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Encyclopedia > Kamikaze (typhoon)

Kamikaze (神風 kamikaze) is a Japanese word, usually translated as divine wind, beleived to be a gift from the gods. The term is first known to have been used as the name of a pair or series of typhoons that are said to have saved Japan from two Mongol fleets under Kublai Khan that attacked Japan in 1274 and again in 1281. Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004. ... The Samurai Suenaga facing Mongol arrows and bombs. ... Qubilai Khan, Qubilai Khan or the last of the Great Khans (September 23, 1215 - February 18, 1294) (Mongolian: Хубилай хаан, Chinese: ; pinyin: ), was a Mongol military leader. ... Events May 7 - In France the Second Council of Lyons opens to consider the condition of the Holy Land and to agree to a union with the Byzantine church. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ...


In popular Japanese myths at the time, the god Raijin was the god who turned the storms against the Mongols. Other variations say that the god Fujin or Ryujin caused the destructive kamikaze. Raijin surrounded by drums to make thunder. ... The Japanese wind god Fujin, 17th century. ... Ryujin (Japanese for luminous being, also known as Rinjin) was the god of the sea in Japanese mythology. ...


The name given to the storm, kamikaze, was later used during World War II as nationalist propaganda for suicide attacks by Japanese pilots. This use of kamikaze has come to be the common meaning of the word in English. Combatants Major Allied powers: United Kingdom Soviet Union United States France Republic of China and others Major Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Charles de Gaulle Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hirohito Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead... Eugène Delacroixs Liberty Leading the People, symbolizing French nationalism during the July Revolution. ... An Australian anti-conscription propaganda poster from World War One Propaganda is a type of message aimed at influencing the opinions or behavior of people. ... It has been suggested that Personnel involved in the development of World War II suicide attacks be merged into this article or section. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Recent research has found that causes contributing to the invasion's failure included:

  • Many of the ships were requisitioned river craft with flat bottoms and wobbly masts, and thus unstable in rough sea.
  • Some of the ships had been poorly made, perhaps as the result of deliberate sabotage by Chinese shipbuilders who resented their Mongol conquerors.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Kamikaze (typhoon) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (172 words)
Kamikaze (神風 kamikaze) is a Japanese word, usually translated as divine wind — which came into being as the name of typhoons that are said to have saved Japan from the Mongol invasion fleet of 4,000 (actual: 1,170) ships ordered by Kublai Khan in 1281.
The name given to the storm, kamikaze, was later used during World War II for suicide attacks by Japanese pilots, and this is the common meaning of the word in English.
This tropical cyclone (hurricane or typhoon) related article is a stub.
Kamikaze - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2938 words)
Kamikaze (神風) is a word of Japanese origin, which in the English language usually refers to suicide attacks carried out by Imperial Japan's military aviators against Allied shipping towards the end of the Pacific campaign of World War II, by crashing their planes into warships.
In the Japanese language, kamikaze (IPA: [kamikaze]) (Japanese:神風), usually translated as "divine wind" (kami is the word for "god", "spirit", or "divinity"; and kaze for "wind"), came into being as the name of a legendary typhoon said to have saved Japan from a Mongol invasion fleet in 1281.
At Okinawa, kamikaze attacks focused at first on Allied destroyers on picket duty, and then on the carriers in the middle of the fleet.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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