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Encyclopedia > Kalemegdan
Kalemegdan fortress complex
Kalemegdan fortress complex

Kalemegdan (Serbian: Kалемегдан or Kalemegdan) is a fortress located in the same named park. It is located in downtown Belgrade, Serbia. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x681, 228 KB)http://skyscrapercity. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x681, 228 KB)http://skyscrapercity. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Belgrade (Serbian: Београд or Beograd ) is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Serbia. ... Motto: none Anthem: Bože pravde (English: God of Justice) Capital Belgrade Largest city Belgrade Official language(s) Serbian1 Government Republic  - President Boris Tadić  - Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Formation and independence    - Formation of Serbia 814   - Formation of the Serbian Empire 1345   - Independence from the Ottoman Empire July 13, 1878...

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History

Kalemegdan is the fortress that remained of the ancient city of Singidunum, today's Belgrade. The city was founded by a Celtic tribe called Scordisci in the 3rd century BC. Later on it was conquered by the Romans and became a part of 'the military frontier' - where the Roman Empire bordered 'barbaric Central Europe'. Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... Singidunum was an ancient Roman city, first settled by the Scordisci in the 3rd century B.C., and later garrisoned and fortified by the Romans who romanized the name. ... Belgrade (Serbian: Београд or Beograd ) is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Serbia. ... A Celtic cross. ... Scordisci were, in ancient geography, a war-like tribe inhabiting the southern part of lower Pannonia, comprising parts of the present-day countries Austria, Croatia, Hungary, Serbia, Slovenia, Slovakia and Bosnia and Herzegovina, between the Savus (Sava), Dravus (Drava) and Danube rivers. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 3rd century BC started on January 1, 300 BC and ended on December 31, 201 BC. // Events The Pyramid of the Moon, one of several monuments built in Teotihuacán Teotihuacán, Mexico begun The first two Punic Wars between Carthage... The Roman Empire was a phase of the ancient Roman civilization characterized by an autocratic form of government. ...


The name Kalemegdan derives from the Arabic and Turkish languages and signifies the Fortress amidst battlefields. It is named Kalemegdan with reason. The Arabic language (Arabic: ‎ translit: ), or simply Arabic (Arabic: ‎ translit: ), is the largest member of the Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family (classification: South Central Semitic) and is closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ...


Singidunum was defended by the Roman legion IV Flaviae which built a fortified camp on a hill at the confluence of the rivers the Danube and the Sava. In the period between AD 378 and 441 the Roman camp was being repeatedly destroyed in the invasions by the Goths and the Huns. The legend says that Attila's grave lies on the confluence of the Sava and the Danube (under the Fortress). In 476 Belgrade again became the borderline between the empires- Western Roman Empire and Byzantium, and the Slav- Avar State in the North. Events Mid-February: Lentienses cross frozen Rhine, invading Roman Empire. ... Events The Huns invade the Balkans. ... Invasion of the Goths: a late 19th century painting by O. Fritsche portrays the Goths as cavalrymen. ... The Huns were a confederation of Eurasian tribes, most likely of diverse origin with a Turkic-speaking aristocracy, who appeared in Europe in the 4th century, the most famous being Attila. ... Attila redirects here. ... Events August - The usurper Basiliscus is deposed and Zeno is restored as Eastern Roman Emperor. ... Belgrade (Serbian: Београд or Beograd ) is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Serbia. ... The Roman Empire was a phase of the ancient Roman civilization characterized by an autocratic form of government. ... Byzantium was an ancient Greek city-state, which according to legend was founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 667 BC and named after their king Byzas or Byzantas (Βύζας or Βύζαντας in Greek). ... Map showing the location of Avar Khaganate, c. ...


The Byzantine Emperor Justinian I rebuilt the Fortress around 535. In the following centuries it suffered continuous destruction under the Avar sieges. The Slavs (Serbs) and Avars had their 'state union' north of Belgrade. The Serbs left their region in present day Poland a couple of centuries before searching for new lands. During the 6th century Serbs and Avars were crossing the River Danube in Singidunum, going down South (sometimes all the way to Asia Minor, Turkey, and Greece) and going back prosecuted by the Byzantine armies. The Serbs and other Slavic tribes finally settled the region of Belgrade as well as the regions west and south of Belgrade in the beginning of the 7th century. An emperor is a (male) monarch, usually the sovereign ruler of an empire or another type of imperial realm. ... Justinian I depicted on one of the famous mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale. ... Events Beginning of the Western Wei Dynasty in China. ... Map showing the location of Avar Khaganate, c. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Map showing the location of Avar Khaganate, c. ... Belgrade (Serbian: Београд or Beograd ) is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Serbia. ... This Buddhist stela from China, Northern Wei period, was built in the early 6th century. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... Belgrade (Serbian: Београд or Beograd ) is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Serbia. ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ...


The name Belgrade (or Beograd, in Serbian), which in most Slavic languages means a white town or a white Fortress, was first mentioned in AD 878. The Fortress kept changing its masters: Hungary, Bulgaria, and then again Byzantium. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Events The Danes force king Alfred the Great of Wessex to retreat to a fort in Athelney, Somerset. ... Byzantium was an ancient Greek city-state, which according to legend was founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 667 BC and named after their king Byzas or Byzantas (Βύζας or Βύζαντας in Greek). ...

Kalemegdan
Kalemegdan

The Fortress remained a Byzantine stronghold until the 12th century when it fell in the hands of a newly emerging Serbian state. It became a border city of the Serbian Kingdom, later Empire, with Hungary. The Hungarian king Béla gave the Fortress to Serbia in 11th century as a wedding gift (his son married Serbian princess Jelena). After the Serbian Empire collapsed after the Battle of Kosovo, Belgrade was chosen in 1404 as the capital of the principality of Despot Stefan Lazarević. Major work was done to the ramparts which were encircling a big thriving town. The lower town at the banks of the Danube was the main urban center with a new build Orthodox cathedral. The upper town with its castle was defending the city from inland. Belgrade remained in Serbian hands for almost a century. After the Despots death in 1427 it had to be returned to Hungary. An attempt of Sultan Mehmed II to conquer the fortress was prevented by Janos Hunyadi in 1456 (Siege of Belgrade). It saved Hungary from an Ottoman invasion for 70 years. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1000x665, 231 KB)http://skyscrapercity. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1000x665, 231 KB)http://skyscrapercity. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Motto: none Anthem: Bože pravde (English: God of Justice) Capital Belgrade Largest city Belgrade Official language(s) Serbian1 Government Republic  - President Boris Tadić  - Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Formation and independence    - Formation of Serbia 814   - Formation of the Serbian Empire 1345   - Independence from the Ottoman Empire July 13, 1878... Béla I (Hungarian: , Slovak: Belo I), was the king of Hungary between 1061 and 1063. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... Combatants Ottoman Empire Serbia, Bosnia Commanders Murad I †, Bayezid I, Yakub Lazar Hrebeljanović †, Vuk Branković, Vlatko Vuković Strength ~40,000 / 50,000 ~25,000 The Battle of Kosovo Polje (Косовски бој or Бој на Косову) was fought on St Vitus Day (28 June) 1389 between Serbia and the Ottoman Empire. ... Belgrade (Serbian: Београд or Beograd ) is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Serbia. ... Events June 14 - Owain Glyndwr of Wales allies with the French against the English and the Henry of Lancaster. ... Despot Stefan Lazarevićs Coat of Arms 1415 AD Despot Stefan Lazarević (in Cyrillic: Стефан Лазаревић) (1374-1427) was the son and heir to Lazar (Cyrillic: Лазар), the Serbian prince who died at the Battle of Kosovo against the Turks in 1389, and princess Milica (Cyrillic: Милица) from the subordinate branch of the Nemanji... Belgrade (Serbian: Београд or Beograd ) is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Serbia. ... Events Lincoln College, a constituent college of the University of Oxford, is founded. ... Mehmed II (also known as el-Fatih (الفاتح), the Conqueror, in Ottoman Turkish, or, in modern Turkish, Fatih Sultan Mehmet) (March 30, 1432 – May 3, 1481) (Arabic: محمد الثاني) was first the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire for a short time from 1444 to 1446, and later from 1451 to 1481. ... John Hunyadi John Hunyadi (Ioannes Corvinus in Latin, Johann Hunyadi in German, Hunyadi/Hunyady János in Hungarian, Iancu (or Ioan Corvin) de Hunedoara in Romanian, Ján Huňadi in Slovak) (c. ... // Events July 7 - Joan of Arc acquitted (but she had already been executed). ... Combatants Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Hungary Commanders Mehmet II John Hunyadi Strength About 100,000 About 75,000 Casualties About 50,000 About 10,000 After the fall of Constantinople in 1453, Ottoman sultan Mehmed II was rallying his resources in order to subjugate the Kingdom of Hungary. ...


In 1521, 132 years after the Battle of Kosovo, the Fortress, like most parts of the Serbian state, was conquered by the Turks and remained (with short periods of the Austrian and Serbian occupation), under the rule of the Ottoman Empire until the year 1867 when the Turks withdrew from Belgrade and Serbia. During the period of short Austrian rule (1718-1738) the fortress was largely rebuilt and modernized. It witnessed two Serbian Uprisings in the 19th century, the Great Serbian Migration in the 17th century, the Dark Ages of the Turkish Period. Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther in the papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem. ... Combatants Ottoman Empire Serbia, Bosnia Commanders Murad I †, Bayezid I, Yakub Lazar Hrebeljanović †, Vuk Branković, Vlatko Vuković Strength ~40,000 / 50,000 ~25,000 The Battle of Kosovo Polje (Косовски бој or Бој на Косову) was fought on St Vitus Day (28 June) 1389 between Serbia and the Ottoman Empire. ... 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Flag of the First Serbian Uprising First Serbian Uprising was an uprising at the beginning of the 19th century in which Serbs living in Belgrade Pashaluk in the Ottoman Empire, led by Karadjordje, managed to liberate the Pashaluk for a significant time, which eventually led to the creation of modern... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ...


The Fortress suffered further damages during the First and the Second world wars. After almost two millennia of continuous sieges, battles and conquests the Fortress is today known as the Kalemegdan fortress.

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Timeline

6000 BC: The Vinca culture flourishes in the territory of today's Belgrade. // Events c. ... The Vinča culture was an early culture of Europe (between the 6th and the 3rd millennium BC), stretching around the course of Danube in Romania, Serbia, Bulgaria and Macedonia, although traces of it can be found all around the Balkans. ...


267 BC: Scordisci founded Singidunum. Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC - 260s BC - 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 272 BC 271 BC 270 BC 269 BC 268 BC 267 BC 266 BC 265 BC 264 BC 263...


168 BC: The Illyrians are defeated by the Romans. Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC - 160s BC - 150s BC140s BC 130s BC 120s BC 110s BC Years: 173 BC 172 BC 171 BC 170 BC 169 BC - 168 BC - 167 BC 166 BC 165... Illyria Illyria (Anc. ... This article is becoming very long. ...


AD 378-441: The Roman settlement of Singidunum is destroyed by the Huns. Events Mid-February: Lentienses cross frozen Rhine, invading Roman Empire. ... Events The Huns invade the Balkans. ... Many historians consider the Huns (meaning person in Mongolian language) the first Mongolian and Turkic people mentioned in European history. ...


535: Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Emperor Justinian I rebuilds the Kalemegdan fortress. Events Beginning of the Western Wei Dynasty in China. ... Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered around its capital in Constantinople. ... Justinian I depicted on one of the famous mosaics of the Basilica of San Vitale. ...


610: Serbs settle permanently at Singidunum, changing its name to Beograd. Events October 4 - Heraclius arrives by ship from Africa at Constantinople, overthrows Byzantine Emperor Phocas and becomes Emperor. ... Serbs (in the Serbian language Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ...

Statue constructed in order of co-operational respect with France during World War I
Statue constructed in order of co-operational respect with France during World War I

868: The name Belgrade appears in a written document for the first time, in a letter from the Pope. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x416, 151 KB)http://skyscrapercity. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x416, 151 KB)http://skyscrapercity. ... Combatants Allied Powers: United Kingdom France Italy Russia United States Serbia Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Commanders Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Ferdinand Foch Georges Clemenceau Nicholas II Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Wilhelm II Reinhard Scheer Franz Josef I Conrad von Hötzendorf İsmail Enver Ferdinand I Casualties... Events 11 May: Printing of The Diamond Sutra, the oldest dated printed book. ... The current Pope is Benedict XVI (born Joseph Alois Ratzinger), who was elected at the age of 78 on 19 April 2005. ...


10th century: Belgrade taken over by Bulgaria, Hungary and Byzantium. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ...


1182: The Serbs ally with Hungary and gain their full independence. Events Canute VI crowned king of Denmark. ...


1389: Battle of Kosovo. Collapse of the Serbian Empire. Events February 24 - Margaret I defeats Albert in battle, thus becoming ruler of Denmark, Norway and Sweden June 28 - Battle of Kosovo between Serbs and Ottomans. ... Combatants Ottoman Empire Serbia, Bosnia Commanders Murad I †, Bayezid I, Yakub Lazar Hrebeljanović †, Vuk Branković, Vlatko Vuković Strength ~40,000 / 50,000 ~25,000 The Battle of Kosovo Polje (Косовски бој or Бој на Косову) was fought on St Vitus Day (28 June) 1389 between Serbia and the Ottoman Empire. ...


1404: Belgrade is chosen as the capital of the principality of Despot Stefan Lazarević. Events June 14 - Owain Glyndwr of Wales allies with the French against the English and the Henry of Lancaster. ... Despot Stefan Lazarevićs Coat of Arms 1415 AD Despot Stefan Lazarević (in Cyrillic: Стефан Лазаревић) (1374-1427) was the son and heir to Lazar (Cyrillic: Лазар), the Serbian prince who died at the Battle of Kosovo against the Turks in 1389, and princess Milica (Cyrillic: Милица) from the subordinate branch of the Nemanji...


1456: Siege of Belgrade. Major Ottoman attempt to conquer Belgrade only three years after they gained Constantinople is prevented by Janos Hunyadi. // Events July 7 - Joan of Arc acquitted (but she had already been executed). ... Combatants Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Hungary Commanders Mehmet II John Hunyadi Strength About 100,000 About 75,000 Casualties About 50,000 About 10,000 After the fall of Constantinople in 1453, Ottoman sultan Mehmed II was rallying his resources in order to subjugate the Kingdom of Hungary. ... John Hunyadi John Hunyadi (Ioannes Corvinus in Latin, Johann Hunyadi in German, Hunyadi/Hunyady János in Hungarian, Iancu (or Ioan Corvin) de Hunedoara in Romanian, Ján Huňadi in Slovak) (c. ...


1521: Belgrade falls to Ottoman Sultan Suleiman I the Great. Serbia becomes part of the Turkish Ottoman empire for 300 years. Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther in the papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem. ... now. ... This is a current Biography collaboration of the week! Please help improve it to featured article standard. ...


1526: The Battle of Mohács, between the Ottoman Empire and Hungary. Hungary is defeated and their king, King Louis II is killed. Hungary loses its independence. Events January 14 - Treaty of Madrid. ... Combatants Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Hungary Commanders Suleiman I Louis II of Hungary Pál Tomori György Zápolya Strength 100,000[citation needed] 300 cannons 26,000[citation needed] 53 cannons John Zápolyas 8000, plus croatian count Frankopans 5000 men-strong army did not arrive...


1683: Vizier Kara Mustapha, the leader of the Ottoman army, suffers a great loss at the siege of Vienna and is forced to commit suicide in the city of Belgrade. Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ...


1688: The Austrians capture the fortress from the Turks. // Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ...


1690: The Turks recapture Kalemegdan. Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ...


1717: Austrian General Prince Eugene of Savoy captures Belgrade and northern Serbia. // Events January 4 — The Netherlands, Britain & France sign Triple Alliance February 26-March 6 What is now the northeastern United States was paralyzed by a series of blizzards that buried the region. ... Prince Eugen von Savoyen in a contemporary painting François-Eugène, Prince of Savoy-Carignan, known as Prinz Eugen von Savoyen in German and Eugenio, Principe di Savoia in Italian (October 18, 1663 – April 24, 1736) was arguable the greatest general to serve the Habsburgs. ...


1739: Belgrade and its inhabitants are ceded to Turkey by the Austrians. // About the number 1739 1739 is the smallest integer that can be written as sum of three perfect cubes, in two ways. ...


1792: The Austrians arrange a treaty that states that no Janissaries may be admitted into Belgrade or any Serbian town. 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Chamberlain of Sultan Murad IV with janissaries The Janissaries (or janizaries; in Turkish: Yeniçeri (yeni çeri, meaning new soldier); in Greek: Γενίτσαροι; in Bulgarian: яничари; in Croatian and Bosnian: Janjičari; in Slovenian: Janjičarji; in Hungarian: Janicsárok; in Serbian :Јањичари; in Romanian: ieniceri; in Arabic: الانكشارية) comprised infantry units that formed...


1792-1795: In Constantinople, the treaty to keep out the Janissaries is annulled. They get into the fortress by fraud and assassinate Hadji Mustapha Pasha, and begin a rule of tyranny over the countryside. 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


1804: Đorđe Petrović, also known as Karađorđe or Black Đorđe, leads a revolt against the Ottoman Empire. 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... KaraÄ‘orÄ‘e (Карађорђе, also Black George, George Czerny), (November 3, 1768? – July 13, 1817) was the leader of the First Serbian uprising against the Turks, and the founder of the House of KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević. He was born ĐorÄ‘e Petrović. Because of his dark complexion and short temper he...


1806: Karađorđe takes over the fortress of Kalemegdan. 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


1813: Serbia allies with Russia against Turkey, but Serbia was betrayed and the Turks return to Belgrade. They then took revenge because of Karađorđe's revolt and started a massacre and killed all the men who had not fled to Sumadija. 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Categories: Serbia and Montenegro geography stubs | Serbia ...


1815: Miloš Obrenović, prince of Serbia, leads a Serb revolt against the Ottoman Empire with the aid of Russia. He succeeds, but the settlement allows a garrison of Turkish troops to occupy the fortress. The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... MiloÅ¡ Obrenović Milosh Obrenovich (MiloÅ¡ Obrenović or in Cyrillic Милош Обреновић 1780 - 1860) was prince of Serbia between 1817 and 1839, and again from 1858 to 1860. ...


1862: Two Turkish soldiers kill a young Serb. In the disorder a Serbian policeman is killed and another is hurt. The incident incites riots that continue throughout the night. The garrison then opens fire from the fortress onto Belgrade for four hours. 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


1866: The British convince the Ottomans to withdraw from the Fortress. Turks begin withdrawing from the Danubian cities; by 1876 no Turkish troops are left in Serbia. 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


1878: Serbia and Montenegro are again recognized as independent states. 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


1906: Austria-Hungary bans all livestock imports from Serbia, known as the 'Pig War', to but their plan backfires when Serbia establishes new markets for its goods in Greece, Egypt, Turkey, and Germany. 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...

Monument to "The Victor" - the protector of Belgrade

1914: At the outset of World War I, Austria-Hungary unsuccessfully attacks the fortress from the Danube. Image File history File linksMetadata Belgrade_Kalemegdan&Pobednik. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Belgrade_Kalemegdan&Pobednik. ... The Victor overlooking New Belgrade at Kalemegdan Fortress The Pobednik (Serbian Cyrillic: Победник; English: The Victor) is a monument in the Kalemegdan Fortress (in Belgrade, Serbia-Montenegro), erected after WWI to commemorate the first Allied victory of the war, the defeat of the Austro-Hungarian Empire by the Kingdom of Serbia... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Combatants Allied Powers: United Kingdom France Italy Russia United States Serbia Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Commanders Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Ferdinand Foch Georges Clemenceau Nicholas II Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Wilhelm II Reinhard Scheer Franz Josef I Conrad von Hötzendorf İsmail Enver Ferdinand I Casualties...


1915: Austrian troops conquer the fortress as well as the rest of the country. 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


1918: Serbian troops recapture the fortress near the end of the war. 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ...


1919: Belgrade becomes the capital of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, and later Kingdom of Yugoslavia. 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. ... Coat of arms of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia Flag of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a kingdom in the Balkans which existed from the end of World War I until World War II. It occupied an area made up of the present-day states of Bosnia...


1941: The fortress is captured by Nazi Germany. This article is about the year. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ...


1944: American and British planes bomb the Nazi-occupied city of Belgrade. 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ...


1945: Belgrade is liberated by the Yugoslav National Liberation Army and their Soviet allies. 1945 (MCMVL) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in all South Slavic languages, Југославија in Serbian and Macedonian Cyrillic) is a term used for the three separate political entities that existed during most of the 20th century on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe. ... The Rebellion The Yugoslav Partisans were the main resistance movement engaged in the fight against the Axis forces in the Balkans during World War II. // Origins The Yugoslav Partisans went under the official name of National Liberation Army and Partisan Detachments of Yugoslavia (Slovene: Narodnoosvobodilna vojska in partizanski odredi Jugoslavije...


1991: After the disentigration of Yugoslavia, Belgrade becomes the capital of the newly declared Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in all South Slavic languages, Југославија in Serbian and Macedonian Cyrillic) is a term used for the three separate political entities that existed during most of the 20th century on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe. ... Official language Serbian written in Cyrillic alphabet1 Capital Belgrade2 President3 Svetozar Marović Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 105th 102,350 km² 0. ...


1999: NATO bombing campaign lasts for 3 months. 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...


2000: The biggest demonstrations ever recorded in Serbia take place in the capital; Serbs overthrow the Milošević dictatorship and establish democracy. This article is about the year 2000. ... Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević   (IPA Serbian Cyrillic: Слободан Милошевић) (20 August 1941 – 11 March 2006) was President of Serbia and of Yugoslavia. ...


2003: Union of Serbia and Montenegro is proclaimed with Belgrade as its capital. 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


2006: Serbia proclaims independence from Serbia and Montenegro. 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Kalemegdan Park

Kalemegdan park is a very desirable location for locals and visitors alike. The park’s numerous winding walking paths, shady benches, picturesque fountains, random statues, mammoth historical architecture, and incredible river views are inviting.


As Belgrade’s tourism industry is still in its infancy visitors won’t find hordes of guided tours traipsing through the park. This definitely has its advantages, as visitors can experience the park at your own pace without annoying mobs passing you by and blocking the best views. On the other hand, there is so much history to the statues and structures within the park, a simply stroll through will leave visitors with little understanding of significance of this incredible place. The park has recently started selling maps for visitors so it can guide them through this maze complex.

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Zoo

The Belgrade zoo is located within Kalemegdan park.

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External links

  • Kalemegdan and the Belgrade fortress
  • Kalemegdan fortress in winter

  Results from FactBites:
 
Kalemegdan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1484 words)
Kalemegdan (Serbian: Kалемегдан or Kalemegdan) is a fortress located in the same named park.
Kalemegdan is the fortress that remained of the ancient city of Singidunum, today's Belgrade.
Singidunum was defended by the Roman legion IV Flaviae which built a fortified camp on a hill at the confluence of the rivers the Danube and the Sava.
monkeytravel.org serbia and montenegro page 3 (337 words)
Kalemegdan is a Turkish word meaning "field-battle", but that name belies the rather more ancient history of the place.
Kalemegdan Park is on a rocky outcrop overlooking the confluence of the Sava and Danube Rivers, a strategically valuable location that the Romans first fortified in the 1st Century CE.
Later, after numerous raids ransacked the Roman castrum, their foundations were added to by the Byzantines, the Serbs, the Ottomans, and the Austrians—all of whom sought control of passage on the two rivers and a base for maintaining order over the surrounding lands.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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