FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Kabylie" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Kabylie
Tamurt n leqbayel
Flag of Kabylie
Location of Kabylie
Largest city Béjaïa
Government Not an administrative unit
Area
 -  Total 44 000 km² 
 sq mi 
Population
 -   estimate 7000000[1] (2004)
 -  Density 170 /km² 
 /sq mi
Great Kabylie in 1857

Kabylie or Kabylia (Kabyle: Tamurt n Leqbayel) is a cultural region in the north of Algeria. It corresponds more or less with the homeland of the Kabyle people. Image File history File links Flag_of_Algeria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kabylia. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 712 KB, MIME type: image/png) Self modified file from source: en. ... Nickname: Location of Béjaïa within Algeria Country Algeria Wilaya Béjaïa Province Government  - Mayor Abdelhafidh Bouaoudia (2005-2007) Area  - City 3,268. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1650x790, 471 KB) Summary Description: map of Kabylie Source: download from [Wikipedia Itilia] et un peu modifié. Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Kabylie Maps of... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Kabyle is a Berber language (Kabyle: ثاقبايليث , taqbaylit, pronounced ) spoken by the Kabyle people. ... Cultural geography is a sub-field within human geography. ... The definition of continental subregions in use by the United Nations. ... A homeland is the concept of the territory to which one belongs; usually, the country in which a particular nationality was born. ... The Kabyles are a Berber people whose traditional homeland is highlands of Kabylie (or Kabylia) in northeastern Algeria. ...


It is part of the Atlas Mountains and is located at the edge of the Mediterranean Sea. Kabylia covers several districts (wilayas) of Algeria: the whole of Tizi Ouzou and Bejaia (Bgayet), most of Bouira (Tubirett) and parts of the wilayas of Bordj Bou Arreridj, Jijel, Boumerdes, and Setif. Map showing the location of the Atlas Mountains (colored red) across North Africa The Atlas Mountains (Arabic: ‎) are a mountain range in northwest Africa extending about 2,400 km (1,500 miles) through Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia, and including The Rock of Gibraltar. ... Composite satellite image of the Mediterranean Sea. ... A wilaya is an administrative subdivision of several countries, including Algeria, Morocco, Sudan, and Oman. ... Tizi Ouzou comes from Berber language Tizi Uzezzu, spelt Tizi Wezzu, translates to View point of the flower, is a major Kabyle town and capital of Tizi Ouzou province, Algeria. ... Bejaïa is a port in Béjaïa province, Algeria. ... Bouira is a wilaya of Algeria. ... Bordj Bou Arreridj, population 128,535 (1998 census), is a city in Bordj Bou Arreridj Province, Algeria. ... Jijel (also called Djidjelli) is the capital of Jijel Province. ... Boumerdes is a wilaya of northern Algeria, between Algiers and Tizi-Ouzou; its capital, Boumerdes, is largely a new city built in the 1980s. ... Setif is a city and wilaya in Algeria in which an uprising occurred against the French colonizers. ...

Contents

History

Middle Ages

The Fatimid dynasty of the 10th century originated in Petite Kabylie, where an Ismaili da'i found a receptive audience for his millennialist preaching, and ultimately led the Kutama tribe to conquer first Ifriqiya and then Egypt. After taking over Egypt, the Fatimids themselves lost interest in the Maghreb, which they left to their Berber deputies, the Zirids. The Zirid family soon split, with the Hammadid branch taking over Kabylie as well as much of Algeria, and the Zirids taking modern Tunisia. They had a lasting effect on not only Kabylie's but Algeria's development, refounding towns such as Bejaia (their capital after the abandonment of Qalaat Beni Hammad) and Algiers itself. The Fatimids, Fatimid Caliphate or al-FātimiyyÅ«n (Arabic الفاطميون) is the Shia dynasty that ruled over varying areas of the Maghreb, Egypt, and the Levant from 5 January 910 to 1171. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... The IsmāʿīlÄ« (Urdu: اسماعیلی IsmāʿīlÄ«, Arabic: الإسماعيليون al-IsmāʿīliyyÅ«n; Persian: اسماعیلیان Esmāʿīliyān) branch of Islam is the second largest part of the ShÄ«a community, after the Twelvers (Ithnāʿashariyya). ... A caller to Islam is someone who invites or calls non-Muslims to become Muslims, and so is the Islamic equivalent of a Christian missionary; the activity of such a person is referred to as Dawah. ... The Kutama were a Berber tribe,in the region of Jijel, a member of the great Bavares orientaux confederation of the Maghreb. ... In medieval history, Ifriqiya or Ifriqiyah (Arabic: إفريقية) was the area comprising the coastal regions of what are today western Libya, Tunisia, and eastern Algeria. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Zirids were a Berber dynasty, originating in Petite Kabylie among the Kutama tribe, that ruled Ifriqiya (roughly, modern Tunisia), initially on behalf of the Fatimids, for about two centuries, until weakened by the Banu Hilal and finally destroyed by the Almohads. ... The Hammadids, an offshoot of the Zirids, were a Berber dynasty who ruled an area roughly corresponding to modern Algeria for about a century and a half, until, weakened by the Banu Hilals incursions, they were destroyed by the Almohads. ... Bejaïa is a port in Béjaïa province, Algeria. ... Al Qala of Beni Hammad is a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Algeria located close to the Algerian coast west of Algiers. ... “Alger” redirects here. ...


After the Hammadids' collapse, the coast of Kabylie changed hands regularly, while much of the interior was often effectively unruled. Under the Ottoman Turks, most of Kabylie was inaccessible to the deys, who had to content themselves with occasional incursions and military settlements in some valleys. In the early part of the Ottoman period, the Belkadi family ruled much of Grande Kabylie from their capital of Koukou, now a small village near Tizi-Ouzou; however, their power declined in the 17th century. The Ottoman Turks were the ethnic subdivision of the Turkic people who dominated the ruling class of the Ottoman Empire. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ...


Modern age

Kabyle women, 1886.
Kabyle women, 1886.

The area was gradually taken over by the French from 1857, despite vigorous local resistance by the local population led by leaders such as Lalla Fatma n Soumer, continuing as late as Cheikh Mokrani's rebellion in 1871. Much land was confiscated in this period from the more recalcitrant tribes and given to French pied-noirs. Many arrests and deportations were carried out by the French, mainly to New Caledonia. Colonization also resulted in an acceleration of the emigration into other areas of the country and outside of it. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1029x810, 492 KB) Summary 1886 woodcut of Kabyle women, from Century Magazine May 1886-October 1886. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1029x810, 492 KB) Summary 1886 woodcut of Kabyle women, from Century Magazine May 1886-October 1886. ... This article needs translation. ... Cheikh Mokrani Mohamed El- Mokrani (1815 - 1871) was one of the principal leaders of the popular uprising at the end of 19th century following the French conquest in Algeria in 1830. ... Pied-noir is a term for the former French colonists of North Africa, especially Algeria. ...


Algerian immigrant workers in France organized the first party promoting independence in the 1920s. Messali Hadj, Imache Amar, Si Djilani, and Belkacem Radjef rapidly built a strong following throughout France and Algeria in the 1930s and actively developed militants that became vital to the future of both a fighting and an independent Algeria. During the war of independence(1954-1962), Kabylie was one of the areas that was most affected, because of the importance of the maquis (aided by the mountainous terrain) and French repression. The FLN recruited several of its historical leaders there, including Hocine Aït Ahmed, Abane Ramdane, and Krim Belkacem. Messali Hadj (مصالي الحاج) was the founder of the Mouvement National Algérien, an early Algerian nationalist group and rival of the Front de Libération Nationale. ... This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... The National Liberation Front , (Arabic: Jabhat al-TaḩrÄ«r al-WaÅ£anÄ«, French: Front de Libération Nationale aka FLN) is a socialist political party in Algeria. ... Hocine Aït Ahmed Hocine Ait Ahmed (born 20 August 1926 in Ain El Hammam, Kabylie) is an Algerian politician. ... Abane Ramdane Abane Ramdane was an Algerian revolutionarist born in Kabylie, He was the architect of the Soummam platform in 1956. ... Krim Belkacem Krim Belkacem (September 14, 1922 - October 18, 1970) was an Algerian revolutionary fighter and politician. ...


After the independence

Tensions have arisen between Kabylia and the central government on several occasions, initially in 1963, when the FFS party of Hocine Aït Ahmed contested the authority of the single party (FLN). In 1980, several months of demonstrations demanding the officialization of the Berber language, known as the Berber Spring, took place in Kabylie. FFS can stand for: The Sims 2: Family Fun Stuff, a Stuff Pack for The Sims 2. ... Hocine Aït Ahmed Hocine Ait Ahmed (born 20 August 1926 in Ain El Hammam, Kabylie) is an Algerian politician. ... The Berber Spring (in Kabyle, Tafsut Imazighen or simply Tafsut) was a period of political mobilization, cultural and labor and street agitation, and criminalization of political activity in Kabylie. ...


The politics of identity intensified as the Arabization movement in Algeria gained steam in the 1990s. In 1994–1995, a school boycott occurred, termed the "strike of the school bag." In June and July of 1998, the area blazed up again after the assassination of singer Matoub Lounes and at the time that a law generalizing the use of the Arabic language in all fields went into effect. In the months following April 2001 (called the Black Spring), major riots — together with the emergence of the Arouch, neo-traditional local councils — followed the killing of a young Kabyle (Masinissa Guermah) by gendarmes, and gradually died down only after forcing some concessions from the President, Abdelaziz Bouteflika.
This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... “Arabic” redirects here. ... Black Spring is a book published in 1936 by American writer Henry Miller on Obelisk Press in Paris, France. ... The Berber Arouch Citizens Movement, or simply Arouch, is an organization representing Algerian Berbers. ... Massinissa Guermah of northern Algeria was a young Kabyle (Berber) killed by gendarmes in 2001. ... Abdelaziz Bouteflika (IPA: ) (Arabic: عبد العزيز بوتفليقة) (born March 2, 1937 in Oujda, Morocco) has been the President of Algeria since 1999. ...


Since 23 March 2007, the Military of Algeria has conducted extensive searches in the Kabylie region in search of members of the GSPC. Two major roads, between Béjaïa and Amizour and between El-Kseur and Bouira, have been partially closed. The bombings in Alger on 11 April 2007 rendered this search all the more urgent, as the GSPC has recently become the Maghrebin arm of the Al-Qaida Network. The armed forces of Algeria is comprised of the Peoples National Army (ANP), Algerian National Navy (MRA), Air Force (QJJ), and Territorial Air Defense Force. ... The Al-Qaeda group in the Maghreb[1], previously known as the Salafist Group for Preaching and Combat (Arabic: الجماعة السلفية للدعوة والقتال; French: Groupe Salafiste pour la Prédication et le Combat, GSPC; also known as Group for Call and Combat) is a militant Sunni Islamist group which aims to overthrow the Algerian... Nickname: Location of Béjaïa within Algeria Country Algeria Wilaya Béjaïa Province Government  - Mayor Abdelhafidh Bouaoudia (2005-2007) Area  - City 3,268. ... Bouira is a wilaya of Algeria. ... Alger may refer to: People Alger Hiss (1904-1996), a controversial US political figure Alger of Liège (1055-1131), a French Roman Catholic priest David Alger (1943-2001), former head of Fred Alger Management Fanny Alger, believed to be the first plural wife of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ...


Geography

Landscape of Kabylie.
Landscape of Kabylie.

Main features: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 2085 KB) Paysage de Kabylie (wilaya de Sétif) (Algérie)/ Landscape of Kabylie (wilaya of Setif) (Algeria) source of the image : Flickr. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 2085 KB) Paysage de Kabylie (wilaya de Sétif) (Algérie)/ Landscape of Kabylie (wilaya of Setif) (Algeria) source of the image : Flickr. ...

  • The Great Kabylia, which goes from Thenia (west) to Bejaia (east), and from the Mediterranean Sea (north) to the valley of Soummam (south), that is to say, 200 km by 100 km, beginning 50 km from Algiers, the capital of Algeria.
  • Kabylia of Bibans and Kabylia of Babors, which form the Little Kabylia.

Three large chains of mountains occupy most of the area: Bejaïa is a port in Béjaïa province, Algeria. ... “Alger” redirects here. ...

  • In the north, the mountain range of maritime Kabylia, culminating with Aït Jennad (1278 m)
  • In the south, the Djurdjura, dominating the valley of Soummam, culminating with Lalla-Khadîdja (2308 m)
  • Between the two lies the mountain range of Agawa, which is the most populous and is 800 m high on average. The largest town of Great Kabylia, Tizi Ouzou, lies in that mountain range. Larbaa Nat Iraten (formerly "Fort-National"in French occupation), which numbered 28,000 inhabitants in 2001, is the highest urban centre of the area.

Agawa can refer to: Agawa is a Japanese surname. ... Tizi Ouzou comes from Berber language Tizi Uzezzu, spelt Tizi Wezzu, translates to View point of the flower, is a major Kabyle town and capital of Tizi Ouzou province, Algeria. ... Larbaa Nat Iraten (Larbaa Nath Irathen) is a town in the middle of Kabylie. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...

Population

Main article: Kabyle people

The area is populated by the Kabyles, the second Berber group per order of importance after the Chleuhs in Morocco. Their name means "tribe" (from the Arabic "qabîlah" قبيلة). They speak the Kabyle variety of Berber. Since the Berber Spring in 1980, Kabyles have been at the forefront of the fight for the official recognition of the Berber language in Algeria (see Languages of Algeria). The Kabyles are a Berber people whose traditional homeland is highlands of Kabylie (or Kabylia) in northeastern Algeria. ... Berbers are the indigenous peoples of North Africa west of the Nile Valley. ... Chleuh people are a Berber ethnic group, they live mainly in the Moroccos Atlas Mountains. ... Kabyle is a Berber language (Kabyle: ثاقبايليث , taqbaylit, pronounced ) spoken by the Kabyle people. ... The Berber languages (or Tamazight) are a group of closely related languages mainly spoken in Morocco and Algeria. ... The Berber Spring (in Kabyle, Tafsut Imazighen or simply Tafsut) was a period of political mobilization, cultural and labor and street agitation, and criminalization of political activity in Kabylie. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... The Berber languages (or Tamazight) are a group of closely related languages mainly spoken in Morocco and Algeria. ... % speaking Berber in each wilaya in 1966 The official language of Algeria is Arabic, as specified in its constitution since 1963. ...


Economy

The traditional economy of the area is based on arboriculture (orchards, olive trees) and on the craft industry (tapestry or pottery). The mountain and hill farming is gradually giving way to local industry (textile and agro-alimentary). For the Italian political alliance see Olive Tree, and the color, olive (color). ... This article is about tapestry the textile. ... Unfired green ware pottery on a traditional drying rack at Conner Prairie living history museum. ...


Politics

“Berber flag”, by berber cultural movement.

Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Kabyle_people. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Kabyle_people. ... The Socialist Forces Front (Front des Forces socialistes, FFS) is a Kabyle Berber-based social democratic political party in Algeria It was formed in 1963 by Hocine Ait Ahmed. ... Hocine Aït Ahmed Hocine Ait Ahmed (born 20 August 1926 in Ain El Hammam, Kabylie) is an Algerian politician. ... The Rally for Culture and Democracy (French: Rassemblement pour la Culture et la Démocratie) is a political party in Algeria. ... Saïd Sadi Saïd Sadi (born 26 August 1947 in Aghribs, near Azazga) is an Algerian psychiatrist and Berber nationalist. ... This article concerns secularism, the exclusion of religion and supernatural beliefs. ... Berberism is a political and a social movement across North Africa among Berbers, Berberism aspires to the recognition of the Berber culture and its language(s), Berberists see Northwest Africans as principally Berbers whether they are Berber-speaking or Arabs-speaking as being Berbers. ... In Algerian politics, Algerianist is a political label given to Kabyles who see Algeria as a nation-state in which Kabylie is a region. ... Black Spring is a book published in 1936 by American writer Henry Miller on Obelisk Press in Paris, France. ... The Movement for the Autonomy of Kabylie (MAK) (Kabyle: Timanit i Tmurt n Iqbayliyen) is a Berber organization which demands autonomous status for the region of Kabylie in Algeria. ... Black Spring is a book published in 1936 by American writer Henry Miller on Obelisk Press in Paris, France. ...

Bibliography

Mohamed Dahmani, Economie et Societe en Grande Kabylie (Alger: Office des Publications Universitaires, 1987)


References

  1. ^ (French) « Langue et littérature berbères » by Salem Chaker (Inalco), May 2004.

External links

The Berber Portal


  Results from FactBites:
 
Kabylie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1369 words)
Kabylie or Kabylia is a mountainous area in the north of Algeria.
During the war of independence(1954-1962), Kabylie was one of the areas that was most affected, because of the importance of the maquis (aided by the mountainous terrain) and French repression.
The MAK (Movement for the Autonomy of Kabylie) also emerged during the Black Spring, and is a political association that militates for the autonomy of Kabylie.
algeria Human Rights (13219 words)
Although the Government recognized the Amazigh language as a national language, Kabylie ethnic, cultural, and linguistic rights were the objects of demonstrations and riots in the spring of 2001 and remained an undercurrent of the political scene throughout the year, particularly during protests surrounding the parliamentary and local elections.
Wide-spread protest throughout the Kabylie region during July and August forced 21 gendarmerie brigades to withdraw after a young man was killed when shot in the head by a plastic bullet during riots in Chemini, Bejaia.
The Kabylie region launched a sometimes violently enforced boycott to protest the lack of transparency, increased corruption, and overt discrimination against Amazigh parties and candidates, successfully limiting the vote to 15 percent in some regions and 7 percent in Tizi Ouzou.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m