town. In one year alone, 8 million head of cattle from Texas boarded trains in Dodge City bound for the East, earning Dodge the nickname "Queen of the Cowtowns." In part as a response to the violence perpetrated by cowboys, on February 19, 1881, Kansas became the first U.S. state to adopt a Constitutional amendment prohibiting all alcoholic beverages. African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... John Brown (May 9, 1800 – December 2, 1859) was a white American abolitionist who advocated and practiced armed insurrection as a means to abolish all slavery. ... Benjamin Pap Singleton (1809-1892) was a significant figure in nineteenth century African American history. ... The Chisholm Trail was a route used in the late 19th century in the Western United States for cattle drives, the movement of cattle overland. ... The cowboy, the quintessential symbol of the American Old West, circa 1887. ... Not to be confused with William Wild Bill Hickok, American football player. ... Fort Riley is a census-designated place and United States Army post, in Northeast Kansas, on the Kansas River. ... Hays is a city in Ellis County, Kansas, near the intersection of Interstate 70 and U.S. Highway 183. ... Abilene is a city in Dickinson County, Kansas, United States, 163 miles (262 km) west of Kansas City. ... For the 1939 western movie, see Dodge City (1939 film). ... William Barclay Bat Masterson (November 27, 1853 [1] – October 25, 1921) was a figure of the American Old West. ... Wyatt Berry Stapp Earp (March 19, 1848–January 13, 1929) was an American farmer, teamster, sometime buffalo hunter, officer of the law in various Western frontier towns, gambler, saloon-keeper, and miner. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Booze redirects here. ...


Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1860 107,206
1870 364,399 239.9%
1880 996,096 173.4%
1890 1,428,108 43.4%
1900 1,470,495 3.0%
1910 1,690,949 15.0%
1920 1,769,257 4.6%
1930 1,880,999 6.3%
1940 1,801,028 -4.3%
1950 1,905,299 5.8%
1960 2,178,611 14.3%
1970 2,246,578 3.1%
1980 2,363,679 5.2%
1990 2,477,574 4.8%
2000 2,688,418 8.5%
Est. 2007 2,775,997 3.3%

As of 2007, Kansas has an estimated population of 2,775,997, which is an increase of 20,180, or 0.7%, from the prior year and an increase of 87,579, or 3.3%, since the year 2000.[8] This includes a natural increase since the last census of 93,899 people (that is 246,484 births minus 152,585 deaths) and a decrease due to net migration of 20,742 people out of the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 44,847 people, and migration within the country produced a net loss of 65,589 people.[9] The center of population of Kansas is located in Chase County, at 38°27′N, 96°32′W, approximately three miles north of the community of Strong City.[10] The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... This distribution is named for the pyramidal shape of its graph. ... Center of population is a subject of study in the field of demographics. ... Chase County (standard abbreviation: CS) is a county located in the U.S. state of Kansas. ... Strong City is a city located in Chase County, Kansas. ...

Demographics of Kansas (csv)
By race White Black AIAN* Asian NHPI*
2000 (total population) 91.19% 6.41% 1.78% 2.10% 0.12%
2000 (Hispanic only) 6.63% 0.23% 0.19% 0.05% 0.02%
2005 (total population) 90.87% 6.60% 1.67% 2.45% 0.12%
2005 (Hispanic only) 7.89% 0.28% 0.20% 0.06% 0.02%
Growth 2000–05 (total population) 1.74% 5.04% -4.13% 19.15% 3.43%
Growth 2000–05 (non-Hispanic only) 0.19% 4.28% -5.09% 19.19% 2.86%
Growth 2000–05 (Hispanic only) 21.51% 25.88% 3.71% 17.69% 5.86%
* AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native; NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

As of 2004, the population included 149,800 foreign-born (5.5% of the state population). The largest reported ancestries in the state are: German (25.9%), Irish (11.5%), English (10.8%), American (8.8%), French (3.1%), and Swedish (2.4%).[11] People of German ancestry are especially strong in the northwest, while those of British ancestry and descendants of white Americans from other states are especially strong in the southeast. Mexicans are present in the southwest and make up nearly half the population in certain counties. Many African Americans in Kansas are descended from the Exodusters, newly freed blacks who fled the South for land in Kansas following the Civil War. Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... British Americans are citizens of the British or partial British ancestry. ... By county. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Exodusters was a name given to black Americans who fled the Southern United States for Kansas in 1879 and 1880. ...


See Also British American and German-American British Americans are citizens of the British or partial British ancestry. ... German Americans (German Deutschamerikaner) are citizens of the United States of ethnic German ancestry and currently form the largest ancestry group in the United States, accounting for 17% of the U.S. population. ...


Rural flight

Urban and rural populations

Kansas is one of the slowest-growing states in the nation. Known as a rural exodus, the last few decades have been marked by a migratory pattern out of the countryside into cities. Rural exodus is a term used to describe the migratory patterns that normally occur in a region following the mechanisation of agriculture. ...


Out of all the cities in these Midwestern states, 89% have fewer than 3000 people, and hundreds of those have fewer than 1000. In Kansas alone, there are more than 6,000 ghost towns, according to one Kansas historian. A street corner in the ghost town of Bodie, California. ...


At the same time, some of the communities in Johnson County (metropolitan Kansas City) are among the fastest growing in the country.

Economy

Top 9 Kansas Employers (by number of employees)[12]
Rank Business Employees Location
#1 Spirit AeroSystems 21,000 Wichita
#2 Cessna 13,000 Wichita
#3 Fort Riley 12,500 Riley County
#4 Raytheon 9,500 Wichita
#5 Scanlon's LLC 6,000 Leavenworth
#6 University of Kansas Medical Center 5,000 Kansas City
#7 Via Christi St. Joseph Hospital 5,000 Wichita
#8 Via Christi St. Francis Hospital 3,300 Wichita
#9 Kansas State University 3,030 Manhattan

The 2003 gross domestic product of Kansas was US$97 billion, an increase of 4.3% over the prior year, but trailing the national average increase of 4.8%. Its per-capita income was US$29,438. The December 2003 unemployment rate was 4.9%. The agricultural outputs of the state are cattle, sheep, wheat, sorghum, soybeans, cotton, hogs, corn, and salt. Eastern Kansas is part of the Grain Belt, an area of major grain production in the central United States. The industrial outputs are transportation equipment, commercial and private aircraft, food processing, publishing, chemical products, machinery, apparel, petroleum and mining. Spirit AeroSystems, Inc. ... For other uses, see Wichita (disambiguation). ... Cessna Aircraft Company, headquartered in Wichita, Kansas, is a manufacturer of general aviation aircraft, from small two-seat, single-engine aircraft to business jets. ... For other uses, see Wichita (disambiguation). ... Fort Riley is a census-designated place and United States Army post, in Northeast Kansas, on the Kansas River. ... Riley County (standard abbreviation: RL) is a county located in the state of Kansas. ... Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) is a major American defense contractor and industrial corporation with core manufacturing concentrations in defense systems and defense and commercial electronics. ... For other uses, see Wichita (disambiguation). ... This article is about a U.S.-specific corporate form; for a general discussion of entities with limited liability, see corporation. ... Leavenworth redirects here. ... The University of Kansas (often referred to as just KU or Kansas) is an institution of higher learning located in Lawrence, Kansas. ... Nickname: Location in Wyandotte, County in the state of Kansas. ... For other uses, see Wichita (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wichita (disambiguation). ... Kansas State University, officially called Kansas State University of Fashion and Design [2] but commonly shortened to K-State, is an institution of higher learning located in Manhattan, Kansas, in the United States. ... Riley County Courthouse, Manhattan Manhattan is a town located in northeastern Kansas at the junction of the Kansas River and Big Blue River. ... GDP redirects here. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... Species See text. ... Species T. aestivum T. boeoticum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum T. timopheevii References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 Wheat Wheat For the indie rock group, see Wheat (band). ... Species About 30 species, see text Sorghum is a genus of numerous species of grasses, some of which are raised for grain and many of which are utilised as fodder plants either cultivated or as part of pasture. ... Binomial name Glycine max Soybeans (US) or soya beans (UK) (Glycine max) are a high-protein legume (Family Fabaceae) grown as food for both humans and livestock. ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... Hog is a domestic or feral adult swine. ... This article is about the maize plant. ... This article is about common table salt. ... Categories: US geography stubs | Belt regions of the United States ...


Kansas ranks 8th in U.S. oil production. Production has experienced a steady, natural decline as it becomes increasingly difficult to extract oil over time. Since oil prices bottomed in 1999, oil production in Kansas has remained fairly constant, with an average monthly rate of about 2.8 million barrels (450,000 m³) in 2004. The recent higher prices have made carbon dioxide sequestration and other oil recovery techniques more economical. Petro redirects here. ... Carbon dioxide (chemical formula: ) is a chemical compound composed of two oxygen atoms covalently bonded to a single carbon atom. ...


Kansas ranks 8th in U.S. natural gas production. Production has steadily declined since the mid-1990’s with the depletion of the Hugoton Natural Gas Field—the state's largest field which extends into Oklahoma and Texas. In 2004, slower declines in the Hugoton gas fields and increased coalbed methane production contributed to a smaller overall decline. Average monthly production was over 32 billion cubic feet (0.9 km³). For other uses, see Natural gas (disambiguation). ... Hugoton Natural Gas Area is a combination of large natural gas fields in the U.S. State of Kansas, the largest of which is the Hugoton Field. ... Coalbed methane is a form of natural gas extracted from coal beds. ...


Kansas has three income brackets for income tax calculation, ranging from 3.5% to 6.45%. The state sales tax in Kansas is 5.3%. Various cities and counties in Kansas have an additional local sales tax. Except during the 2001 recession (March–November 2001) when monthly sales tax collections were flat, collections have trended higher as the economy has grown and two rate increases have been enacted. Total sales tax collections for 2003 amounted to $1.63 billion, compared to $805.3 million in 1990. In macroeconomics, a recession is a decline in a countrys real gross domestic product (GDP), or negative real economic growth, for two or more successive quarters of a year. ...


Revenue shortfalls resulting from lower than expected tax collections and slower growth in personal income following a 1998 permanent tax reduction has contributed to the substantial growth in the state's debt level as bonded debt increased from $1.16 billion in 1998 to $3.83 billion in 2006. Some increase in debt was expected as the state continues with its 10-year Comprehensive Transportation Program enacted in 1999. As of June 2004, Moody's Investors Service ranked the state 14th for net tax-supported debt per capita. As a percentage of personal income, it was at 3.8%—above the median value of 2.5% for all rated states and having risen from a value of less than 1% in 1992. The state has a statutory requirement to maintain cash reserves of at least 7.5% of expenses at the end of each fiscal year. Moodys Corporation (NYSE: MCO) is the holding company for Moodys Investors Service which performs financial research and analysis on commercial and government entitities. ...


Major company headquarters in Kansas include the Sprint Nextel Corporation (with operational headquarters in Overland Park), Embarq (with national headquarters in Overland Park), YRC Corp Overland Park, Garmin in Olathe, Payless Shoes (National headquarters and major distribution facilities in Topeka), and Koch Industries (with national headquarters in Wichita). To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Overland Park is the second most populous city in the U.S. state of Kansas. ... Embarq Corporation, or EMBARQ is the fourth largest local exchange carrier in the United States (below the Baby Bells) and the largest independent local provider, serving customers in 18 states and providing local, long distance, high-speed data and wireless services to residential and business customers. ... Overland Park is the second most populous city in the U.S. state of Kansas. ... Overland Park is the second most populous city in the U.S. state of Kansas. ... For other places with the same name, see Olathe (disambiguation). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Koch Industries, Inc. ... For other uses, see Wichita (disambiguation). ...


Transportation

Map of the Kansas road system.
Map of the Kansas road system.

Kansas is served by two Interstate highways with one beltway, two spur routes, and three bypasses, with over a total of 874 miles (1,407 km) in all. The first section of Interstate in the nation was opened on I-70 just west of Topeka on November 14, 1956. I-70 is a major east/west route connecting to St. Louis and Kansas City, Missouri, in the east and Denver, Colorado, in the west. Cities along this route (from east to west) include Kansas City, Lawrence, Topeka, Junction City, Salina, Hays, and Colby. I-35 is a major north/south route connecting to Des Moines, Iowa, in the north and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, in the south. Cities along this route (from north to south) include Kansas City (and suburbs), Ottawa, Emporia, El Dorado, and Wichita. File links The following pages link to this file: Kansas Categories: National Atlas images | Kansas maps ... File links The following pages link to this file: Kansas Categories: National Atlas images | Kansas maps ... Interstate Highways in the 48 contiguous states. ... For the American political term, see Inside the Beltway and Beltway bandits. ... A spur route in the United States Interstate highway system refers to a branch off of a primary interstate that connects with a destination away from the primary interstate. ... A bypass is a road or highway that avoids (bypasses) a built-up area, town, or village, to let through traffic flow without interference from local traffic, to reduce congestion in the built-up area, and to improve road safety. ... Interstate 70 (abbreviated I-70) is a long interstate highway in the United States that runs from Interstate 15 about a mile from Cove Fort, Utah to a Park and Ride in Baltimore, Maryland. ... This article is about the state capital of Kansas. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... St. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... Nickname: Location of Denver in the State of Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country United States State State of Colorado City and County Denver[1] Founded 1858-11-22, as Denver City, K.T.[2] Incorporated 1861-11-07, as Denver City, C.T.[3] Consolidated... Nickname: Location in Wyandotte, County in the state of Kansas. ... Lawrence is a river city in and the seat of Douglas County, Kansas, United States, 41 miles (66 km) west of Kansas City, along the banks of both the Kansas (Kaw) and Wakarusa Rivers. ... This article is about the state capital of Kansas. ... Junction City is a city in Geary County, Kansas, United States. ... Salina is a city in and the county seat of Saline County, Kansas, United States. ... Hays is a city in Ellis County, Kansas, near the intersection of Interstate 70 and U.S. Highway 183. ... Advertised as The Oasis on the Plains, Colby is the county seat6 and largest city in Thomas County, Kansas, with a total population of 5,450 as of the 2000 census. ... Interstate 35 (abbreviated I-35 or IH-35) is an interstate highway running north-south in the central United States. ... “Des Moines” redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in Oklahoma County and the state of Oklahoma. ... Ottawa is a city situated along the Marais des Cygnes River in the central part of Franklin County, located in east-central Kansas, in the central United States. ... Emporia is a city located in Lyon County, Kansas, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 26,760. ... El Dorado is the largest city and county seat of Butler County, Kansas. ... For other uses, see Wichita (disambiguation). ...


Spur routes serve as connections between the two major routes. I-135, a north/south route, connects I-70 at Salina to I-35 at Wichita. I-335, a northeast/southwest route, connects I-70 at Topeka to I-35 at Emporia. I-335 and portions of I-35 and I-70 make up the Kansas Turnpike. Bypasses include I-470 around Topeka and I-235 around Wichita. I-435 is a beltway around the Kansas City Metropolitan Area while I-635 bypasses through Kansas City, Kansas. Interstate 135 (abbreviated I-135) is a 95. ... Interstate 335 (abbreviated I-335) is the name of an interstate highway spur route of Interstate 35 in the U.S. state of Kansas. ... The Kansas Turnpike is a tolled freeway that lies entirely within the U.S. state of Kansas. ... Interstate 470 (abbreviated I-470) is a 13. ... Interstate 235 in Kansas is a 16. ... Interstate 435 (abbreviated I-435) is an Interstate Highway beltway that encircles much of the Kansas City metropolitan area in the states of Kansas and Missouri, USA. I-435, a spur route of Interstate 35, is 80. ... Kansas City satellite map The Kansas City Metropolitan Area is a fifteen county metropolitan area is anchored by Kansas City, Missouri straddling the border between the states of Missouri and Kansas. ... Interstate 635 (abbreviated I-635) is a connector highway between Interstate 35 in Overland Park, Kansas and Interstate 29 in Kansas City, Missouri, approximately 12 miles (19. ...


US Route 69 runs north and south, from Minnesota to Texas. The highway passes through the eastern section of Kansas, from the Kansas City area, through Louisburg, Fort Scott, Frontenac, Pittsburg, and Baxter Springs before entering Oklahoma. Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Kansas City satellite map The Kansas City Metropolitan Area is a fifteen county metropolitan area is anchored by Kansas City, Missouri straddling the border between the states of Missouri and Kansas. ... Louisburg is the name of some places in the United States of America and Canada: Louisburg, Nova Scotia, Canada Louisburg, Kansas, United States of America Louisburg, Minnesota, United States of America Louisburg, Missouri, United States of America Louisburg, North Carolina, United States of America (See also Lewisburg. ... Fort Scott is a city located 88 miles (158 km) south of Kansas City, on the Marmaton River. ... Frontenac is a city in Crawford County, Kansas, United States. ... Pittsburg is a town in Crawford County, in the Ozark region of Southeast Kansas, 27 miles south of Fort Scott, Kansas, 96 miles west of Springfield, Missouri, and 137 miles northeast of Tulsa, Oklahoma. ... Spring River Baxter Springs is a city situated along the Spring River in the extreme southeastern part of Cherokee County, located in southeast Kansas, in the Central United States. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ...


Kansas also has the second largest state highway system in the country after California. This is because of the high number of counties and county seats (105) and the inter-twineing of them all. However, if the Farm to Market Roads of Texas are counted, Texas would have the largest state highway system in the country. This article is about the U.S. state. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... A Farm to Market Road is a state government road which serves to connect rural and agricultural areas to market towns. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ...


In January 2004, the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT) announced the new Kansas 511 traveler information service.[13] By dialing 511, callers will get access to information about road conditions, construction, closures, detours and weather conditions for the state highway system. Weather and road condition information is updated every 15 minutes. The elaborate and efficient transportation system in Kansas has attracted praise from experts nationwide, including the former Mayor of New York City, Ed Koch, who frequents Kansas roadways. The Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT) is a state government organization in charge of maintaining public roadways of the U.S. state of Kansas. ... 5-1-1, initially designated for road weather information, is a transit and traffic information telephone hotline in some regions of the United States. ...


The state's only major commercial airport is Wichita Mid-Continent Airport, located along US-54 on the western edge of the city. Most air travelers in eastern Kansas fly out of Kansas City International Airport, located in Platte County, Missouri. For those in the far western part of the state, Denver International Airport is a popular option. Connecting flights are available from smaller airports in Dodge City, Garden City, Great Bend, Hays, Manhattan, Salina, and Topeka. Wichita Mid-Continent Airport (IATA: ICT, ICAO: KICT) is a commercial airport located 5 miles (8 km) southwest of Wichita, in Sedgwick County, Kansas, USA. It is the largest airport in the state of Kansas. ... U.S. Route 54 is an east-west United States highway that runs northeast-southwest for 1,197 miles (1,926 km) from western Illinois to El Paso, Texas. ... Airport diagram Airport from the east. ... Platte County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... KDEN redirects here. ...


Law and government

State and local politics

See also: List of Governors of Kansas

The top executives of the state are Democratic Governor Kathleen Sebelius and Lieutenant Governor Mark Parkinson. Both officials are elected on the same ticket to a maximum of two consecutive 4-year terms. Parkinson replaced John E. Moore who served as Lt. Governor during Sebelius's first term which ended on January 8, 2007. Sebelius will not be up for re-election in 2010. The state's Attorney General is Democrat Stephen Six, a former Douglas County District Court Judge who was appointed to the post. This is a list of Governors of Kansas. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The Governor of Kansas holds the supreme executive power of the State as provided by the first article of the Kansas Constitution. ... Kathleen Gilligan Sebelius (born May 15, 1948 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American Democratic politician who currently serves as the 44th Governor of Kansas. ... The Kansas Democratic Party is the state affiliate political party of the national Democratic Party in Kansas. ... The Governor of Kansas holds the supreme executive power of the State as provided by the first article of the Kansas Constitution. ... Kathleen Gilligan Sebelius (born May 15, 1948 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American Democratic politician who currently serves as the 44th Governor of Kansas. ... Mark Parkinson is an American lawyer, businessman, and politician who is currently a Democratic candidate for the lieutenant governor of Kansas. ... John E. Moore, born in Charleston, West Virginia, is an American politician and the current Lieutenant Governor of Kansas. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Paul J. Morrison is a United States politican and lawyer and is the Attorney General of Kansas. ...


The legislative branch of the state government is the Kansas Legislature. The bicameral body consists of the Kansas House of Representatives, with 125 members serving two year terms, and the Kansas Senate, with 40 members serving four year terms. Chamber of the Estates-General, the Dutch legislature. ... The Kansas Legislature meet at the State Capitol in Topeka. ... In government, bicameralism is the practice of having two legislative or parliamentary chambers. ... The Kansas House of Representatives is the lower house of the Kansas Legislature, the state legislature of the U.S. State of Kansas. ... The Kansas Senate in legislative session in January 2006. ...

State symbols

Kansas has a reputation as a progressive state with many firsts in legislative initiatives—it was the first state to institute a system of workers' compensation (1910) and to regulate the securities industry (1911). Kansas was also one of the first states to permit women's suffrage in 1912. Suffrage in all states would not be guaranteed until ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920. The council-manager government was adopted by many larger Kansas cities in the years following World War I while many American cities were being run by political machines or organized crime. Kansas was also at the center of Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, a 1954 Supreme Court decision that banned racially segregated schools throughout the U.S. Kansas state symbols are defined in legislature bill introduced and adopted as the official symbols by acts of the Kansas Legislature. ... This is a list of official U.S. state amphibians: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia Categories: U.S. state insignia ... Binomial name Ambystoma mavortium Baird, 1850 The Barred Tiger Salamander (Ambystoma mavortium) is a species of salamander found from southwestern Canada in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, south through the western United States to Texas, and northern Mexico. ... A state animal is the official or representative animal of a U.S. state. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... This is a list of official U.S. state fish: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia Categories: U.S. state insignia ... Binomial name (Rafinesque, 1818) Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, are North Americas most numerous catfish species. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Sturnella neglecta Audubon, 1844 The Western Meadowlark, Sturnella neglecta, is a medium-sized blackbird, very similar in appearance to the Eastern Meadowlark. ... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: External link Juelies State Flower Garden of Gifs See also Lists of U.S. state insignia Categories: Lists of flowers | U.S. state insignia ... For other uses, see Sunflower (disambiguation). ... This is a list of U.S. state insects: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia Categories: U.S. state insignia ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies North-west of Europe South-west of Europe Middle East Africa Synonyms Apis mellifica Linnaeus, 1761 The Western honey bee or European honey bee (Apis mellifera) is a species of honey bee. ... Here is a list of state mottos for countries and their subdivisions around the world. ... This is a list of official U.S. state reptiles: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia Categories: U.S. state insignia ... Genera Cuora Pyxidea Terrapene The box turtle is one of several species of turtles. ... This is a list of official U.S. state soils: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia External link United States Dept. ... Each state in the United States (except New Jersey) has a state song, selected by the state legislature as a symbol of the state. ... Home on the Range is the state song of Kansas. ... This List of U.S. state trees includes official trees of the following states and U.S. possessions: See also Lists of U.S. state insignia National Grove of State Trees External link USDA list of state trees and flowers Categories: U.S. state insignia | Lists of plants | Trees ... Species Populus deltoides L. Populus fremontii [[]] Populus nigra L. This article is about the poplar species. ... Workers compensation (colloquially known as workers comp in North American English or compo in Australia) provides insurance to cover medical care and compensation for employees who are injured in the course of employment, in exchange for mandatory relinquishment of the employees right to sue his or her employer for... For security (collateral), the legal right given to a creditor by a borrower, see security interest A security is a fungible, negotiable instrument representing financial value. ... The term womens suffrage refers to an economic and political reform movement aimed at extending suffrage — the right to vote — to women. ... Amendment XIX in the National Archives The Nineteenth Amendment (Amendment XIX) to the United States Constitution provides that neither any individual state or the federal government may deny a citizen the right to vote because of that citizens sex. ... The council-manager government is one of two main variations of representative municipal government in the United States. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... In this 1899 cartoon from Puck, all of New York City politics revolves around boss Richard Croker A political machine is an unofficial system of a political organization based on patronage, the spoils system, behind-the-scenes control, and longstanding political ties within the structure of a representative democracy. ... Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ... Holding Segregation of students in public schools violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, because separate facilities are inherently unequal. ... This article is about the state capital of Kansas. ...


Since the 1960s, Kansas has grown more socially conservative. The 1990s brought new restrictions on abortion, the defeat of prominent Democrats, including Dan Glickman, and the Kansas State Board of Education's 1999 decision to eliminate evolution from the state teaching standards, a decision that was later reversed.[14] In 2005, voters accepted a constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage. The next year, the state passed a law setting a minimum age for marriage at 15 years. [15] In 2008, Governor Sebelius vetoed permits for the construction of new coal-fired energy plants in Kansas, saying: "We know that greenhouse gases contribute to climate change. As an agricultural state, Kansas is particularly vulnerable. Therefore, reducing pollutants benefits our state not only in the short term – but also for generations of Kansans to come." [16] Daniel Robert Dan Glickman (born November 24, 1944) is an American politician. ... Kansas State Board of Education is the Kansas Board of Education. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... Recognized in some regions United States (MA, CA eff. ...


Federal politics

See also: U.S. Congressional Delegations from Kansas

The state's current delegation to the Congress of the United States includes Republican Senators Sam Brownback of Topeka and Pat Roberts of Dodge City and Representatives Jerry Moran (R) of Hays (District 1), Nancy Boyda (D) of Topeka (District 2), Dennis Moore (D) of Lenexa (District 3), and Todd Tiahrt (R) of Goddard (District 4). Kansas has not elected a Democrat to the U.S. Senate since 1932, when Franklin D. Roosevelt won his first term as President in the wake of the Great Depression. This is the longest Senate losing streak for either party in a single state. Senator Sam Brownback carries the distinction of being the politician elected with the highest percentage of the statewide vote in Kansas history and was a candidate for the Republican party nomination for President in 2008. These are tables of congressional delegations from Kansas to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2400x3040, 1421 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sam Brownback Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2400x3040, 1421 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sam Brownback Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Samuel Dale Brownback (b. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... GOP redirects here. ... Samuel Dale Brownback (b. ... This article is about the state capital of Kansas. ... Charles Patrick Pat Roberts (born April 20, 1936) is a United States Senator from Kansas. ... For the 1939 western movie, see Dodge City (1939 film). ... Jerry Moran (born May 29, 1954, in Great Bend, Kansas) has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1997, representing Kansass 1st District (map). ... Hays is a city in Ellis County, Kansas, near the intersection of Interstate 70 and U.S. Highway 183. ... The 1st Congressional District of Kansas is a congressional district in western and central Kansas. ... Nancy Boyda (August 2, 1955) is the Democratic congresswoman representing Kansass 2nd congressional district. ... This article is about the state capital of Kansas. ... The 2nd Congressional District of Kansas is a congressional district in eastern Kansas. ... Dennis Moore (born November 8, 1945), is an American politician, and a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1999, representing Kansass 3rd congressional district[1]. // Moore was born in 1945 in Anthony, Kansas. ... Lenexa is a city in the central part of Johnson County, located in Northeast Kansas, in the Central United States. ... The 3rd Congressional District of Kansas is a congressional district in eastern Kansas. ... Todd Tiahrt (born June 15, 1951), American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1995, representing the Fourth Congressional District of Kansas. ... Goddard is a city located in Sedgwick County, Kansas. ... The 4th Congressional District of Kansas is a congressional district in south central Kansas. ... FDR redirects here. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Samuel Dale Brownback (b. ...


Historically, Kansas has been strongly Republican. In fact, the only non-Republicans Kansas has given its electoral vote to are Populist James Weaver and Democrats Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Roosevelt, and Lyndon Johnson. In 2004, George W. Bush won the state's 6 electoral votes by an overwhelming margin of 25 percentage points with 62% of the vote. The only two counties to support Democrat John Kerry in that election were Wyandotte, which contains Kansas City, and Douglas, home to the University of Kansas, located at Lawrence. James Baird Weaver James Baird Weaver (June 12, 1833 – February 6, 1912) was a United States politician and member of the United States House of Representatives, representing Iowa as a member of the Greenback Party. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Wyandotte County (standard abbreviation: WY and commonly referred to as The Dotte by its residents) is a county located in the U.S. state of Kansas. ... Nickname: Location in Wyandotte, County in the state of Kansas. ... Douglas County (standard abbreviation: DG) is a county located in the U.S. state of Kansas. ... Lawrence is a river city in and the seat of Douglas County, Kansas, United States, 41 miles (66 km) west of Kansas City, along the banks of both the Kansas (Kaw) and Wakarusa Rivers. ...


State law

See also: Alcohol laws of Kansas

The legal drinking age in Kansas is 21. In lieu of the state retail sales tax, a 10% Liquor Drink Tax is collected for liquor consumed on the licensed premises and an 8% Liquor Enforcement Tax is collected on retail purchases. Although the sale of cereal malt beverage (also known as 3.2 beer) was legalized in 1937, the first post-Prohibition legalization of alcoholic liquor did not occur until the state's constitution was amended in 1948. The following year the Legislature enacted the Liquor Control Act which created a system of regulating, licensing, and taxing, and the Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) was created to enforce the act. The power to regulate cereal malt beverage remains with the cities and counties. Liquor-by-the-drink did not become legal until passage of an amendment to the state's constitution in 1986 and additional legislation the following year. As of November 2006, Kansas still has 29 dry counties and only 17 counties have passed liquor-by-the-drink with no food sales requirement.[17] Today there are more than 2600 liquor and 4000 cereal malt beverage licensees in the state.[18] Flag of the State of Kansas The alcohol laws of Kansas are among the strictest in the United States, in sharp contrast to its neighboring state of Missouri (see Alcohol laws of Missouri), but much like (though still stricter than) its other neighboring state of Oklahoma (see Alcohol laws of... The legal drinking age is a limit assigned by governments to restrict the access of children and youth to alcoholic beverages. ... Grain redirects here. ... Malt beverage is in American term for alcoholic and non-alcoholic fermented beverages, in which the primary ingredient is barley, which has been allowed to sprout (malt) slightly before it is processed. ... Hoppy, a low alcohol beer Low alcohol beer (also, non-alcoholic beer, small beer, or small ale) is beer with very low or no alcohol content. ... Detroit police inspecting equipment found in a clandestine underground brewery during the prohibition era. ... The Kansas Constitution was originally known as the Wyandotte Constitution to distinguish it from three proposed constitutions that preceded it. ... The Kansas Legislature meet at the State Capitol in Topeka. ... This article is about counties in the U.S. that prohibit alcoholic beverage sales. ...


State agencies

The state's investigative branch is the Kansas Bureau of Investigation. The Kansas Corporation Commission regulates public utilities, common carriers, oil and gas production, telecommunications companies, and motor carriers. The Kansas Department of Agriculture regulates the supply of meat, milk and eggs among other agricultural goods and services. The Secretary of Agriculture is Adrian Polansky, who heads the department as well as operating Polansky farms. The Kansas Bureau of Investigation, or KBI is the criminal investigative arm of the state of Kansas. ...


Important cities and towns

See also: List of cities in Kansas
Cities with population of at least 10,000
City Population* Growth rate** Metro area
1 Wichita 357,698 0.29% Wichita
2 Overland Park 166,722 1.78% Kansas City
3 Kansas City 143,801 -0.34% Kansas City
4 Topeka 122,113 -0.13% Topeka
5 Olathe 114,662 3.69% Kansas City
6 Lawrence 88,605 1.68% Lawrence
7 Shawnee 59,252 3.64% Kansas City
8 Manhattan 50,737 1.83%
9 Salina 46,140 0.13%
10 Lenexa 44,520 1.71% Kansas City
11 Hutchinson 41,085 -0.29%
12 Leavenworth 34,993 -0.23% Kansas City
13 Leawood 30,702 1.75% Kansas City
14 Garden City 27,175 -0.80%
15 Emporia 26,188 -0.40%
16 Dodge City 26,101 0.54%
17 Prairie Village 21,414 -0.49% Kansas City
18 Derby 21,101 2.62% Wichita
19 Liberal 20,384 0.58%
20 Hays 19,726 -0.23%
21 Pittsburg 19,120 -0.12%
22 Newton 18,093 0.34% Wichita
23 Junction City 16,106 -2.36% Manhattan‡
24 Gardner 15,597 10.17% Kansas City
25 Great Bend 15,537 0.20%
26 McPherson 13,594 -0.23%
27 Ottawa 12,792 1.15% Kansas City
28 El Dorado 12,718 -0.13% Wichita
29 Winfield 11,741 -0.65% Winfield-Arkansas City‡
30 Arkansas City 11,416 -0.78% Arkansas City-Winfield‡
31 Parsons 11,237 -0.36%
32 Merriam 10,773 -0.35% Kansas City
33 Lansing 10,705 1.79% Kansas City
34 Coffeyville 10,387 -0.97%
35 Atchison 10,154 -0.13%
36 Haysville 10,029 2.45% Wichita
*Estimated as of July 1, 2006[19]
**Estimated annual growth rate 2000–2006
‡Defined as a micropolitan area

Kansas has 627 incorporated cities. By state statute, cities are divided into three classes as determined by the population obtained "by any census of enumeration". A city of the third class has a population of less than 5,000, but cities reaching a population of more than 2,000 may be certified as a city of the second class. The second class is limited to cities with a population of less than 25,000, and upon reaching a population of more than 15,000, they may be certified as a city of the first class. First and second class cities are independent of any township and are not included within the township's territory. This is a listing of cities located in the U.S. state of Kansas. ... For other uses, see Wichita (disambiguation). ... Overland Park is the second most populous city in the U.S. state of Kansas. ... Kansas City satellite map The Kansas City Metropolitan Area is a fifteen county metropolitan area is anchored by Kansas City, Missouri straddling the border between the states of Missouri and Kansas. ... Nickname: Location in Wyandotte, County in the state of Kansas. ... This article is about the state capital of Kansas. ... For other places with the same name, see Olathe (disambiguation). ... Lawrence is a river city in and the seat of Douglas County, Kansas, United States, 41 miles (66 km) west of Kansas City, along the banks of both the Kansas (Kaw) and Wakarusa Rivers. ... Shawnee is a rapidly growing community located in northwest Johnson County, Kansas and is a western suburb of Kansas City, Missouri. ... Riley County Courthouse, Manhattan Manhattan is a town located in northeastern Kansas at the junction of the Kansas River and Big Blue River. ... Salina is a city in and the county seat of Saline County, Kansas, United States. ... Lenexa is a city in the central part of Johnson County, located in Northeast Kansas, in the Central United States. ... Hutchinson is the largest city and county seat of Reno County, Kansas, west of Kansas City, Missouri, on the Arkansas River. ... Leavenworth redirects here. ... Leawood is a city in Johnson County, Kansas and is a suburb of Kansas City, Kansas. ... Garden City is a city in Finney County, Kansas, United States. ... Emporia is a city located in Lyon County, Kansas, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 26,760. ... For the 1939 western movie, see Dodge City (1939 film). ... Prairie Village is a city in Johnson County, Kansas and is a suburb of Kansas City, Missouri. ... Derby is a suburb of Wichita located in Sedgwick County, Kansas. ... Liberal is a city in Seward County, Kansas, United States. ... Hays is a city in Ellis County, Kansas, near the intersection of Interstate 70 and U.S. Highway 183. ... Pittsburg is a town in Crawford County, in the Ozark region of Southeast Kansas, 27 miles south of Fort Scott, Kansas, 96 miles west of Springfield, Missouri, and 137 miles northeast of Tulsa, Oklahoma. ... Main Street and E 4th looking north to downtown. ... Junction City is a city in Geary County, Kansas, United States. ... Gardner is a city in Johnson County, Kansas, USA. The population in 2006 was 13,321. ... Great Bend is the largest city and county seat of Barton County, Kansas, United States. ... McPherson is a city located in McPherson County, Kansas. ... Ottawa is a city situated along the Marais des Cygnes River in the central part of Franklin County, located in east-central Kansas, in the central United States. ... El Dorado is the largest city and county seat of Butler County, Kansas. ... Winfield is a city situated along the Walnut River in the west-central part of Cowley County, located in south-central Kansas, in the central United States. ... Arkansas City is a city situated at the confluence of the Arkansas and Walnut rivers in the southwestern part of Cowley County, located in south-central Kansas, in the central United States. ... Parsons is a city in the northern part of Labette County, located in southeast Kansas, in the Central United States. ... Merriam is a city located in Johnson County, Kansas. ... Lansing is a city situated along the Missouri River in the eastern part of Leavenworth County, located in northeast Kansas, in the central United States. ... Coffeyville is a city situated along the Verdigris River in the southeastern part of Montgomery County, located in Southeast Kansas, in the central United States. ... Two views of a pedestrian mall on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Commercial Street in downtown Atchison A statue of Amelia Earhart on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Atchison is a city situated along the Missouri River in the eastern part of Atchison County, located in northeast Kansas, in the... Haysville is a city in Sedgwick County, Kansas, United States. ... United States micropolitan areas, as defined by the Census Bureau and the Office of Management and Budget, are areas in the United States based around a core city or town with a population of 10,000 to 49,999. ... A Municipal Corporation is a legal defintion for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, and towns. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... A civil township is a widely-used unit of local government in the United States, subordinate to a county. ...


Northeast Kansas

The northeastern portion of the state, extending from the Eastern border to Junction City and from the Nebraska border to south of Johnson County, has a rich history and is home to more than 1.5 million people in the Kansas City, Lawrence, Topeka, and St. Joseph metropolitan areas. In the Kansas City Metropolitan Area, the cities of Johnson County have some of the fastest growing populations and highest median incomes in the state and the entire country. Overland Park, a young city incorporated in 1960, has the largest population and the largest land area in the county. It is home to Johnson County Community College, the state's largest community college, and the corporate campus of Sprint Nextel, the largest private employer in the metro area. In 2006 the city was ranked as the 6th best place to live in America; the neighboring city of Olathe was 13th.[20] Olathe is the county seat and home to Johnson County Executive Airport. The cities of Olathe, Shawnee, and Gardner have some of the state's fastest growing populations. The cities of Overland Park, Lenexa, Olathe, and Gardner are also notable because they lie along the former route of the Santa Fe Trail. Among cities with at least one thousand residents, Mission Hills has the highest median income in the state. Junction City is a city in Geary County, Kansas, United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kansas City satellite map The Kansas City Metropolitan Area is a fifteen county metropolitan area is anchored by Kansas City, Missouri straddling the border between the states of Missouri and Kansas. ... Johnson County (standard abbreviation: JO) is a county located in the state of Kansas. ... Overland Park is the second most populous city in the U.S. state of Kansas. ... The JCCC Student Center Johnson County Community College (often referred to as JCCC) is located in Overland Park, Kansas. ... A community college is a type of educational institution. ... Sprint Nextel Corporation (NYSE: S) is the third largest wireless telecommunications network in the United States with 52. ... For other places with the same name, see Olathe (disambiguation). ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Johnson County Exectuive Airport (IATA: OJC, ICAO: KOJC) is an airport located in Olathe, Kansas, in the United States. ... Shawnee is a rapidly growing community located in northwest Johnson County, Kansas and is a western suburb of Kansas City, Missouri. ... Gardner is a city in Johnson County, Kansas, USA. The population in 2006 was 13,321. ... Lenexa is a city in the central part of Johnson County, located in Northeast Kansas, in the Central United States. ... Trail logo The Santa Fe Trail was an historic 19th century transportation route across southwestern North America connecting Missouri with Santa Fe, New Mexico. ... Mission Hills is a city in Johnson County, Kansas, (USA). ...


Several institutions of higher education are located in Northeast Kansas including Baker University (the first university in the state) in Baldwin City, MidAmerica Nazarene University in Olathe, Ottawa University in Ottawa and Overland Park, Kansas City Kansas Community College and KU Medical Center in Kansas City, and KU Edwards Campus in Overland Park. Less than an hour's drive to the west, Lawrence is home to the University of Kansas, the largest public university in the state, and Haskell Indian Nations University. Baker is a small university of more than 3000 students and is located in Baldwin City, Kansas. ... MidAmerica Nazarene University (MNU) is a Christian liberal arts college in Olathe, Kansas. ... Ottawa University (OU) is a not-for-profit educational institution affiliated with the American Baptist Churches USA. It was founded in 1865. ... Lawrence is a river city in and the seat of Douglas County, Kansas, United States, 41 miles (66 km) west of Kansas City, along the banks of both the Kansas (Kaw) and Wakarusa Rivers. ... The University of Kansas (often referred to as KU or just Kansas) is an institution of higher learning in Lawrence, Kansas. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Haskell Indian Nations University is a four year degree granting university in Lawrence, Kansas which offers free tuition to members of registered Native American tribes in the United States. ...


To the north, Kansas City, Kansas, with the second largest land area in the state, contains a number of diverse ethnic neighborhoods. Its attractions include the Kansas Speedway, the Woodlands, and Kansas City T-Bones. Further up the Missouri River, the city of Lansing is the home of the state's first maximum-security prison. Historic Leavenworth, founded in 1854, was the first incorporated city in Kansas. North of the city, Fort Leavenworth is the oldest active Army post west of the Mississippi River. The city of Atchison was an early commercial center in the state and is well-known as the birthplace of Amelia Earhart. Nickname: Location in Wyandotte, County in the state of Kansas. ... Kansas Speedway is a speedway in Kansas City, in the U.S. state of Kansas. ... The Kansas City T-Bones minor league baseball team is based out of Kansas City, Kansas and play in CommunityAmerica Ballpark near the Kansas Speedway. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... Lansing is a city situated along the Missouri River in the eastern part of Leavenworth County, located in northeast Kansas, in the central United States. ... Leavenworth redirects here. ... In 1827, Colonel Henry Leavenworth established a post on the bluffs overlooking the western bank of the Missouri River to protect the fur trade, safeguard commerce on the Santa Fe Trail and maintain the peace among the inhabitants. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Two views of a pedestrian mall on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Commercial Street in downtown Atchison A statue of Amelia Earhart on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Atchison is a city situated along the Missouri River in the eastern part of Atchison County, located in northeast Kansas, in the... Amelia Mary Earhart (24 July 1897 – missing 2 July 1937, declared dead 5 January 1939) was a noted American aviation pioneer, author and womens rights advocate. ...


To the west, nearly a quarter million people reside in the Topeka metropolitan area. Topeka is the state capital and home to Washburn University. Built at a Kansas River crossing along the old Oregon Trail, this historic city has several nationally registered historic places. Further westward along Interstate 70 and the Kansas River is Junction City with its historic limestone and brick buildings and nearby Fort Riley, well-known as the home to the U.S. Army's 1st Infantry Division, also known as the "Big Red One". A short distance away, the city of Manhattan is home to Kansas State University, the second largest public university in the state and the nation's oldest land-grant university, dating back to 1863. South of the campus, Aggieville dates back to 1889 and is the state's oldest shopping district of its kind. This article is about the state capital of Kansas. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Washburn University, located in Topeka, Kansas, provides broadly-based liberal arts and professional education through more than 200 certificate, associate, baccalaureate, master’s and juris doctor programs through the College of Arts and Sciences and the Schools of Law, Business, Nursing and Applied Studies. ... The Kansas River near De Soto Kaw River (map) looking southward from middle of Turner Diagonal bridge. ... For other uses, see Oregon Trail (disambiguation). ... Interstate 70 (abbreviated I-70) is a long interstate highway in the United States that runs from Interstate 15 about a mile from Cove Fort, Utah to a Park and Ride in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Junction City is a city in Geary County, Kansas, United States. ... Fort Riley is a census-designated place and United States Army post, in Northeast Kansas, on the Kansas River. ... The United States Army is the largest, and by some standards oldest, established branch of the armed forces of the United States and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Big Red One redirects here. ... Shoulder Patch of the United States Army 1st Infantry Division. ... Riley County Courthouse, Manhattan Manhattan is a town located in northeastern Kansas at the junction of the Kansas River and Big Blue River. ... Kansas State University, officially called Kansas State University of Fashion and Design [2] but commonly shortened to K-State, is an institution of higher learning located in Manhattan, Kansas, in the United States. ... Revelers celebrate New Years Eve on December 31, 2005 in Aggieville. ...


Wichita

Wichita, Kansas, the largest city in the state of Kansas
Wichita, Kansas, the largest city in the state of Kansas

In south-central Kansas, the four-county Wichita metropolitan area is home to nearly 600,000 people. Wichita is the largest city in the state in terms of both land area and population. 'The Air Capital' is a major manufacturing center for the aircraft industry and the home of Wichita State University. With a number of nationally registered historic places, museums, and other entertainment destinations, it has a desire to become a cultural mecca in the Midwest. Although Wichita's population growth has been anemic in recent years, surrounding suburbs are among the fastest growing cities in the state. The population of Goddard has grown by more than 11% per year since 2000.[19] Other fast-growing cities include Andover, Maize, Park City, Derby, and Haysville. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3680x1232, 688 KB) Summary Wichita, Kansas panorama photo by Hugh Mason Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Wichita, Kansas ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3680x1232, 688 KB) Summary Wichita, Kansas panorama photo by Hugh Mason Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Wichita, Kansas ... For other uses, see Wichita (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wichita (disambiguation). ... Wichita State University (WSU) is an American state-supported university located in the middle-size city of Wichita, Kansas, in the south central part of the state. ... Goddard is a city located in Sedgwick County, Kansas. ... Andover is a city in Butler County, in the Wichita metropolitan area, Kansas, United States. ... Maize is a city located in Sedgwick County, Kansas. ... Park City is a city in Sedgwick County, Kansas; it is a suburb of Wichita. ... Derby is a suburb of Wichita located in Sedgwick County, Kansas. ... Haysville is a city in Sedgwick County, Kansas, United States. ...


Up river (the Arkansas River) from Wichita is the city of Hutchinson. The city was built on one of the world's largest salt deposits, and it has the world's largest and longest wheat elevator. It is also the home of Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center, Prairie Dunes Country Club and the Kansas State Fair. North of Wichita along Interstate 135 is the city of Newton, the former western terminal of the Santa Fe Railroad and trailhead for the famed Chisholm Trail. To the southeast of Wichita are the cities of Winfield and Arkansas City with historic architecture and the Cherokee Strip Museum (in Ark City). The city of Udall was the site of the deadliest tornado in Kansas on May 25, 1955; it killed 80 people in and near the city.[21] To the southwest of Wichita is Freeport, the state's smallest incorporated city (population 8). The Arkansas River flows through Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas. ... Hutchinson is the largest city and county seat of Reno County, Kansas, west of Kansas City, Missouri, on the Arkansas River. ... The Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center is a museum and educational facility in Hutchinson, Kansas that is best known for the display and restoration of space artifacts. ... Interstate 135 (abbreviated I-135) is a 95. ... Main Street and E 4th looking north to downtown. ... Categories: Rail stubs | Defunct railroad companies of the United States | Arizona railroads | California railroads | Colorado railroads | Illinois railroads | Iowa railroads | Kansas railroads | Louisiana railroads | Missouri railroads | Nebraska railroads | New Mexico railroads | Oklahoma railroads | Texas railroads ... The Chisholm Trail was a route used in the late 19th century in the Western United States for cattle drives, the movement of cattle overland. ... Winfield is a city situated along the Walnut River in the west-central part of Cowley County, located in south-central Kansas, in the central United States. ... Arkansas City is a city situated at the confluence of the Arkansas and Walnut rivers in the southwestern part of Cowley County, located in south-central Kansas, in the central United States. ... The Cherokee Strip of Kansas, in the United States, was a disputed strip of land on the southern border of the state. ... Udall is a city located in Cowley County, Kansas. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Freeport is a city located in Harper County, Kansas. ...


Around the state

Kansas Population Density Map

Located midway between Kansas City, Topeka, and Wichita in the heart of the Bluestem Region of the Flint Hills, the city of Emporia has several nationally registered historic places and is the home of Emporia State University, well-known for its Teachers College. It was also the home of newspaper man William Allen White. Image File history File links Kansas_population_map. ... Image File history File links Kansas_population_map. ... The Flint Hills are a group of hills in eastern Kansas, extending from Marshall County in the north, to Cowley County in the south. ... Emporia is a city located in Lyon County, Kansas, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 26,760. ... Emporia State University (ESU) is a comprehensive Regents university serving residents of Eastern Kansas. ... William Allen White Born in Emporia, Kansas, on February 10, 1868, William Allen White was a nationally known newspaper editor for much of his life. ...


Southeast Kansas


Southeast Kansas has a unique history with a number of nationally registered historic places in this coal-mining region. Located in Crawford County (dubbed the Fried Chicken Capital of Kansas), Pittsburg is the largest city in the region and the home of Pittsburg State University. The neighboring city of Frontenac in 1888 was the site of the worst mine disaster in the state in which an underground explosion killed 47 miners. "Big Brutus" is located a mile and a half outside the city of West Mineral. Along with the restored fort, historic Fort Scott has a national cemetery designated by President Lincoln in 1862. Southeast Kansas is a region of the U.S. state of Kansas. ... Crawford County (standard abbreviation: CR) is a county located in the U.S. state of Kansas. ... Pittsburg is a town in Crawford County, in the Ozark region of Southeast Kansas, 27 miles south of Fort Scott, Kansas, 96 miles west of Springfield, Missouri, and 137 miles northeast of Tulsa, Oklahoma. ... Pittsburg State University, also called Pitt State or PSU, is a public university with approximately 6,600 students (5,200 undergraduates and 1,400 graduate students) located in Pittsburg, Kansas. ... Frontenac is a city in Crawford County, Kansas, United States. ... A home page for Big Brutus, Inc. ... West Mineral is a city located in Cherokee County, Kansas. ... Fort Scott is a city located 88 miles (158 km) south of Kansas City, on the Marmaton River. ...


Central and North-Central Kansas


Salina is the largest city in central and north-central Kansas. South of Salina is the small city of Lindsborg with its numerous Dala horses. Much of the architecture and decor of this town has a distinctly Swedish style. To the east along Interstate 70, the historic city of Abilene was formerly a trailhead for the Chisholm Trail and was the boyhood home of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. To the west is Lucas, the Grassroots Art Capital of Kansas. Salina is a city in and the county seat of Saline County, Kansas, United States. ... Lindsborg is a city located in McPherson County, Kansas, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 3,321. ... A Dalahäst, Dala horse or Dalecarlian horse is a traditional wooden statuette of a horse originating in the Swedish province of Dalarna (Dalecarlia). ... Interstate 70 (abbreviated I-70) is a long interstate highway in the United States that runs from Interstate 15 about a mile from Cove Fort, Utah to a Park and Ride in Baltimore, Maryland. ... Abilene is a city in Dickinson County, Kansas, United States, 163 miles (262 km) west of Kansas City. ... The Chisholm Trail was a route used in the late 19th century in the Western United States for cattle drives, the movement of cattle overland. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... Lucas is a town in Russell County, Kansas, United States. ...


Northwest Kansas

Westward along the Interstate, the city of Russell, traditionally the beginning of sparsely-populated northwest Kansas, is the home of former U.S. Senator Bob Dole and the boyhood home of U.S. Senator Arlen Specter. The city of Hays is home to Fort Hays State University and the Sternberg Museum of Natural History, and is the largest city in the northwest with a population of around 20,000. Two other landmarks are located in smaller towns in Ellis County: the "Cathedral of the Plains" is located 10 miles (16 km) east of Hays in Victoria, and the boyhood home of Walter Chrysler is 15 miles (24 km) west of Hays in Ellis. West of Hays, population drops dramatically, even in areas along I-70, and only two towns containing populations of more than 3,000: Colby and Goodland, which are located 35 milies apart along I-70. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 1001 pixel, file size: 579 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Other versions of this file File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 1001 pixel, file size: 579 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Other versions of this file File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Nickname: Location in Wyandotte, County in the state of Kansas. ... Russell is a city in Russell County, Kansas, United States. ... § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ... Arlen J. Specter (born February 12, 1930) is a United States Senator from Pennsylvania. ... Hays is a city in Ellis County, Kansas, near the intersection of Interstate 70 and U.S. Highway 183. ... Fort Hays State University (FHSU) is a public, co-educational university located in Hays, Kansas. ... Ellis County is the name of several counties in the United States: Ellis County, Kansas Ellis County, Oklahoma Ellis County, Texas This is a disambiguation page—a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Victoria is a city located in Ellis County, Kansas. ... Walter Percy Chrysler (April 2, 1875 – August 18, 1940) was an American automobile pioneer. ... Ellis is a city located in Ellis County, Kansas. ... Advertised as The Oasis on the Plains, Colby is the county seat6 and largest city in Thomas County, Kansas, with a total population of 5,450 as of the 2000 census. ... Goodland is a city located in Sherman County, Kansas. ...


Southwest Kansas


Southwest Kansas, and Dodge City in particular, is famously known for the cattle drive days of the late 19th century. The city of Dodge was built along the old Santa Fe Trail route. The city of Liberal is located along the southern Santa Fe Trail route. The first wind farm in the state was built east of Montezuma. Garden City has the Lee Richardson Zoo. For the 1939 western movie, see Dodge City (1939 film). ... Trail logo The Santa Fe Trail was an historic 19th century transportation route across southwestern North America connecting Missouri with Santa Fe, New Mexico. ... Liberal is a city in Seward County, Kansas, United States. ... Montezuma is a city located in Gray County, Kansas. ... Garden City is a city in Finney County, Kansas, United States. ...


Education

Main article: Education in Kansas

Education in Kansas is governed primarily by the Kansas State Board of Education (web). Twice the Board has approved changes in the state science curriculum standards that encouraged the teaching of intelligent design. Both times, the standards were reversed after changes in the composition of the board in the next election. Education in Kansas is governed primarily by the Kansas State Board of Education. ... Kansas State Board of Education is the Kansas Board of Education. ...


Sports in Kansas

Professional Sports Teams

Club Sport League
Kansas City Wizards Soccer Major League Soccer
Kansas City T-Bones Baseball Northern League
Wichita Wingnuts Baseball American Association of Independent Professional Baseball
Topeka Roadrunners Ice hockey North American Hockey League
Wichita Thunder Ice hockey Central Hockey League
Dodge City Legend Basketball United States Basketball League
Kansas Cagerz Basketball United States Basketball League
Kansas Koyotes Indoor Football American Professional Football League

Even though the Wizards are the only major professional sports league team within Kansas (although they were based in Missouri at the time of their founding), many Kansans also support the sports teams of Kansas City, Missouri, including the Kansas City Royals (MLB), the Kansas City Chiefs (NFL) and the Kansas City Brigade (AFL). All three teams except the Brigade, play at the Truman Sports Complex, located about 10 miles (16 km) from the Kansas-Missouri state line. However, the Wizards are considering relocating to a new stadium or complex in Johnson County. The Kansas City Brigade played at the Kemper Arena and will move to the new Sprint Center in 2008. Year founded 1995 League Major League Soccer Nickname Wizards, The Wiz, KC Stadium CommunityAmerica Ballpark Kansas City, KS Coach Curt Onalfo Owner OnGoal, LLC. First Game Kansas City Wiz 3–0 Colorado Rapids (Arrowhead Stadium; April 13, 1996) Largest Win Kansas City Wizards 6–0 MetroStars (Arrowhead Stadium; June 20... Soccer redirects here. ... Major League Soccer (MLS) is a North America professional soccer league. ... The Kansas City T-Bones minor league baseball team is based out of Kansas City, Kansas and play in CommunityAmerica Ballpark near the Kansas Speedway. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article refers to the modern Northern League. ... League affiliations American Association Name Wichita Wingnuts (2008-future) Team Colors red, silver, black Ballpark Lawrence-Dumont Stadium Championships League titles: Owner(s)/Operated By: Wichita Pro Sports General Manager: Josh Robertson Manager: Kash Beauchamp Media: Website: www. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article refers to the modern American Association that started in 2006. ... It has been suggested that Santa Fe Roadrunners be merged into this article or section. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The North American Hockey League (NAHL) and the defunct America West Hockey League merged in 2003 to form a 21-team Junior A league, sanctioned by USA Hockey. ... The Wichita Thunder are a minor league hockey team based in Wichita, Kansas. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... This article is about the current CHL. For earlier leagues also called the Central Hockey League, see Central Hockey League (disambiguation). ... The Dodge City Legend plays basketball in the United States Basketball League, a minor league that plays in the spring. ... This article is about the sport. ... The United States Basketball League OTCBB: USBL is a professional mens spring basketball league. ... The Kansas Cagerz have been a United States Basketball League team since 1999 and are located in Salina, Kansas. ... Kansas Koyotes The Kansas Koyotes are a professional indoor football team based out of Topeka, Kansas. ... Indoor football is a variation of American football with rules modified to make it suitable for play within ice hockey arenas. ... The American Professional Football League (APFL) is an indoor football league based in the midwestern United States that began play in 2003. ... The term major professional sports league is used to describe the most important and well regarded leagues in the biggest professional sports in a country or region. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... Major league affiliations American League (1969–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 10, 20, 42 Name Kansas City Royals (1969–present) Other nicknames The Boys in Blue Ballpark Kauffman Stadium (1973–present) a. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Western Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC West (1970-present) Current uniform Team colors Red, White and Gold Mascot K. C. Wolf (1985-present) Warpaint (1963-1988) Personnel Owner The Hunt Family (Clark Hunt... NFL redirects here. ... Conference American Division Central Year founded 2006 Home arena Kemper Arena (2006-2007); Sprint Center (2008-) City, State Kansas City, Missouri Head Coach Kevin Porter ArenaBowl championships none Conference titles none Division titles none Wild Card berths 1: 2007 The Kansas City Brigade is a team from the Arena Football... The Arena Football League (AFL) was founded in 1987 as an American football indoor league. ... The Truman Sports Complex is a facility located in Kansas City, Missouri. ... Conference American Division Central Year founded 2006 Home arena Kemper Arena (2006-2007); Sprint Center (2008-) City, State Kansas City, Missouri Head Coach Kevin Porter ArenaBowl championships none Conference titles none Division titles none Wild Card berths 1: 2007 The Kansas City Brigade is a team from the Arena Football... Kemper Arena American Royal Center is an 19,500 seat indoor arena in Kansas City, Missouri that has hosted NCAA Final Four basketball games, professional basketball and hockey teams, the 1976 Republican Convention, and is the ongoing host of the American Royal livestock show. ... Sprint Center[1] is a large, multi-use indoor arena in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. ...


Persons in western Kansas may sometimes support the major league teams in Denver. Many people who live close to the Oklahoma state line support the Dallas Cowboys. All Chiefs games are televised throughout Kansas by television stations in Topeka and Wichita, and Broncos and Cowboys games which do not conflict with Chiefs telecasts are also broadcast across the state. Nickname: Location of Denver in the State of Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country United States State State of Colorado City and County Denver[1] Founded 1858-11-22, as Denver City, K.T.[2] Incorporated 1861-11-07, as Denver City, C.T.[3] Consolidated... City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys, The Pokes Team colors White, Silver, Silver-Green, Royal Blue, Navy Blue Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Western Conference (1960) Eastern Conference (1961-1969) Capitol Division...


Two major auto racing facilities are located in Kansas. The Kansas Speedway located in Kansas City hosts races of the NASCAR, IRL, and ARCA circuits. Also, the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) holds drag racing events at Heartland Park Topeka. Juuso Pykälistö driving a Peugeot 206 World Rally Car at the 2003 Swedish rally Racing cars redirects here. ... Kansas Speedway is a speedway in Kansas City, in the U.S. state of Kansas. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... The Indy Racing League, better known as IRL, is the sanctioning body of a predominantly American based open-wheel racing series. ... The Automobile Racing Club of America (ARCA) is an auto racing sanctioning body in the United States founded in 1964 (not to be confused with the sports car club of the same name founded by the Collier brothers in 1933). ... The National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) is a drag racing governing body, which sets rules in drag racing and host events all over the United States and Canada. ... Top Fuel dragster Drag racing is a sport in which cars race down a track with a set distance as fast as possible. ... Heartland Park Topeka is a multi-purpose motorsports facility located 5 miles south of Topeka, Kansas. ...


College Sports

While there are no major league sports franchises within the state, many Kansans are fans of the state's major college sports teams, especially the Jayhawks of the University of Kansas, commonly referred to as "KU," and the Wildcats of Kansas State University, known as "KSU" or "K-State" by many. Wichita State University, which also fields teams (called the Shockers) in Division I of the NCAA, is best known for its baseball program. The sports teams at the University of Kansas are known as the Jayhawks. ... The University of Kansas (often referred to as KU or just Kansas) is an institution of higher learning in Lawrence, Kansas. ... Kansas State Universitys athletic teams are called the Wildcats, and their official color is royal purple; white and silver are generally used as complementary colors. ... Kansas State University, officially called Kansas State University of Fashion and Design [2] but commonly shortened to K-State, is an institution of higher learning located in Manhattan, Kansas, in the United States. ... Wichita State University (WSU) is an American state-supported university located in the middle-size city of Wichita, Kansas, in the south central part of the state. ... Wichita State University (WSU) is an American state-supported university located in the city of Wichita, Kansas. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... NCAA redirects here. ...


Generally, although this is certainly not a hard and fast rule, most KU fans tend to hail from the eastern third of the state, and urban areas throughout Kansas, specifically the Kansas City suburbs in Johnson County, while much of rural Kansas, especially the west, is dominated by K-State supporters. This perhaps stems from the historic roles of the schools: KU as the liberal arts and professional university, and K-State as the agricultural science and engineering university. However, over the past 15 years, with K-State becoming dominant in football and KU in basketball, many Kansans support both schools, depending on which sport is in season.


Both KU and K-State have tradition-rich programs in men's college basketball. The Jayhawks are a perennial national power, ranking third in all-time victories among NCAA programs, behind Kentucky and North Carolina. The Jayhawks are also the reigning national champions of men's college basketball, winning the 2008 NCAA Tournament in April for their third national crown. K-State's glory days on the hardwood were mainly from the 1940s to the 1960s, with the 1980s also seeing some very good teams come from Manhattan. The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ...


However, success on the football field has been infrequent for either team. When the two teams met in 1987, KU's record was 1-7 and K-State's was 0-8. Fittingly, the Sunflower Showdown that year, dubbed the "Toilet Bowl" by the media, ended in a 17-17 tie. There have been recent breakthroughs for both schools. KU won the Orange Bowl for the first time in three tries in January 2008, capping a 12-1 season, the best in school history. K-State was historically one of the worst college football programs in the country, until Bill Snyder arrived to coach the Wildcats in 1989. After a mediocre start, he turned K-State into a national force for most of the 1990s and early 2000s, until he retired after the 2005 season. The team won the Fiesta Bowl in 1997 and took the Big XII Conference championship in 2003. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Sunflower Showdown is the series of athletic contests between Kansas State University and the University of Kansas, most notably football and mens basketball. ... The Orange Bowl can refer to: Miami Orange Bowl stadium in Miami, Florida. ... Bill Snyder (born October 7, 1939, in Saint Joseph, Missouri) is the former head football coach for Kansas State University, holding that position from 1989 to 2005. ... The Fiesta Bowl, now sponsored by Tostitos tortilla chips (a Frito-Lay product), is a United States college football game played annually since 1971. ... Categories: College athletics conferences ...


In 1992-93, KU became the first college program to participate in a football bowl game, the NCAA men's basketball tournament, and the College World Series of baseball in the same academic year. The College World Series is the tournament which determines the NCAA Division I collegiate baseball champion. ...


Notable residents

Amelia Earhart (aviation pioneer), Carrie Nation (temperance activist), former President Dwight D. Eisenhower, former Vice President Charles Curtis, and former presidential candidates Bob Dole and Alf Landon called Kansas their home. NASA astronauts Ronald Evans, Joe Engle, and Steve Hawley also lived in Kansas. Amelia Mary Earhart (24 July 1897 – missing 2 July 1937, declared dead 5 January 1939) was a noted American aviation pioneer, author and womens rights advocate. ... Temperance advocate Carrie Nation with her bible, and her hatchet. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ... Alf Landon Alfred Mossman Alf Landon (September 9, 1887 – October 12, 1987) was an American Republican politician from Kansas, who was defeated in a landslide by Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1936 presidential election. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Astronaut (disambiguation). ... Ronald Ellwin Evans, Jr. ... Joseph Joe Henry Engle (born August 26, 1932 in Dickinson County, Kansas) is a former NASA astronaut and a retired U.S. Air Force colonel. ... Steven A. Hawley (born December 12, 1951) is a NASA mission-specialist astronaut, who has made 5 spaceflights so far. ...


Despite its strong agricultural reputation, Kansas was home to industrial and intellectual pioneers Walter Chrysler of automotive fame, Clyde Cessna and Lloyd Stearman (aviation pioneers), Jack Kilby (microchip inventor, The Nobel Prize Winner in Physics 2000), George Washington Carver (educator and scientist), Earl W. Sutherland, Jr. (The Nobel Prize Winner in Physiology or Medicine 1971), and Vernon L. Smith (The Nobel Prize Winner in Economics 2002). Also from Kansas are General Richard Myers (Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff, 2001-05) and Robert Gates (United States Secretary of Defense December 2006 - Present). In addition, Kansas is the home of "Top Cop" Vern Miller who raided an Amtrak train on July 20, 1972 and confiscated all the liquor on board. He charged Amtrak with selling liquor-by-the-drink, illegal in Kansas at that time and the case was eventually declared al certiore, validating both the lower court's conviction and the flamboyant Miller's stance that "If you don't like a law, get it changed...don't break it." -- Wichita Eagle July 20, 1972 Walter Percy Chrysler (April 2, 1875 – August 18, 1940) was an American automobile pioneer. ... Clyde Vernon Cessna (1879 - November 1954), is the founder of the Cessna Aircraft Company of Wichita, Kansas. ... Lloyd C. Stearman (born October 26, 1898, in Wellsville, Kansas) was a famous aviator and airplane designer. ... Jack St. ... George Washington Carver (July 12, 1864 – January 5, 1943)[1] worked in agricultural extension at the Tuskegee Institute, in Tuskegee, Alabama, teaching former slaves farming techniques for self-sufficiency. ... Earl Wilbur Sutherland Jr. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... General Richard B. Myers General Richard Bowman Myers (born March 1, 1942) of the United States Air Force is a former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Americas highest ranking military officer. ... Robert Michael Gates (born September 25, 1943) is currently serving as the 22nd United States Secretary of Defense. ...


Kansas was also home to Danny Carey (musician), Del Close (comdedian/actor), Inger Stevens (actress),Vivian Vance (actress), Samuel Ramey (opera singer), Louise Brooks (actress), Annette Bening (actress), Bill Kurtis (Journalist), Jack Cafferty (Journalist}, John Brown (abolitionist), Langston Hughes (poet), Gordon Parks (photographer, movie director, musician, author), Fatty Arbuckle (actor), William Inge (writer), Dennis Hopper (actor), Kelli McCarty (actress and Miss USA 91), Buster Keaton (actor), Coleman Hawkins (Jazz musician), Martina McBride (Country Singer), Joe Walsh (Musician), Chely Wright (Country Musician), Melissa Etheridge (musician), Kirstie Alley (actress), Paul Rudd (actor), Sarah Lancaster (actress), Charlie Parker (Jazz musician), Mike Jerrick (network journalist), Steve Doocy (network journalist, author), Campbell Brown (network journalist), Jeff Probst (Survivor host), Survivor: Guatemala winner Danni Boatwright, Jessica Hughbanks(Big Brother 8 contestant), Sharon Obermueller (Big Brother 9 contestant), Melissa McDermott (Journalist), Phil McGraw (psychologist), Phil Stacey (American Idol Finalist) and William Allen White (editor). Daniel Edwin Danny Carey (born May 10, 1961 in Lawrence, Kansas, U.S.A.) is the drummer for the progressive rock band Tool. ... Vivian Roberta Jones (July 26, 1909 – August 17, 1979), known professionally as Vivian Vance, was an Emmy Award-winning American television actress, theater actress, and singer. ... For the American film director, see Sam Raimi. ... Louise Brooks (14 November 1906 – 8 August 1985) was an American dancer, showgirl, and silent film actress. ... Annette Bening (born May 29, 1958) is an American Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-winning actress. ... Bill Kurtis (born September 21, 1940) is a television journalist and producer best known as the host of numerous A&E crime and news documentary shows, including Investigative Reports, American Justice, and Cold Case Files. ... Jack Cafferty (born December 14, 1942 in Chicago, Illinois) is a CNN commentator and occasional host of specials. ... John Brown (May 9, 1800 – December 2, 1859) was a white American abolitionist who advocated and practiced armed insurrection as a means to abolish all slavery. ... Langston Hughes (February 1, 1902 – May 22, 1967) was an American poet, novelist, playwright, short story writer, and columnist. ... Gordon Parks at Civil Rights March on Washington, 1963. ... Roscoe Conkling Arbuckle (March 24, 1887 – June 29, 1933) was an American silent film comedian. ... William Motter Inge (May 3, 1913 – June 10, 1973) was an American playwright and novelist, whose works feature solitary protagonists encumbered with strained sexual relations. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... Kelli McCarty (b. ... Joseph Frank Buster Keaton (October 4, 1895 – February 1, 1966) was an Academy Award-winning American comic actor and filmmaker. ... Coleman Hawkins Coleman Randolph Hawkins, nicknamed Hawk and sometimes Bean, (November 21, 1901 or 1904 - May 19, 1969) was a prominent jazz tenor saxophone musician. ... Martina McBride (born Martina Mariea Schiff, July 29, 1966 in Sharon, Kansas) is an American Grammy nominated country music singer-songwriter. ... For other persons named Joe Walsh, see Joe Walsh (disambiguation). ... Chely Wright (born Richel Renee Wright October 25, 1970 in Kansas City, Missouri), is an American Country Music singer, who released her debut album in 1994. ... Melissa Lou Etheridge (born May 29, 1961, in Leavenworth, Kansas) is an Academy Award-winning and two-time Grammy Award-winning American rock musician and singer. ... Kirstie Louise Alley (born January 12, 1951 in Wichita, Kansas) is an American actress best known for her role in the TV show Cheers. ... Paul Stephen Rudd (born April 6, 1969) is an American film, television, and stage actor. ... Sarah Beth Lancaster (born February 12, 1980 in Overland Park, Kansas) is an American actress. ... For other persons of the same name, see Charles Parker. ... Mike Jerrick (right) and Dayside co-host Juliet Huddy (left) Michael Eugene Joseph Jerrick is the co-host with Juliet Huddy of the morning program The Morning Show with Mike and Juliet, which began in January of 2007 and is syndicated widely throughout the country, mostly on Fox owned networks. ... Steve Doocy, (born October 19, 1956) is an American television personality and New York Times bestselling author. ... For the Australian rules footballer, see Campbell Brown (footballer). ... Jeffrey Lee Probst (born November 4, 1962) is a six-time Emmy-nominated (once awarded) American television personality, acting as a game show host, executive producer and a reporter. ... Danielle Boatwright (born July 13, 1975 in Tonganoxie, Kansas), a beauty queen and model from Kansas, won $1,000,000 on Survivor: Guatemala, the eleventh season of the reality television show Survivor. ... Big Brother 8 was the eighth season of the US version of the reality TV-show Big Brother on CBS. The season was announced on February 1, 2007. ... Melissa McDermott is a reporter for CBS News. ... Dr. Phil McGraw Dr. Phillip C. McGraw (born September 1, 1950), known popularly as Dr. Phil, is an American television psychologist. ... Joel Philip Stacey (born January 21, 1978) is an American singer and a top 6 finalist on season 6 of American Idol. ... For the current American Idol season, see American Idol (season 7). ... William Allen White Born in Emporia, Kansas, on February 10, 1868, William Allen White was a nationally known newspaper editor for much of his life. ...


Famous athletes from Kansas include Braden Looper, Johnny Damon, Kyle Farnsworth, Wes Santee, Joe Carter, Wilt Chamberlain, George Brett, Barry Sanders, Gale Sayers, John H. Outland, Billy Mills, Jim Ryun, Walter Johnson, Jackie Stiles, Caroline Bruce, John Riggins, Maurice Greene, Kendra Wecker, and Lynette Woodard. Kansas was also home to coaches James Naismith, Larry Brown, Phog Allen, Dean Smith, Adolph Rupp, Gene Keady, Lon Kruger,John Calipari, Roy Williams, Glen Mason, Tex Winter, Mark Turgeon, Bill Self, Bill Snyder and Eddie Sutton. Braden LaVern Looper (born on October 28, 1974 in Weatherford, Oklahoma) is a pitcher in Major League Baseball for the St. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Kyle Lynn Farnsworth (born April 14, 1976 in Wichita, Kansas) is a Major League Baseball relief pitcher for the New York Yankees. ... Wes Santee (born March 25, 1932) was an American middle distance runner and athlete who competed mainly in the 1,500 meters. ... For others with similar names, see Joseph Carter (disambiguation). ... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt, The Big Dipper, and Chairman of the Boards, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia/San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for... George Howard Brett (born May 15, 1953 in Glen Dale, West Virginia) is a former Major League Baseball player for the Kansas City Royals. ... Barry David Sanders (born July 16, 1968)) is a Hall of Fame and Heisman Trophy winning American football running back who spent all of his professional career with the Detroit Lions in the NFL. Sanders is best known for being one of the most prolific running backs in NFL history... Gale Eugene Sayers (b. ... John H. Outland (born ? - March 24, 1947) was an All-American college football player and the namesake of the Outland Trophy. ... For the Irish poet, see Billy Mills (poet) William Billy Mills (born June 30, 1938) is the only American ever to win an Olympic gold medal in the 10,000 m run which he did at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. ... James Ronald (Jim) Ryun (born April 29, 1947) is an American former track athlete and politician, who was a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from 1997 to 2007, representing the 2nd District in Kansas. ... Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887-December 10, 1946), American professional baseball pitcher. ... Jackie Marie Stiles is a basketball shooting guard born December 21, 1978 in Kansas City, Kansas to Pat and Pam Stiles. ... Caroline Cadman Bruce (b. ... John Riggins (born August 4, 1949, in Seneca, Kansas) is a former American Football running back, playing from 1971-1985. ... Maurice Greene (born July 23, 1974) is an American sprinter in athletics, who holds several world records and Olympic medals. ... Kendra Wecker on the San Antonio Silver Stars Kendra Renee Wecker (born December 16, 1982 in Marysville, Kansas) is a professional basketball player from the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA). ... Lynette Woodard (born August 12, 1959, in Wichita, Kansas) was a womens basketball player who made history by becoming the first female member of the Harlem Globetrotters and who tasted success abroad before finally reaching, at age 38, her dream of playing in a American womens professional basketball... James Naismith James A. Naismith (November 6, 1861 – November 28, 1939) was the inventor of the sport of basketball and the first to introduce the use of a helmet in American football. ... Larry Brown For other people of the same name, see Larry Brown (disambiguation). ... Forrest Phog Allen, D.O. (November 18, 1885 – September 16, 1974) was an American collegiate basketball coach known as the Father of Basketball Coaching. ... Dean Edwards Smith (born February 28, 1931) is a retired head coach of men’s college basketball. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Gene Keady (May 21, 1936 is a former basketball coach and NFL quarterback. ... Lon Kruger (born August 19, 1952 in Silver Lake, Kansas) is an American basketball coach. ... John Vincent Calipari (born February 10, 1959, in Moon Township (A suburb of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States) is a former professional and current college basketball coach. ... Roy Williams (born August 1, 1950 in Marion, North Carolina) is head coach of the mens basketball team at the University of North Carolina. ... Glen O. Mason (born April 9, 1950 in Colonia, New Jersey) is the former college football head coach of the University of Minnesota. ... Morice Fredrick Tex Winter (born February 25, 1922) is a successful American basketball coach and innovator of the triangle offense. ... Mark Turgeon (born February 5, 1965 in Topeka, Kansas) is the current head basketball coach of Texas A&M University. ... Bill Self (born December 27, 1962 in Okmulgee, Oklahoma) is the head mens basketball coach at the University of Kansas. ... Bill Snyder (born October 7, 1939, in Saint Joseph, Missouri) is the former head football coach for Kansas State University, holding that position from 1989 to 2005. ... Eddie Sutton (born March 12, 1936 in Bucklin, Kansas) is the former head coach of several NCAA Division I mens basketball programs, most recently at Oklahoma State University. ...


Famous fictional residents include Marshal Matt Dillon from the TV show Gunsmoke, Mary Ann Summers of Gilligan's Island, Dennis Mitchell (Dennis the Menace), Dean and Sam Winchester from the TV show Supernatural, Clark Kent/Superman, Liz Sherman, Lt. Col. Cameron Mitchell of Stargate SG-1, Walter and India Bridge from Mr. and Mrs. Bridge, Jonas Nightengale from Leap of Faith, and Dorothy Gale from The Wizard of Oz. Marshal Matt Dillon is a fictional character featured on both the radio and television versions of Gunsmoke. ... This article is about the radio and television series. ... Mary Ann Summers is a fictional Kansas farm girl who is a character in the television sitcom Gilligans Island which ran on the CBS network from 1964 to 1967, and has run more or less continuously since in reruns. ... For the NES (Nintendo Entertainment System) video game, see The Adventures of Gilligans Island. ... Dennis the Menace is a daily syndicated newspaper comic strip originally created, written and illustrated by Hank Ketcham since March 12, 1951, which made its debut in only 16 newspapers. ... Dean Winchester is a fictional character on The CW Television Networks Supernatural, portrayed by Jensen Ackles. ... Samuel Sam Winchester is a fictional character in The CW Television Networks Supernatural, played by Jared Padalecki. ... This article is about the US TV series. ... For other uses, see Clark Kent (disambiguation). ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Liz Sherman is a fictional character in the Hellboy comic book series created by Mike Mignola. ... Lieutenant Colonel Cameron Mitchell (born 1970) is a fictional character on the science fiction television show Stargate SG-1, played by Ben Browder. ... Stargate SG-1 (often abbreviated as SG-1) is a science fiction television series, part of the Stargate franchise. ... Mr. ... Leap of Faith is 1992 comedy-drama film about a fake Christian faith healer who uses a fraudulent traveling revival show to bilk believers of the money. ... For the Doctor Who character, see Ace (Doctor Who). ... The Wizard of Oz may refer to: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, a 1900 book by L. Frank Baum Political interpretations of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz The Wizard of Oz (1939 film), most notable adaptation See The Wizard of Oz (adaptations) for all other adaptations Wizard of Oz, the...


Landmarks

See also: List of Registered Historic Places in Kansas

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1520, 1592 KB) 2005 photo by Edwin Olson File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kansas Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1520, 1592 KB) 2005 photo by Edwin Olson File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kansas Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Konza in spring with herd of bison in distance The Konza Prairie Preserve is a 3487-hectare (8,616 acre, 13. ... The Flint Hills are a group of hills in eastern Kansas, extending from Marshall County in the north, to Cowley County in the south. ... Below is a list of Kansas landmarks. ... List of Registered Historic Places in Kansas: Allen County Iola Allen County Jail Northrup House Anderson County Garnett Anderson County Courthouse Shelley-Tipton House Greeley Spencers Crossing Bridge Harris Samuel J. Tipton House Atchison County Atchison A. J. Harwi House Amelia Earhart Birthplace Amelia Earhart Historic District Atchinson Santa... John Brown (May 9, 1800 – December 2, 1859) was a white American abolitionist who advocated and practiced armed insurrection as a means to abolish all slavery. ... Osawatomie is a city located in Miami County, Kansas. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... Abilene is a city in Dickinson County, Kansas, United States, 163 miles (262 km) west of Kansas City. ... The Chisholm Trail was a route used in the late 19th century in the Western United States for cattle drives, the movement of cattle overland. ... Temperance advocate Carrie Nation with her bible, and her hatchet. ... Medicine Lodge is the largest city and county seat of Barber County, Kansas. ... Lecompton is a city located in Douglas County, Kansas, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 608. ... Wamego is a city in Pottawatomie County, Kansas, United States. ... The Wizard of Oz is a 1939 musical fantasy film produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. ... The Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center is a museum and educational facility in Hutchinson, Kansas that is best known for the display and restoration of space artifacts. ... The Smithsonian Institution Building or Castle on the National Mall serves as the Institutions headquarters. ... This article is about the Apollo mission. ... SR-71 redirects here. ... The Kansas Museum of History in Topeka, Kansas, USA, is the state history museum. ... Several places brag that they have the biggest ball of twine. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cawker City is a city located in Mitchell County, Kansas. ... The Big Well, in Greensburg, Kansas, USA, is a water well designed to provide water for the Santa Fe and Rock Island railroads. ... Greensburg is a city in the central part of Kiowa County, located in Southwest Kansas, in the Central United States. ...

See also

  • List of Kansas-related topics
Kansas Portal

This is a listing of topics related to the State of Kansas. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kansas. ...

References

  1. ^ "Bill makes English official language", Associated Press, 2007-05-12. Retrieved on 2007-05-26.  House Bill No. 2140 was signed into law on May 11, the law begins July 1.
  2. ^ a b Elevations and Distances in the United States. U.S Geological Survey (29 April 2005). Retrieved on November 6, 2006.
  3. ^ http://www.census.gov/geo/www/us_regdiv.pdf
  4. ^ John Koontz, p.c.
  5. ^ Rankin, Robert. 2005. "Quapaw". In Native Languages of the Southeastern United States, eds. Heather K. Hardy and Janine Scancarelli. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, pg. 492
  6. ^ Connelley, William E. 1918. Indians. A Standard History of Kansas and Kansans, ch. 10, vol. 1
  7. ^ [1] NOAA National Climatic Data Center. Retrieved on October 25, 2006.
  8. ^ State Population Estimates. Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States, Regions, and States and for Puerto Rico: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2007 (NST-EST2007-01). U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division. Released 2007-12-22. Six year change is from 2000-07-01 to 2007-07-01.
  9. ^ State Population Estimates. Kansas population has increased at a decreasing rate; reducing the number of congressmen from 5 to 4 in 1992 (Congressional Redistricting Act, eff. 1992). Cumulative Estimates of the Components of Population Change for the United States, Regions and States: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006 (NST-EST2006-04). U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division. Released 2006-12-22.
  10. ^ http://www.census.gov/geo/www/cenpop/statecenters.txt
  11. ^ Kansas - Race and Hispanic Origin: 1860 to 1990
  12. ^ America's Career InfoNet
  13. ^ Kansas Department of Transportation (2004-01-22). "KDOT Launches New Traveler Information Service". Press release. Retrieved on 2006-07-14.
  14. ^ Los Angeles Times. Vote by Kansas School Board Favors Evolution's Doubters
  15. ^ [2][dead link]
  16. ^ Kansas Governor Rejects Two Coal-Fired Power Plants
  17. ^ Liquor Licensee and Supplier Information. Alcoholic Beverage Control, Kansas Department of Revenue. Retrieved on 2007-01-18.
  18. ^ History of Alcoholic Beverages in Kansas. Alcoholic Beverage Control, Kansas Department of Revenue (2000). Retrieved on 2007-01-18.
  19. ^ a b Population Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division. Annual estimates of the population through 2006-07-01. Released 2007-06-28.
  20. ^ Best places to live 2006. MONEY Magazine. Retrieved on 2006-12-09.
  21. ^ The Blackwell Tornado of 25 May 1955. NWS Norman, Oklahoma (June 13, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-01-28.
  22. ^ Historic Lecompton - Constitution Hall State Historic Site. Retrieved on 13 April 2007.
  23. ^ Kansas Historical Society

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

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Official sites Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ...

Additional information


is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Kansas Board of Regents is a body consisting of nine members which governs six state universities in Kansas. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...

Coordinates: 38.5° N 98° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Kansas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5237 words)
Kansas is bordered by Nebraska on the north; Missouri on the east; Oklahoma on the south; and Colorado on the west.
Kansas was admitted to the United States as a free state on January 29, 1861, making it the 34th state to enter the Union.
Kansas has a reputation as a progressive state with many firsts in legislative initiatives—it was the first state to institute a system of workers compensation (1910).
Kansas (band) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1987 words)
Kansas is a 1970s American rock band, specializing in progressive rock with a distinctly American flavor.
Kansas' next release Drastic Measures (#41) was written mostly by the Elefante brothers, with just three tracks from Livgren, although all three have been favorites among many fans.
Kansas has continued to tour year after year, but the band has never been able to regain any mass popularity or critical notice even despite the decent sales of Somewhere to Elsewhere, an album that featured all original members of Kansas III plus Greer, with all songs written by Livgren.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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